ArtSlant https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/show en-us 40 The Traitorous Translator: Power and Representation in Transnational Discourse <p>My memories of learning a second language date back to my post-elementary school years, what they call the prep-year, in a bilingual school in Turkey. From the first lesson, the struggle to communicate was real: our teacher, who was from Wales, spoke only English, and my class of ten Turkish-speaking students got by with dictionaries and gestures. For many of us in that classroom, and in Turkey more broadly, not knowing English was a failure&mdash;and it was something we had better remedy soon.</p> <p>When I first saw Luis Camnitzer&rsquo;s work at Gallery 400 in Chicago, I had a flashback to my English class. I could only read one of the six lines from Camnitzer&rsquo;s <em>Insults </em>(2009): &ldquo;All those who can&rsquo;t read English are stupid.&rdquo; As an artist, critic and an educator, Camnitzer addresses socio-political issues, using tongue-in-cheek texts to question and challenge global economic discourse. In <em>Insults, </em>his use of humor highlights perceptions of language and how hierarchies&mdash;insiders, outsiders&mdash;might appear between translations. English is a language, but it&rsquo;s also a mechanism of power, a social and economic infrastructure&mdash;it can be an entryway or a barrier depending on who&rsquo;s speaking and what, or where, they&rsquo;re trying to access.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171214184713-Camnitzer.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Luis Camnitzer,&nbsp;<em>Insults</em>, 2009/2017, vinyl, dimensions variable. Installation view in <em>Traduttore, Traditore</em> at Gallery 400, 2017. Courtesy the artist and Alexander Gray Associates, New York</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Curated by Karen Greenwalt and Katja Rivera, the group show <em>Traduttore, Traditore</em>, at Gallery 400, explores the dynamics of power and the shortcomings of globalization, particularly in respect to the movement of people and things as they cross borders. The title is taken from an Italian aphorism that roughly translates to &ldquo;translator, traitor,&rdquo; and refers here to the flaws in the process of cultural, artistic, and linguistic translations. Artists in the show point to the entanglement of language, customs, economy, memory, and history: what meaning is lost, or found, when an artwork, commodity, or body travels from one space, venue, or country to another?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171213161318-G4_0050.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Edra Soto,&nbsp;<em>Tropicalamerican</em>, 2014, Inkjet prints on paper. Installation view in <em>Traduttore, Traditore </em><em>at Gallery 400, 2017. </em>Courtesy of the artist</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Edra Soto&rsquo;s <em>Tropicalamerican </em>(2014) illustrates the process of cultural translation across visual and material languages. A Puerto Rican artist based in Chicago, Soto uses a symbol of national pride, the flag, to demonstrate representations of American, Puerto Rican, and Chicagoan identities. Soto crafted these flags using tropical leaves from Robert Rauschenberg&rsquo;s Captiva terrain during her Robert Rauschenberg Foundation Residency in the summer of 2014. The ephemeral nature of the leaves contrasts the imagined permanence of national sovereignty. Yet, Soto translates her materials further, photographing the quilted flags and reconfiguring them into a digital format. On the south wall of Gallery 400, three framed screen-prints on paper look like green renditions an American flag. Following a complicated lineage of patriotic art traditions, including the practices of Rauschenberg, Jasper Johns, and David Hammons, Soto amalgamates her identity into these flags, expressing her experience of place and migration.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171213161020-G4_0109.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Emily Jacir,&nbsp;<em>Where We Come From (Maha)</em>, 2001&ndash;03, Framed laser prints and c-print mounted on cintra. Installation view in <em>Traduttore, Traditore </em><em>at Gallery 400, 2017. </em>Courtesy the artist and Rhona Hoffman Gallery, Chicago.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Employing politically engaged conceptual techniques, Emily Jacir&rsquo;s work brings together questions of identity, place, and access in an asymmetrically globalized world. In <em>Where We Come From</em> (2002&ndash;2003) Jacir asked Palestinians in exile what she could do for them anywhere in Palestine, leveraging her own privileged freedom of movement as an American passport holder. She documented the wishes and the performed activities in photographs and texts. The piece, comprising some 30 wishes was originally commissioned for Al-Ma&#39;mal Foundation for Contemporary Art, Jerusalem, and then exhibited in the 8th Istanbul Biennial. In Istanbul, these wishes were lined along the wall of the Tophane-i Amire Art Center, a former 15th-century Ottoman cannon foundry. Wishes ranged from &ldquo;Go to Haifa and play soccer with the first Palestinian boy you see on the street,&rdquo; to &ldquo;Drink the water in my parents&rsquo; village,&rdquo; or &ldquo;Go to my mother&rsquo;s grave in Jerusalem on her birthday and place flowers and pray.&rdquo; Yet, coming from people displaced by war and exiled by the Israeli state, the wishes met a sour coincidence when displayed in the space, once a weapon foundry to the empire, which occupied the lands owned by the Palestinians. At Gallery 400, the presentation is different: the venue lacks this extra contextual weight, and only one of the wishes is on display. Nevertheless the solitary text, &ldquo;Climb Mount Carmel in Haifa and look at the Mediterranean from there,&rdquo; complemented by a photo of the Mediterranean from Mount Carmel, is enough to illustrate the fragmented personal histories, sorrows, and longings of people in exile.</p> <p>Many works make the visitor consider the bitter side of migration and diasporic and transnational communities. Michael Rakowitz, in his<em> The Flesh is Yours, The Bones are Ours </em>(2015) installation, originally commissioned for the 14th Istanbul Biennial, echoes the forgotten and painful history of Armenians in Turkey. The title comes from a Turkish saying, used when an apprentice is given to a master. As a tribute to the lost skills of the Armenian minority, Rakowitz, made molds, casts, and rubbings of ornaments made by Armenian Art Nouveau craftsman Garabet Cezayirliyan, which are visible today as embellishments embedded in Istanbul architecture. Rakowitz displays these relics alongside dog bones excavated from Sivriada, one of the&nbsp;Princess&rsquo; Islands in the Marmara Sea. In Byzantine times, Sivriada was used as a place of worship and a prison. Now it is famous for the 1911 &ldquo;Hayırsızada Dog Massacre,&rdquo; in which authorities ordered stray dogs from the mainland to be exiled to the island. Around 80,000 dogs were killed, mostly due to hunger. The state did its best to exterminate these human and animal populations, but Rakowitz reveals how material traces of unwanted and exiled populations impact the landscape to this day.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171213161206-G4_0017.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Michael Rakowitz,&nbsp;<em>The Flesh Is Yours, The Bones Are Ours: Architect as Dragoman</em>, 2015, mixed media. Installation view in <em>Traduttore, Traditore</em> at Gallery 400, 2017. Courtesy the artist and Rhona Hoffman Gallery, Chicago</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Like Jacir&rsquo;s work, Rakowitz&rsquo;s installation changes from one venue to the next. In its original Istanbul guise, covering a floor in the Galata Greek Primary High School, Rakowitz included vitrine displays referencing Louis Sullivan&rsquo;s quest for a new architectural language in Chicago&mdash;drawing parallels with the Armenian architectural ornamentation and modernization projects in Istanbul. This work later traveled to the artist&rsquo;s own city, Chicago, where it was displayed between the Graham Foundation and Rhona Hoffman Gallery. Now, in an abbreviated form in Gallery 400, it is transformed once again by the contingencies of space and curatorial scope.</p> <p>The curators of <em>Traduttore, Traditore</em> argue that &ldquo;designations of nationalities are inherently fraught at a moment when identity can be exclusionary, or worse, used as a weapon.&rdquo; At a time when &ldquo;Muslim bans&rdquo; masquerade as national security protocols; when the president of the United States claims the city of Jerusalem as the capital of one people, but not another; when the complexity of identities in diverse nations are whitewashed for political expediency, it is crucial to consider the wide-reaching armatures of power and how these relate to language, culture, and commerce. Translation has always been a force for both creativity and destruction. The artists in <em>Traduttore, Traditore </em>ask: who wields the translator&rsquo;s pen, and what is lost in messaging by the most privileged and powerful among us? Picking up that pen themselves, they reveal that the answers aren&rsquo;t trivial&mdash;they have real-world consequences on the movement, identities, and lives of people around the globe.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/418487-p%C4%B1nar-%C3%9Cner-y%C4%B1lmaz?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Pınar &Uuml;ner Yılmaz</a></p> <p><em>Pınar &Uuml;ner Yılmaz is a writer, curator, and PhD candidate in Art History at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She is currently based between Istanbul and Chicago.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;<span style="text-align: center;">Installation view in&nbsp;</span><em style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">Traduttore, Traditore</em><em style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</em>at Gallery 400, Chicago)</span></p> Fri, 15 Dec 2017 02:48:01 +0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: Thoka Maer <p><a href="http://www.thokamaer.com/" target="_blank">Thoka Maer</a>&nbsp;(Lisette Berndt) makes tiny, exquisite stories in GIF form. The medium doesn&rsquo;t always lend itself to evoking complex emotions, but Maer&rsquo;s work does just that: she infuses genuine, relatable feelings within a few simple looping frames. With vignettes chronicling everyday life and observed human behaviors, the work is sometimes happy, sometimes sad&mdash;often both at once. In 2011, Maer started the popular Tumblr page &ldquo;<a href="http://itsnobiggie.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">It&rsquo;s No Biggie</a>,&rdquo; where she dryly illustrates small, daily frustrations familiar to us all.</p> <p>Last week Maer exhibited in the group show <em><a href="http://manacontemporary.com/flatland">Flatland: A journey of many dimensions</a></em> with Mana Contemporary, where she was a resident in the BSMT New Media Program in 2016. The exhibition set up shop in five Downtown Miami storefronts featuring works by artists who &ldquo;imagine new perspectives of &lsquo;reality.&rsquo;&rdquo; Maer&rsquo;s contribution brought her GIF work into three dimensions. She spoke with me on the occasion about blurring the lines between her careers as artist and illustrator and pushing her GIFs into new, offline territories.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171213145831-tumblr_mqldl9Qlw41r4ibs7o1_500.gif" /></p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: How would you describe yourself?</strong></p> <p><strong>Thoka Maer: </strong>Female. 166cm tall. Good with pencils. Problem solver. Ideas. Precision and detail.&nbsp;Could be a little more social. I love nice people.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What were you like as a child?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>TM: </strong>My mom says that I was as annoying as I was the best child to have :) My grandmother says that I always kept myself busy with things and that she could leave me play by myself for hours.&nbsp;My dad would probably say that I was quite ok.&nbsp;I hope I was a good friend. I was an only child that wished for siblings every day.&nbsp;I loved to draw and sing, roaming the forests. I was quiet and extremely shy. I still am, but a grown up, better adapted version of that. I don&rsquo;t think that anyone expected even something remotely close to what I do and am now. I was supposed to become a florist when I was 16. But I rebelled, finally. &nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171213150857-tumblr_omi9rkEyHG1qie9jco1_500.gif" /></p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first recognize yourself as a creative person?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM: </strong>Very late. I think that lack of value for creativity in the place I grew up in made it hard to understand and see myself as such and also actually live it out.</p> <p><strong>CP: What did computers mean to you when you were growing up?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM: </strong>Nothing pretty much. They were all locked away. Inaccessible. I was conditioned to think that computers aren&rsquo;t for girls.&nbsp;I had my first own computer when I was 21. Every new venture I&rsquo;ve taken on it since has felt very threatening every time, until I actually started doing it, realizing that I love it and am pretty good at it, too.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171213150649-tumblr_inline_oc23ztyGGP1qhw1o1_1280.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first recognize computers&rsquo; creative applications?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM: </strong>I do animation/projection work mostly. So none of my work requires coding but animation software, Photoshop, etc.&nbsp;I started using that just when I applied for art school. We had to explore a lot of things that I would have never attempted to use on my own, like Processing and After Effects.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171213151355-tumblr_oqkeewSH9Z1qie9jco1_500.gif" /></p> <p><strong>CP: Do you think your upbringing&nbsp;in communist Germany has influenced the art that you make?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM: </strong>Probably, but I couldn&rsquo;t say how exactly.&nbsp;What it has definitely shaped is my perception and the meaning of art and an ability of finding my place in it.&nbsp;Art in the East German world only had a practical purpose that also always had to conform with the political view points.&nbsp;An artistic, individualistic kid didn&rsquo;t really have a place there. They didn&rsquo;t want anyone to excel, be better than anyone else.&nbsp;</p> <p>Everyone was supposed to be the same.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171213150757-tumblr_mcvcakyema1r4ibs7o1_500.gif" /></p> <p><strong>CP: What were you early memorable experiences of the internet?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM: </strong>Chatrooms. I wanted to talk to people from as far as possible.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What is the continuing influence of the internet on your creativity?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM: </strong>It stresses it out.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Do you remember the first animation you made?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM: </strong>Yes. It was a pink rabbit hopping along the train tracks inside of an abandoned subway station in Berlin.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171213152007-tumblr_og8meq3ZP31qie9jco2_500.gif" /></p> <p><strong>CP: Can you talk a little about your use of white space?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM: </strong>The white space developed a lot through a desire of having my illustrations or GIFs look more organically on the internet. Most websites have a white background. Without breaking in the borders of the image file, they look more like a natural part of the environment they&rsquo;re living in.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: You made a book called&nbsp;<em>Almost Exactly - A Paradox Compendium</em>. Where does your interest in</strong>&nbsp;<strong>paradoxes stem from?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM:&nbsp;</strong>Paradoxes to me are infinite stories that never stop telling themselves. They have this universal beauty that&rsquo;s so captivating and inescapable.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171213150218-4.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Panel from&nbsp;<em>Almost Exactly - A Paradox Compendium</em>.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: You started your Tumblr in 2011. When did you first realize it was&nbsp;becoming popular?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM:</strong> Classmates of mine in Uni started using Tumblr and I was only mildly interested in the beginning until I realized that it&rsquo;s actually a great tool to liberate yourself from all that artistic self doubt.&nbsp;I just started putting out my work on Tumblr to set an end point to their creation and move on to the next thing. My main Tumblr is still <a href="http://thokamaer.tumblr.com/">thokamaer.tumblr.com</a> which I have since 2009 I think. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s No Biggie&rdquo; was the one that eventually got popular.&nbsp;</p> <p>When I moved to New York I also started working on an incredible commission that came through the Creatr program at Tumblr. It was a collaboration with a fellow Creatr Sam Cannon, a photographer who shot the United States of Women Conference at the White House including the Obamas, Joe Biden, Oprah Winfrey, Patricia Arquette and so many more. I was working from NY, laying animations over the photos and all of that happened live during the event. The group show <em>Flatland</em>, which was curated by Grace Franck and hosted by Mana Contemporary during Miami Art Week, means I am again with my group of fellow Tumblr GIF artists.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171213150405-3.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">United States of Women Summit, Collaboration with Sam Cannon</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Why did you choose the name&nbsp;&ldquo;It&rsquo;s No Biggie&rdquo;?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM: </strong>It has a tiny undertone of irony or sarcasm in it. It started out as this blog with miniature stories about daily mishaps. The loop of the GIF made telling those stories so much more pleasing since it lets the story escalate in a way.&nbsp;And &ldquo;It&rsquo;s No Biggie&rdquo; because it&rsquo;s just tiny stuff that shouldn&rsquo;t bother us but, if we&rsquo;re not in the right mood, can also be the straw that breaks the camel&rsquo;s back.&nbsp;Plus they&rsquo;re tiny.&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171213151447-tumblr_n0mqxwPxMa1r4ibs7o1_500.gif" style="text-align: center;" /></p> <p><strong>CP: When and why did you adopt the artist name Thoka Maer?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM: </strong>I think around 2009/10 probably. And that was also for liberation. I realized that my artistic self has different intentions than what&rsquo;s required from me when I work as a commercial illustrator. Thoka Maer is easier on compromising with clients&rsquo; needs where as Lisette is really just my very own self, who as an artist has very different, personal intentions. She just works for herself and doesn&rsquo;t need publicity or anything.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171213152159-5.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Illustration for artist panel at Mana Contemporary</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first understand that there were commercial applications for your art?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM: </strong>It actually happened the other way around I would say. First there were the GIFs which I made for fun. Those turned into commercial work and from there I went to art.&nbsp;</p> <p>An interesting experience on that road was a panel that Traceloops, Zolloc, Julian Glander, Sam Cannon, and I did as a part of our [BSMT New Media Program] residency at Mana Contemporary. Mana invited us as a group of GIF artists with different backgrounds to develop a spatial art show, taking the GIF into the three-dimensional work.&nbsp;The panel was to introduce us to the traditional art world. All of us more or less perceived ourselves as artists in a way, even though we apply it for commercial work. Some people in the audience though didn&rsquo;t really accept that approach as a valid path to art, which was interesting and surprising to us.&nbsp;We might have proven ourselves worthy of the art world now. Hopefully :)</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171213151742-1.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">Illustration for Kiblind Magazine</span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <p><strong>CP: How would you describe the relationship between your personal and commercial work?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM: </strong>It&rsquo;s very fluid now. The line between my identity as Thoka Maer and Lisette Berndt has become very blurry. This interview is kind of a proof to that since I, until recently, would have never talked about me as Lisette in that context.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What question do people ask most about your GIFs?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM: </strong>&ldquo;Which program do you use?&rdquo;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171213151630-tumblr_nq96ocyFsP1r4ibs7o2_r1_500.gif" /></p> <p><strong>CP: You were in the group show <em>Flatland: A Journey of Many Dimensions</em> during Miami Art Week.</strong> <strong>How did you become involved with it?