ArtSlant https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/show en-us 40 Under the Radar: Bat-Ami Rivlin | Hanna Washburn | e-oul <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/480548-bat-ami-rivlin?utm_source=Bat-AmiRivlin&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Bat-Ami Rivlin &ndash; New York</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1041023?utm_source=Bat-AmiRivlin&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1041023/u3azr9/20170406222804-Rivlin_BatAmi_18.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1041032?utm_source=Bat-AmiRivlin&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1041032/y8wnrh/20170407053835-Ami-01.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1041049?utm_source=Bat-AmiRivlin&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1041049/y8wnrh/20170407055156-Rivlin_BatAmi_6.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1041024?utm_source=Bat-AmiRivlin&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1041024/y8wnrh/20170406222809-Steve_photoshopped.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/472529-hanna-washburn?utm_source=HannaWashburn&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Hanna Washburn &ndash; New York City</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1046244?utm_source= HannaWashburn&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1046244/u3azr9/20170512153617-melancholic.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="60%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1046255?utm_source=HannaWashburn&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1046255/y8wnrh/20170512153623-phlegmatic.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1046256?utm_source=HannaWashburn&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1046256/y8wnrh/20170512153624-sanguine.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1046251?utm_source=HannaWashburn&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1046251/y8wnrh/20170512153622-phantomlimb4.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/477657-e-oul?utm_source=e-oul&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">e-oul &ndash; London</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1037681?utm_source=e-oul&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1037681/u3azr9/20170327093148-ChrystalEpicodeTatemodern_Pital_rainbow.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1039514?utm_source=e-oul&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1039514/y8wnrh/20170328184553-NewM_cloth22_a.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1037679?utm_source=e-oul&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1037679/y8wnrh/20170316083523-Chrystal_s_epicode_AverityOfRace.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1040043?utm_source=e-oul&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1040043/y8wnrh/20170331192035-IMG_7104_s.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/s?marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Fri, 26 May 2017 09:15:51 -0400 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list In “A Room of Our Own,” Istanbul Artists Talk Motherhood, Careers, and Periods <p>Two years after giving birth to a human being, I realized that my body and mind had become entities, two different systems: one, a figure of unity and strength, the other caught in an interminable state of disfigurement. No matter how hard I tried to ignore my body &ldquo;becoming animal,&rdquo; as Deleuze and Guattari would say, no matter how much I laughed in the face of post-partum depression tales, I could not have my life back as it was before. I was stuck in this simultaneous nightmare and heaven called motherhood, unwittingly thinking about my own femininity at all times.</p> <p>In that light, when I received a questionnaire a few months ago about topics like menstruation, childbirth, abortion, miscarriage, biological clocks, and menopause, I felt relief to learn that I wasn&rsquo;t the only one contemplating issues like the hierarchies of motherhood and childcare, feminine biological cycles, and their physical and emotional outcomes. This intimate survey, sent to me by an artist and fellow curator, was the starting point for the current Ark K&uuml;lt&uuml;r exhibition <em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/446482-a-room-of-our-own?tab=EVENT">A Room of Our Own</a></em>, which is an extension of workshops on motherhood and fertility run by Arzu Yayıntaş&nbsp;and G&uuml;neş Terkol since 2015. Initiated in response to escalating patriarchal political inclinations in Turkey and state control and social pressures on women&rsquo;s bodies&mdash;in 2008, for example, the then prime minister of Turkey advised all women to have at least three children&mdash;the workshops aimed to reconsider often overlooked or under-discussed issues like birth, childcare, and the power dynamics of motherhood.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170524152222-Alaca_Heyheyler-Ay_Cad_r_.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>Curator Arzu Yayıntaş&nbsp;echoed my own recent sentiments as she elaborated on the personal impetus behind the workshops and subsequent exhibition: &ldquo;I entered the world of motherhood after I gave birth, and since then my life has transformed painstakingly. As an activist feminist, I have been an advocate for abortion, yet the scarcity of discussions about motherhood made me think about the division of labor in childcare, isolation in motherhood, and the dilemma between the career and motherhood.&rdquo; The workshops, she said, made her realize just how much people had been suppressing these issues and needed to talk about them.</p> <p>Like the workshops and questionnaire, the exhibition, which included an open call for artwork, was a collaborative, exploratory venture. Yayıntaş and her co-curators, Terkol and artist Sevil Tunaboylu, conceptualized the exhibition as &ldquo;a common space with a more equalitarian and embracing attitude.&rdquo; Some artists produced new works, while others dug into their own archives for previously unexhibited artworks. The resulting show brings together 22 artists who handle the topics of motherhood, fertility, and labor using nearly every imaginable medium.</p> <p>Ark K&uuml;lt&uuml;r is a three-story building in Istanbul, with a garden in the entrance. Before entering the building, one hears Sena Baş&ouml;z&rsquo;s <em>Sweetheart </em>(2017), which is installed at the bottom of a cheesewood shrub. Emanating from a secluded corner of the garden, we hear terms of endearment like &ldquo;my love,&rdquo; &ldquo;sugar-darling,&rdquo; &ldquo;honey babe.&rdquo; Baş&ouml;z&rsquo;s work recalls the the tale of King Midas, whose barber whispered into a hole in the ground, &ldquo;King Midas has the ears of an ass!&rdquo; Just as plants grew around this hole to speak the king&rsquo;s secret, Baş&ouml;z&rsquo;s plant voices the hidden words of a silenced mother. &nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170524151143-Arzu_Yay_ntas_-_Annenin_takim_cantasi_k.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Arzu Yayıntaş</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>On the second floor entrance, we see Yayıntaş&rsquo;s <em>Mother&rsquo;s Toolkit</em> (2017). In the middle of this assembly of photos is an image of a woman with milk leaking from one breast, staining her t-shirt. For a woman who has experienced lactation, encountering this image is a visceral experience. For me, it brings back memories of pumping milk for my daughter in a filthy archive restroom while I worked on my dissertation, and still coming home to find my shirt stained. Around this photo are images of items about birth and its control, displayed like portraits of loved family members: a nursing bra, re-usable bra pads, a nipple shield, manual and electric breast pumps, contraceptives. Nearby, &Ouml;zg&uuml;l Arslan&rsquo;s video <em>Milk Me</em> (2006) chronicles an electric pump milking a woman, filling only a third of a bottle. Arslan criticizes exclusion of women from the labor market, and the overemphasis on women&rsquo;s reproductive capacities and value&mdash;as long as they are child-bearers. Her work speaks to capitalism&rsquo;s exploitation of women, who not only have a huge pay-gap in the work force, but are also expected to maintain the domestic space.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170524151737-O_zgu_l_Arslan_-_Sag__Beni_.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">&Ouml;zg&uuml;l Arslan</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>An embroidered tulle curtain marks the entryway to <em>Moon Tent</em> (2017), a work created by the exhibition organizers Yayıntaş, Terkol, and Tunaboylu. <em>Moon Tent</em> invites participants to think collaboratively about dreams, thoughts, and feminine cycles, directly responding to the questionnaire disseminated at the outset of the project. <em>Have you ever thought about your own birth or have you talked to your own mother about it? What do you think about abortion? </em><em>If we wanted you to choose one color for before and after birth, what would those be? Do you think menopause is liberating or restrictive?</em> The results are published in a book and expressed in the form of embroidered images, illustrations, texts, and photographs on the tent&rsquo;s walls. One embroidered image depicts a woman having a C-section&mdash;&ldquo;I didn&rsquo;t feel my belly&rdquo; reads a nearby text; another shows a breastfeeding woman with the text &ldquo;As if my breasts were his/hers, I felt under invasion.