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Altman Siegel Gallery

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20130430103000-othesleepingshow5

containment and escape

O the sleeping bag contains the body but not the dreaming head on show at the Altman Siegel Gallery from April 18th to June 1st, features work by three artists; Alice Channer, Aaron Flint Jamison and Anicke Yi. The title is taken from a poem by Matthea Harvey, a dark meditation on containment, or it’s failure. This is the theme that unites the three artists, whose work at first seems unconnected in medium and subject. Alice Channer’s Body Fluids is the first to confront me as I enter the gallery- a large digital print that is draped over a steel bar hung near the ceiling. It is positioned in front o... [more]
Posted by Leslie Allen Spillane on 4/23/13
20130430103000-othesleepingshow5

O the sleeping bag contains the body but not the dreaming head

by Christina Catherine Martinez
In an intriguing gesture of enticement, the information provided on Altman Siegel’s sparse four-part installation is limited to the poem by Matthea Harvey, from which the exhibition borrows its title.   Everything Must Go Today’s class 3-Deifying:Godgrass, godtrees, godroad. A sheet of geese bisects the rainstorm.The water tower is ten times full. We practice drawing cubes—That’s the house squared away & the incubator with Baby.The dead are in their grid. Oh the sleeping bag contains the bodyBut not the dreaming head.   In October of 1912, Harriet Monroe christened the inaugural issue of Poet... [more]
Posted by Christina Catherine Martinez on 4/30/13
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Watchlist Artist: Will Rogan

Altman Siegel is pleased to present Blanking Out, the second exhibition at the gallery for Will Rogan. This exhibition will include new photographs, drawings and sculptures by the San Francisco based artist. Will Rogan’s practice reflects the poignant, ironic, disastrous and beautiful in the urban and domestic landscapes around him. Rogan uses this material for artistic interventions, which often highlight the profound and analytical in everyday life. Taking a playful stance on mundane situations and structures, Rogan's work merges the critical with the poetic. Obliquely referencing themes of M... [more]
Posted by Abhilasha Singh on 3/13/13
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Filling in the Blank

by Brady Welch
The history of human endeavor is littered with absences, alternately deliberate or unintentional. And yet these gaps in the record invariably serve a purpose. It is difficult to imagine Neoclassical sculpture, for instance, absent their creators' belief that ancient statuary lacked pigment. Or the notion that the Gospel of Mark, as written by its original author, does not end with Christ's resurrection and ascension, but rather with the fright of the apostles at His empty tomb. Given a lack of information, or information that is somehow lacking, societies supplant their own reasoning into that... [more]
Posted by Brady Welch on 2/22/11
Wardill

Emily Wardill's "Gamekeepers without A Game"

by Franklin Melendez
What is life? A frenzy. What is life? A fiction, A shadow, an illusion, And the greatest profit is small; For all of life is a dream, And dreams, are nothing but dreams. Pedro Calderón de la Barca, Life is A Dream London-based Emily Wardill’s first US gallery exhibition features her latest film project, Gamekeepers without Game, accompanied by a selection of large-scale production stills. The film is based on Pedro Calderon’s de la Barca’s 17th century morality play, Life is a Dream, the tale of a young prince imprisoned by his father because of a dark future foretold. Like a slightly happier Oed... [more]
Posted by Franklin Melendez on 4/12/10
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Logocentric

by Ava Jancar
          For the 1968 Summer Olympics held in Mexico City, graphic designer Lance Wyman conceived of a logo as a part of the first ever integrated identity for an Olympic Games. The logo, the word MEXICO, the numbers 68, and the five Olympic rings enveloped by alternating black and white lines, parallel and concentric in relation to the rounded typeface of the words and numbers, is more visually enthralling than it is legible, its message swallowed by optical undulations. This Op pattern, à la Bridget Riley, comes to enunciate a distinct time-based visual sign, signifying Mexico in 1968 more so... [more]
Posted by Ava Jancar on 3/1/10