</strong></p> <p>Through the residency program at <a href="http://manacontemporary.com/manabsmt/">Mana BSMT</a> that was founded by Grace Franck. We started in August 2016 and originally the residency was supposed to go on for six months, ending with a big group show. Which happened. Our final show <em>Surface</em>, in January of 2017, impressed Mana so much that they decided to take us all to Art Basel. Since then, Grace has invited more new media artists like Pablo Gnecco, James Clar, Alex Czetwertynski, Freeka Tet, and more to the residency program. They are now part of the show plus a few more artists, who are just taking part in the show like Dave&amp;Gabe or Andrew Thomas Huang.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Can you tell us a little about the work you have produced for it?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM: </strong>Based on the original challenge Mana gave us, of taking the GIF into the 3D world, I basically took that literally. The work I&rsquo;m showing here is a further development of my piece for our show <em>Surface</em> in January. It&rsquo;s an installation of&nbsp;five suspended planes of plexiglass with dream-like animations reprojected on to it. The animation plays with the illusion of depth, enhanced by the levels of projection surfaces, creating a transient experience of space and time.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171213172501-2.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Installation in&nbsp;<em>Flatland</em>. Photo: On The Real Film</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What particular challenges were there in making this work?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM:</strong> It&rsquo;s a very big but also extremely delicate piece due to the plexiglass. It also requires an intense amount of precision to get everything straight and lined up since each plane catches only parts of the projection to create this spatial experience.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What else do you have coming up?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM: </strong>I want to develop further as an artist for sure. This experience with Mana was eye-opening regarding new opportunities. It opened this previously unknown door to me of what else I want to do with art off the computer screen, outside of the internet.&nbsp;I&rsquo;m looking forward to 2018!</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171213151921-tumblr_og14efF4Bo1qie9jco1_500.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&#39;re interested in what&#39;s happening with art on the web. We invited online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, to write a bi-monthly column for us. Every other Wednesday he selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Thu, 14 Dec 2017 01:31:11 +0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list FINAL WEEK to Apply to the ArtSlant Prize IX <table border="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table border="0"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p>Round 9, <em>the final round</em>, closes December 18th! Apply today for your chance at $5k in prizes and an exhibition in New York during Armory Week! To apply, sign in to <a href="https://www.artslant.com">artslant.com</a>, click the menu icon in the upper right and select&nbsp;ArtSlant Prize.</p> <p>Above: Round 9 <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1078965">submission</a> from&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/168409-christopher-tavares-silva">Christopher Tavares Silva</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/262035-brian-steckel">Brian Steckel</a></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p>The ArtSlant Prize is an annual competition hosted by ArtSlant.com. Jurors for the prize are prominent curators, gallerists, museum professionals, and arts folk from aroud the world that we greatly admire. Check out the jurors from previous rounds and learn more about the Prize on our <a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/articles/show/8456">FAQ</a>.</p> <p>Up for grabs are exhibition and sales opportunities including inclusion in our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.amazon.com/sp?_encoding=UTF8&amp;asin=&amp;isAmazonFulfilled=&amp;isCBA=&amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;orderID=&amp;seller=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;tab=products&amp;vasStoreID=#">Amazon Art Sales Platform</a>, and great exposure&mdash;not to mention cash prizes for selected ArtSlant Prize winners.&nbsp;</p> <p>Check out the latest submissions from the ArtSlant Community on our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase">Art page</a>. &nbsp;</p> <p>Previous ArtSlant Prize winners have gone on to secure gallery representation and have been purchased by prominent collectors, museum directors and personalities.</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="text-align: center;"><em style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="font-family: helvetica;">&nbsp; </span></strong></em><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170104153040-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="box-sizing: border-box; border: 0px; vertical-align: middle; max-width: 100%; height: 200px; padding-right: 10px; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; display: block; font-family: Georgia, Times, &quot;Times New Roman&quot;, serif; font-size: 18px; text-align: center; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255); width: 200px;" /><em style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="font-family: helvetica;">&nbsp;</span></strong></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large;">1st Place: $3000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">2nd Place: $1000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">3rd Place: $1000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">Honorable Mention&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <table align="center" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p>&nbsp;</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <table align="center"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2016+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2016:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/318334-brigitta-varadi" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Brigitta Varadi</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">,&nbsp;</span><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/71495-tiffany-smith" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Tiffany Smith</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">,&nbsp;</span><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/280850-sterling-crispin" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Sterling Crispin</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">,&nbsp;</span><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/468710-bex-ilsley" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Bex Ilsley</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">,&nbsp;</span><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/373164-zzin-jinhee-park" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Jinhee Park</a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2014+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2015:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/16146-theresa-ganz" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Theresa Ganz</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/315939-tina-tahir" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Tina Tahir</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/204298-rachel-garrard" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Rachel Garrard</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/347173-bryan-volta" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Bryan Volta</a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2014+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2014:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/45525-edra-soto" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Edra Soto</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/246553-adam-douglas-thompson" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Adam Douglas Thompson</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/241839-anastasia-samoylova" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Anastasia Samoylova</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/378398-oren-pinhassi" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Oren Pinhassi</a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2013+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2013:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/247077-robin-kang?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Robin Kang</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/238335-maureen-meyer?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Maureen Meyer</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">,&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/334738-alison-pilkington?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Alison Pilkington</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/311414-alexis-courtney?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Alexis Courtney</a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong style="line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2012+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2012:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/135691-veronica-bruce" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Veronica Bruce</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/23907-steven-vasquez-lopez" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Stephen Vasquez Lopez</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/152389-susan-meyer" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Susan Meyer</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/224530-timothy-gaewsky" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Timothy Gaewsky</a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong style="line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2011+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2011:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/233718-holly-murkerson" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Holly Murkerson</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/36482-jason-irwin" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Jason Irwin</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/57515-christine-de-la-garenne" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Christine de la Garenne</a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong style="line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2010+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2010:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/18169-chantel-foretich?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Chantel Foretich</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/29757-robert-minervini?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Robert Minervini</a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong style="line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2009+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2009:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/103857-michael-zelehoski?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Michael Zelehoski</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/46020-yo-fukui?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Yo Fukui</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/10432-julie-davidow?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Julie Davidow</a></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170320214133-artslant-springbreak.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 385px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 10px;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/articles/show/47340-announcing-the-artslant-prize-2016-winners-and-exhibition-at-springbreak-art-show" target="_blank">ArtSlant Prize 2016 Exhibition</a>&nbsp;at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.springbreakartshow.com/" target="_blank">SPRING/BREAK Art Show</a>, March 2017.</span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <hr /> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**All participants in the ArtSlant Prize Showcase Series agree to ArtSlant&#39;s&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/5575">Terms &amp; Conditions</a>.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**<em>Fees from the Artslant Juried Showcase competitions will be dedicated to the promotion of our prize winners and the administration of the competition.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Tue, 12 Dec 2017 01:34:22 +0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Katya Grokhovsky Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/48067-under-the-radar-romily-alice-walden-dain-mergenthaler-katya-grokhovsky" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/233356-katya-grokhovsky" target="_blank">Katya Grokhovsky</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>As a child, I had difficulty in expressing myself verbally, so I used drawing and movement as a way to display my vision to the world. I am still doing that today, utilizing my art to communicate the often invisible, absurd, grotesque, and difficult aspects of human experience as it pertains specifically to a female immigrant person, which is what I inhabit.</p> <p>I am interested in politics of protest to the prescribed notions of earthly existence, through exposure and analysis of the monstrous, the dangerous, the unwanted, the hidden, the ignored, the fragile, discarded and disappeared, lost and underestimated. I mine the daily battlefields of domesticity, human relations, power hierarchy,&nbsp;labor, loneliness, failures, ambitions, emotions, desires and dreams, autobiographically and through observation.</p> <p>By employing my art as a language, I attempt to activate my ideas through visual and performative codes via the use of objects, my own body, gestures, text, voice, sound, materials, time, space, and site.&nbsp;My work tends to surprise and haunt me all the time and I am in constant dialogue with myself and the universe through it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171211093805-20171206045044-1.KatyaGrokhovskyTemporaryHabitat.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Temporary Habitat</em>, 2017, Mixed media, found objects, video, performance.&nbsp;Variable</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>I believe it is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility to question the way the world functions, in all of its aspects, from the mundane and banal minutia of daily life and struggles, to the tragic, political, personal, dramatic, grandiose, and triumphant. To be fully aware and awake, to listen, look, analyze and critique, to push the limits and boundaries of yourself and your audience. Perhaps, to possess a unique sense of place in the world, of an observant outsider, looking on and in, to be curious, to see and understand the underside, the underbelly, the beauty and ugliness, to peek beyond the frontiers, the facades, the masks. To dissect the dogmas, conditioning, and systems we are governed by and born into, to transform, to rebel, to live a life as an artist, to oppose the norm, the society, the establishment.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)? </strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/201261256?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Bad Woman</em>, 2017</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>My art is what I truly do best in life and I believe one of my recent works is the greatest thing I have made to date. A culmination of numerous previous works, research, experimentation, and observation, <em>Bad Woman</em> is a performance for video, which was created initially for a solo installation of the same name in Australia this year, and has now grown into much larger series. Filmed on location in my parents&rsquo; backyard in Melbourne, Australia, where we first migrated to from Ukraine in the 90s, the work somehow captures both the wildness and slight absurd grittiness of Australia and the immigrant, as well as art-historical displacement. It combines many of the mediums I work with, such as found objects, installation, video, costumes, and performance and employs humor as&nbsp;a&nbsp;transcendent medium.</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>The work I want to make will dismantle the patriarchy and rebuild the world. I will never make this in my lifetime or many lifetimes after this one, but I will practice in the meantime. Ever since I awoke to my reality as a living woman on this earth, I understood I will never be free, especially internally. My lifetime project is to basically de-condition and decolonize my own mind and body, and through that, the rest of the world. How long can the planet survive under the patriarchal rule? We are all to blame for its gradual demise and debasement and I would like to smash the failing system with my art&mdash;or die trying. In the meantime, all I can do is chip away at a stone.</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.shayarick.com/" target="_blank">Shay Arick</a>, an artist from Israel, living in New York, who works with many mediums and explores and critiques ideas of masculinity and social taboos.</p> <p><a href="http://www.deborahcastillo.com/" target="_blank">Deborah Castillo</a>, a Venezuelan artist, based in Brooklyn, who dissects ideas of patriarchal power through performance, video, and sculpture.</p> <p><a href="http://www.katepowerartist.com/" target="_blank">Kate Power</a>, a multidisciplinary artist and writer, based in Adelaide, Australia, who deconstructs social human relations and dynamics.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;<em>Bad Woman</em>, 2017, Video still)</span></p> Mon, 11 Dec 2017 17:48:18 +0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list With Billionaire Backers, Miami’s Museums Go All In for Contemporary Art (and Little Else) <p>For the first two weeks in December the international art world descends upon Miami Beach for some of the most hotly anticipated art fairs in the world, where buyers, gallerists, artists, and hangers-on come to mix, mingle, and cavort. Thanks in part to Art Basel Miami Beach, the city&rsquo;s institutional landscape has undergone a dramatic transformation in the last several years. For a town that sees dozens of fairs come and go each December, the burgeoning museum scene&mdash;the cultural stalwarts that stick around after the convention center empties and beachside pavilions come down&mdash;could be considered a better reflection of Miami&rsquo;s local culture and values. Who are the newcomers to this scene? And are they shaking off the glittery patina of wealth and privilege that the fairs leave behind?&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>In the past five years the introduction of the Perez Art Museum Miami (PAMM), the Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA), and newly renovated Bass have ostensibly transformed the cultural landscape. Still, these young and re-branded institutions face a number of hurdles including complicated private-public financing structures and repetitive &ldquo;international contemporary&rdquo; programming; not to mention they are all <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/30/arts/design/institute-of-contemporary-art-miami-miami-contemporary-art.html" target="_blank">vying for the same donor base</a>&mdash;competing for attention amongst themselves, not unlike the explosion of fairs which they might otherwise counteract.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171207160801-ICA_Miami_by_Iwan_Baan.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">ICA Miami. Photo: Iwan Baan</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The most recent addition to the scene, the <a href="https://www.icamiami.org" target="_blank">ICA</a>, inaugurates its new home this month, right in the heart of the Design District. Its placement, between upscale boutiques from international fashion brands is a testament to Miami&rsquo;s current institutional landscape. Born out of the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA), the ICA was formed when disgruntled board members took the bulk of MOCA&rsquo;s private collection to start their own museum. In partnership with Craig Robins&mdash;one of Miami&rsquo;s top real estate developers, responsible for radically transforming the Design District&mdash;and Norman Braman, a local car-dealing baron worth an estimated $2.5 billion according to <em>Forbes, </em>plans for a new building were drawn.</p> <p>While Robins temporarily housed the museum in the Moore Building, Braman provided the funds ($75 million in cash and donated land) to construct a permanent facility right around the corner. The glitzy structure, designed by Aranguren &amp; Gallegos, is a far cry from the museum&rsquo;s MOCA roots, as a small museum serving an underprivileged local community in North Miami.</p> <p>&ldquo;ICA is unique in our city because we are a free art museum open to all,&rdquo; <a href="http://www.miaminewtimes.com/arts/institute-of-contemporary-art-ica-miami-completes-construction-of-its-new-design-district-building-9425802" target="_blank">explains</a> newly appointed ICA Director, Ellen Salpeter. &ldquo;Another thing that sets us apart is that the development of our permanent home in the Design District has been independently funded without public dollars.&rdquo;</p> <p>The new ICA is a fixture in the Design District, capitalizing on the shifting expanse of the art world, abutting high fashion and design. &ldquo;While our programmatic focus is global, we view the Design District as a natural extension of our building,&rdquo; Saltpeter says of the museum&rsquo;s association with its high-end neighborhood, where it abuts high fashion and design. Their latest programming includes a sculpture garden with work by Sol Lewitt and Mark Handforth planted along the neighborhood&rsquo;s ample sidewalks and plazas.