&rdquo; There is humor too: in one photo, a breastfeeding woman holds up her middle finger; in a folding pop-up card a baby pops and an Oscars statue pop out of a uterus.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170524151927-Ay_C_ad_r_3.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Arzu Yayıntaş,&nbsp;G&uuml;neş Terkol,&nbsp;Sevil Tunaboylu,&nbsp;<em>Moon Tent</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In the middle of the ceiling, which is covered by rainbow-colored tulle, there is a moon. As a symbol of feminine cycles, the moon unites a large cross-section of women under its tent (it&rsquo;s worth noting that, though trans women are never explicitly excluded, the exhibition&rsquo;s reproductive focus centers largely on cisgender women&rsquo;s experiences): women who had an abortion, gave birth, or had a miscarriage; women who don&rsquo;t want children; women who felt useless because of infertility or menopause; women who love or hate their menstruation; women whose bodies are controlled by the government or families; women who felt shame for breastfeeding in public&hellip;</p> <p>Throughout the exhibition, the tent is used for performances and workshops in which women share and learn how to fight against social pressure and misogyny. It is the eponymous &ldquo;room of our own,&rdquo; reconceptualized from Virginia Woolf as a communal space necessary for women not only to create their artwork, but also to unpack baggage long hidden from public or pigeon-holed as &ldquo;womanly&rdquo; or &ldquo;feminine&rdquo; within the art world.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170524152335-Neriman_Polat_-_Onu_Besleme.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Neriman Polat</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Climbing up to the third floor, we see the text work of Oda Projesi, an artist initiative founded in 2000 by &Ouml;zge A&ccedil;ıkkol, G&uuml;neş Savaş, and Se&ccedil;il Yersel. The roots of their ongoing project, ANA&mdash;&ldquo;mama&rdquo; in Turkish&mdash;were planted in 2013 in Astrid Noack&rsquo;s Atelier residency, in Copenhagen. Inspired by identifying their own needs as artists and mothers, the artists collected audio recordings on the subjects of motherhood and being a woman artist, and shared their strategies concerning these issues. Across the stairwell is Neriman Polat&rsquo;s <em>Heartless Blankets</em>&nbsp;series, in which she recomposes texts and images on children&rsquo;s blankets. In <em>Don&rsquo;t Feed Him </em>(2017), a female rabbit, whose gender we can identify through her clothing, feeds a male one. One of the thousands of representations in which a woman is happily feeding a man, the blanket speaks to the early socialization of gender roles. Polat questions the role of women as caretakers, reminding us that being an &ldquo;evil&rdquo; mother/sister/wife is a taboo.</p> <p><em>Cut</em>, by Nurcan G&uuml;ndoğan, is an installation and video staged in a room with an old TV set, a chair, a hand-knit baby sweater, and an umbilical cord hung on the wall. It&rsquo;s a ceremonial place where the artist has severed her relationship with her mother by taking her umbilical cord back at the age of forty. &ldquo;Cut&rdquo; also references to the cinematographic &ldquo;Cut!&rdquo; for this will be the last video that the artist will shoot with her mother. In the video, G&uuml;ndoğan asks her mother questions about birth, abortion, and fertility. Considering abortion, G&uuml;ndoğan&rsquo;s mom responds, &ldquo;You shouldn&rsquo;t have done it in the first place! Abortion is unacceptable!&rdquo; She tells her daughter that menopause devalues a woman because it ends her fertility, and thus womanhood. When asked if she needs her womanhood, however, she replies: &ldquo;Why would I need my womanhood? I&rsquo;ve given birth, I&rsquo;m done!&rdquo; These answers illustrate the toxic patriarchal mindset the artist and others like her have grown up with in Turkish society.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170524152725-DSC00982.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Nurcan G&uuml;ndoğan</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>There&rsquo;s an old custom in Turkey for a mother to slap her daughter in the face when she menstruates for the first time. It&rsquo;s too easy for women to internalize and perpetuate shame and misconceptions about their bodies and roles in society. These kinds of unquestioned traditions are also the reason why a strong, feminist exhibition like <em>A Room of Our Own </em>is so crucial at a time like this, when the patriarchy is gaining social and political power in the country. As Yayıntaş told me:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">This is an exhibition to share and get stronger. This is the reason to use the room metaphor. The room is to shatter the very clich&eacute;s about women in the society and to heal at the same time. The room is to make more experiences visible and strengthen women&rsquo;s solidarity. We aim to remember our first slap when we menstruate for the first time and heal it by embracing each other.</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">&nbsp;</p> <p><em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/446482-a-room-of-our-own?tab=EVENT">A Room of Our Own</a> runs at Ark K&uuml;lt&uuml;r in Istanbul from May 9&ndash;June 4, 2017, featuring Ada Tuncer, Arzu Arbak , Arzu Yayıntaş, Ecem Yerman, Ece Eldek, Elif Varol Ergen, Fatoş Irwen, Gizem Aksu, G&ouml;k&ccedil;e Deniz Balkan, G&uuml;neş Terkol, Işıl Eğrikavuk, Merve &Ccedil;anak&ccedil;ı, Nancy Atakan, Neriman Polat, Nurcan G&uuml;ndoğan, Oda Projesi, &Ouml;zg&uuml;l Arslan, Se&ccedil;il Yersel, Sena Baş&ouml;z, Sevil Tunaboylu, Sezgi Abalı and Yasemin Nur.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/418487-p%C4%B1nar-%C3%9Cner-y%C4%B1lmaz?tab=REVIEWS">Pınar &Uuml;ner Yılmaz</a></p> <p><em>Pınar &Uuml;ner Yılmaz is a writer, curator, and PhD candidate in Art History at the University of Illinois at Chicago. She is currently based between Istanbul and Chicago.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;Arzu Yayıntaş,&nbsp;G&uuml;neş Terkol,&nbsp;Sevil Tunaboylu, <em>Moon Tent</em>. All images: Courtesy of the artists)</span></p> Fri, 26 May 2017 10:06:42 -0400 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: Neon Saltwater <p><a href="http://www.neonsaltwater.com/" target="_blank">Neon Saltwater</a> (a.k.a. Abby Dougherty) is a Seattle-based new media artist whose specializes in creating digital interiors that exist somewhere between the pastel, neon glow of the 1980s and a perfect, fantasy future.</p> <p>Dougherty designed real interiors before she began experimenting with her hyper-stylized digital spaces. In 2015 she coined a word to describe them: <em>R o o m w a v e</em> . The <em>R o o m w a v e</em> concept has garnered a passionate <a href="http://roomwave.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">online following</a> through various social media sites with members contributing found photographs as well as original artwork that reflect the <em>R o o m w a v e </em>ideal. Dougherty insists that that ideal is not purely based on aesthetics but also an enigmatic and elusive quality that even she, as the creator, finds it hard to define.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170524133743-Night-After-the-Mall-2.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Night After the Mall</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: Tell us a little about the origins of your alternate name Neon Saltwater.</strong></p> <p><strong>Neon Saltwater:</strong> Neon Saltwater started as a name of a music playlist that I shared with a (now estranged) friend. The name came randomly to me in kind of a flash as I imagined a scene in a dark room with big clear plastic tanks of colored water that were glowing. I named the playlist &ldquo;Neon Saltwater Party.&rdquo; It was the kind of place I imagined interacting with the person in.&nbsp;We always had this silent connection that was really bizarre and alien, as if it was from a past life. The energy felt supernatural and belonged to another realm and the music made it feel real. All the songs on the playlist had to capture the essence of that word neonsaltwater. As a visual artist, I decided to create visual representation of places where that energy lived.</p> <p>The images I create have the same rules of the playlist. It felt natural to brand my art in that way as I have always really appreciated collections and series.&nbsp;People started to call me <em>Neon Saltwater</em> and I was ok with that. I think my personal identity as Abby doesn&rsquo;t matter because my intention when creating this collection is to express mysterious emotions that other people have also felt before and that is what my art is always about.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170524132031-badlands-crater.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>&ldquo;Badlands&rdquo; for Crater</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What sparked your interest in using computers creatively? &nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>NS: </strong>I have always been an&nbsp;artist and I have always felt&nbsp;comfortable with computers.