Bigindicator

LISA CURET, KEIRA KOTLER, INDIRA MARTINA MORRE

Event  |  Reviews  |  Comments
1_float
Float, 2009 Oil on Canvas With Resin Two Canvases, Each:11 X 14 In. © Courtesy of the Artist and SFMOMA Artists Gallery
4_september-26-to-october-28_-2008-_i-look-for-light_
September 26 to October 28, 2008 [I Look for Light], 2008 Urethane and Varnish on Acrylic 18 X 18 In. © Courtesy of the Artist and SFMOMA Artists Gallery
6_resonance-of-signs
Resonance of Signs, 2009 Graphite and Gesso on Linen Over Panel 12 X 12 In. © Courtesy of the Artist and SFMOMA Artists Gallery
LISA CURET, KEIRA KOTLER, INDIRA MARTINA MORRE

Fort Mason Center
2 Marina Boulevard, Building A
San Francisco, CA 94123
March 18th, 2010 - April 23rd, 2010
Opening: March 18th, 2010 5:30 PM - 7:30 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.sfmoma.org/artistsgallery
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
Marina/Presidio
EMAIL:  
artistsgallery@sfmoma.org
PHONE:  
415-441-4777
OPEN HOURS:  
Tue-Sat 10:30-5
TAGS:  
abstract

DESCRIPTION

Bay Area-artist Lisa Curet's work channels and incorporates qualities found in pattern painting. Layer upon layer of shapes and color are applied, creating a tension between the varied surfaces. The combined results are flooded with resin, sealing and fusing the multiple applications. Inspired by travel and human interaction, she views her works as metaphors for one's conscious perception of the world outside.

Keira Kotler is interested in the pure experience of color without the context of a given subject matter. Recently included in two notable exhibitions addressing spirituality and the sublime, her work focuses on light, shadow, and what she describes as the "subtle nuances found in common experiences." This exhibition debuts a new series of paintings that further her interest with psychological introspection.

Indira Martina Morre applies multiple layers of white gesso on canvas and renders them to a rich satin finish. Here, she creates floating fields of her personalized markings made from graphite, charcoal, and pastel. In suspended masses, they imply an inner space suggesting psychological galaxies. Concerned with the influence of technology upon human cognitive experience, the paintings, while delicately beautiful, whisper an ambivalent tone.