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171207161206-Bass_1_Web.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">The Bass. Photo: Zachary Balber</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Along with the ICA, <a href="https://thebass.org" target="_blank">the Bass</a> makes its long-awaited reintroduction this month. For the past two and a half years, the museum had shuttered its doors to undergo a major renovation that doubled the programmable space without altering the building&rsquo;s footprint.</p> <p>The Bass is housed in the former Miami Beach Public Library and Art Center, originally built in 1930 by Russell Pancoast in a grand art deco style. The building was converted into an art museum in 1964 with a massive donation of works by local connoisseurs John and Johanna Bass. Their collection of old master works was noted to be one of the most fraudulent in history, with Picasso himself labeling one of his pieces in the collection &ldquo;faux&rdquo; in a letter to the Art Dealers Association of America.</p> <p>Last year, curators were planning a grand reopening with exhibitions by Ugo Rondinone, Mika Rottenberg, and Pascale Marthine Bayou in time for Art Basel 2016. Plans were postponed for Art Basel 2017, with organizers citing construction delays due to preservation concerns related to the historical structure.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171207161433-Web_33.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Pascale Marthine Bayou&rsquo;s intervention in the Bass&rsquo; permanent collection</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Unlike the fully private ICA, the Bass is a public-private partnership with a taxpayer-funded budget and a private board responsible for covering $3.5 million in yearly operational expenses. Despite its slightly more democratic organizational structure, the Bass wouldn&rsquo;t exist today without help from its own philanthropic billionaire, George Lindemann. He spearheaded the museum&rsquo;s massive renovation, and as president of the board, he oversees its finances, helping the small institution raise cash from a shrinking donor pool. Not only does the Bass compete against the ICA, but several years ago a new competitor came on the scene.</p> <p>In 2013, the P&eacute;rez Art Museum Miami (PAMM) made its Art Basel debut with a spectacular home designed by Herzog and de Meuron, ideally situated at the mouth of Biscayne Bay. Opened to the public in 1984 as the Center for the Fine Arts (CFA), then later the Miami Art Museum (MAM), the institution took its newest name after one of the town&rsquo;s top real estate developers, Jorge P&eacute;rez, of the Related Group, donated substantial money and artwork from his private collection to support the institution at a seminal period in its history. In addition to the $100 million used in taxpayer funds, the billionaire offered $20 million in cash and another $20 million in art to prop up the new museum.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171207161640-WEB-Clean-Pe_rez-Art-Museum-Miami_-east-facade.-Armando-MannyofMiami.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">P&eacute;rez Art Museum Miami, east fa&ccedil;ade. Photo: <a href="MannyofMiami.com" target="_blank">Armando Colls</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The museum&rsquo;s rapid growth, however, led to a budget crunch. As the <em>New York Times </em>noted in <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/30/arts/design/institute-of-contemporary-art-miami-miami-contemporary-art.html" target="_blank">a recent article</a> about Miami&rsquo;s competing contemporary art museums, &ldquo;PAMM&rsquo;s 2015 tax return, the most recent period publicly available, shows it ended that year with expenses exceeding revenue by nearly $5 million.&rdquo;</p> <p>PAMM took a major shift in fall 2015, with the appointment of Franklin Sirmans as its new director. The former department head and curator for contemporary art at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art (LACMA), Sirmans vowed that PAMM would commit itself to serve the local community by highlighting work by artists from Latin America and the Caribbean, demographics typically overlooked by the art establishment.</p> <p>PAMM has indeed mounted many strong exhibitions sticking to this goal, such as last year&rsquo;s Julio Le Parc blockbuster&nbsp;<em>Form into Action.</em>&nbsp;Yet, PAMM, ICA, and the Bass all largely feature programming dedicated to international contemporary art of the sort that draws crowds to Art Basel each year. What&rsquo;s particularly glaring is the lack of an art museum committed to showing old masters and Modern art.</p> <p>Museums have a profound effect on a city&rsquo;s culture; pieces they acquire and exhibit project and shape perceptions of the local culture around the world. Miami is known as a haven for the buying and selling of contemporary art, so it&rsquo;s no wonder the city should have one, or even two, institutions devoted to attracting top names in the field from around the world. The ICA alone has mounted the first US shows for artist like Thomas Bayrle, Alex Bag, and others&mdash;acquiring and commissioning original pieces for their permanent collection in the process. The Bass mounted the first retrospective for Italian-born Rondinone, and commissioned&nbsp;<em>Miami Mountain</em>, a&nbsp;<a href="https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/miamimountain/" target="_blank">highly Instagrammable</a>&nbsp;outdoor sculpture in the vein of his site-specific installation&nbsp;<em>Seven Magic Mountains</em>&nbsp;in the Nevada Desert. Fantastic artists and artworks, all. But they do little to introduce homegrown practitioners or craft a unique Miami identity that exists outside of the city&rsquo;s reputation as a destination for art world jetsetters. It&rsquo;s hardly a coincidence that the Zurich and New York-based Galerie Eva Presenhuber is featuring a huge, open-plan booth dedicated to Rondinone at Art Basel Miami Beach this week.</p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171207161813-miamimountain.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/miamimountain/" target="_blank">#MiamiMountain</a> on Instagram</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In many cases the billionaires that fund the construction and operation of these institutions play a hand in the process, and institutional identity, by way of donations. Braman donated a Lichtenstein canvas for the ICA&rsquo;s inaugural exhibition, <em><a href="https://www.icamiami.org/exhibition/the-everywhere-studio/" target="_blank">The Everywhere Studio</a></em>. And in June 2016 PAMM announced the donation of over a hundred works from Craig Robins, the largest in its short history. Pieces by Jedediah Caesar, Patty Chang, A&iuml;da Ruilova, and others formed a part of a growing contemporary art collection.</p> <p>Yet, with all three museums acquiring and exhibiting pieces from the very same artists bought and sold at the fairs, they tip the scales in favor of seasonal collectors and gallerists, rather than locals.</p> <p>Philanthropic support for the arts is hardly new or unique to Miami, but what is novel is the city&rsquo;s reliance on a handful of powerful billionaires to bankroll so many public museums covering the same art historical time period. The dearth of fully taxpayer-funded institutions not only creates a lack of public oversight and accountability, but begs the question: whom do these private institutions serve? Though directors and curators would insist they&rsquo;re programming with an eye towards the local community, the reliance on private capital would suggest otherwise.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/448412-neil-vazquez?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Neil Vazquez</a></p> <p><em>Neil Vazquez is a Miami-based writer and Northwestern University graduate. He usually can be found sipping overpriced coffee, walking his golden retriever, or profusely sweating in yoga classes around town.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: ICA Miami. Photo: Iwan Baan)</span></p> Fri, 08 Dec 2017 00:57:24 +0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list At Miami's All-Women Art Fair Poorgrrrl Channels the Weight of Womanhood <p><a href="https://www.instagram.com/poorgrrrl/?hl=en" target="_blank">Poorgrrrl</a> is a persona that arouses pity in her audience. The Miami-based artist&rsquo;s performances are fragmented, confessional, musical, and often incorporate lighting, costume, and installation. They are always accompanied by sound, produced by her collaborator, <a href="https://soundcloud.com/byrdipop" target="_blank">byrdipop</a>. For Poorgrrrl, the music entertainment industry is a platform for performance art. The unease she generates onstage can sometimes leave the audience feeling confused or disappointed when her performances purposefully don&rsquo;t match up with the typical concert-goer&rsquo;s expectations.</p> <p>This week, Poorgrrrl will perform for the opening of <a href="https://www.fairmarket.art/">Fair.</a>, Miami Art Week&rsquo;s new women-only art fair, which curators <a href="http://www.faenaart.org/" target="_blank">Zoe Lukov</a> and <a href="http://spinelloprojects.com/" target="_blank">Anthony Spinello</a> have ambitiously organized at the new Brickell City Centre, a large 5,000 square foot shopping mall in downtown Miami. Presented by Swire Properties Inc., the <a href="https://us2.campaign-archive.com/?u=bdff9d4f3cd4095b8bfc6d528&amp;id=c783578675" target="_blank">press release</a> states it &ldquo;aims to address gender inequality in the art world and beyond, highlight[ing] activism in contemporary creative practices&rdquo; and to &ldquo;inspire and empower women.&rdquo; Running from December 7&ndash;10, the booth-less presentation will be located throughout multiple spaces within the shopping center.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171206131635-jit_glitter.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Photo: Vanessa Turi</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>While the fair&rsquo;s mission is to address gender inequality, nothing is for sale. Artists were paid a fee for their participation along with the production of new work as per <a href="http://wageforwork.com/fee-calculator" target="_blank">W.A.G.E. guidelines</a>, but I can&rsquo;t seem to wrap my head around why it is &ldquo;fair&rdquo; to bar any work from selling, affecting earning potential and preventing collector base growth for participating artists. The fair&rsquo;s name and emphasis comes across as puzzling: an artist should always receive W.A.G.E. fees, have their cost of production covered, and retain the ability to sell their work. Nevertheless, it&rsquo;s important to reiterate that this <em>is</em> the first contemporary art fair exclusively showing work made by women, making this a definite must-see Basel satellite event, even if it grapples with inequality issues in a complicated and contradictory way. In this context Poorgrrrl&rsquo;s performance at Fair. feels aptly curated as the artist co-opts pity as a form of feminism.</p> <p>The inaugural Fair. and my conversation with Poorgrrrl, below, are not untimely. Much of Poorgrrrl&rsquo;s lyricism is rooted in larger systemic inequalities and addresses a bigger intersectional picture. Speaking from a marginalized position, she deliberately uses the tools that oppress and discomfort her to discomfort and oppress her audience. The result is a raw recounting of the pain, anger, and gaslit reality that emanates from womanhood. Her lyrics turn sharply at the edges of byrdipop&rsquo;s bass and pop-filled beats in a schema similar to and as deftly crafted as the upbeat melodies of Johnny Marr&rsquo;s guitar laid up against Morrissey&rsquo;s words and heartbreaking and sardonic delivery in The Smiths.</p> <p>Lyrics from Poorgrrrl&rsquo;s latest song and music video, &ldquo;F :) :) K S O N G,&rdquo; directed by <a href="https://www.instagram.com/keanuorange/" target="_blank">Keanu Orange</a>, and premiering on ArtSlant below, go like this:</p> <p align="center"><em>finally / finally fucking me and / you&rsquo;re finally fucking me /</em></p> <p align="center"><em>and trapping me / and you&rsquo;re disgusting / you wanna do it all the time</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/242411300" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">&ldquo;F :) :) K S O N G,&rdquo;&nbsp;Directed by Keanu Orange @keanuorange. Shot by Sally Hunter @sallyhunterrr.&nbsp;Styled by GAMI @yasgami. Edited by CJ @th3gayagenda&nbsp;<a href="http://emmyandcj.com/" target="_blank">http://emmyandcj.com</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Audrey Phillips: What you are going to be doing at FAIR.? </strong></p> <p><strong>Poorgrrrl:</strong> I will be performing there, with my collaborator <a href="https://soundcloud.com/byrdipop" target="_blank">byrdipop</a>, for the opening along with <a href="http://waterplanet.tv/" target="_blank">Virgo</a> and <a href="https://suzianalogue.bandcamp.com/" target="_blank">Suzi Analog</a>. The performance I&rsquo;m doing is sound based. The sound and the performance will be maybe aggressive, or, pathetic at times. We plan on producing an uncomfortable stage presence while creating a variety of soundscapes that weave in and out of unreleased songs we have made.</p> <p><strong>AP: When you say pathetic does that relate to the performance or the sound?</strong></p> <p><strong>PG:</strong> Both. I want the viewer to feel that pity, like when you watch something live and &ldquo;life happens&rdquo; and for a moment the veil is lifted. The scene is broken and you can see through it. The character failed and it feels awkward. We will use both our bodies, the way we interact, and the way we sound to provoke the viewers in all types of ways. It isn&#39;t interesting for me to just entertain people. I want to challenge the viewer&rsquo;s expectations of performance.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171206131733-poorgrrrl-ica-01.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Photo: Sarah Moody</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AP: It&rsquo;s interesting in relation to FAIR., because it&rsquo;s for women but they aren&rsquo;t allowed to sell their work. I like the idea of a fair where art isn&rsquo;t for sale but I don&rsquo;t know that a women-only fair is the right context for such a venture. I feel like they are two contradicting forms of activism: the inequality and lack of visibility women face in and outside of the art world and an anti-capitalist fantasy. Women artists already make less than men, so why put us in a situation where it will perpetuate these inequalities? Tying it to how you describe your performance, even the name you perform under&mdash;Poorgrrrl, is already full of pity within the FAIR. context. It&rsquo;s conceptually connected on some level.</strong></p> <p><strong>PG:</strong> The other side of that, for me is that if it weren&rsquo;t for this opportunity I wouldn&rsquo;t perform at Basel at all, which is maybe part of the whole issue. As far as there being these two separate ideas you mentioned&mdash;not having visibility or equal pay&mdash;those things confuse and upset me and I guess inform the performance.</p> <p>Poorgrrrl is bipolar as fuck. Like, there is the pity, this poor girl, and then there is the rage that goes hand-in-hand, repressed or not. Poorgrrrl is this contrast between a really strong powerful stage presence and sound, and this pathetic looking and weak sounding experience. There is always both.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allow="encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" gesture="media" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/11bXqEcPH2Q" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">&ldquo;the blu&eacute;zZz&hellip;rn:&rdquo; Written by POORGRRRL. Produced by DJ BUDDY BOY. Mixed by Andrew Byrd. Directed by Biagio Musacchia. Director of Photography: David Cabrera. 1st ac: Jose Trujillo. Styled by Madhavi Ghiotti</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AP: Is there empowerment in evoking pity from the audience and playing with their expectations? Can pity be a feminist tool? You mention this being the only opportunity you&rsquo;ve been given this year despite you being a prominent figure in the local Miami arts community. I personally don&rsquo;t ascribe categorical statements to feminism in contrast to earlier waves because with marginalized folks, I don&rsquo;t think that reversing the roles in the power struggle necessarily yields equality. I often find using the tools we&rsquo;ve been given to work with within the patriarchy as marginalized groups (as in this case of evoking pity to attain something), presents a richer and maybe more honest form of feminism and possibly what real power could look like within the system.</strong></p> <p><strong>PG:</strong> I&rsquo;m really into unpacking this trope of &ldquo;the damsel in distress&rdquo;&mdash;it is something I come back to over and over again with the work that I am doing. I agree completely in thinking reversing power roles is not the answer, not the only answer. The damsel in distress performs this helplessness and in return she is usually tended to, taken care of. The performance works to manipulate someone to help basically, support, save. So this makes me feel a few ways.</p> <p>First of all: good for her [laughs]. She figured out a way to support herself, to be &ldquo;saved&rdquo; but then it&rsquo;s also like, hey c&rsquo;mon girl get off your lazy ass and save your damn self. I feel kind of the same about, a lot of things. Back to what you are saying about the power struggle, I see women (and basically any &ldquo;oppressed&rdquo; party) and feel two ways. I&rsquo;m like <em>fuuuck this is so challenging </em>and then I&rsquo;m like, but it&rsquo;s also unfortunately reinforcing how we see ourselves in a way, like this condemned position. Everything seems to perpetuate it, internally and externally.</p> <p>I am kind of exaggerating here or going out on a limb to bring up a point, but if we continue to let ourselves be oppressed or marginalized, it will just go on forever. This is really challenging though because no doubt, the position of the oppressed is totally unfair but I guess seeing people continuously having to address themselves as such makes me feel like how can this change? Without the oppressed there is no oppressor or whatever. There is no master without a slave.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allow="encrypted-media" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" gesture="media" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/jyPOz140Jyw" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Directed and produced by POORGRRRL. Filmed by David Cabrera</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AP: But it&rsquo;s difficult because we are not choosing to be oppressed, and the whole system is geared to perpetuate our oppression. I mean there are attempts now with Fair. for example, or with all the men in power in the film and television industry getting called out and actually facing consequences for predatory behavior. I understand that we need to remain active to shift the paradigm, but people in power are never going to willingly give up their seat. I guess it&rsquo;s just overwhelming what we&rsquo;re up against and I suppose pity comprises a big part of that awareness. </strong></p> <p><strong>PG:</strong> I feel open in this conversation to bring something up that is kinda off topic but on topic and I have been thinking about it a lot lately. Primarily because of this movement of mainly women outing dudes, but, really just outing anyone that made or makes another person feel uncomfortable or totally violated by way of power dynamics and intimidation for sexual misconduct. I have this situation I am in the middle of figuring out how to use, to help other women and other people in general, to understand an unspoken truth. But&mdash;and herein lies the huge problem&mdash;when I unpack this, I end up feeling, at the &ldquo;end of the day&rdquo; that it will actually hurt me more to share it than to keep it to myself, and this really bothers me.</p> <p>To put it bluntly, I was raped by someone in the art world, in <em>my</em> art world and community. Someone I trusted and considered a friend. This happened six years ago. I have to see them or their name all the time, and there is just so much about the situation that I want to&hellip; share, just because I think what happened and why I couldn&rsquo;t process it or react the way I wish I did is something that needs to be addressed.</p> <p>It&rsquo;s shit like this that makes it so clear to me how very much we (as women) did not ask for &ldquo;this&rdquo; and how very fucked up this whole situation is. I can&rsquo;t even out this guy because people will find ways to make me seem like a crazy bitch. The worst and most annoying questions: &ldquo;Well, did you do something to provoke it though?&rdquo; or &ldquo;Do you really want to ruin his life?&rdquo; are really hard to navigate and make me feel like I need to downplay it to myself and think it&rsquo;s not important enough to share. This is mega problematic and basically <em>IS </em>the whole problem with all of this. It&rsquo;s so frustrating.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171206182444-poorgrrrl4.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Photo:&nbsp;Carlo Cavaluzzi</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AP: I am so sorry to hear that happened to you. Your experience makes me think of #MeToo. While I greatly appreciate the solidarity shared openly online by survivors of sexual harassment or assault, I also see that not everyone is ready or feels comfortable speaking out&mdash;nor should they have to. Poorgrrrl lays flaws of tidy narratives bare. There are still revelations to be made, and they aren&rsquo;t all hashtag ready. Coming forward can be uncomfortable, stumbling, imperfect, dangerous. </strong></p> <p><strong>This revelation from your personal life also seems to loop back into Poorgrrrl&rsquo;s conceptual makeup, like throughout the course of this interview, you&rsquo;ve managed to evoke pity from me. Is it hard to draw the line where Poorgrrrl ends and you begin?