&nbsp;Computers and 3D modeling programs allow me to really express things I can&rsquo;t express in other mediums and I feel the most connected to myself when I am playing with space and objects in 3D. The possibilities are endless and it&rsquo;s satisfying to create things that defy gravity.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: You also work as an interior designer. Which came first real or digital interiors?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS:</strong> I was an interior designer first but I have always been an artist that loved spaces.&nbsp;I didn&#39;t start making digital rooms as an art form though until a few years after college.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170524133725-This-Place-isn_t-Real.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>This place isn&#39;t real but I know we were there</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How was your art school experience and what lasting impact did it have on your work?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS: </strong>Interior design was probably the most non-typical &ldquo;art school&rdquo; major that Cornish (College of the Arts, Seattle) offered and most of the curriculum was more technical and meant to prepare us to go off to architectural firms. However, my class had an incredible teacher for most of our initial interior studio classes named Jon Gierlich. He made an incredible impact on my design process. He really valued conceptualism and abstract thinking when it came to environments. He gave us assignments that we thought were ridiculous at first but they conditioned us to develop a deep emotional relationship with space and to think about interiors as having an intentional energy. He always emphasized the idea that there was a live spirit in architecture and space and we grew to pour our hearts into our projects. I feel so lucky to have had him when we did: he passed away our senior year but his methods and teachings are still ingrained in my process.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170524133800-itkillsme.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>It Kills Me</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What attracted you to focus on creating digital interiors and architecture in your art?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS: </strong>In real life, I am actually an&nbsp;interior designer and I have always loved environments. I started rearranging my room about once a month when I was a kid and it would drive my parents nuts. I somehow figured out how to get my 10-year-old body to push a huge dresser across the room sometimes in the middle of the night when my parents were sleeping. Once I had the idea to do it, I had to do it right then and there even if it was not an appropriate time. I was obsessed with the change of emotion I felt from furniture being switched around. Now I love everything related from event design to home staging. I love aesthetic consistency and formulaic compositions of space. Digital media lets me create rooms faster more often than reality.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170524133826-itsalwayswithyou.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>It&#39;s always with you</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What is <em>R o o m w a v e </em>?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS:</strong>&nbsp;<em>R o o m w a v e</em> is a term I made up that is inspired by an aspect of Vaporwave (music genre) that often expresses a romanticism with isolated consumerist environments. When I discovered Vaporwave, I got instant goose bumps because I realized the subconscious thoughts/feelings/weird memories that had always been in my dreams or thoughts were being defined by a music genre and people on the internet. I created <em>R o o m w a v e</em> as a Facebook group&nbsp;to share photos of rooms that gave me these strange mysterious sensations of d&eacute;j&agrave; vu and fantasy.&nbsp;I wanted to know if other people felt these things too. <em>R o o m w a v e</em> rooms typically are just about over-the-top design, places that inspire us, offer an escape from reality. In my personal opinion <em>R o o m w a v e</em> isn&rsquo;t purely aesthetic and has a quality that is kind of indescribable. It has an energy that often has to do with the way the room was staged and photographed and how it is. Sometimes rooms might have typical aesthetic qualities but no ounce of energy. <em>R o o m w a v e</em> is a living thing: it&rsquo;s either there or it&rsquo;s not, and that&rsquo;s all I really know at this point. Defining the rules of <em>R o o m w a v e</em>&nbsp; in words has been almost impossible at times.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170524133900-LanaLang.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Lana Lang I</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How has your work with physical spaces influenced your digital spaces?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS: </strong>After school being very hypothetical and conceptual, I entered a harsh reality of realizing that most spaces were based on budget, practicality, and material resources available. That discouraged me but my work experience in event design and personal styling has trained my critical eye to be quick and careful at editing. For a long time I was forced to put my personal sense of expression to the side and rely on my sense of design principles to complete projects I didn&rsquo;t always love.&nbsp;Now I feel like I have more control over the aesthetic I am going for and I feel like I have an easier time channeling and executing the abstract emotions that I feel.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170524134012-Guava_Lounge_.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Guava Lounge Pet Shop</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: In your upcoming UNVIRTUAL project you intend to make a &ldquo;real&rdquo; version of one of your digital spaces. Why is that important for you?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS: </strong>I think this <a href="https://www.gofundme.com/38yx9xs" target="_blank">UNVIRTUAL</a> project is just about melting my love for virtual spaces and real interior design together. Real life spaces aren&rsquo;t as cinematic as they could be and they have to be durable and practical. UNVIRTUAL only has to exist as a temporary installation for a few weeks and doesn&rsquo;t have to be functional long term. It gives me the flexibility to bend the rules and portray an ultimate fantasy space that people can walk around in.&nbsp;Neon Saltwater is a super lonely experience when viewing it as a flat image and I&rsquo;m excited to twist that and make it a thing people experience around others.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: You are trying to raise money for the project through GoFundMe. Is this a reflection on the difficulty</strong> <strong>digital artists have in monetizing and funding their work?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS: </strong>Most of the digital community that exists on Instagram and Tumblr and stuff doesn&rsquo;t always have the same effect when printed. I think the general lack of tangibility makes it hard to sell because it&rsquo;s meant to be consumed at any time on a screen on social media. My dream from the beginning was to bring Neon Saltwater into reality for people to experience in a non-isolated way, and thanks to the community and the fundraising platform, UNVIRTUAL will be the first step to do that.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170524134136-SICKSADWORLDGIF.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Sick Sad World for Crater</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Was it a deliberate decision to never have people inhabiting your spaces?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS: </strong>Definitely. It is a deliberate decision for many reasons. Neon Saltwater is about how rooms can capture emotions and feelings long before and after people inhabit them. It&rsquo;s about the energy that lingers there. The only time I have ever put a person (me) in a space, I made myself blurry like a ghost. Second, the spaces are not defined by a specific kind of person that inhabits them, and are more about the general human experience. Putting people the space would influence or imply a specific narrative and it would destroy the mystery and obscurity of the space. The point is to invite any person to interpret the spaces by referencing their own experiences and sense of nostalgia.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Your spaces tend to reflect a feeling of &ldquo;generic, futuristic 80s, LA, dream luxury.&rdquo; What interests you about that aesthetic particularly?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS: </strong>For me it&rsquo;s nostalgia mixed with a desire to exist in an era that was not afraid of color and texture. I think tropical settings have always represented an ideal escape or vacation from reality and a lot of people respond to that. It never gets old for me. Neon Saltwater definitely expresses moments I want to experience in reality. It has always been about making my daydreams into a digitally tangible thing.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170524135022-Lana-Lang-II-.