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Michael Beck: Objects of Desire

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Go West Young Man, 2013 Oil on Canvas 38 X 60 In. © Paul Thiebaud Gallery
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Deep Blue Waters, 2013 Oil on Canvas 68 X 58 In. © Paul Thiebaud Gallery
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House Tour (The Naughty Chair), 2013 Oil on Canvas 48 X 36 In. © Paul Thiebaud Gallery
Michael Beck: Objects of Desire

645 Chestnut Street
San Francisco, CA 94133
September 10th, 2013 - October 26th, 2013
Opening: September 12th, 2013 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.paulthiebaudgallery.com
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
Financial District/Wharf
EMAIL:  
info@paulthiebaudgallery.com
PHONE:  
415.434.3055
OPEN HOURS:  
Tue - Sat; 10am-6pm
TAGS:  
realism
COST:  
Please contact gallery for pricing

DESCRIPTION

The Paul Thiebaud Gallery is pleased to present our second showing of work by Bay Area painter, Michael G. Beck.  The realist paintings continue Beck’s exploration and elevation of the mundane object, usually an item discarded, well-worn, or rendered obsolete with regard to use in today’s age—almost detritus of past eras.  He frequently searches for material in flea markets, especially at the Alameda Flea Market.  This series began in the later 1990s, when the painter turned to single, solitary objects and their complicated shadow patterns produced through the use of multiple light sources.  By depicting the objects in their actual sizes, Beck wishes to engage the viewer as if the objects were truly present in the round and in real time.  As he explained, “ . . . making it smaller creates a preciousness, making it larger creates an issue that goes beyond what the actual object is (i.e. Rosenquist, Oldenburg, etc.).”  Simply through the rendering as a two-dimensional painting, the subject matter of Beck’s work offers a different encounter psychologically and emotionally.  The titles of the works are not merely descriptive.  They are ironic, witty, provocative, nostalgic, and edgy.  While not suggestive of narratives, the work frequently strikes personal chords with viewers as remembrances, both actual and fictional, of the past.  Beck adds, “They invite flights of fantasy, stories designed by the individual viewer.  These stories are the biographies that I try to elicit from the viewer.”