&nbsp;&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>PG:</strong> No matter what I do I can&rsquo;t escape the ancestral tragedy in my bloodline. I&rsquo;ve never been able to make anything that doesn&rsquo;t end up being about it. I don&rsquo;t even realize at first, but then there it is, staring me in the face. It&rsquo;s all I&rsquo;ve ever known. I needed a way to take that bullshit out of me, like a garbage dump, and put it next to me, so that I could at least imagine existing without it. Without all that trash. I needed to break the curse. Poorgrrrl is a crucible for all this <em>pain </em>and<em> pity and shit</em>. She is the martyr. The whore. The disgrace. I can fill her up with all my fucking trauma and throw her to the wolves, and then at least, they won&rsquo;t eat me.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171206182509-poorgrrrl_2016.jpeg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Photo:&nbsp;Courtesy of III Points</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Poorgrrrl will perform at the opening of Fair. on Thursday, 6:30pm. She has a limited-edition record and zine being released on Natalia Zuluaga and Gean Moreno&rsquo;s </em><a href="https://namepublications.org/" target="_blank"><em>NAME publications</em></a><em> this month and a full-length album for </em><a href="http://www.parachuterecords.com/artists/poorgrrrl" target="_blank"><em>Parachute Records</em></a><em> slated for release in 2018.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/472848-audrey-l-phillips?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Audrey L. Phillips</a></p> <p><em>Audrey Phillips is a Toronto-based writer. She is a regular contributor to AQNB.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Photo:&nbsp;Carlo Cavaluzzi</span><span style="font-size:12px;">)</span></p> Fri, 08 Dec 2017 01:12:10 +0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Christopher Tavares Silva Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/46705-b-stylecolor-333333under-the-radar-kate-woods-christopher-tavares-silva-andrea-musab" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/168409-christopher-tavares-silva" target="_blank">Christopher Tavares Silva</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>I use the languages of visual art and sound because I&rsquo;m attracted to their poetic and transformative potentials, and though I enjoy weaving in literal references and representations of things, I&rsquo;m equally if not more interested in the ways that the pure physical energies of sound, color, and form communicate. It&rsquo;s precisely because audio/visual languages operate more viscerally and strangely than words, that I continue to experiment with them.</p> <p>A more specific goal of mine is ensuring that my work achieves a certain quality of tone. If there is a potential that some combinations of ideas, colors, shapes, and sounds can achieve a resonance which promotes healing, softening, and rejuvenation in my fellow humans, then that resonance is what I&rsquo;m seeking to communicate. The concepts I am preoccupied with naturally emerge during my process, though I am less interested in the viewer having a definitive idea of what they are looking at, than I am in trying to make them feel that they are having a sublime/spiritual/heart opening and nourishing experience. I like to think that in addition to whatever else the work might be communicating, each piece is another way of giving my love to the world.</p> <p>I also know that it&rsquo;s quite likely that I&rsquo;m insane, so I try avoid the pitfalls of taking myself too seriously. If I can make life a little more soulful, beautiful, fun, and funky for a bunch of people, then that will be great. If I can make work which encourages the disintegration and reformation of our dysfunctional and oppressive political systems, even better. For a bit more, my general artist statement is sort of a living document and can be found in its current form&nbsp;<a href="http://chrissilva.com/mission" target="_blank">here.</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171204145317-20170510155135-08_OpenSource.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Open Source</em>, 2017,&nbsp;Reclaimed wood, paint</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>There are already too many things in the world with dogmas attached to them and art feels like a pursuit which should be absolutely free of that. Having said that, I appreciate artists who exhibit an impulse to make work which seeks to add more love, justice, and beauty to our world, and though I remain puzzled by what the most effective way to do that is, it is also a personal goal of mine.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)? </strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/241874858?byline=0&amp;portrait=0" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Colony Collapse: 1983</em>, Reclaimed wood sculpture, with video mapping and audio soundtrack. Collaboration with Brian Steckel. Exhibited at Linda Warren Projects, September 8&ndash;November 4.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>There&rsquo;s this piece I&rsquo;ve been wanting to create which would instantly eliminate injustice from the world but I&rsquo;m having an unbelievably hard time figuring out how to get a hold of the right divine powers to work with.</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p>I&rsquo;m a huge fan of the&nbsp;<a href="http://selinatrepp.info/artwork/4108312-Rotation.html" target="_blank">stop-motionstudio animations</a>&nbsp;of Selina Trepp.</p> <p><a href="https://www.instagram.com/maxsansing" target="_blank">Max Sansing&rsquo;s</a>&nbsp;work is gorgeous.</p> <p>I really enjoy watching the progression of&nbsp;<a href="http://roberthardgrave.com/" target="_blank">Robert Hardgrave&rsquo;s</a>&nbsp;work. I like most of it, and absolutely love some of it, but what I admire most is his refusal to sit content in any one mode for too long. He&rsquo;s not relying on any kind of formulas and is a true adventurer.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: <em>Colony Collapse (Reprise)</em>, 2016, Mixed-media installation with LED lighting and original soundtrack.)</span></p> Mon, 04 Dec 2017 23:22:19 +0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Announcing the Georgia Fee Resident | Winter 2018 <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><strong style="font-size: large; font-family: Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif;">Georgia Fee Artist | Writer Resident, Winter 2018</strong></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px;">We are very pleased to announce the selection of <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/494242-ali-fitzgerald" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Ali Fitzgerald</a> as our 2018 Winter Resident. Thank you to all applicants and a very special thank you to all <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show_as_email/48755-announcing-the-georgia-fee-residency-winter-2018-shortlist" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">shortlisted applicants</a> who were interviewed over the past two weeks.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px;"><strong><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20171203213754-alicomicportrait.png" style="float: right; width: 180px; height: 181px;" />Ali Fitzgerald</strong>&nbsp;lives in Berlin and mostly works in the milieu of socially-critical visual narratives. She currently contributes comics and visual essays to <a href="http://nymag.com/author/Ali%2520Fitzgerald/" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">New York Magazine&#39;s <em>The Cut</em></a><em> </em>&nbsp;and<a href="http://www.newyorker.com/contributors/ali-fitzgerald" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">&nbsp;<em>The New Yorker</em></a><em>.</em> She has also contributed art-world comics to <em><a href="http://www.art-magazin.de/szene/14040-bstr-berlin-cool-dead/114440-img-folge-10" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">art &ndash; Das Kunstmagazin</a></em> and <em>Modern Painters Magazine</em> and created the popular comic <a href="https://www.mcsweeneys.net/authors/ali-fitzgerald" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">Hungover Bear and Friends</a> for <em>McSweeney&#39;s</em>, which ran from 2013 to 2016.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px;">She contributes arts writing to <a href="http://magazine.art21.org/author/ali-fitzgerald/" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">Art21</a>&nbsp; and founded the column Queer Berlin in 2013. Her artwork has been exhibited extensively in the U.S. and Europe as well as featured or mentioned &nbsp;in&nbsp;the <em>New York Times</em>,&nbsp;<em>Art Lies</em>, <em>Afar Magazine,</em> <em>The Berlin Quarterly</em>, <em>The Guardian</em>, <em>The Economist</em>, <em>Bitch</em>, <em>Gastronomica</em>, <em>Dada Magazine</em>, <em>Taggespeigel</em>, <em>Tip Magazin</em>, <em>The Huffington Post</em>, <em>Varoom Magazine</em>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<em>Art in America</em>.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px;">Her first graphic novel, based on comic workshops conducted in refugee shelters as well as Berlin&#39;s historical//contemporary relationship to immigration and bohemia, will be published by <a href="http://www.fantagraphics.com/" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">Fantagraphics</a> in the Spring of 2018.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table align="center" height="auto" width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td width="33%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20171203213356-GezaFuerstPage3color-sm.png" style="width: 250px;" /></td> <td width="33%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20171203213414-HbearSkepticalLove088-sm.png" style="width: 250px;" /></td> <td width="33%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20171203213427-WomensMarch2Fixed-sm.png" style="width: 250px;" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px;">Project Description:</span></strong></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px;">At the <em>Georgia Fee Residency</em> in Paris, I plan to investigate France&rsquo;s evolving visual relationship to propaganda, looking deeply at aesthetics of nationalism and politicized otherness.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px;">To this end, I will create a visual diary/blog documenting fonts and signage throughout Paris,&nbsp; tracing their history and ideological bent. I will also look at how we construct and uphold the Parisian mystique in our cultural consciousness through visuals defined during the Belle &Eacute;poque and elucidated in text by Walter Benjamin.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px;">Alongside these diary entries, I will draw several longer graphic vignettes. In one visual essay, I plan to discuss the dueling propaganda posters of occupied France, conducting research of wartime posters at Les affiches de Bernard Taboureau<em>,&nbsp;</em>a collection on the outskirts of Paris which houses examples of propaganda posters from both World Wars. I also plan to study the occupation-era photos of Andr&eacute; Zucca taken for <em>Signal</em>, a German propaganda magazine, as well as the films financed by the collaborationist Vichy government from 1940-1944.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px;">In another planned visual essay, I will dissect the weaponized visuals of Marine Le Pen and the National Front. Recently, Rovopress, and the National Front&rsquo;s youth wing have created memes and graphics portraying muslims as a danger to French society while using archetypal &ldquo;French&rdquo; symbols to evoke a sense of ethno-nationalism. These visual strategies have proven quite effective and recall older forms of propaganda that have been used to suppress immigrant communities.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px;">France has a particularly rich history of drawing as social activism and during the residency, I will look at artists like Honor&eacute; Daumier as well as contemporary artists exhibiting in France, to identify common and enduring visual strategies employed as social critique. Paris has traditionally been a nexus of resistance, and I plan to investigate historical and contemporary artistic interventions which function(ed) as revolutionary acts. Finally, I plan to look at futurist letterforms and other graphics that gesture towards utopian ideals and progressive future(s).</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px;">At the end of the residency, I will compile my sketches, writings, and visual essays into a limited edition risograph book and a series of mid-size prints.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px;">In 2016 and 2017, I gave several lectures about visual storytelling as a tool to affect social change. I plan to give a similar one-day lecture and workshop in Paris, focused on how we can best harness the potency of comics to foster empathy and greater understanding within our communities.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px;">I will also host a more informal weekly event called &ldquo;Propaganda Club&rdquo; where I invite members of the community to read, watch, and visually analyze propaganda and discuss the nature of media manipulation found in posters, memes, films and books like <em>1984</em>, <em>The Handmaid&rsquo;s Tale</em>, or <em>Parable of the Sower</em>.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" style="text-align: center;"> <p style="text-align: left;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: #000000; line-height: 28px;"><strong>Georgia Fee Artist/Writer Residency</strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px; text-align: left;">&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #000000;">was established in memory of&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/la/articles/show/32913" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">ArtSlant&#39;s Founder who passed away December 8th, 2012.</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px; text-align: left;">&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #000000;">Georgia was dedicated to supporting and investing in young artists and writers, and she had a deep connection with the city of Paris. This project-driven residency, which offers artists and writers the opportunity to create work in Paris, has been created in Georgia&#39;s memory.</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: #000000; line-height: 28px;">The goal of the Georgia Fee Artist/Writer Residency in Paris is to support and invest in emerging artists and writers, to provide an opportunity for them to advance their work and explore and engage with the cultural landscape of Paris, to encourage experimentation, and to increase exposure of their work to an international audience.</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: #000000; line-height: 28px;">The Residency is open to visual artists of all mediums, art writers, and critics, 24 years or older. Selection is based on the merit of past work and the potential for future success, the ability to independently develop new work, and the proposed project&#39;s relevance to the city of Paris.</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: #000000; line-height: 28px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">More info: <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/foundation" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">Georgia Fee Artist|Writer Residency</a></span></p> <p><a href="mailto:%20residency@artslant.com" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">residency@artslant.com</a></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">&nbsp;</span></p> <img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150328160032-res_artis_member_logo.jpg" width="200" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: large;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>The Georgia Fee Artist | Writer Residency is a strategic partner of Residency Unlimited</strong><em>&nbsp;</em></span></span></p> <a href="http://www.residencyunlimited.org/"><img alt="" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20140320152708-RU-Logo-2014.png" style="float: left; margin: 10px;" width="100" /></a> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: large;"><span style="font-size: small;"><em><a href="http://www.residencyunlimited.org/" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">Residency Unlimited (RU)</a> is a not for profit art organization that fosters highly customized residencies through strategic partnerships with collaborating institutions. Moving beyond the traditional studio model, RU supports local and international artists and curators at all levels of their career, and is particularly committed to promoting multidisciplinary practices and to building lasting connections between residents and the broader arts community.</em></span></span></p> <hr /></td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170515175611-ArtSlant-Logo-2014-01.jpg" style="width: 200px; height: 36px;" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);"><span style="font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/la/users/signin" style="color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration-line: none;">Subscribe</a>&nbsp;| <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/6424" style="color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration-line: none;">Contact Us</a></span></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"> <span style="color: #00cfa6;">|</span> <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew" style="text-decoration-line: none;"><span style="color: #00cfa6;">Website</span></a></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Tue, 05 Dec 2017 20:36:37 +0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Intimate Debris: Nature, Industry, and the Body in the Photography of LaToya Ruby Frazier <p>LaToya Ruby Frazier&rsquo;s photography braids together the intimacies between landscape, industry, and the Black woman&rsquo;s body. Impactful, private, and silver ensconced, her images reveal a sometimes wonderful and other times tragic interdependency. In two recent Pittsburgh exhibitions&mdash;<em>The Notion of Family</em>&nbsp;at Silver Eye Center for Photography and&nbsp;<em>On The Making Of Steel Genesis: Sandra Gould Ford&nbsp;</em>at the August Wilson Center, a shared exhibition of photography by Frazier and Sandra Gould Ford&mdash;Frazier captures the interconnectivity between the landscape and the body and how the elements of one penetrate the other: &ldquo;I believe that the history of a place is written on the body of its inhabitants and their environment,&rdquo; <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/48826-latoya-ruby-frazier-in-conversation" target="_blank">Frazier says</a>. &ldquo;Often in my photographs, whether it&rsquo;s a landscape of a house or an aerial view of railroads or a steel mill, I see the landscape as a portrait, a portrait of the body.&rdquo;</p> <p>It is perhaps the simplest of ironies, no pun intended, that the medium through which Frazier explores genealogies between family, nature, and industry requires the element of the human hand to exact transformation&mdash;like in the steel industry. &ldquo;I see chemicals and elements that can build empires, harm, or kill, alongside chemistry that makes silver halide appear on film (gelatin silver print) and ferric ammonium citrate and <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potassium_ferricyanide" target="_blank">potassium ferricyanide</a> visible on paper (cyanotype),&rdquo; says the artist.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171201095212-LRF_242.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><em>United States Steel Mon Valley Works E. T. Plant</em>, 2013, 48 x 60 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown&#39;s enterprise, New York/ Rome</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Steel mills supported hundreds of thousands of families for more than a century, providing the backbone from which other industries and commerce flowed. Money paid from the steel mills to employees drove local economies that, for some generations, produced memories of prosperity. The progeny of those generations, however, face the shuttered storefronts that accompanied the steel industry&rsquo;s decline. This physical and emotional inheritance, the indelible echoes of steel mills, lives on in the children of the small cities that deteriorate under state and federal fiduciary neglect. With a piercing eye and fervorous emotion, Frazier witnesses and documents this enduring legacy.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table align="center" width="650"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;The history of a place is written on the body of its inhabitants and their environment.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This body of Frazier&rsquo;s photography centers on her home of Braddock, Pennsylvania, site of massive steel industrial complexes, past and present. The environs of steel cities have trained the artist to search for intimate debris: the entanglements between human bodies, nature, material resources, and businesses engulfed, enriched, and discarded. Frazier&rsquo;s images picture how far these entities reach into one another and become passed down through generations: how do they haunt one another?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171201094823-LRF_150.