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Lana Lang II</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Why do you think so many young artists are drawn to the 80s as an inspiration?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS: </strong>I think people that are my age are influenced by the 80s&nbsp;because it was still lingering in the early 90s. A lot of people don&rsquo;t&nbsp;think about how decades are a smooth&nbsp;evolution into each other and they don&rsquo;t abruptly end.&nbsp;As a child born in 1990, I grew up watching videos from the 80s and so it&rsquo;s familiar in a very distant way. It&rsquo;s very comforting, as if the imagery I saw as a kid is real memory.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Can you let us a little about your process? How much are your spaces planned in advance</strong></p> <p><strong>NS: </strong>I get flashes of &ldquo;imaginary&rdquo; rooms in my head all the time and I don&rsquo;t know where they come from. I dream of architecture in high detail and wake up remembering how to navigate the spaces.&nbsp;I start by building those images in my head and they often change organically as I go. I don&rsquo;t stop working on a composition until it feels done and sometimes it takes me 10 hours to get one right. It is similar to how I curate <em>R o o m w a v e</em> &mdash;by the end of rendering it either has the right energy or it doesn&rsquo;t.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170524135123-Sleepwalker.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Sleepwalker</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: There is a community of artist exploring similar themes to yours in different ways. Do you feel part of a community with those artists?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS: </strong>I&nbsp;definitely feel like part of the community and it has been very fulfilling to find people out in the world that feel very similar things. Online has given me a chance to meet and collaborate with people on other continents I wouldn&rsquo;t otherwise ever have the chance to connect with.&nbsp;Some of my all time favorites are Ethan Redd,&nbsp;Jess Audrey Lynn, Anny Wang, Max Seckel, Miranda lorikeet,&nbsp;Brit Ruggirello,&nbsp;Fvck Render, Blake Kathryn, lena ighpre, Mind PANIC, Ruby Gloom, Nicole Ruggiero, and so many more!&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Can you talk about your relationship with color?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS: </strong>Ever since I was a child, I have zoomed in on color and analyzed it. It wasn&rsquo;t until recently that I discovered I might have synthesia (Google it) because I have such an intense reaction to color. I see colors&rsquo; auras in days, months, years, decades, words, letters, numbers, people, sounds, and smells and it&rsquo;s how I memorize information. In the beginning of Neon Saltwater I used a lot of pastel colors but it is not limited to that. I am inspired by almost every color. As Neon Saltwater evolves, you will start to see new color themes and relationships emerge.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170524135224-breathing.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Heartbeat Between Lives</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Would you describe your work as political?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS: </strong>A lot of my art comes from a reaction of feeling very alienated and bummed out by politics and an observer of society rather than a participant. I always feel like I&rsquo;m on the outside looking in (like an alien) and I can&rsquo;t fully immerse myself into the reality that most people live in. I don&rsquo;t think of my work as political but a friend once told me that virtual reality is political for being created in the first place.</p> <p><strong>CP: The new media art scene has been at the cutting edge of new feminist thought.</strong> <strong>Why do you&nbsp;think it&rsquo;s such an important medium for that?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS: </strong>Digital media can be produced and distributed on social media quickly and frequently and the constant exposure is a powerful tool to influence people. While there are so many criticisms of social media, there are also so many amazing artists that I admire taking advantage of the platform and publishing really positive and empowering imagery.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170524135328-grossrelationstionscrater.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Gross Relations for Crater</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Seattle is a rapidly growing tech city but it&rsquo;s new media/digital art scene is very small.</strong> <strong>Why do you think that is? </strong></p> <p><strong>NS: </strong>I think integrating digital art into more events and the music scene will really bring more appeal to the medium. It needs to find a way to find monetary value and demand because it is so time consuming to create. I think the music and club scene has utilized my artwork in a way that is very impactful and there&rsquo;s a lot of opportunity to collaborate with entertainment industry on a local scale.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What else do you have coming up?</strong></p> <p><strong>NS: </strong>UNVIRTUAL is the only thing solid and I am putting all my energy into right now. I like to do collaborations but have put those on pause for now. I have another project that is up in the air that may exist in mid-August.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170524135454-withoutyou.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Without You</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&#39;re interested in what&#39;s happening with art on the web. We invited online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, to write a bi-monthly column for us. Every other Wednesday he selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: <em>Mall Feelings</em>. All images: Courtesy of Neon Saltwater)</span></p> Wed, 24 May 2017 11:56:37 -0400 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Christa Pratt Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/46392-b-stylecolor-333333under-the-radar-ashley-eliza-williams-christa-pratt-eden-auerbach-ofratb" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from </em><em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/460608-christa-pratt" target="_blank"><em>Christa Pratt</em></a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>I&rsquo;m interested in staying spiritually, politically, and emotionally in-tune with myself and my existence through sculpting blackness in intimate and sensual ways, centering blackness and femininity. Decentering whiteness and patriarchy has been an important part of my self-love journey and my journey as an artist. At its core, with my work I want to communicate that we as living things have continuous access to the immaculate and the sublime, and always have the propensity to reach heights we can&rsquo;t even imagine. Regardless of what people or systems may try to do to limit us, we can create beauty that is intimately unique to each one of us because of our specific experiences. I want my work to communicate self-love and hope.</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>There are a million correct answers to that question. In my opinion, an artist&rsquo;s responsibility is simply to create what is needed, to create the persistence of an idea, or to find new answers. To contribute to yourself and/or those around you, and to contribute in a way that is not harmful. When ideas die or go unchallenged, we never collectively learn or move forward, and we continue making the same mistakes. Artists will create or innovate in whatever method that fits them and for whatever reason, be that to create solace from, to remind, to create a utilitarian solution to a problem, or even to actively ignore. But, the ideas and output should not be harmful.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art or not)?</strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170522175817-MikoThereWereNoMirrorsInMyHouse-2013-8ftx6ft.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>My favorite figurative painting that I&rsquo;ve ever done, called&nbsp;<em>Miko (There Were No Mirrors In My House)</em>, Oil and Acrylic on Canvas, 8 x 6 feet, 2013.</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will.</strong></p> <p>If I really want to make a work, I don&rsquo;t think there&rsquo;s anything that would stop me from making it.</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.theresachromati.com" target="_blank">Theresa Chromati</a>, <a href="http://www.planetlucid.com/cultivate/illustrations/" target="_blank">Ryan Spence</a>, and <a href="http://www.erikaranee.com/index.php" target="_blank">Erika Ranee</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <div> <hr align="left" noshade="noshade" size="0" width="100%" /></div> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Christa Pratt,&nbsp;<em>Planet G</em>,&nbsp;Acrylic Paint on Artist Panel, 20 x 16 inches)</span></p> Mon, 22 May 2017 14:04:10 -0400 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Playing Goatherd in Queens, Nari Ward Tends a Subversive Flock <p>When I visited Nari Ward&rsquo;s Socrates Sculpture Park exhibition <em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/446480-goat">Nari Ward: G.O.A.T. again</a></em> on a spring day, children were roaming the park, enjoying the mellow weather. Presumably on a day trip from a local school in Queens, these kids of diverse backgrounds and and colors, were climbing on <em>Scapegoat</em>, a mammoth-scale goat figure reclining in the middle of the park. They were giggling at <em>Bipartition Bell</em>, a pair of giant copper goat testicles hanging from a steel and wood structure, facetiously evoking the Liberty Bell in terms of its monumentality and heft.