Bigindicator

Construct: Kate Petley and Rusty Scruby

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20120306195236-rsty_treeclimbing
Tree Climbing, 2011 Photographic Reconstruction 76 X 26" © Courtesy of the artist and Turner Carroll Gallery
Construct: Kate Petley and Rusty Scruby

725 Canyon Road
Santa Fe, NM 87501
June 15th, 2012 - July 21st, 2012
Opening: June 15th, 2012 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.turnercarrollgallery.com
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
Eastside
EMAIL:  
info@turnercarrollgallery.com
PHONE:  
505 986 9800
OPEN HOURS:  
Sun-Mon 10-6
TAGS:  
photography, mixed-media
COST:  
Admission is free

DESCRIPTION
Look at. Cut. See. Move. Layer. Look again. Only pattern, really? This exhibition examines two dynamic and unique artists working with complex and immersive two- and three-dimensional visual planes. Both artists rearrange the obvious to create intra-artwork relationships. In a way their artwork collaborates with itself through the practice of layering. To stand infront of Kate’s and Rusty’s work is like looking through a bug’s eye and simultaneously seeing forever.

Turner Carroll Gallery is thrilled to present a group exhibition featuring two up and coming artists never before shown in Santa Fe- Kate Petley and Rusty Scruby.

Petley’s and Scruby's works share a strong interest in color as well as in depicting the environments that surround us in abstract forms. Petley is a Colorado-based artist who creates enigmatic abstractions- she paints on industrial film with strong, bold brushstrokes and suspends these layers amid a pool of acrylic resin, mounted on aluminum. The results are mysterious forms, which evoke memories of various environments and reflections of nature. The use of dark red imagery is contrasted with the punchy colors and fine lines that accent the work.

Kate's work resides in numerous public and private collections, including The Nicolaysen Museum in Casper, Wyoming.

Rusty Scruby, working from Texas, creates beautiful wall pieces as well as sculpture. Photographic reproductions are hand cut up into various shapes and woven together, resulting in a pixilated plane. Aspects of the photograph are repeated over and over, making the viewer appreciate the subtleties of the image through the abstraction of nature. Everyday objects such as playing cards or a milk carton receive special attention when broken down and rebuilt. Scruby's training in engineering becomes apparent through the mathematical precision and construction of his pieces. His work calls on the viewer to use her vision in a more engaging way to reveal beautiful glimpses of seemingly ordinary objects.

In 2010, Rusty received a grant from the NEA to fund an installation called "Playing in the Sand." His work is in well known collections such as the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston, the Art Museum of Southeast Texas in Beaumont and the Microsoft Corporation's collection in Redmond, Washington to name but a few. 

We urge you to cover this exhibition, as it will be one of the most exciting of the

summer!