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Momme Portrait Series (Shadow)</em>, 2008, Gelatin silver print 20 x 24 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown&#39;s enterprise, New York/ Rome</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>The Notion of Family</em> focuses on the bodies of Frazier, her mother, her Grandmother, and Braddock itself. Each photograph is a tessera in a genealogical mosaic. The city-body of Braddock becomes encoded in the blood of its residents, who continue to live shoulder to shoulder with the afterlife of steel mills, and the film of metals they aspirated into the air. Frazier says:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">When you inquire about intimacy I think you are by extension pointing out the bonds, camaraderie, and trust I have in the portraits produced with my grandmother, mother, and Sandra Gould Ford [a photographer and Frazier&rsquo;s co-exhibitor at the August Wilson Center show]. Not only is there trust, but also an identity of sameness. Although each of us individually have our own encounter with Pittsburgh in the 30s, 50s, 60s and 80s, I see us as one entity of time consistently confronting the injustices of our history.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171201094903-LRF_062.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Grandma Ruby, Mom and Me</em>, 2009, Gelatin silver print. Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown&#39;s enterprise, New York/ Rome</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The encounters that Frazier describes are often rendered present in her work through their absence. For example, she exhibits several photographs of her grandmother Ruby&rsquo;s house before and after her death. In one photograph, taken after the home was emptied, hair bobbles and pins, a pack of Pall Malls, and hangars rest on the carpet, leaving behind traces of living: the absence of adorned hair for the bobbles, the absence of lips to smoke the cigarettes, the absence of clothes for the hangars, and bodies to inhabit those clothes. In another photograph in the series, Frazier and her mother stand beside Grandma Ruby&rsquo;s coffin, sentinels of three generations who, through love, dedication, and endurance, outlived the steel industry. &ldquo;These are generational narratives of triumph and a will to survive regardless of circumstance, invisibility, and death,&rdquo; says Frazier, describing the series. &ldquo;There is a direct self-awareness and knowledge of these matters in the portrait <em>Grandma Ruby, Mom and Me </em>(2009)&nbsp;as my mother and I stand guard in front of Grandma Ruby&rsquo;s body in her casket decorated by a few of her porcelain dolls and all the portraits we made together.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171201094943-Video_stills_from_Detox_Braddock_UPMC__2011___03.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Video still from&nbsp;<em>Detox Braddock UPMC</em>, 2011,&nbsp;Single-channel video (color, sound),&nbsp;<span data-term="goog_646348592" tabindex="0">22:24</span>&nbsp;min</span><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>.&nbsp;</em>Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown&#39;s enterprise, New York/ Rome</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Another puissant example is Frazier&rsquo;s video, <em>Detox Braddock UPMC, 2011.</em> In a still photograph from the video, Frazier and her mother sit in a cluttered room with their feet in baths. They look down curiously as man in a lab coat blurs the left foreground. &ldquo;The doctor is pointing out heavy metal pulled out from the pores of our feet due to the ion charge on the foot bath,&rdquo; says Frazier, describing the scene. &ldquo;My mother and I did the detox because we were skeptical if it was real. We were also looking to alternative medicine to combat the discrimination we constantly face in doctor&rsquo;s offices and inaccurate medical records. When I saw the metal floating in my foot bath I observed the landscape of Braddock and the Edgar Thomson Steel Works.&rdquo; Frazier documents life lived in close proximity to the chemical industry, posing a question of price: what is the cost of living in the shadow of industry? What is the cost of nature learning to form itself around and with the manmade particles of that industry? Where does care start and stop for discriminated bodies living during and in the afterlife of industry?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171201154548-Video_stills_from_Detox_Braddock_UPMC__2011__08.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">Video still from&nbsp;<em>Detox Braddock UPMC</em>, 2011,&nbsp;Single-channel video (color, sound),&nbsp;<span data-term="goog_646348592" tabindex="0">22:24</span>&nbsp;min</span><span style="font-size: 12px;"><em>.&nbsp;</em>Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown&#39;s enterprise, New York/ Rome</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table align="center" width="650"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;...women birthed the workforce, worked in the steel mills, took care of their men with job-related ailments, and were exposed to industrial toxicity...&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Similar questions of care, health, and landscape appear in other photographs: many are taken of the UPMC-Braddock Hospital demolition site and at the still operational steel corporations, where Frazier shoots fences and natural geographic features delineating fields of space. In a picture of the ET Plant-United States Steel Mon Valley Work Site, residential spaces ride the spine of the fences to steel mill property. So too does the steel mill contort the line of the Monongahela River that is ribboned on its other side by railroad tracks, hills, and distant residential buildings. This image represents a system of dependency that crystallizes in photographs of Frazier&rsquo;s family, which, like many other families in Braddock, once relied on the steel mill and the UPMC medical industrial complex for healthcare and employment. But the domestic interiors of Frazier&rsquo;s photos shows us the hyper-real cycle of generational influence these industries have and how different generations of families have different perspectives of their hometowns based on the failings of industry and governments.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171201094609-LRF_111_112.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Landscape of the Body (Epilepsy Test)</em>, 2011, Gelatin silver print, 24 x 40 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown&#39;s enterprise, New York/ Rome</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Some of Frazier&rsquo;s photographs draw the viewer&rsquo;s attention towards related themes of the human body and demolished architecture as sites of former habitation. In <em>Epilepsy Test, Landscape of the Body Series, 2011</em>, we see the exposed back of Frazier&rsquo;s mother in a hospital gown juxtaposed beside the UPMC-Braddock hospital building&rsquo;s gutted interior. Vulnerabilities, intimate spaces of dependency, and sites of habitation for perhaps neglect are suggested and offered here for thought and consideration. Juxtaposed as a diptych, the photographs, says Frazier, make a &ldquo;direct connection&rdquo;:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">On the left you see the wires from my mother&rsquo;s head lash down her bare back connected to a medical device. On the right you see the entrails, the gut of the hospital building ripped open with electrical wiring, cables, concrete and debris spilling out.</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">I&rsquo;ll never forget documenting the UPMC Braddock hospital demolition and feeling how the ground shook and trembled like a convulsion or spasm similar to how my mother described her epilepsy-like seizures. The irony about being four generations of Black women in an industrial landscape during a post-industrial economy in Braddock and Pittsburgh is the historic omission and carelessness towards the fact that women birthed the workforce, worked in the steel mills, took care of their men with job-related ailments, and were exposed to industrial toxicity, contracting illnesses like cancer and autoimmune disorders that would sometimes lead to miscarriages, surgical removal of breasts, ovaries, and untimely deaths.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171201094355-Latoya_001_interpreted.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Sandra Gould Ford sitting on the Bank of the Monongahela River in Braddock, PA</em>, 2017, Silver gelatin print, 49 1/2 x 61 1/2 inches. From<em>&nbsp;On The Making Of Steel Genesis: Sandra Gould Ford (2017)&nbsp;</em>at the August Wilson Center,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size:12px;">Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown&#39;s enterprise, New York/ Rome</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>The Notion of Family</em>, challenges the idea that time isolates events. It ruptures the often too comforting assumption that spaces do not reverberate in the physical and perhaps spiritual world of the bodies that inhabited those spaces. Through gentle care, waiting for an acute sense of permission from the subject or space in her lens, Frazier renders multi-temporal images that concretize connections, causalities, and generational perseverance in the face of capitalism and industry that at times offers no ethics of care to the people affected by their operations. Unflinching, and ripe with specificity, <em>The&nbsp;Notion of Family</em>, is stupendous evidence of life achieved, despite the overwhelming forces of economy and industry.</p> <p><em><span id="docs-internal-guid-b4b5dcc8-12be-4842-faf5-cdbbf4ad0ce5">Jessica Lanay spoke with LaToya Ruby Frazier on the occasion of her concurrent exhibitions at Silver Eye and the August Wilson Center in Pittsburgh. You can read a transcript of the complete interview <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/48826-latoya-ruby-frazier-in-conversation">here</a>.</span></em></p> <p><em><a href="https://www.silvereye.org/calendar/2017/9/22/latoya-ruby-frazier-solo-exhibition" target="_blank">The Notion of Family</a> ran at the Silver Eye Center for Photography from September 21&ndash;November 18, 2017.</em></p> <p><em><a href="https://www.silvereye.org/calendar/2017/9/22/latoya-ruby-frazier-solo-exhibition" target="_blank">On The Making Of Steel Genesis: Sandra Gould Ford</a> continues at the August Wilson Center through December 31, 2017.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/490259-jessica-lanay?tab=REVIEWS">Jessica Lanay</a></p> <p><em>Jessica Lanay is a poet and short story writer from the Florida Keys living in Pittsburgh. Her work can be found in Salt Hill Journal, Tahoma Literary Review, and is forthcoming in Fugue and The Common.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: <em>Grandma Ruby and Me</em>, 2005, Gelatin silver print, 16 x 20 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Gavin Brown&#39;s enterprise, New York/ Rome)</span></p> Sat, 02 Dec 2017 00:39:39 +0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list #NotSurprised: What’s Next for the Fledgling Movement? <p>You&rsquo;ve likely seen it; you may have signed it&mdash;if you were fast enough. What started out as a group text between ten arts professionals in late October quickly turned into a letter signed by almost <a href="http://www.not-surprised.org/signatures/" target="_blank">9,500 individually verified people</a> condemning power abuses in the field. The original group chat, started over WhatsApp in the wake of recent <a href="https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-sexual-assault-allegations-knight-landesman" target="_blank">sexual assault allegations</a> made against <em>Artforum</em> co-publisher Knight Landesman, swiftly grew to 124 members. And within 72 hours commiseration had turned into action.</p> <p>As stories of sexual misconduct amassed, part of what is now being called &ldquo;<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Weinstein_effect" target="_blank">the Weinstein effect</a>,&rdquo; the group drafted an official statement on recent events and their sordid familiarity in the arts: We Are Not Surprised. Response to the letter was so overwhelming that its organizers, all volunteers, had to close the option to sign the document on October 30.</p> <p>A full month later, the dust has hardly settled; reports exposing abusers across multiple industries have been published nearly every couple days in the wake of the Weinstein allegations. Now what?&nbsp;</p> <p>While they built a viral campaign complete with its own ready-to-use hashtag and repostable pop imagery, those behind <em>We Are Not Surprised</em> are determined to lay down roots. Weeks after #notsurprised hit the art world&rsquo;s social media, we check in to explore how the fledgling movement intends to harness the staying power required to become a catalyst for palpable change.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-version="7" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:50.0% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/Ba26dD8lF-6/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by notsurprised2017 (@notsurprised2017)</a> on <time datetime="2017-10-30T04:02:16+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Oct 29, 2017 at 9:02pm PDT</time></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The campaign&rsquo;s maxim borrows a line from American neo-conceptual artist <a href="http://projects.jennyholzer.com/" target="_blank">Jenny Holzer</a>&rsquo;s <em>Truisms</em>: &ldquo;Abuse of power comes as no surprise.&rdquo; &ldquo;Many institutions and individuals with power in the art world espouse the rhetoric of feminism and equity in theory, often financially benefitting from these flimsy claims of progressive politics, while preserving oppressive and harmful sexist norms in practice,&rdquo; the letter, titled <a href="http://www.not-surprised.org/home/" target="_blank">We Are Not Surprised</a>, reads. &ldquo;Those in power ignore, excuse, or commit everyday instances of harassment and degradation, creating an environment of acceptance of and complicity in many more serious, illegal abuses of power.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;One of the ways we&rsquo;re trying to create accountability is that there are no &lsquo;sheros.&rsquo; No one person is taking responsibility for this. No one is saying this is my idea, this is my artwork,&rdquo; explains conceptual artist and E-Flux journal editor&nbsp;<a href="https://www.guggenheim.org/artwork/artist/julieta-aranda">Julieta Aranda</a>, a co-writer of the initial statement and member of We Are Not Surprised&rsquo;s organizing body. Those spearheading the project occupy a variety of positions in the art world across international borders. Many have never met in person, and despite a fair few being famed for their practices or playing integral roles in established institutions, most from the founding WhatsApp group are choosing to eschew credit and remain largely nameless in the press. In a field where big egos and ideals of exceptionalism play a large part, a collaboration of this nature, based on solidarity and tied not to one person, is a subversive act in itself.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">(2/3) Abuse of power comes as no surprise. Link with full list of signatures in bio. IG: @notsurprised2017 <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/notsurprised?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#notsurprised</a> <a href="https://t.co/nMgJt3wiFI">pic.twitter.com/nMgJt3wiFI</a></p> &mdash; Not_Surprised (@Not_Surprised1) <a href="https://twitter.com/Not_Surprised1/status/924848565712715777?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">October 30, 2017</a></blockquote> <p><script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8"></script></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Despite frightened rumors circulating between men in the New York art scene that the declaration would soon be followed by a list of accused abusers, Aranda tells me the organizers are clear they have no intention of becoming a vigilante justice group. &ldquo;At some point we were even joking we were going to put a fake page on the site that said &lsquo;List under construction.&rsquo; Just to freak people out,&rdquo; she laughs. And while there is no actual list, like the one that briefly surfaced in the media sector with &ldquo;<a href="https://www.newyorker.com/news/news-desk/the-whisper-network-after-harvey-weinstein-and-shitty-media-men">Shitty Media Men</a>,&rdquo; the group <em>is</em> in the process of compiling survivor-focused support to offer &ldquo;reliable resources&rdquo; for people coming forward and grappling with experiences of abuse.</p> <p>Behind the scenes, organizers are also separating into geographical microcosms to begin planning for the next step of <em>We Are Not Surprised</em>, an offshoot of the letter creating structured localized discussions centered around transparency and the roots of abuse. It is the hope that these discussions will address the larger systems of art world power distribution that create room for rampant racial, class, and gender inequality. &ldquo;You know sexual abuse is a horrible thing but it&rsquo;s a symptom&mdash;it comes from somewhere,&rdquo; Aranda explains. &ldquo;It comes from this idea where you can take a body as disposable basically. We hope that the group actually works towards what&rsquo;s at the root of abuse.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table align="center" width="650"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;Sexual abuse is a horrible thing but it&rsquo;s a symptom&mdash;we hope that the group actually works towards what&rsquo;s at the root of abuse.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The goal is that localized discussions will offer context as to how abuse manifests in different places. As realities of inequalities differ so greatly from city to city, there is no blanket solution to fix everything. Hyper-focusing a group on one sphere of the art world, taking these differences into account, will provide the opportunity to pinpoint specific issues and in turn create regional goals.</p> <p>We Are Not Surprised was a movement built at the speed of light, pulling people quickly with it. In the beginning hours of the letter many signatories were uncomfortable putting both their full names and institutions for fear of career backlash; now the number of signees edges on 10,000. Since the option to sign was closed, however, things have slowed their pace, much to the frustration of organizers. A leaderless resistance is not one that moves forward at Twitter gait. It comes with less salacious but achievable promises, waits patiently for criticism from all levels of the pyramid of power, and provides a decentralized solution meant to diffuse over time. In this vein, organizers have promised over the next month to begin the localized discussions, open the coordinating team up to those who wish to help, place special interest on involving and listening to the least represented, develop a confidential way to communicate with survivors looking for resources, and draft an industry-wide code that institutions will be encouraged to adopt publicly. A robust goal for just one month, and without the headline-ready &ldquo;we have solved sexual assault&rdquo; ring to it, runs the risk of becoming one completed in obscurity.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-version="7" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:62.5% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BbSs3Icl2gg/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by notsurprised2017 (@notsurprised2017)</a> on <time datetime="2017-11-09T23:02:13+00:00" style=" font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px;">Nov 9, 2017 at 3:02pm PST</time></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>However, promise of a soft future, where talent rises to the top bolstered by solidarity and transparency is still an intoxicating one. While many of those benefitting from this disproportionate distribution of power remain silent, flickers of change are still occurring. <em>Artforum</em>&rsquo;s newly appointed editor-in-chief David Velasco said in a statement through the magazine&rsquo;s representatives to <a href="https://news.artnet.com/art-world/open-letter-condemning-art-world-sexism-following-allegations-against-artforum-publisher-1132031" target="_blank">artnet News</a>, &ldquo;The art world is misogynist. Art history is misogynist. Also racist, classist, transphobic, ableist, homophobic. I will not accept this. I know my colleagues here agree. Intersectional feminism is an ethics near and dear to so many on our staff. Our writers too. This is where we​ stand. There&rsquo;s so much to be done. Now, we get to work.&rdquo;</p> <p>What that work look likes, and whether or not it will take place behind closed doors as well as in the public eye remains to be seen. In the meantime, surrounded by the quiet of a litany of bad actors, those less favored in the present system take to group chats and task management channels getting on with their current attempt at dismantling and rebuilding. Cracks in the pyramid of power continue to show. Exhaustingly, the onus falls on those at the bottom to sharpen all available tools and break them ever wider.</p> <p><em>To contribute feedback, ask questions, or get further information on We Are Not Surprised, check out <a href="http://www.not-surprised.org/faqs/" target="_blank">the FAQs</a> or use the hashtag #WANSFeedback in social media.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/491464-maya-roisin-slater?