&nbsp;</p> <p>The Jamaica-born and New York-based Ward has been a prominent figure since the 90s with career highlights like his participation in the 2006 Whitney Biennial and recent win of the Vilcek Prize for the Arts, awarded to immigrant artists. Ward&rsquo;s mastery lies within his witty manipulation of found mundane objects, and the careful balance he creates between the familiar and peculiar. In the center of his occupation of the Socrates Sculpture Park&mdash;the park&rsquo;s first solo show in its 30-year history&mdash;stands <em>Apollo/Poll</em>, a steel, wood, and repurposed vinyl sculpture replicating the iconic Apollo Theater sign in Harlem. With each flicker, LED lights oscillate between &ldquo;Apollo&rdquo; and &ldquo;Poll.&rdquo; Undertaken during last year&rsquo;s presidential election, when the country faced extreme polarization and animosity, Ward&rsquo;s ode to his neighborhood&rsquo;s landmark venue&mdash;now flashing in another up-and-coming neighborhood with working class roots&mdash;spearheads his commentary on race and class struggles.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170516124442-Image_1_Apollo_Poll.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Nari Ward, <em>Apollo/Poll</em>, 2017. Courtesy the artist; Socrates Sculpture Park; Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong; and Galleria Continua, San Gimignano / Beijing / Les Moulins / Habana</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>During our walkthrough, Jess Wilcox, the park&rsquo;s Director of Exhibitions, underlined the parallels Ward aims to build between public art and live performance; referencing both the Apollo&rsquo;s popular Amateur Night and the work&rsquo;s presentation in a public park, she noted how the artist brings together ideas about vulnerability, visibility, and exposure. As an artist subverting utilitarian functions of everyday objects, humor is fundamental for Ward&mdash;and so are puns. Goat sculptures do, indeed, populate the park, but the acronym in the exhibition&rsquo;s title stands for &ldquo;Greatest of All Time&rdquo;&mdash;a hyperbolic expression adopted to define musicians and athletes, made popular by Muhammad Ali and picked up by the Queens native LL Cool J for his best-selling album.</p> <p>The title speaks to the representation and categorization of race, in this case linking it to a controlled promise of achievement. Sports and music&mdash;two fields granted as token routes for the African-American dream&mdash;suggest supposedly realistic pathways for success and acceptance. Bombastic slogans and marketing strategies abound in popular culture: from sneaker ads in which the highest paid musicians and sportsmen play agents of prosperity to music videos depicting extravagant wealth and fame. These roles tailored to African-American youth hardly exceed one-dimensionality, and their definitions of success and achievement are improbable at best. In Ward&rsquo;s exhibition, the goat figure tackles these notions of struggle, guilt, victimization, and public image.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170516124421-Image_2_GOATs_2.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Nari Ward, <em>G.O.A.T.s</em>, 2017 (detail). Courtesy the artist; Socrates Sculpture Park; Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong; and Galleria Continua, San Gimignano / Beijing / Les Moulins / Habana</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Despite carrying different connotations across cultures, goats primarily reflect determination: with their steadfast persistence to reach soaring peaks, goats are the go-getters of the animal kingdom. Conversely, the goat may also represent victimization and guilt. In three major monotheist religions, the goat symbolizes sacrifice, with the scapegoat imaged to be the bearer of all sins. Dispersed around the park&rsquo;s rolling landscape surface, the goats, totaling twenty, pose at varying elevations, adding performative accents to the installation while calling back to the notion of escalation towards success. Like David Hammons&rsquo; <em>Basketball Chandelier</em> series, they convey quixotic heights and the determination to reach them.</p> <p>Sprawling tragically on the grass is the enormous <em>Scapegoat</em>, encapsulating ridicule and futility, a fall from grace. A goat&rsquo;s disembodied head is mounted onto a stick-like apparatus punctuated by a single wheel: it&rsquo;s an impotent hobbyhorse. A fire hose, a material Ward notably used in his 1993 installation <em>Amazing Grace</em>, wraps around the sculpture&rsquo;s baton of a body. The discordance between the primary life-saving purpose of the fire hose and its use by the police to suppress protesting crowds corresponds to the goat&rsquo;s wretched position.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170516124341-Image_4_Scapegoat.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Nari Ward, <em>Scapegoat</em>, 2017. Courtesy the artist; Socrates Sculpture Park; Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong; and Galleria Continua, San Gimignano / Beijing / Les Moulins / Habana. Photo: Matthew Herrmann</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Leaving the park, the tensions between Ward&#39;s subversive subject matter and the way his sculptures disarmed and playfully engaged the school children, stuck with me.&nbsp;Although Ward&rsquo;s sculptures brim with joviality on the surface, they simultaneously encompass serious political commentary on American nationalism and racial and economic injustice. Images of goats hauling shoes or electronic cords may convey pure entertainment for the kids playing around the park, but Ward&rsquo;s sculptures also encapsulate the struggles that they, their parents, relatives, and neighbors may experience throughout their lifetimes. The goats represent immigrants, foreigners, or laborers struggling to make ends meet while defying the pathways&mdash;<em>sports, music</em>&mdash;dictated to them.</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/446480-goat">Nari Ward: G.O.A.T., again</a><em> continues at Socrates Sculpture Park through September 4, 2017.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/216750-osman-can-yerebakan?tab=REVIEWS">Osman Can Yerebakan</a></p> <p><em>Osman Can Yerebakan is a writer and curator based in New York.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Nari Ward, <em>G.O.A.T.s</em>, 2017 (detail). Courtesy the artist; Socrates Sculpture Park; Lehmann Maupin, New York and Hong Kong; and Galleria Continua, San Gimignano / Beijing / Les Moulins / Habana)</span></p> Tue, 16 May 2017 12:45:32 -0400 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Announcing the 2017 Georgia Fee Resident: Shoshana Kessler <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">We are very pleased to announce the selection of </span><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/478156-shoshana-kessler" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration-line: none;">Shoshana Kessler</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"> as our 2017 Resident. Thank you to all applicants and a very special thank you to all </span><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/47820-announcing-the-georgia-fee-artist-writer-residency-shortlist" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration-line: none;">shortlisted applicants</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"> who were interviewed.</span></p> <hr /> <p><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170515171401-IMG_0015.jpg" style="float: right; margin: 10px;" width="250" /></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Shoshana Kessler</strong> is a printer and writer, based in Oxford, U.K. She has previously studied at the University of Edinburgh and the University of Oxford. In 2015, she, alongside colleague Beth Sparks, established <a href="https://www.hurststreetpress.co.uk/hsp-blog/" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">Hurst Street Press</a>, an independent printing press and publishing house. Hurst Street Press is committed to publishing new and experimental works of art and literature, using traditional techniques of production. Their publications include <a href="https://www.hurststreetpress.co.uk/event/iris-iii-the-exhibition/" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;"><em>IRIS</em></a> magazine and <em>The Divers</em>, a first collection of poetry. The Press also runs events and exhibitions alongside their publications, previously exhibiting at <a href="https://www.modernartoxford.org.uk/event/hurst-street-press-presents-sense-place-display/" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">Modern Art Oxford</a> and OVADA, a visual art development space.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px;">Shoshana has written for various publications, including <em>IRIS</em> magazine, <em>The London Magazine</em> and the <em>Oxonian Review</em>. She also works as an editorial assistant for <em>The White Review</em>.