Bigindicator

San Francisco 1964

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20120218180404-tress_woman_lookout_0
Untitled (Coit Tower), 1964 © Courtesy of the Artist and de Young Museum
San Francisco 1964

Golden Gate Park
50 Hagiwara Tea Garden Drive
San Francisco, CA 94118
March 3rd, 2012 - June 3rd, 2012
Opening: March 3rd, 2012 9:30 AM - 5:15 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://deyoung.famsf.org/
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
Haight/GG Park
EMAIL:  
contact@famsf.org
PHONE:  
415-750-3600
OPEN HOURS:  
Tue-Sun, 9:30-5:15, last ticket 4 pm; Friday (March 30 through November 23 only) 9:30-8:45
TAGS:  
photography

DESCRIPTION

In the summer of 1964, San Francisco was ground zero for an historic culture clash as the site of the 28th Republican National Convention and the launch of the Beatles’ first North American tour. In the midst of the excitement, a young photographer new to the city was snapping pictures not of the politicians or musicians but of the people in the crowds and on the streets. Arthur Tress, an accomplished American photographer, made more than nine hundred negatives in San Francisco during the spring and summer of 1964—among his earliest documentary work. Exulting in juxtapositions of the mundane and the absurd, Tress captured the chaos of civil rights demonstrations and political rallies, the idiosyncratic moments of San Francisco’s locals, the peculiar contents of shop windows, a miscellany of odd signs and much more.

Tress developed and printed his black-and-white negatives in a communal darkroom in the city’s Castro district before departing San Francisco in the fall of 1964. The vintage prints were packed away in his sister’s house, coming to light again only in 2009. The rediscovery of this forgotten body of work inspired the photographer to revisit his early negatives, and Arthur Tress: San Francisco 1964 is the delightful outcome.

This exhibition is organized by the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco.

The catalogue is published with the assistance of the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Endowment for Publications.