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Public: Collective Identity: Occupied Space

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20120329000422-2012_public_rafman_17_skweyiya_street_east_london__south_africa
17 Skweyiya Street, East London, South Africa, 2010 © Courtesy of Jon Rafman, Angell Gallery
Public: Collective Identity: Occupied Space

15 King's College Circle
Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H7
Canada
March 28th, 2012 - March 28th, 2012
Opening: March 28th, 2012 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.utac.utoronto.ca/
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
Downtown / University
EMAIL:  
niamh.olaoghaire@utoronto.ca
PHONE:  
416-946-7015
OPEN HOURS:  
Tuesday to Friday 12 to 5 pm Saturday 12 to 4 pm
TAGS:  
photography

DESCRIPTION
Occupied Space
Framing issues and events central to current social and political discourse, the University of Toronto Art Centre (UTAC) and the Museum of Contemporary Canadian Art (MOCCA) present one exhibition in two locations as the focal point of CONTACT 2012: Public

Ranging from images that capture synchronicity to ones that depict conflict, this international group show explores photography as a key nexus in the the public performance of identity and civic expression of authority. UTAC mounts the Occupied Space section of the exhibition with work by Tarek Abouamin, Ariella Azoullay, Sabine Bitter / Helmut Weber, Benjamin Lowy, Sanaz Mazinani, Richard Mosse and Ai Weiwei. MOCCA mounts the Collective Identity section with work by Philippe Chancel, Cheryl Dunn, Barry Frydlender, Baudouin Mouanda, Jon Rafman, Bill Sullivan and Michael Wolf.

CONTACT 2012: Public explores the evolving ways in which photographs portray social structures, draw attention to political issues and influence collective consciousness. Through a series of primary exhibitions, site-specific installations, lectures and events, the festival will look at how photographs make things public. From traditional street photography to imagery captured on the Internet, photojournalism at the front lines to theoretical research projects, CONTACT 2012 will present works that redefine how we perceive public space and challenge how we comprehend issues of public concern.