</span></p> <table align="center" height="auto" width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td width="33%"><a href="https://www.hurststreetpress.co.uk/iris/"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170515171706-IRIS-1.jpg" /></a></td> <td width="33%"><a href="https://www.hurststreetpress.co.uk/the-divers/"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170515171719-TheDivers.jpg" /></a></td> <td width="33%"><a href="https://www.hurststreetpress.co.uk/iris/"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170515171732-IRISII.jpg" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px;">Project Description:</span></strong></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px;">My proposed project is an interpretation of Hope Mirrlees&rsquo;s modernist masterpiece, <em>Paris, A Poem</em>. Paris was written in the summer of 1919, and typeset by the Hogarth Press, Virginia and Leonard Woolf&rsquo;s publishing house. An exploration of the city in a single day, I intend to re-trace the route and undertake a creative re-setting of the poem. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px;"><em>Paris, A Poem</em> acts as a visual and written representation of a very specific time: it records the theatre, the adverts, small bursts of conversation, and the general atmosphere of the city in the wake of World War I. I&rsquo;m interested in the apposition of contemporary Paris with archival remnants from the early twentieth century; looking at which artworks and advertisements have been remembered, whilst recalling those obscured by the progression of taste. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px;">During the residency, I plan to employ traditional methods of production to create the piece. This will involve, for example, using old typefaces as an instrument to investigate the everyday language of a city. Correspondingly, I wish to use modern technology (the internet, mixed-media, film, sound recordings) to showcase the history of both Hope Mirrlees and 1919 Paris.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px;">Alongside this project, I hope to run bookbinding and stitching workshops, as well as readings. These will be offered as a way to encounter the project beyond the page, equipping those interested with new skills, and ensuring that these old techniques are continued.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" style="text-align: center;"> <hr /> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: #000000; line-height: 28px;"><strong>Georgia Fee Artist/Writer Residency</strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px; text-align: left;">&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #000000;">was established in memory of&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/la/articles/show/32913" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">ArtSlant&#39;s Founder who passed away December 8th, 2012.</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 28px; text-align: left;">&nbsp;</span><span style="color: #000000;">Georgia was dedicated to supporting and investing in young artists and writers, and she had a deep connection with the city of Paris. This project-driven residency, which offers artists and writers the opportunity to create work in Paris, has been created in Georgia&#39;s memory.</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: #000000; line-height: 28px;">The goal of the Georgia Fee Artist/Writer Residency in Paris is to support and invest in emerging artists and writers, to provide an opportunity for them to advance their work and explore and engage with the cultural landscape of Paris, to encourage experimentation, and to increase exposure of their work to an international audience.</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: #000000; line-height: 28px;">The Residency is open to visual artists of all mediums, art writers, and critics, 24 years or older. The selection will be made based on the merit of past work and the potential for future success, the ability to independently develop new work, and the proposed project&#39;s relevance to the city of Paris.</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: #000000; line-height: 28px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">More info: <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/foundation" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">Georgia Fee Artist|Writer Residency</a></span></p> <p><a href="mailto:%20residency@artslant.com" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">residency@artslant.com</a></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">&nbsp;</span></p> <img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150328160032-res_artis_member_logo.jpg" width="200" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td> <hr /> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: large;"><span style="font-size: small;"><strong>The Georgia Fee Artist | Writer Residency is a strategic partner of Residency Unlimited</strong><em>&nbsp;</em></span></span></p> <a href="http://www.residencyunlimited.org/"><img alt="" src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20140320152708-RU-Logo-2014.png" style="float: left; margin: 10px;" width="100" /></a> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: arial, helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: large;"><span style="font-size: small;"><em><a href="http://www.residencyunlimited.org/" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">Residency Unlimited (RU)</a> is a not for profit art organization that fosters highly customized residencies through strategic partnerships with collaborating institutions. Moving beyond the traditional studio model, RU supports local and international artists and curators at all levels of their career, and is particularly committed to promoting multidisciplinary practices and to building lasting connections between residents and the broader arts community.</em></span></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 15 May 2017 17:32:45 -0400 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Naira Mushtaq Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/46908-under-the-radar-david-rios-ferreira-zed-nesti-naira-mushtaq">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/320039-naira-mushtaq">Naira Mushtaq</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>My work is a study of relationship between a found object and the emotion it evokes, leading to narratives in a different space. My specific interest lies in the deconstruction and re-framing of vernacular photographs. In working with these, I have found how essentially similar family structures are across cultures. Family albums have disappeared with the advent of digital photography; these fragile prints inadvertently document perhaps the most important bits and pieces of our collective past. I explore this participation by engaging the community, treating them not simply as subject matter but also as involved individuals in this process, working with their explicit consent.</p> <p>However my main focus is not just the exploration of family photographs; revisiting archives of these photographs often makes one wonder about their origin and stories behind these forgotten narratives, and how much they have changed with the passage of time. Time plays a fundamental role in wearing down these memories of our experiences: they diverge, they mould, evolve or dissipate&mdash;such is the play of time. Our memories deceive us, pliable and ever evolving. We are left with fragments of truth, distorted records of our making. For me, the process of translating that found image onto canvas, and then deconstructing it to a mere semblance of what the visual initially was, is very important.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170515084024-naira_mushtaq.jpeg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Naira Mushtaq, 0<em>9-09-1939</em>, 2017, Oil on canvas</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>We are living the most politically charged time my generation has seen, a political unrest that is not contained by geographic borders. It is imperative that the artist community stays vigilant, stays focused, and states their truth. That to me is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (</strong><strong>art</strong><strong>&nbsp;or not)?</strong></p> <p>This particular project was my first foray into the realm of public art. It might not be the greatest thing I have made, but it is most definitely one that I feel the most strongly about:&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170515083646-naira.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Bird&rsquo;s-eye view of the installation set up at a local park that is frequented mostly by working class, the circular walkway was set in an anti clockwise manner&mdash;taking the concept of Muslims circling the holy site in Mecca in a clockwise manner. The motion itself sets one in a trance of reverence.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170515083603-naira_2.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">The center of the installation was an area where the viewer, after coming out of the walkway, could sit and contemplate<br /> and light an incense stick to commemorate the lives lost.