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Maya-Roisin Slater</a></p> <p><em>Maya-Roisin Slater is a Canadian-born, Berlin-based writer and editor with a focus on arts and culture. She writes for publications like Creators, Teen Vogue, Crack Magazine, and others. More of her writing can be found at&nbsp;<a href="http://maya-roisin.com/work" target="_blank">maya-roisin.com/work</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Jenny Holzer, From <em>Truisms</em> (1977&ndash;79), 1982. &copy; 1982 Jenny Holzer, member Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY. Photo: Lisa Kahane. Via: <a href="http://www.not-surprised.org/" target="_blank">not-surprised.org</a>)</span></p> Thu, 30 Nov 2017 00:29:07 +0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Faith Holland’s Speculative Fetishism and Digital Self-Care <p>&ldquo;Best viewed without underwear,&rdquo; reads the vinyl on the wall as you walk into the gallery. Below the text is a fishbowl full of what looks like other people&rsquo;s underthings, left or &ldquo;donated&rdquo; to the exhibition. This is by no means a command, rather a &ldquo;completely consensual suggestion,&rdquo; says artist Faith Holland. Which is an apt descriptor of much of her show <em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/events/show/456393-speculative-fetish" target="_blank">Speculative Fetish</a></em> at TRANSFER Gallery in Bushwick.</p> <p>On the opposing wall is her recent collection, <em>Queer Connections </em>(2017). The installation is a punny take on the gendering of cables and wires that has occurred over time. With brightly colored nail polish, Holland fuses what would be considered two &ldquo;male&rdquo; pieces together. As Holland explained to me, the project began as a daisy chain of wires rendered impotent by their forced connections. She then photographed sections of the chain, creating strange sculptural images that are cropped, enlarged, cut out and mounted under plexi. Together, they dance across the wall in a playful mural, or a &ldquo;wire orgy,&rdquo; as Holland says. But up close there is something disarming about the tenuous connections and the slapdash adhesive rendered larger than life, yet still human in scale.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171128135121-speculative-fetish-3.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Faith Holland,&nbsp;<em>Queer Connections</em>, 2017. Courtesy of TRANSFER. Photo:&nbsp;Walter Wlodarczyk</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>In the center of the room stands a display case. Its surface has a genius-bar-meets-world-of-kink aesthetic; the case below, filled with makeup and wires, resembles a defunct dollar store&mdash;the kind that might sell an assortment of cables just as colorful as the palettes of eye shadows also on view. For the works displayed atop the case Holland takes Apple products&mdash;already known for their softened use of hardware casing&mdash;and covers the touch screens with fluids or materials that either come from, or interact with the human body. The screens are alight with fleshy but pixilated gif loops, and smothered in used contact lenses, pubic hair, lipstick, or moisturizer.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171128135410-Fetish__Lipstick_.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Faith Holland,&nbsp;<em>Fetish (Lipstick)</em>, 2017. Courtesy of TRANSFER</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>At first encounter these objects are abject, yet there is an element of self-care in their handling and upkeep that makes us think about our own relationship to our precious, but somewhat disposable screens. As Holland states, these devices have become so inextricably a part of our lives, yet they are &ldquo;designed to die,&rdquo; to become obsolete in order to be replaced by new and updated versions. In a way, they are utterly human in their needs and upkeep. Holland highlights this analogous relationship by treating the digital screen like a human visage.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20171128161334-wire-bath.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Faith Holland, <em>Wire Bath</em>,&nbsp;2017. Courtesy of TRANSFER.&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This theme is carried through the final piece in the show, which is located in the restroom down the hall. The video work mounted on the wall depicts the artist in a soapy tub full of colorful Ethernet cables, taking equal care to scrub her own body as well as the wires submerged with her. Again, this feeling of abjection, of fetishism, takes root, mixing the physical armatures of the digital with the human experience in unexpected ways. These performative works, including the video installation and the display of Apple screens covered in fluids, are more unsettling to look at, yet they end up resonating in a way that <em>Queer Connections</em> ends up falling a bit flat. Where the cheeky comparison of &ldquo;male&rdquo; and &ldquo;female&rdquo; wires begins to wear thin, the screen-visage or wire-appendages sink in, making us uncomfortably aware of our own dependencies and new techno-fetishism that is increasingly normalized. We may not be physically bathing with our internet or moisturizing our iPhone screens, but most of us are guilty of this fetish-like behavior.</p> <p>Faith Holland presents a picture of technological eroticism that fuses our consumer-driven tech culture with fluids and products more commonly associated with sex, beauty, and self-care. The works are colorful, yet dulled down by use; electric, yet rendered useless. From the image-sculptures on the walls to the iPhone-cum-living object, there is an element of clumsy affection that begs the viewer to come in, take off your panties, and stay a while.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171128134818-wire-bath-toe.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Courtesy TRANSFER</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Faith Holland&rsquo;s <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/events/show/456393-speculative-fetish" target="_blank">Speculative Fetish</a> continues at TRANSFER Gallery through January 6, 2018.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/452624-olivia-b-murphy?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Olivia B. Murphy</a></p> <p><em>Olivia B. Murphy is a writer and editor based in New York, covering arts and culture. Her work has appeared in various publications both in print and online, including&nbsp;L&#39;Officiel Magazine,&nbsp;Hyperallergic, Freunde Von Freunden,&nbsp;Whitehot,&nbsp;Riot of Perfume,&nbsp;doingbird, and&nbsp;Whitewall Magazine.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;Faith Holland,&nbsp;<em>The Fetishes</em>, 2017. Courtesy of TRANSFER. Photo:&nbsp;Walter Wlodarczyk.&nbsp;All images: Courtesy of TRANSFER)</span></p> Wed, 29 Nov 2017 00:14:24 +0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Rachel Frank Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/45539-b-stylecolor-333333-under-the-radar-rachel-frank-xia-zhang-gudrun-lockb" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/257498-rachel-frank" target="_blank">Rachel Frank</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>My work uses sculpture, video, and performance to explore the tensions between the natural world and the manmade. Mixing environmental theory, political activism, and research into natural history, my work makes connections between personal histories and contemporary issues concerning the natural world, extinction, and loss that we collectively face today.</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>I personally think an artist has a responsibility to continually question themselves and the world around them. I think they should strive to be honest and truthful about what they are making and why. I think this sounds easy in theory, but many artists have a hard time not latching onto trends and making what they perceive the market wants. It&rsquo;s not easy to make yourself continually vulnerable by thematizing what you are really interested in, regardless of its currency, since it makes the prospect of rejection more difficult.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)? </strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171126173615-Vapors_Vessels__1_.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Vessels</em>, 2017, Single-channel HD Video Still</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>I&rsquo;m probably like many artists in that I&rsquo;m most excited about the project or projects I am working on at the present moment. One of my on-going sculptural video projects,&nbsp;<em><a href="http://www.rachelfrank.com/Vapors" target="_blank">Vapors</a></em>, features human performers wearing masks of an extinct woolly rhinoceros and woolly mammoth&mdash;two animals from the last wave of extinctions of Megafauna at the end of the Ice Age&mdash;who, transported in time, carry out a fragmented dialogue on&nbsp;Anthropogenic shifts, transitions, and upheavals in the landscape. The most recent iteration of the project,&nbsp;<em>Vessels</em>&nbsp;expands upon this project,&nbsp;examining the historical ways man divined the future and sought influence over natural processes.&nbsp;<em>Vessels</em>&nbsp;is being presented at Hunter College in the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/459336-rachel-frank-vessels" target="_blank">Thomas Hunter Projects</a>&nbsp;space with an opening reception on Friday, December 8.</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>I don&rsquo;t want to say never, but I would love to work on a large-scale production of&nbsp;<em>A Midsummer Night&rsquo;s Dream</em>, from the sets to the costumes and staging, drawing a closer connection to the myth of Theseus and the Minotaur. It would be amazing to have the space to think both about small features like how Oberon&rsquo;s headdress might respond to a particular scene to larger questions like how staging might change the lighting and narrative of an individual character.</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t? </strong>&nbsp;</p> <p>I feel like there are many artists out there that should be known but are still emerging, so this is a difficult question. If I had to pick three, I&rsquo;m really interested in artists at the moment who are mixing various genres in exciting new ways:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.brianzegeer.com/" target="_blank">Brian Zegeer</a>&nbsp;uses an eclectic mixture of video, sculpture, and drawing in his work exploring both Appalachian narratives from his birthplace and his Lebanese heritage.&nbsp;<a href="http://susanmetrican.com/home.html" target="_blank">Susan Metrican</a>&nbsp;is a Boston-based artist who mixes theatricality into her sculptural paintings exploring a bodily relationship between objects and perception.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wienalin.com/sculpture01/" target="_blank">Wiena Lin&rsquo;s</a>&nbsp;works imagine a post-Anthropocene world of human-made objects, mixing invented archeology, technology, and sculpture. There are many more, but these three fall into the above criteria in interesting ways.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Rachel Frank,<em>Vapors</em>, 2017, Single Channel Hd Video Still)</span></p> Mon, 27 Nov 2017 01:42:43 +0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Beloved Sculptor Thaddeus Mosley on 91 Years of Carving His Own Path <p>Walking into Thaddeus Mosley&rsquo;s studio is like entering a bestiary that has exploded from its pages. From three feet tall to scraping the ceiling of the workshop, the wooden bodies of Mosley&rsquo;s sculptures radiate warmth and power as they cut through the air. Inspired by birds and the art of Brancusi, Mosley&rsquo;s daring compositions arc into splendid, gravity-defying geometries. With works weighing as much as four hundred pounds, one wonders how this 91-year-old artist is still intimately engaging the wood with his body, chiseling it by hand, some seven decades into his career.</p> <p>On November 8, in an event filled with cutting-edge poetry and performance, Mosley received the Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professional Achievement Award from his alma mater, the University of Pittsburgh. I was lucky enough to interview him in his studio about how he eschewed the trappings of the commercial art world, how to define &ldquo;Black Art,&rdquo; and what advice he has for aspirant young artists.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table align="center" width="550"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;The main thing that sustained me was that I wanted to find out what I could do and I haven&rsquo;t found that out yet.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171122091836-3466469054_42e0269e0a_b.jpg" style="text-align: center;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><em>Thaddeus Mosley: Sculpture (Studio | Home)</em>, Installation at The Mattress Factory, 2009.<br /> Courtesy of The Mattress Factory, Pittsburgh, PA. Photo: Tom Little</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Jessica Lanay: How long have you been making art now that you are 91? What made you start?</strong></p> <p><strong>Thaddeus Mosley:</strong>&nbsp;I have been making art since I was in my late 20s. In the early 50s Scandinavian design furniture came to the United States and at Kaufmann&rsquo;s Department Stores they did all sorts of things that stores don&rsquo;t do now: they had a whole display floor of Scandinavian furniture and they always had sculpture and paintings up. They had small teak birds and fish on wire stands. I looked at those and said, &ldquo;well, I can make those.&rdquo; I didn&rsquo;t use teak wood, I just used two-by-fours. So I went to the hardware store and got some brass rods and I made my own fish and birds and stuff.</p> <p><strong>JL: Did you have experience with wood carving before?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM:</strong> Oh, no, no, I had a lot of experience with looking at the stuff.</p> <p><strong>JL: Did you find that you had an affinity for drawing and painting?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM:</strong> When I was a kid I did, but in schools that I went to art was not a big part of the curriculum. In grade school they had art, but in my young days young folks did athletics. I thought when I was a kid I would like to be a painter.</p> <p>At the University of Pittsburgh I had a friend who painted but he went into sociology. We used to go to the Carnegie, particularly to the Internationals because in those days the directors would travel around the world for three or four years and choose [artists] individually, so we couldn&rsquo;t wait to see what would be in the Carnegie International&mdash;those were the type of things that spurred me. When I was young, I always thought there wasn&rsquo;t anything I couldn&rsquo;t do if I wanted to do it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171122091744-3309713074_c646f2b6da_b.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">The artist&rsquo;s studio. Courtesy of The Mattress Factory, Pittsburgh, PA. Photo: Tom Little</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JL:</strong> <strong>When I came into your studio, I saw influences from Dogon art, Makunde art, sculptors like Edmonia Lewis, I saw Alberto Giacometti; I see lines similar to lines in the drawings of Modigliani&mdash;which visual artists influence you?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM:</strong> My main influences are Brancusi, Noguchi, and African Art. I like David Smith&rsquo;s sculpture a great deal. And out of West Africa, where I think most of my influence comes from, it would mostly be the Central Congo. A lot of African Art and Noguchi&rsquo;s things include repetition of form or variations on form or a theme, where a shape is turned different ways or elongated or diminished. There you get to see some of my vision.</p> <p>Another thing people should be aware of is the connection I have with the material. I want to show the beauty, the warmth of the wood by creating more texture, and most of the woods just have a natural finish. That is the main advantage of this material, as opposed to steel or clay. It has an organic warmth that inorganic materials don&rsquo;t have.</p> <table align="right" width="350"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: right;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;Everything should rise from the bottom to the top to get the feeling of levitation.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><strong>JL:</strong> <strong>Your work represents an incredible defiance of gravity. Some pieces seem to me as if they should be falling over, but there is this balance of air and shape. I imagine that you aren&rsquo;t only looking at the wood, but the space around it. Compositionally, take us through making a piece.</strong></p> <p><strong>TM:</strong> I have a philosophy of weight and space and that means that everything should rise from the bottom to the top to get the feeling of levitation; I would say my talent is making things that come apart&mdash;most of these pieces can be taken apart. Sometimes you get the feeling of intimacy between shapes. I always look to see how well they hold up in space. You can almost take the same thing in music, how it punctuates the space around it&mdash;what it does in the silence you might say.</p> <p>I always say there is a dance: does the piece look like it has movement even though it is standing still? I like for them to look like they are supposed to move. I try to visualize in my mind how things are going to look when they are done. Sometimes I get a piece of wood that is interesting and I see interesting shapes. Most of this is mental and not physical pre-planning. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn&rsquo;t.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171122091907-3309711858_10494a110f_b.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">The artist&rsquo;s studio. Courtesy of The Mattress Factory, Pittsburgh, PA. Photo: Tom Little</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JL:</strong> <strong>A lot of emerging and mid-career artists decide to move to larger cities&mdash;New York or Los Angeles&mdash;to be closer to the commercial art industry. What inspired you to stay in Pittsburgh?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM:</strong> Well, two or three things. First of all, I never liked the commercial aspect of this business. Like any business, for the people that are seeking to get in&mdash;whether you are a writer or dancer or actor&mdash;you are almost always at the will of the controllers. You do what they want you to do, when they want you to do it, and for the price they want you to do it. In the &rsquo;60s, Leon Arkus asked me to have a solo show, my first solo show, at the Carnegie Museum of Art. Leon brought in Art Seidenberg and Lefevre Gallery, people from New York, to look at my work. Both of them wanted to know if I could do two shows at one time and I said that I couldn&rsquo;t produce that much work. And they asked if I could move to New York and I explained that I would have to get transferred from Pittsburgh. They said, &ldquo;what do you mean transferred?&rdquo; and I said, &ldquo;I can get transferred from the Post Office here to the Post Office in New York.&rdquo; Then they said that I couldn&rsquo;t have a job&mdash;that I would have to spend all of my time working on my art. In the meantime I was married with children. If I had been a single guy I might have considered it. But I said that I couldn&rsquo;t do it. That aspect of churning out work helped me discover that it wasn&rsquo;t about the art but about something they could sell.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table align="center" width="650"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;When you are involved in the commercial aspect of the arts you always have the pressure to produce and sell, and I never really wanted that.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I was married twice, I had three kids living with me, and I had to get a house. I always believe that your first consideration if you are a parent is your children. Then I guess I got past the age that people were really interested in me. I was in a show in Philadelphia and one of the critics said that he couldn&rsquo;t be interested in someone&rsquo;s work who is past the age of forty. I was surprised that you recognized all the African influence in my artwork; very few African American institutions have been interested in my work. But I have never depended on art for a living&mdash;I was in the civil service for many years. I have a pension and can do whatever I want. When you are involved in the commercial aspect of the arts you always have the pressure to produce and sell, and I never really wanted that.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171122092026-3466469928_c3d981918a_b.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Thaddeus Mosley: Sculpture (Studio | Home)</em>,&nbsp;Installation at The Mattress Factory,&nbsp;2009.&nbsp;<br /> Courtesy of The Mattress Factory, Pittsburgh, PA. Photo: Tom Little</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JL: How have you been able to sustain a whole life of art? I know there are a lot of artists who give up because they feel they can&rsquo;t work full-time and do their art. Or a lot of people who find it hard to get exposure for their work and give up because they figure they are never going to be able to do anything with it. What has been your life philosophy for continuing to make art no matter what?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM: </strong>At an art residency I came across a young man who asked me how he could make a living doing sculpture. I told him that there are numerous ways you can make a living at this but I think the main thing you have to decide is why you are doing this. Like someone that is writing poetry or someone who is writing novels&mdash;because everyone hopes that they are going to become another Picasso or someone like that&mdash;I never felt that way. I made sculpture for myself. I was very selfish. I wanted it in my house. I think the main thing that sustained me was that I wanted to find out what I could do and I haven&rsquo;t found that out yet. I tell anyone, I don&rsquo;t think anything is as exciting as finding that you can do something yourself. I am always eager to come to the studio and if I get an idea I start working on it.