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Palais de Tokyo

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The Only One Who Knows Desire

by Stephanie Cristello
I last felt this way when reading Ada by Nabokov. The pitch of amorous Baroque satire is about the same. Nabokov’s delicious novel traces a lifelong affair between a brother and sister (beginning with him aged fourteen, her eleven), under the pretense that they mistakenly think themselves cousins. It is set in the late nineteenth century, at their families’ summer home, in a place resembling the South of France. Opening in time for FIAC in Paris, Icelandic artist Ragnar Kjartansson’s exhibition at the Palais de Tokyo, entitled Seul celui qui connaît le désir (loosely trans... [more]
Posted by Stephanie Cristello on 10/21/15
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Watch DVDs, Eat Hot Dogs, and Swing on Tires

by James Loks
To enter this exhibition is to descend into an anarchic post-apocalyptic maze where mankind has come to rely on parcel tape as never before and small children run around like fuzzy static magnets for polystyrene debris. Yes, we are entering the world of Thomas Hirschhorn on a quite unprecedented scale, and as ever the Swiss artist presents us with an immersive vision. This is an exhibition where you can spend time, and after contemplating disruptions in doxical praxis you can watch DVDs, eat hot dogs, swing on tires, carve sculptures out of polystyrene—particularly enjoyed by the childre... [more]
Posted by James Loks on 5/19/14
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Hypnosis

by James Loks
There's part of this job that involves trying to use words to conjure the experience of an artwork or an exhibition for the reader. From the second I entered this show I realised that with the work of Julio le Parc – no chance. There's no way that I can tell you even a fraction of what the experience of being in this show is like. Not least because just finding your way through the first immersive sculpture – a small fully mirrored room full of tightly packed full length hanging mirrors that are slowly rotating – is next to impossible. I was pleased I overheard the gallery attendant telling s... [more]
Posted by James Loks on 2/28/13
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IN THE ENTRAILS OF THE SECRET PALAIS

by Jonathan Roze
If we can blame contemporary art exhibitions for being inaccessible to the general public because of their conceptualism, it is also true that urban art exhibitions often tend to focus on aesthetics only. Indeed, some of them are not much more than a static alignment of canvases whose main purpose is simple retinal seduction. However, spontaneity, with all the ingenuity it implies, remains an essential feature of this art born in the street. So how can the urban artist benefit from this spontaneity, by creating works freed from academic standards and from the burden of art history, without show... [more]
Posted by Jonathan Roze on 9/10/13
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ArtSlant STREET: In the Entrails of the Secret Palais

by Jonathan Roze
If we can blame contemporary art exhibitions for being inaccessible to the general public because of their conceptualism, it is also true that urban art exhibitions often tend to focus on aesthetics only. Indeed, some of them are not much more than a static alignment of canvases whose main purpose is simple retinal seduction. However, spontaneity, with all the ingenuity it implies, remains an essential feature of this art born in the street. So how can the urban artist benefit from this spontaneity, by creating works freed from academic standards and from the burden of art history, without show... [more]
Posted by Jonathan Roze on 9/23/13
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Territory, Identity, Culture & Politics: Paris Triennale 2012

by Katie Addleman
It’s hard to imagine that there’s more than this — more than the hundreds of works currently filling the immense, labyrinthine new Palais de Tokyo as part of the 2012 Paris Triennale, Intense Proximity — but the event in fact continues at seven other locations in and just outside of Paris. It’s a dizzying thought. The exhibition at Palais de Tokyo is already more landscape than art show. I felt like I was wandering around some wonderful, unfamiliar country, snapping pictures of the exotic vegetation to show the people back home. I’m not sure that this was the response that Okwui Enwezor, the d... [more]
Posted by Katie Addleman on 5/5/12
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Messages from Afar

by Lillian Davies
      Palais de Tokyo’s current exhibition takes its title from the mysterious shortwave radio antennas that emit seemingly random series of numbers, tones and melodies from various points around the globe. Many believe these “Spy Number Stations” have been in use since World War I, and have increased in prevalence since the 1990s. Most uninitiated listeners presume the stations are run by national governments as a means to communicate with their spies working around the globe. Following the previous exhibition “GAKONA” — loosely based on the work of Nikola Tesla — Palais de Tokyo again mines th... [more]
Posted by Lillian Davies on 8/13/09
Babydisco

Babydisco

Every morning I stop by Peet’s for caffeine and sugar. While I’m waiting I peruse the art work on the walls, the product of an elementary school art docent program. I am eternally grateful to the dedicated parents who volunteer their time. In his Arts and Culture Plan, Barack Obama pledged “to promote the importance of arts and art education” as president. But up to now, the docent-led program is the only art education that most children receive. That said, it’s not difficult to guess what masterpiece inspired each child’s drawing: The majority of docents are not trained teachers, artists, or art h... [more]
Posted by Michael Singman-Aste on 12/9/08