Bigindicator

(in)Common

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20130224080613-13__22413
Lost Loftings, 2013 Aluminum, Bronze, and Acrylic 22" X 22" X 3.5" (56, X 56 X 9 Cm) © Courtesy of the artist and Christopher Cutts Gallery
(in)Common

21 Morrow Avenue
Toronto, Ontario M6R 2H9
Canada
March 2nd, 2013 - April 3rd, 2013
Opening: March 2nd, 2013 2:00 PM - 6:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.cuttsgallery.com
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
Dundas West
EMAIL:  
info@cuttsgallery.com
PHONE:  
416-532-5566
OPEN HOURS:  
Tue-Sat 10-6
TAGS:  
sculptural installations

DESCRIPTION

Christopher Cutts Gallery is pleased to host its 5th solo exhibition by celebrated Canadian artist Michel Goulet. Goulet who lives and works in Montreal, Canada has had numerous exhibitions in important public institutions and created over 40 permanent site-specific installations nationally and internationally. He has also been honored with a number of distinguished awards. Such as: representing Canada at the Venice Biennial in 1998, a recipient of the Paul–Émile Borduas prize in 1990, The Governor General Award in 2008, an honorary doctorate from the University of Sherbrooke in 2010, and in 2012 was appointed as a member of the Order of Canada.
 
This exhibition titled (In)Common features a number of new sculptural installations that extend Goulet’s artistic practice of utilizing and combining everyday mundane objects in the realization of a new and dynamic aesthetic order. This order encourages the viewer to participate in the interpretation and reinvention of the creative process, which allows one to rethink the banal, by visual recognition, association and manipulation.
 
Goulet states that, “My work is not a comfort for the soul, but rather an intermediary to meet people and begin a dialogue. Those that I speak to will often be surprised and at times amused, or disconcerted by my artifacts that question the reality of things and the values of our consumer society. I am attempting to produce an initial shock that perhaps will continue in the mind and experience of the viewer.”