</p> <p>You have to have the spirit of an amateur, loving to do something just for the doing. I knew people who started out as painters and they didn&rsquo;t sell anything so they quit. They would be better off selling cars than painting if that was it. A lot of times there is a lack of mutual support that makes people stop or question themselves. When you are first starting out you don&rsquo;t have the greatest confidence, you&rsquo;re finding your way. But for me, it has always been a very internal and selfish quest.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171122092005-3390652388_569e7961f6_b.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">The artist&rsquo;s home.&nbsp;Courtesy of The Mattress Factory, Pittsburgh, PA. Photo: Tom Little</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table align="center" width="650"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;How do you know if someone is doing Black Art? Look at the artist&mdash;I don&rsquo;t care what the art looks like.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JL: What are you thoughts on Blackness or a Black Art Aesthetic&nbsp;in terms of your art and process?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM:</strong> I was in the time when the Black Revolution was on in the &rsquo;60s. I knew Dana Chandler and some of those people who were Black Revolutionary Artists. I knew people like Baraka. Some of these people were like, if you weren&rsquo;t writing about the protest or if your painting did not address the conditions of the African American in the United States then it was European Decadence. And I knew a group of people that had spaces here that said that any artist that shows in White institutions can&rsquo;t show with us. And I said, &ldquo;well, you just did me a favor.&rdquo;</p> <p>I had friends that adhered to this philosophy, but I think that your first responsibility is to your own mind and your own integrity and what you see as an individual. If you think that you need to belong to a herd to be comfortable then that is okay. But I also knew people who were chanting freedom but wanted the woman to walk four or five steps behind them and be subservient to them and I said, &ldquo;you aren&rsquo;t talking about freedom, you&rsquo;re talking about being in charge, you want power over other people, you want the same thing that you&rsquo;re deriding.&rdquo;</p> <p>I have a friend&mdash;I think he is one of the few great painters in the country&mdash;Sam Gilliam, and people were putting him down because they did not think he was doing what they called &ldquo;Black Art.&rdquo; People ask, well how do you know if someone is doing Black Art? And I say that the easiest definition is to look at the artist&mdash;I don&rsquo;t care what the art looks like. I just feel that an artist first has to not worry about conforming. I just do what I do, and if you don&rsquo;t like it, that&rsquo;s fine. I like it and I am not going to make something I don&rsquo;t like.</p> <p><strong>JL:</strong> <strong>What advice would you give to an artist trying to find their way?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM:</strong> The first thing I would say is to look a lot and read a lot. How I learned was looking and reading and buying art books and going to museums and galleries and looking to see how I think the thing was made. I would tell them to find out why this is making your life interesting. There are a lot of things that aren&rsquo;t very valuable in life so you want to do something that is going to increase the value of your life or enhance it to some degree and, as odd as it may seem, this is what makes my life, even in my old age. I am always happy. The good, bad and the ugly, I enjoy looking at it all. If it is not fun making it then I have no interest in it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/490259-jessica-lanay?tab=REVIEWS">Jessica Lanay</a></p> <p><em>Jessica Lanay is a poet and short story writer from the Florida Keys living in Pittsburgh. Her work can be found in Salt Hill Journal, Tahoma Literary Review, and is forthcoming in Fugue and The Common.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>(Image at top: Thaddeus Mosley at home. All images: Courtesy of The Mattress Factory, Pittsburgh, PA. Photos: Tom Little)</p> Wed, 22 Nov 2017 23:58:20 +0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Art Golacki Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/46540-b-under-the-radar-thomas-flynn-ii-art-golacki-patricia-glauserb" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/418627-art-golacki" target="_blank">Art Golacki</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>Since every one of us evolved from the very subjective perception of ever-changing phenomena called collectively a reality, I am in constant process of sharing my personal experience of that journey.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>In my opinion, to translate what is indescribable.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171120095225-20170512210639-golacki_talkingtrees25.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Talking Trees 25</em>, 2017, Photography</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>Self discovery, but I am afraid I do not have any tangible evidence to support it.</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>A feature scientific film investigating every single cell of my body in search of an Ego.</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>Tomasz Bednarczyk,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.discogs.com/artist/878081-Tomasz-Bednarczyk" target="_blank">Tomasz Bednarczyk Discography at Discogs</a><br /> Fascinating young Polish composer, master of minimal and ambient, my favorite chill out.</p> <p>Jerzy Rosolowicz,&nbsp;<a href="https://makinguse.artmuseum.pl/en/jerzy-rosolowicz/">Jerzy Rosołowicz &middot; MAKING USE</a><br /> Protagonist of the conceptual&nbsp;art&nbsp;movement in Poland and at the same time extremely modest and kind man, my favorite&nbsp;art&nbsp;college teacher.</p> <p>Stanislaw Ignacy Witkiewicz,<strong>&nbsp;</strong><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanis%C5%82aw_Ignacy_Witkiewicz" target="_blank">Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz - Wikipedia</a><br /> Colorful and fascinating personality, multi-disciplinary Polish artist from interwar period openly admitting his experience with psychedelics, my favorite teenage idol.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: <em>Still Life in Black with Melons</em>, 2017, Digital photography)</span></p> Mon, 20 Nov 2017 17:54:48 +0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list The Trouble with “Neighbors”: Ai Weiwei, the Istanbul Biennial, and Forced Migration <p>Last month Public Art Fund in New York opened Ai Weiwei&rsquo;s citywide exhibition, <em><a href="https://www.publicartfund.org/ai_weiwei_good_fences_make_good_neighbors" target="_blank">Good Fences Make Good Neighbors</a></em>. The project entails steel, fence-like architectural interventions and large-scale banners depicting photographs of Syrian refugees from the artist&rsquo;s time in Lesbos, Greece. The exhibition is not alone in its use of domestic language to address global issues of mass forced migration. The 15th Istanbul Biennial, which concluded last week and was curated by Danish-Norwegian artist duo Elmgreen &amp; Dragset, took the title <em><a href="http://15b.iksv.org/home" target="_blank">a good neighbour</a></em>.</p> <p>The conceit of &ldquo;neighbor&rdquo; brings us to the scale of the home without quite entering <em>our</em> home: a neighbor, after all, is our closest foreign element. Today, both Turkey and the US find themselves embroiled in internal debates over policies concerning both external borders and internal relations between communities. The invocation of neighbors addresses&mdash;though to what end varies between these exhibitions&mdash;geopolitical issues over borders and boundaries and the legal designations that determine the futures of populations displaced by war and famine. In Ai&rsquo;s installation borders are evoked by fences and images of refugees installed in public spaces around the city. The Istanbul Biennial, on the other hand, nods to Turkey&rsquo;s status as hosting one of the highest populations of displaced Syrians more intimately, focusing on the private rather than public spaces.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117153513-12.-GoodFencesPhoto_JasonWyche_4027_ed.jpg.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ai Weiwei, <em>Arch</em> from <em>Good Fences Make Good Neighbors</em>, 2017, Galvanized mild steel and mirror polished stainless steel. Courtesy of Ai Weiwei studio and Frahm &amp; Frahm. Photo: Jason Wyche</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Last March Angela Merkel negotiated what has since been termed the &ldquo;EU-Turkey Deal,&rdquo; offering Turkey 6 billion Euro in refugee aid in exchange for the country preventing further crossings to Europe, particularly via Greece. Anyone arriving &ldquo;irregularly&rdquo; to Greece&mdash;even those seeking asylum&mdash;would, according to the deal, be returned to Turkey and made to apply from there. In Turkey, however, only asylum seekers originating from Europe qualify as &ldquo;refugees&rdquo; in any legal sense, as the country signed the 1951 Geneva Convention with a &ldquo;geographical limitation.&rdquo; The three million asylum seekers currently in Turkey, and any held in transit to Europe, are instead deemed &ldquo;<a href="https://www.loc.gov/law/help/refugee-law/turkey.php" target="_blank">persons of subsidiary protection</a>&rdquo;&mdash;a designation that nefariously keeps would-be asylum seekers outside of the international refugee system that would protect them.</p> <p>While many asylum seekers are living in camps in the south of Turkey, others have made it to cities, and Istanbul reflects its new population. In the months preceding the exhibition, promotional posters for the Biennial introduced the &ldquo;good neighbor&rdquo; theme in a series of questions: <em>Is&nbsp;a good neighbor&nbsp;your friend on Facebook?</em> <em>Is&nbsp;a good neighbor&nbsp;someone who lives the same way as you? Is&nbsp;a good neighbor&nbsp;a stranger you don&rsquo;t fear?</em> The inquisitive framework&mdash;<i>what is a good neighbor anyway?&mdash;</i>contrasts the aphoristic &ldquo;good neighbor&rdquo; in Ai&rsquo;s title, which references an ironic and <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2010/05/sarah-palin-misinterprets-robert-frost/57248/" target="_blank">often misunderstood</a> line from Robert Frost&rsquo;s 1915 poem &ldquo;Mending Wall.&rdquo; In both cases, however, the notion of neighbor works to &ldquo;domesticate&rdquo; debates about migration, to bring them down to the scale of the local, the neighborhood, the family, the home&mdash;at least ideologically. In its iterations since the the Gezi Park protests of 2013, the Istanbul Biennial has included works that take a wide-angle analysis of global socio-economic changes, featuring artists and collectives whose practices offer broad analyses of the socio-economic actors at work in the changing city. In its 2017 edition, the Biennial instead &ldquo;zoomed-in&rdquo; to show art that takes the home and interiority as its jumping-off point.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117153712-TP2_4648Ai_Weiwei_on_Porcelain__Sakip_Sabanci_Museum__Istanbul__2017__courtesy_of_Sakip_Sabanci_Museum_.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117184706-IMG_4287.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Ai Weiwei on Porcelain</em>, Sakip Sabanci Museum, Istanbul, 2017. Courtesy of Sakip Sabanci Museum</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Ai, who has been praised for addressing the migration crisis and critiqued for his tone-deaf or misguided attempts at doing so, opened the show <a href="http://www.sakipsabancimuzesi.org/en/page/exhibitions/ai-weiwei-porcelain" target="_blank"><em>Ai Weiwei on Porcelain </em></a>at the Sabanci Museum in Istanbul timed with Biennial. The exhibition includes many of his most recognizable works as well as recent work addressing the Syrian refugee crisis. Many newer works on view use domestic objects as materials and canvases&mdash;including pottery, dishes, and wallpaper emblazoned with black-and-white vignettes of refugees in makeshift camps, in transit, or running from the police. In one particularly distressing instance this wallpaper stretches around a huge atrium space, serving as a backdrop to larger-than-life documentation of Ai&rsquo;s notorious performance work, <em>Dropping a Han Dynasty Urn </em>(1995). Similarly the work <em>Study of Perspective</em> (1995&ndash;2003), in which Ai photographs his hand &ldquo;flipping off&rdquo; various architectural symbols of power around the world, reads as a kind of tone-deaf bad boy move when placed in the context of aestheticized images of refugees, people to whom the option to move around the globe so freely is all but impossible.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117153925-Screen_Shot_2017-11-15_at_10.55.11_AM.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ai Weiwei on eBay</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Prior to the Public Art Fund opening in New York, the organization opened a Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign and it is currently offering limited editions of the artist&rsquo;s work on eBay, including small prints of the wallpaper included in the Sabanci exhibition. No portion of the proceeds have been announced as directed toward organizations working to aid victims of forced migration, nor were donation options offered on the crowdfunding campaign menu. Rather than instrumentally benefitting refugees, the resulting &ldquo;good fences&rdquo; around New York City are aesthetically pleasing passageways and architectural interventions that offer seating and social space in parks and art venues including Washington Square, the Queens Museum, Cooper Square, and Central Park. According to the artist, the artworks are meant to &ldquo;raise awareness&rdquo; of the global refugee crisis and to the bordered and bounded lives of individuals. Instead, they materialize as convivial social projects in a city central to the international power structures that produce global inequalities&mdash;further pointing to questions about Ai&rsquo;s relationship to the state powers he aims to critique. If indeed this project is intended to &ldquo;raise awareness,&rdquo; how does that function within a leisure space? And what does it mean to do so using &ldquo;neighbor,&rdquo; in a place like New York, where, unlike Turkey, it is largely rhetorical? Ai&rsquo;s interventions do little to interrogate their namesake. Who <em>are </em>these neighbors&mdash;us or them? What makes a neighbor good or bad? Who, if anyone, is implicated or educated by this artwork?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117154044-14.-GoodFences_CircleFence_TimothySchenck_05.jpg.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ai Weiwei, <em>Circle Fence</em> from <em>Good Fences Make Good Neighbors</em>, 2017, Powder coated mild steel, polypropylene netting. Courtesy of the artist. Photo: Timothy Schenck</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Last Year Ai was &ldquo;<a href="http://www.artnews.com/2016/10/31/political-reactions-a-testy-ai-weiwei-speaks-with-tania-bruguera-at-the-brooklyn-museum/" target="_blank">testy</a>&rdquo; in a talk with Tania Bruguera at the Brooklyn Museum, responding to her criticisms of his now infamous photograph of himself reenacting the death of three-year-old Alan Kurdi on a beach in Bodrum, Turkey. He reprimanded Bruguera for not knowing the exact count of those who&rsquo;d lost their lives in passage. The trouble with counting the dead and depicting only their loss or desperation is that the refugee &ldquo;crisis&rdquo; isn&rsquo;t just a moment: it is an ongoing situation that continues even as Ai builds his beautiful fences in New York. To count is a process of memorialization we enact when a war is over, and those numbers can be put to wicked use. While Ai aggregates objects&mdash;life vests, clothing, shoes&mdash;to materialize the vast numbers of dead or displaced people, FRONTEX, the European Union&rsquo;s border agency, and its supporters use the same numbers to argue for further limitations on passage and harsher criminalization, which leads desperate people to attempt even more risky routes in order to avoid detection.&nbsp; Ai&rsquo;s 2016 installation of 14,000 life jackets on the columns of the Konzert Haus in Berlin was tagged with #safepassage which may have raised some awareness of refugees&rsquo; plights, but it also overwhelmed that hashtag&rsquo;s use by Medicine Sans Frontiers and aid groups who often used it for updates on travel conditions. The image of the thousands of bright orange life jackets became a favorite social media share and was retweeted and praised by some of the same officials who supported the EU-Turkey Deal (which further restrained refugees coming from Syria). Keeping refugees in Turkey has been instrumental in Europe, leaving already vulnerable people in a much less protected position&mdash;good neighbors indeed!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Powerful art installation by Chinese artist <a href="https://twitter.com/aiww?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@aiww</a> draping 14k refugee life vests from Greece to <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Berlin?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Berlin</a> concert hall <a href="https://t.co/kHbDvEAchI">pic.twitter.com/kHbDvEAchI</a></p> &mdash; Sebastian Ernst (@seb_ernst) <a href="https://twitter.com/seb_ernst/status/698823489864736768?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 14, 2016</a></blockquote> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Converse to spectacles of horror and vignettes of tragedy on fine china, the Istanbul Biennial stepped away from the directly political, particularly from the limited ways in which Turkey&rsquo;s art scene has come to be read as a go-to site for geopolitical catastrophizing. Without artwork directly critical of the government, the exhibition has been <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/sep/15/istanbul-biennial-hires-provocative-curators-but-wheres-the-political-art" target="_blank">critiqued</a> as lacking in political art. To say the work included is not political, however, misses the strength and subtlety of the exhibition. In contrast to the more broadly critical artworks presented in past biennials, Elmgreen &amp; Dragset have largely included artists and artworks that address daily life or engage in the making of domestic space and the borders that surround and divide it. Many works point to the ways in which the home is not a haven from the political but the seat of its entrenchment. None does this more clearly than Lee Miller&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.leemiller.co.uk/media/Lee-Miller-in-Hitler-s-apartment-at-16-Prinzregentenplatz-Note-the-combat-boots-on-the-bath-mat-now-stained-with-the-du/WDCDbTDMLParKJghr89Pdw..a" target="_blank">haunting photographs</a> made in the home of Adolf Hitler.</p> <p>Around the corner from Miller, in the Pera Museum, <a href="http://www.pacegallery.com/artists/507/fred-wilson" target="_blank">Fred Wilson</a> draws on materials common to stately old Istanbul homes to interrogate the erasure of Black and Afro-Turk histories from official Ottoman and Republican Turkish histories and Ottoman Turkey&rsquo;s connection to slave routes through Vienna. He commissioned two intricate chandeliers that utilize both Turkish and Venetian glass methods&mdash;in one, the two styles seem to be engulfing the other. On the surrounding walls are Ottoman Turkish-style tiles painted in Arabic script with the phrases &ldquo;Mother Africa&rdquo; and &ldquo;Black is Beautiful.&rdquo; The most powerful of his works are the smallest: etchings Wilson purchased from local souvenir art shops depicting Ottoman-era images of the city. He overlaid these in translucent velum, carefully excised to obscure all but the small and often singular black figures hidden among crowds.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117154140-IKSV_15B_Sahirugureren_307.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117164829-IMG_4225.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Fred Wilson, <em>Afro Kismet</em>, 2017, Historic photographs, engravings and oil paintings; contemporary acrylic paintings and miniatures, late 19th century Othello poster; Anthropomorphic terracotta flask from the 3rd century BC, glass pendants from the 5th century BC; contemporary Iznik tile panels, carpet, chandelier sculptures, globe sculpture, blown glass sculptures; mid 20th century wooden African mask, late 20th century African figures, wooden false wall, birdcage, antique chair and table, wall vinyl, mounted photo scans, cowrie shells, Dimensions variable. Courtesy of Pace Gallery and the artist. Sponsored by the Denver Art Museum. Photo (top): Sahir Uğur Eren. Photo (below): the author</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>While few works address the refugee crisis directly, there are strong pieces that address the precariousness of &ldquo;home,&rdquo; be it house or country. Mahmoud Obaidi&rsquo;s&nbsp;<em>Compact Home Project</em>&nbsp;consists of archives of sketches, newspaper clippings, and other ephemera he has collected since leaving Iraq.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.pedrogomezegana.net/" target="_blank">Pedro G&oacute;mez-Ega&ntilde;a&rsquo;s</a>&nbsp;<em>Domain of Things</em>&nbsp;is a darkly beautiful performance installation in the Galata Greek School: an elevated domestic space suspended on rails is slowly shifted and disrupted by performers uncomfortably entangled among the supports.