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de Young Museum

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Bay Mood

Richard Diebenkorn is an artist with strong ties to the Bay Area, having attended both Stanford and UC Berkeley and teaching at what is today the San Francisco Art Institute. Richard Diebenkorn: The Berkeley Years, 1953-1966 exhibition at the de Young museum focuses on the later period of his work, when he resided in Berkeley for 13 years and produced some of his most wide-ranging, complex work. This period encompasses a huge array of subject matter, from abstract and figurative work to landscapes, interiors and still-life. A leading abstract expressionist on the west coast, his palette is hea... [more]
Posted by Leslie Allen Spillane on 9/16/13
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In the Shadows of Children, Playing

by Andrew Berardini
A shirtless boy stands in front of a dilapidated house, his face blank, clutched in one hand a doll, in the other a disembodied arm arced as if the adult to whom it belonged had suddenly disappeared. A skull looks over him up near the front column, a mannequin head pokes out of the unkempt grass just a few feet away, another strange weed in this wild garden. What is that in the bush to the left, is it a bag? Hard to tell. What is he doing here? Who is he waiting for? All the skulls and heads and arms and dolls, look fake of course, stand-ins or games, tricks or costumes. But the scene is real or... [more]
Posted by Andrew Berardini on 11/21/11
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From a Fashion Person, to an Art Person

by Christina Catherine Martinez
There’s something oblique about Cristobal Balenciaga’s enduring epithet as “Fashion’s Picasso.” A compliment given by the late photographer Cecil Beaton that’s been peppered liberally throughout the press material for this really important thing I was really excited to write about, until my editor touched me to the quick with some comment about fashion not really being art. I’m sure John James Audobon would be humbled by the thought of being called “Ornithology’s Picasso” but what has ornithology done for you lately? The Fondazione Prada is built upon impossible shoes and coats that nice normal... [more]
Posted by Christina Catherine Martinez on 5/16/11
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My Favorites

My Favorite Works at De Young Museum, San Francisco Today, I visited De Young Museum in San Francisco for the King Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of Pharaohs exhibit. It was a fantastic show, despite the fact that the most spectacular beautifully inlaid gold mask of the young king, who died at the age of 19, was not included in the current exhibit of these artifacts. Some old timers had the luck of viewing it when the show came to San Francisco decades ago. I cannot say that I was cheated out of something. It was a very beautiful and stimulating exhibit. You can still catch the show before it... [more]
Posted by Matthew Felix Sun on 1/5/10
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Andy is a Fan

by Montgomery Rene
       Beginning Valentine's day, Andy Warhol is a music lover, fan and celebrity at the de Young. And for the first time ever in documented gallery settings, music is not just the soundtrack to history- music is the history as well. In this Andy Warhol Live exhibit, we are introduced to his various art forms, sauced perfectly in the music it was influenced on, created with and subject to. Entering, you find youth's influences in his Elvis, Marilyn, Shirley and Judy works. But you are also made aware of the audio influence these celebrities must have had on Andy. Greeted by the giant silks... [more]
Posted by Montgomery Rene on 2/14/09
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Talk to Me

by Kristi Beardshear
Confined to one  room, Signs is a small, unassuming exhibition at the de Young that, nevertheless, holds definite charm. The exhibition explores, as its title suggests, the presence of signs in photography and the interplay of word and image. In many of the photographs, the signs captured inject multiple layers of meaning into what would otherwise be a mundane scene. They reminded me of those ironic greeting cards that feature a smiling 50's housewife a la Norman Rockwell with some dire message like “I'm sorry I accidentally ran over your dog.” This disconnect between the image and its text,... [more]
Posted by Kristi Beardshear on 2/28/09
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Other Reliquaries: Inside and Out

by Michelle Y. Hyun
        A different sort of reliquary is shown in various forms at In the Name of God: War, Religion, and the Reliquaries of Al Farrow at the de Young Museum. Also linking past and present, Farrow presents contemporary artifacts and ironic reliquaries, alongside their imitable predecessors. An earthenware bowl made by an unidentified Mimbre artist (ca. 1000-1150) sits cracked yet restored in a plexi-glass display case alongside a Farrow’s own bowl bearing the painted symbol of a tribal American flag carried with gun by an unidentified soldier. Another display case contains a gilt copper re... [more]
Posted by Michelle Y. Hyun on 2/1/09
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The YSL Revolution

by Kristi Beardshear
  As someone with more than a passing interest in fashion and a working, though by no means extensive knowledge of its iconic designers, I had some idea of what to expect going into the Yves Saint Laurent retrospective at the De Young Museum: several incarnations of his trapeze silhouette, perhaps a safari jacket, the Mondrian-inspired sheath dress, and, of course, le smoking, a tuxedo made for women that has become a symbol of the liberating influence Saint Laurent has had on the fashion industry and the way women dress. I saw all of those things, of course—they are, after all, among the designs for which Saint Laurent is be... [more]
Posted by Kristi Beardshear on 11/29/08
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Where the Land Meets the Sea

by Andy Ritchie
The unclad, expansive elegance of Maya Lin’s Systematic Landscapes angled in at me on the narrow gallery approach, her work spare but magnetic. Obediently, I ratcheted my head back to the introductory video sequence, jolted into humility just minutes ago upon learning a colleague of mine, Tyler Potts (DU BFA 2002), created this logically laid, constant fade of images for the PBS series art:21. This instantly lent a shade of kinship to my rapport with the exhibition and further drove me to drink it in. Drink is a curious verb, I realize, as I stand surrounded by seas without water, w... [more]
Posted by Andy Ritchie on 11/17/08
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Sneak preview of Chihuly at the de Young, opens 06/14

by Natalie Hegert
"The most ambitious show I've created to date," is how Dale Chihuly describes his exhibition, opening on June 14 at the de Young Museum, "We went all-out for this show." Artslant was invited to the press preview of the show, still in the process of installation, on June 10, so we're able to give you a sneak preview of Chihuly at the de Young: Many of the installations are presented on plexi-glass, providing a reflective surface which adds more dimensions to the work. This piece is entitled the Glass Forest and highlights the artist's use of neon: The Venetians along with corresponding drawing... [more]
Posted by Natalie Hegert on 6/10/08
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Nature and Culture 2; Chihuly at the de Young

by laurie halsey brown
In a much less subtle exhibition, contemporary glass works by Chihuly are on display at the De Young Museum. His works emphasize the drama of light and form that are inherent in the medium. His focus seems to be on how to conform the glass to his vision, with an interest in having the viewer ‘wowed'. The intensity and complexity of his process in relation to the sheer scale does have power, but few works resonate beyond that. The best work in the exhibition is an installation work of exquisite pieces that reference Tabac Basketry, and the Native American Indian culture surrounding them. In... [more]
Posted by laurie halsey brown on 8/27/08
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Stunningly Beautiful

by Ava Jancar
In an exhibit culled from the de Young Museum's permanent collection, a number of stunningly beautiful floral platinum prints are on display. Selected from photographer Edwin Hale Lincoln's early twentieth century document of the wildflowers of New England, these examples meld an exhaustive study of regional flora with a pure vision of aesthetics. Coming out of the late nineteenth century Arts and Crafts tradition, Lincoln's photographs, in spite of his scientific stance, embody the decorative and naturalistic ideals of the movement. Often bordering on abstraction, the curvaceous qualities o... [more]
Posted by Ava Jancar on 4/28/08