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FotoObscura

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Helicopters
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Evening Star
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Moons
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Morning Star
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Pixel Study, 2009
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Pixel Study, 2009
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Prayer Closet
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Door 11
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Intersection
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Mill Quilt
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Untitled from the series There are some mornings when the sky looks like, 2010 Unique Silver Gelatin Photogram 20 X 24"
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Untitled from the series There are some mornings when the sky looks like a road, 2010 Unique Silver Gelatin Photogram 20 X 24"
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Untitled from the series There are some mornings when the sky looks like a road, 2010 Unique Silver Gelatin Photogram 20 X 24"
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Melted Mint Chromogenic Print 16 X 20"
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Bullets and Lace Chromogenic Print 20x30"
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Twin Drips Chromogenic Print 16 X 20"
FotoObscura
Curated by: Marisa McCarthy

1270 Valencia Street
San Francisco, CA 94110
November 17th, 2010 - January 3rd, 2011
Opening: November 17th, 2010 6:00 PM - 10:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.heartsf.com
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
Mission
OPEN HOURS:  
open 5pm until 11pm (Thu, Fri, Sat until 12 am) / Closed Tuesday
TAGS:  
photography, digital, abstract

DESCRIPTION

FotoObscura: Abstraction through Photography

Heart presents a selection of work that blurs the boundary between photography and abstract art. The photographers of FotoObscura move beyond traditional modes of photographic representation by manipulating images through a variety of techniques. Kirk Crippens and Adam Wier use perspective to achieve abstraction, while Keith Petersen and Julie Garner abstract their images digitally or manually during post-production. Klea McKenna's photograms negate the need for the traditional picture-taking device of the camera altogether. Whatever the process, the results beg one to consider the ever-evolving role of photography and the limitless possibilities of the medium.