<a href="http://www.officinedellimmagine.com/lungiswagqunta_bio.html" target="_blank">&nbsp;Lungiswa Gqunta</a>&rsquo;s&nbsp;<em>Lawn</em>&nbsp;reproduces the very stage of neighborly relations, the lawn, in the green hues of broken pop bottles, filled with oil to evoke the small homemade fire bombs of riots.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117154236-IKSV_15B_Sahirugureren_235.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Pedro G&oacute;mez-Ega&ntilde;a, <em>Domain of Things</em>, 2017, Metal structure, wooden panels, furniture, sound, performance Dimensions variable Courtesy of the artist Produced with the support of Arts Council Norway, Office for Contemporary Art Norway, City of Bergen Norway, Faculty of Fine Art, Music and Design, University of Bergen and BIT Teatergarasjen. Presented with the support of QP Magazine. Photo: Sahir Uğur Eren</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117154342-IKSV_15B_Sahirugureren_058.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Lungiswa Gqunta, <em>Lawn 1</em>, 2016/17 Wood, 3,168 broken Coca Cola glass bottles, petrol, ink, 25.5 x 484 x 366 cm. Courtesy of the artist. Photo: Sahir Uğur Eren</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In both the Biennial&rsquo;s domestic sensibilities and Ai&rsquo;s fences-cum-playgrounds and images of toiling refugees, what is most conspicuously missing is an investigation into the lives of communities. While, as Ai&rsquo;s work makes clear, thousands have died in transit at sea or remain in danger, millions of people are now living in new places. And millions of Turks now find themselves with new neighbors in the midst of an already turbulent and suspicious political climate that strains trust among even established relations.</p> <p>Across Istanbul there are many groups, both art and community projects, addressing these issues. <a href="http://www.pagesbookstorecafe.com/" target="_blank">Pages</a>, a bookstore founded by a Syrian children&rsquo;s book author and his wife, is a home not only for other refugees but also a space in which to welcome those wanting to learn more about Syrian culture, including evenings of live music. It made an appearance in the biennial, if only as the site where the artist Victor Leguy met Syrians and collected their personal artifacts. These were then displayed in the Istanbul Modern, hung and partially obscured by a line of white paint. It is a beautiful work but one that also troubles the continued question of why is it that refugees are so often represented as absences or artifacts, when they aren&rsquo;t being portrayed en mass. There are, by most counts, between two and three million refugees from Syria quietly going about their lives in Turkey, as well as many more from Libya, Iraq, and Afghanistan. Their lives are not limited to the hour of border crossing, or to the suffering and loss they have experienced; their representations should not be limited to death and loss of home.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117165846-IKSV_15B_Sahirugureren_244.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Victor Leguy, 2017, Istanbul Modern, 15th İstanbul Biennial. Photo: Sahir Ugur Eren</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>One work in the Biennial addresses another population weathering the precarity of globalization, though their displacement is more economic than violent. Chinese photojournalist Sim Chi Yin&rsquo;s <em>The Rat Tribe </em>is a portrait series depicting migrant low-wage workers in their underground living spaces within the 6,000 basements and air raid shelters around Beijing. Despite the bleak conditions and cramped quarters depicted, these images work to show the realities of people in migration. Their home lives, relationships, personal proclivities, and even joys are evident.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117184331-image1.jpeg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Sim Chi Yin, 2017, Pera Museum, 15th Istanbul Biennial. Photo: the author</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Critiques that the 15th Istanbul Biennial lacks political edge ring false. That the domestic or interior is somehow apolitical is an old-fashioned assertion, one no longer fitting, lest we suggest that it is only bodies in the street, only public action made visible that can be deemed truly political. Rather now, <em>how</em> we consider the domestic, the interpersonal, dare I say, the feminine, remains a central question. The obvious, if hollow, political&mdash;the zoomed-out scale, the representations of borders and bodies so often present in the work of &ldquo;political&rdquo; artists&mdash;is everywhere, and as Ai&rsquo;s exhibitions show, highly popular and profitable.</p> <p>How and when does the domestic encounter and engage its already political place? How can kinship be reordered, and by whom? It is in these questions that we find the politics within the social and physical markings of the home, and where we open up an important assumption at the heart of the conceit of &ldquo;neighbor&rdquo;: the given-ness, the taken-for-granted acceptance of borders, at any level. Porosity marks lives in cosmopolitan centers; food, culture, faith, music, and language travel across borders the way sounds and smells travel through walls. Our relationships within walls are never hermetically sealed to what is outside. The domestic, the home, its neighbors and its fences, are not merely metaphors for the nation, its borders, and those outside its boundaries. Instead the domestic is itself always already engaged in the production and contestation of those systems in question. Just as the public produces our private selves, so too does the private produce a public, a national, an international; the very notion of who has a private life not only reflects but reinforces divisions of value in world politics and policy.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/200738-danyel-ferrari?tab=REVIEWS">Danyel Ferrari</a></p> <p><em>Danyel M. Ferrari is an artist and writer based in Brooklyn and Istanbul. She is a current PhD candidate at Rutgers University in Media Studies.&nbsp;</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Promotional poster for the 15th Istanbul Biennial, Curated by Elmgreen &amp; Dragset. Photos by Lukas Wassmann, Graphic design by Rupert Smyth)</span></p> Sat, 18 Nov 2017 23:14:28 +0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Genevieve Goffman | Katrina Majkut | Sheelah Mahalath Bewley <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/490681-genevieve-goffman?utm_source=GenevieveGoffman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Genevieve Goffman &ndash; Portland, OR</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1063863?utm_source=GenevieveGoffman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1063863/u3azr9/20170916202813-101216_GGoffmage-4__1_.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1063870?utm_source=GenevieveGoffman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1063870/mf2ji7/20170916202843-111316_GGoffman-31.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1063867?utm_source=GenevieveGoffman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1063867/mf2ji7/20170916202824-111316_GGoffman-1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1063868?utm_source=GenevieveGoffman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1063868/mf2ji7/20170916202826-111316_GGoffman-9.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/181750-katrina-majkut?utm_source=KatrinaMajkut&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Katrina Majkut &ndash; Brooklyn</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1073135?utm_source= KatrinaMajkut&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1073135/u3azr9/20171031200101-Consent_Is_Asking_Every_Time_Condom.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1073592?utm_source=KatrinaMajkut&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1073592/mf2ji7/20171101131912-Step_7_Vaginal_Swabs_and_Smears.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1073583?utm_source=KatrinaMajkut&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1073583/mf2ji7/20171101131906-Kit_Cover.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1073589?utm_source=KatrinaMajkut&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1073589/mf2ji7/20171101131910-Step_4_Debris_Collection.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/490547-sheelah-mahalath-bewley?utm_source=SheelahMahalathBewley&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Sheelah Mahalath Bewley &ndash; UK</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1061425?utm_source=SheelahMahalathBewley&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1061425/u3azr9/20170830093923-2_bra.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1061447?utm_source=SheelahMahalathBewley&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1061447/mf2ji7/20170830095529-3_lighten_up.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1061449?utm_source=SheelahMahalathBewley&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1061449/mf2ji7/20170830095600-9_Wreath.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1061448?utm_source=SheelahMahalathBewley&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1061448/mf2ji7/20170830095541-2_running_scared.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/sp?_encoding=UTF8&amp;asin=&amp;isAmazonFulfilled=&amp;isCBA=&amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;orderID=&amp;seller=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;tab=products&amp;vasStoreID=#" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Fri, 17 Nov 2017 22:08:06 +0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: The Wrong Edition <p><a href="http://thewrong.org/" target="_blank">The Wrong</a> is a decentralized biennial exhibition, the largest of its kind, dedicated to contemporary digital art and culture. Now in its third edition, simply titled <em>(biennale)</em>, The Wrong features a tremendous number of curated exhibitions, projects, and events&mdash;both online (in &ldquo;<a href="http://thewrong.org/filter/pavilion/" target="_blank">pavilions</a>&rdquo;) and off (in &ldquo;<a href="http://thewrong.org/filter/embassy/" target="_blank">embassies</a>&rdquo;).</p> <p>Because of the sheer magnitude of content, tackling the biennial can be an overwhelming prospect, even for the initiated. For this week&rsquo;s Wednesday Web Art column, we&rsquo;re easing you into the world of The Wrong, sharing some of our favorite work from the 2017 edition. But as you&rsquo;ll quickly learn, with such an extensive exhibition at your fingertips&mdash;1,400 artists across 70 pavilions and nearly 30 embassies&mdash;it&rsquo;s hard to stop here. Consider these works as launching points for charting your own path into the seemingly endless corners of The Wrong.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/HuMcfHjiVTg" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Aleksandra Kovačević &amp; Jelena Nikolić</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="https://wrongprostheticco.wordpress.com/portfolio/aleksandra-kovacevic-jelena-nikolic/" target="_blank">meetme@heaven</a></em><br /> This strangely calming, perpetually rotating marble slab carved with inspirational messages is the perfect way to start your Wrong adventure. It can be a challenging, emotional journey, but as the artists of this piece state: &ldquo;&lsquo;Life is full of problems, and the only way to improve our chances of overcoming most of these problems is to optimize how we think about them.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="https://wrongprostheticco.wordpress.com/" target="_blank">Prosthetic</a></em>, Curated by Darko Vukic<br /> This pavilion is inspired by the quote from political theorist Hannah Arendt: &ldquo;Our life is prosthetic. We assume that through these variety of processes we can realize our desires which themselves are becoming prosthetic. We also assume other life through this prosthetization of our current endeavors.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Q-kkh_jaDcY" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Karin Ferrari</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="http://postinternet.art/pages/karin.html" target="_blank">Hyperconnected (The Whole Picture)</a></em><br /> Ferrari&rsquo;s work is an exploration of the explosion of conspiracy culture in the internet age. The fact that this video is specifically about the &lsquo;truth&rsquo;&nbsp; behind the symbolism of the internet means the it functions brilliantly on multiple levels of paranoia and digital creation.</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="http://postinternet.art/index.html" target="_blank">Postinternet.art</a></em>, Curated by Juha van Ingen &amp; Jarkko R&auml;s&auml;nen<br /> The contributing artists were only given the name of the pavilion as inspiration for their work, leading to an eclectic mix of art dedicated to this ubiquitous term.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171115155435-Lara_Joy_Evans.png" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Lara Joy Evans</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <a href="https://lightlitecoin.info/lje" target="_blank">https://lightlitecoin.info/lje</a><br /> The primal woman&mdash;part neural network, part Neanderthal, part mud, according to DNA panel results&mdash;joyfully connects with internet life. Evans&rsquo; work, comprising &ldquo;photographs altered by AI and neural network,&rdquo; is a welcome moment of pure human vitality among the digital hive-mind.</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <a href="http://lightlitecoin.info" target="_blank"><em>Light Lite Coin</em></a>, curated by Coleman Mummery<br /> Described by the curator as, &ldquo;self help for collective paranoia,&rdquo; the artworks in this pavilion are all programs. &ldquo;There are bio-social implications to running these programs on yourself and sharing them with others.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/137466365" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Morgan Beringer</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="https://www.thenormalpavillion.xyz/morgan-beringer" target="_blank">Abstraction 47</a></em><br /> An endlessly morphing, mysterious and beautiful vision that evokes something between an unfathomable alien storm and a haunted impressionist watercolor.</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="https://www.thenormalpavillion.xyz/" target="_blank">Normal</a></em>, curated by Ilavenil Jayapalan<br /> This enigmatic pavilion interrogates what constitutes &ldquo;Normality.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xlanYJwnuvw" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Elizaveta Perebatova</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="http://proteytemen.com/diapavilion/perebatova/" target="_blank">ATTENTION</a></em><br /> Perebatova suggests that &ldquo;we have worked out ways of interacting with the world and have stopped notice the moment of interaction [sic]. We are automatic and enslaved by our habits.&rdquo; Her witty and enchanting video presents cryptic illustrations of banal design objects, with instructions to &ldquo;listen to reality, to look at it as if we are doing it for the first time.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="http://proteytemen.com/diapavilion" target="_blank">Diapavilion</a></em>, Curated by Protey Temen<br /> The artists in this pavilion are students of fine arts and contemporary illustration at HSE Art and Design School in Moscow, Russia. Most of works they have created are surreal and inventive pastiches of social and scientific instructional films.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171115155220-MutantClub.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artwork &amp; Pavilion:</strong> Various Artists, <em><a href="http://www.mutantclub.net/" target="_blank">Mutant Club</a></em>, Curated by Enrique Salmoiraghi<br /> One of the few pavilions where the collected contributions of the artists seamlessly form a single piece of art. They have provided the dancers and decorations for the titular intergalactic u.f.o. nightclub. This just might be the most universal, engaging, and downright entertaining pavilions in the whole biennale.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171115155134-Renee_Cox.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Renee Cox</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artworks &amp; Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="http://gisdejeunersurlherbe.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">Gis Dejeuner Sur L&rsquo;Herbe</a></em>, Curated by Jeroen Bouweriks<br /> This is one of the most successful pavilions shaped by a singular concept. The idea itself basically overwhelms the contributions of the artists, making it the curator&rsquo;s work more than anything else. Bouweriks asked a long list of artists, theorists, curators, gallerists, and designers&rdquo; in iPhone chats to Google Manet&rsquo;s painting<em> Le D&eacute;jeuner sur l&rsquo;Herbe</em> and then send him the &ldquo;original&rdquo; as an attached image. This prompt inspired reactions ranging from delight to confusion, with most contributors following his instructions exactly. Some deviate from the plan a little and send work adapted from or inspired by the famous painting, like this response (above) from the brilliant Renee Cox.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/QByGFQBiV20" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Peter Rahul</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="http://gfxfreeerror.com/peter-rahul.html" target="_blank">Phase 2</a></em><br /> A hypnotic abstract exploration of vintage computer graphics and CRT technology, this piece finds the right balance between warm nostalgia and an alternative future in a parallel universe where analogue conquered digital.</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="http://gfxfreeerror.com/index.html" target="_blank">GFX Free Error</a></em>, Curated by Haydi Roket<br /> Named after the error warning given to a malfunctioning video card, this pavilion features works that question the effects of broken technology on our perception of reality. The curator asks: &ldquo;Do we merely create new realities from these faults? If it&#39;s the sole truth, then what happens to those broken realities around us?&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/bXn1xavynj8" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artists:</strong> Signe Pierce &amp; Alli Coates</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="https://q-safe-q.tumblr.com/tagged/signepierceandallicoates/" target="_blank">American Reflexxx</a></em><br /> A modern masterpiece of documentary art: the reaction these artists got for simply being &ldquo;different&rdquo; among those who consider themselves &ldquo;normal&rdquo; is truly horrifying. The film presents a perfect representation the soul-crushing culture of trolling and bullying that is now synonymous with being online. The subject was highlighted and compounded by the fact that the abuse continued when <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXn1xavynj8" target="_blank">the video was posted online</a>. Pierce says, &ldquo;It did feel similar to the mob scene all over again, only yes, people had the opportunity to bash me anonymously.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>Pavilion: </strong><em><a href="https://q-safe-q.tumblr.com/tagged/home/chrono" target="_blank">Safe</a></em>, curated by Christopher Clary<br /> This pavilion explores the concept of being &ldquo;safe&rdquo; and &ldquo;safe spaces&rdquo; in network culture. The artists have each contributed work that &ldquo;questions the validity of safety through expressions of intersectional trauma&mdash;personal, familial, collective, and systemic.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/234747372" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Josefin Jonsson</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="http://pinkpinkmoon.altervista.org/josefin-jonsson/" target="_blank">Falling Stars</a></em><br /> According to <a href="https://www.instagram.com/pastelae/" target="_blank">her Instagram</a>, Jonsson creates &ldquo;pastel original artworks with dream layers and soft pink internet feelings.&rdquo; This descriptor barely prepares you for this unsettling slice of futuristic, new-age hypnotherapy.</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="http://pinkpinkmoon.altervista.org/" target="_blank">Pink, Pink Moon</a></em>, Curated by Fabio Paris<br /> An all-women pavilion that is also one of the biennial&rsquo;s most compelling and subversive. The artists have made work that presents &ldquo;the pink as nexus of contemporary aesthetics and not as a feminist reading.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171115154831-Mani_Nilchiani.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Mani Nilchiani</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="http://foreverfornever.xyz/" target="_blank">You-Eye</a></em><br /> A clever, minimalist, motion-activated interactive piece that questions the value and meaning of familiar symbols of modern life. It&rsquo;s also a lot of fun to play with!</p> <p><strong>Pavilion: </strong><em><a href="http://foreverfornever.xyz/" target="_blank">Forever Fornever</a></em>, Curated by Chris Romero<br /> This pavilion looks at the disappearing line between our digital personas and our physical bodies. The artworks &ldquo;portray the present, a hyper-technological world, and hypothesize the future&mdash;a dream caught between utopia and nightmare.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&#39;re interested in what&#39;s happening with art on the web. We invited online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, to write a bi-monthly column for us. Every other Wednesday he selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Thu, 16 Nov 2017 20:45:40 +0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list