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Dolby Chadwick Gallery

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Watchlist Artist: Ian Kimmerly

Dolby Chadwick Gallery is pleased to announce Continuous Wave, an exhibition of new paintings by Ian Kimmerly. Kimmerly boldly embraces the disparate by integrating various styles and techniques into each painting. Softly blurred photorealistic figures slip between abstract gestures while gleaming, thickly impastoed streaks of paint are counterbalanced by bright, geometric pops of color. Though the final paintings depend on a number of different factors, his process typically involves the same set of steps: after priming the canvas with an acrylic glaze and placing the figures, Kimmerly begins... [more]
Posted by Abhilasha Singh on 6/5/13
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In Space and Time

by Kristi Beardshear
And now for something completely different. Louise LeBourgeois's work, currently on view at Dolby Chadwick Gallery, is light, airy, and serene. LeBourgeois's meditation on water is minimal landscape—well, seascape—at its best. Each of the eight pieces from LeBourgeois's water series are created from the same, basic format: the deceptively calm, flat expanse of sea, the deep blue sky, the clouds. These are seascapes stripped down to their bare elements to such an extreme that the spacial context begins to lose meaning as forms fade into the abstract. What emerges is an impression... [more]
Posted by Kristi Beardshear on 7/26/09
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Bodies in Motion

by Jolene Torr
Everything in the universe is moving. Expanding. Whirring. Dividing. Duplicating. Bodies in motion: the body electric. Every second. Always. And it's in that slight and noiseless inch or pause between seconds that Alex Kanevsky captures and considers the understated complexities of what it is to be human. In his current exhibition at the Dolby Chadwick Gallery, Kanevsky's paintings and photographs halt those infinitesimal gaps between movements, normally invisible to the naked eye. In photography, these movements appear as a blur, a consequence of the amount of time the camera shutter is open.... [more]
Posted by Jolene Torr on 4/9/08