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>&#39;Hum jo tareek rahon mein marray gaye&#39; (</em><em>we who were slayed in the dark alleys)</em> (2015), was a public installation held a local park in Lahore. The objective of this installation was to document and remember various acts of terrorism in the name of religion.</p> <p>The structure was a walkway with a contemplative space in the middle. We designed the triangular buntings, which reference clippings from Urdu newspapers. More than 126 incidents were extracted&mdash;we repeated/hung each incident around 40 times and moved on to the next, hanging them in chronological order (monthly and yearly). Each individual bunting shared the year and place of a person&rsquo;s death, the reason of the life lost, and how it was taken.</p> <p>It is a memorial to share and reflect over history and time. The center of the installation provided a place where incense sticks could be lit in remembrance. Traditionally used and somehow mystical (associated with shrines of saints and graveyards), therse perfumed <em>agerbatis</em> made the work akin to a vigil.</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>I have a Jekyll and Hyde practice. A part of me is happy to paint slightly unnerving, nostalgia-ridden works while the other part of me is ears-deep in creating subversive public artworks that critique the local government and their complacent and complicit ways.</p> <p>One of the works that I really want to create is ironically driven from the idea of the bat signal: an ephemeral subversive political statement set against the landscape of the historic city of Lahore.</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p>Three is too little a number for the amazing artists that I want to name. But for this I will name three incredibly talented and the most badass women that I have had the privilege of knowing: <a href="https://www.instagram.com/khanamra/?hl=en" target="_blank">Amra Khan</a>, <a href="https://www.instagram.com/mariakhan396/?hl=en" target="_blank">Maria Khan</a>, and <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/448737-sehr-jalil" target="_blank">Sehr Jalil</a>, who as it happens is already on ArtSlant.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <div> <hr align="left" noshade="noshade" size="0" width="100%" /></div> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Naira Mushtaq,&nbsp;<em>04-07-1996</em>, 2013, Gel transfer and collage on paper)</span></p> Mon, 15 May 2017 10:33:36 -0400 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Graham Macaulay | Al Anood Al Obaidly | Nari Kim <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/477693-graham-macaulay?utm_source=GrahamMacaulay&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Graham Macaulay &ndash; London, Ontario</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/trn/works/show/1036020?utm_source=GrahamMacaulay&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1036020/u3azr9/20170312182646-01_Macaulay.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/trn/works/show/1036029?utm_source=GrahamMacaulay&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1036029/mf2ji7/20170312182738-08.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/trn/works/show/1036036?utm_source=GrahamMacaulay&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1036036/mf2ji7/20170312182951-07_Macaulay.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/trn/works/show/1036031?utm_source=GrahamMacaulay&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1036031/mf2ji7/20170312182739-09.jpg " width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/481492-al-anood-al-obaidly?utm_source=AlAnoodAlObaidly&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Al Anood Al Obaidly &ndash; Abu Dhabi</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1043454?utm_source= AlAnoodAlObaidly&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1043454/u3azr9/20170423110335-taped_collage.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1043453?utm_source=AlAnoodAlObaidly&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1043453/mf2ji7/20170423110327-NIK_5939w.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1042709?utm_source=AlAnoodAlObaidly&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1042709/mf2ji7/20170418110850-d232.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1042706?utm_source=AlAnoodAlObaidly&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1042706/mf2ji7/20170418110554-The-Un-wanted-door-sculpture.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/480581-narikimstudio?utm_source=NariKim&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Nari Kim &ndash; Brooklyn</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1041241?utm_source=NariKim&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1041241/u3azr9/20170408025349-05_Nari_Kim.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1041245?utm_source=NariKim&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1041245/mf2ji7/20170408025359-09_Nari_Kim.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1041243?utm_source=NariKim&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1041243/u3azr9/20170408025353-07_Nari_Kim.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1046301?utm_source=NariKim&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1041246/mf2ji7/20170408025402-10_Nari_Kim.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/s?marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Fri, 12 May 2017 19:43:44 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Ellsworth Kelly’s Final Paintings Show an Artist Consciously Shaping His “Late Style” <p>Before Ellsworth Kelly died of natural causes at the age of 92, he was busy planning a late-career comeback. Not that he went anywhere&mdash;as a forefather of minimalist abstraction, his paintings are an omnipresent staple of museum collections around the world. This comeback was more of a reclamation, a chance for Kelly to redefine himself in his own terms, instead of the frequent mislabeling of his work as starkly minimalist. The first component of Kelly&rsquo;s comeback was an <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/409636-ellsworth-kelly-photographs" target="_blank">exhibition of his photography</a>, which had been largely unseen by the public. Presented only months after his December 2015 death, the photography exhibition was a wonderfully eccentric and surprising coda for the artist; it was a testament to Kelly&rsquo;s roots in the geometries of the natural world, and his disposition for careful, slow looking.</p> <p>As with the photography exhibition, Matthew Marks Gallery now hopes to revive conversations about Kelly&rsquo;s late career with <em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/445133-last-paintings" target="_blank">Ellsworth Kelly: Last Paintings</a></em>, a muted eulogy of sorts that celebrates the artist&rsquo;s idiosyncratic vision of abstracted nature. Kelly&rsquo;s late paintings are a testament to the infinite permutations an artist can make within his recognized canon. There is an effort here to go beyond Kelly&rsquo;s established vocabulary of colors and shapes, splashing his ideas onto the gallery walls in subtle, quiet ways.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170507141926-Kelly_Diptych-_Green_Blue.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ellsworth Kelly, <em>Diptych: Green Blue
</em>, 2015, 
Oil on canvas, two panels
, Overall: 80 x 114 1/2 inches

. &copy; Ellsworth Kelly. Courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Speaking to the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/03/arts/design/ellsworth-kelly-last-paintings.html?ribbon-ad-idx=3&amp;rref=arts/design&amp;module=Ribbon&amp;version=context&amp;region=Header&amp;action=click&amp;contentCollection=Art%20%26%20Design&amp;pgtype=article" target="_blank"><em>New York Times</em></a> ahead of the exhibition, Kelly&rsquo;s partner of 32 years, Jack Shear, remarked how &ldquo;Ellsworth [liked] to play games with vision more than anything.&rdquo; In <em>Last Paintings</em>, visions become revisions&mdash;a few works on view revisit the artist&rsquo;s earlier paintings as points of departure. For example, <em>Diptych: Green Blue</em> (2015) evokes <em>Green Blue Red</em> (1963), but nixes the latter&rsquo;s red background. Knowing what it lacks, <em>Diptych: Green Blue</em> subsequently merges with its background, the wall, as an extension of its canvas. Like an organism that adapts to its surroundings, Kelly&rsquo;s latest edits make his old work lighter, freeing it from the picture plane&rsquo;s grid and into the viewer&rsquo;s environment. Only one other work in the exhibition directly deals with Kelly&rsquo;s trademark suite of colors. <em>Blue Black Red</em> (2015) is another callback; this one reaches even farther back into history, evoking the collage&nbsp;<em>Study for Four Color Panels</em> (1954). Again, Kelly dissolves the latter&rsquo;s white background in his revision.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170507141800-Kelly_White_Diagonal_Curve.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ellsworth Kelly, <em>White Diagonal Curve</em>, 2015
, Oil on canvas
, 51 1/2 x 120 inches

. &copy; Ellsworth Kelly. Courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery
