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In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection

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20130529222237-itm-secondary
Landscape of Mountains and River, Edo period (1615–1868), c. 1770 Pair of Six-panel Folding Screens; Ink and Gold Wash on Paper 65 in X 144 in (overall) © Private Collection
In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection

200 Larkin St.
San Francisco, CA 94102
June 28th, 2013 - September 22nd, 2013
Opening: June 28th, 2013 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.asianart.org/
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
Union Square/Civic Center
EMAIL:  
members@asianart.org
PHONE:  
415.581.3500
OPEN HOURS:  
Tue-Wed, Fri-Sun 10-5; Thu (Jan-Oct) 10-9; Thu (Nov-Dec) 10-5; closed Mon
TAGS:  
japanese, Japan, Edo, Momoyama, traditional
COST:  
$12 for adults, $8 for seniors (65+), college students with ID, and youths (13–17)

DESCRIPTION

In the Moment: Japanese Art from the Larry Ellison Collection will introduce 64 exceptional artworks spanning 1,100 years.

The exhibition explores the dynamic nature of art selection and display in traditional Japanese settings, where artworks are often temporarily presented in response to a special occasion or to reflect the change of seasons. In the Moment also considers Mr. Ellison’s active involvement in displaying art in his Japanese-style home, shedding light on his appreciation for Japan’s art and culture.

Included in the exhibition are significant works by noted artists of the Momoyama (1573–1615) and Edo (1615–1868) periods along with other important examples of religious art, lacquer, woodwork, and metalwork. Highlights include a 13th–14th century wooden sculpture of Shotoku Taishi; six-panel folding screens dating to the 17th century by Kano Sansetsu; and 18th century paintings by acclaimed masters Maruyama Okyo and Ito Jakuchu.

"This exhibition offers a rare glimpse of an extraordinary collection," said Jay Xu, director of the Asian Art Museum. "We aim to present it in a fresh and original way that explores traditional Japanese principles governing the relationship of art to our surroundings and social relationships."