</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Such a strategy is most salient in Kelly&rsquo;s <em>White Diagonal Curve</em> (2015) in the gallery&rsquo;s second room. This piece revisits one of Kelly&rsquo;s signature shapes, an arc that may evoke the distant horizon over some large expansive view. Yet here, the curve vanishes&mdash;as any white monochrome would&mdash;into the gallery&rsquo;s white walls. Through this monochrome, we see Kelly&rsquo;s continued reliance on the specific architecture and aesthetics of the gallery space. For him, the white cube can be more than a dissociated non-place of art; it can be a laboratory for his optical experiments.</p> <p>What&rsquo;s most striking about Kelly&rsquo;s final paintings is the mordant ethos emanating from the four black-and-white paintings within the gallery. Comprising half of the exhibition, these paintings have a strong formal appeal that encapsulates Kelly&rsquo;s visual interest in the ambiguities between foreground and background, movement and stagnancy. In the standout <em>White Angle Over Black</em> (2015) we even see Kelly again playing with the visual sameness of white wall and canvas, allowing his angle to soar between the two planes like the bird it takes its form from.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170507141824-Kelly_White_Angle_Over_Black.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ellsworth Kelly, <em>White Angle Over Black</em>, 
2015
, Oil on canvas, two joined panels, 78 x 47 3/8 inches

. &copy; Ellsworth Kelly. Courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery
</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>But there is something more than formal intrigue in these black-and-white paintings; there is a sense of lateness that surrounds them. Lateness, that <em>memento mori</em> of a word, can describe art as a function of the artist&rsquo;s age. As art lovers, we harbor an undeniable zeal for work that brushes with death. Our cultic curiosity allows us to reconstitute Kelly&rsquo;s black-and-white paintings as signals of an imminent demise. But late style is not just a fan&rsquo;s machination: looking at Kelly&rsquo;s work, we can parse a few common components of late style. We see the artist playing with fragments of his past oeuvre for sources of innovation. Kelly&rsquo;s last paintings show an artist turning inward&mdash;a stark contrast to the man known for sourcing his abstract shapes from the natural world. Kelly&rsquo;s final paintings show an artist who was once again on the edge of brilliance and madness. He was willing to dissolve his beautiful canvases into the gallery walls, dissolve the shapes he had so carefully crafted over a seven-decade career. Working until the day he died, Kelly sought the absolution of nirvana in his disintegrating canvases; he sought a beautiful dismantling of conventions, even as his life came to a close.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/445133-last-paintings" target="_blank">Ellsworth Kelly: Last Paintings</a><em> runs from May 5&shy;&ndash;June 24, 2017, at Matthew Marks Gallery, 522 W. 22nd Street.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/477123-zachary-small" target="_blank">Zachary Small</a></p> <p><em>Zachary Small is a New York-based genderqueer writer. He&rsquo;s written for many publications including Hyperallergic, BOMB Magazine, Artinfo Magazine, and HowlRound. He was recently named the 2017 recipient of the CUE Foundation&rsquo;s Young Art Critic Mentorship Program. His latest play, /VANITAS/ debuted at Dixon Place. He tweets from @ZSmall93 and can be reached at zsmall93[at]gmail[dot]com.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Ellsworth Kelly, <em>Blue Black Red</em>, 
2015, 
Oil on canvas, three joined panels, 73 5/8 x 131 inches
. &copy; Ellsworth Kelly. Courtesy Matthew Marks Gallery
)</span></p> Wed, 10 May 2017 12:21:32 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Caroline Augusta | Nancy Marcum | Almudena Blanco <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/481200-caroline-augusta?utm_source=CarolineAugusta&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Caroline Augusta &ndash; Sonora, CA</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1041946?utm_source=CarolineAugusta&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1041946/u3azr9/20170412212525-3.png" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1041942?utm_source=CarolineAugusta&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1041942/y8wnrh/20170412212513-2.png" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1041944?utm_source=CarolineAugusta&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1041944/y8wnrh/20170412212516-4.png" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1041949?utm_source=CarolineAugusta&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1041949/y8wnrh/20170412212619-9.png" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/481800-nancy-marcum?tab=PROFILE?utm_source=NancyMarcum&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Nancy Marcum &ndash; Oneida, TN &amp; Atlanta, GA</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1043821?utm_source= NancyMarcum&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1043821/u3azr9/20170425202047-imgtopleft267web.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1043806?utm_source=NancyMarcum&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1043806/y8wnrh/20170425201600-DSC08260usemeweb.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1043818?utm_source=NancyMarcum&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1043818/y8wnrh/20170425201915-349web.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1043856?utm_source=NancyMarcum&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1043856/y8wnrh/20170425221950-imgtopleft271web.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/466469-almudena-blanco?tab=PROFILE?utm_source=AlmudenaBlanco&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Almudena Blanco &ndash; Bilbao</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1006404?utm_source=AlmudenaBlanco&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1006404/u3azr9/20160906164740-OrdinaryObjectsPlayingBellowThe_A2016150x200bajas.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1006406?utm_source=AlmudenaBlanco&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1006406/y8wnrh/20160906165616-untitled22016bajas.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1006405?utm_source=AlmudenaBlanco&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1006405/y8wnrh/20160906165258-untitled2016bajas.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1014997?utm_source=AlmudenaBlanco&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1014997/y8wnrh/20161103015617-venusandherhorse2016.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/s?marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Sat, 06 May 2017 17:11:33 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Amanda Joy Calobrisi Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/44415-bunder-the-radar-tom-ridinger-faren-ziello-amanda-joy-calobrisib" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/440923-amanda-joy-calobrisi" target="_blank">Amanda Joy Calobrisi</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>The first language that I learned to read was body language. Being a cautious but curious child, cursed by shyness, it was (and still is) my primary language. Observing the adults was preferable to playing with the kids. I gathered expressions, gestures, and stances into a sort of dictionary of my mind and tried to figure out how they connected to verbal language. The body more often than not seemed to defy the words, undo them and render them useless. I think my interest in these contradictions lead me to visual art and figure painting in particular. Through the process of looking at the photograph and thinking it through the painting, I ponder the appearances of things, give them form and still the disappearing revelations.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170504121353-20170503215934-bendingoverbackward.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Amanda Joy Calobrisi,&nbsp;<em>Moon Bridge (Topsy Turvy)</em>, 2016,&nbsp;Graphite, gouache, acrylic on canvas</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>The responsibility of an artist is to be open and receptive, to wander outside of one&rsquo;s shoes, to pose good questions and to dig deep. The sage spirit John Berger describes this responsibility in&nbsp;<em>Steps Toward a Small Theory of the Visible</em>&nbsp;as &ldquo;going in close.&rdquo; He says: &ldquo;To go in close means forgetting convention, reputation, reasoning, hierarchies and self. It also means risking incoherence, even madness. For it can happen that one gets too close and then the collaboration breaks down and the painter dissolves into the model. Or the animal devours or tramples the painter into the ground.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>Interesting that you ask&hellip; I was recently laying in bed with a migraine in that liminal space between pain and sleep when I imagined making a full length, narrow, vertical painting of my father. He was standing life sized, almost facing me. I then rotated the long painting and hung it horizontally on the wall in my studio. I felt a sense of quiet as the canvas&rsquo; orientation abruptly shifted the subject from living to coffin. I spent the next few weeks mentally tortured by how I could make this painting, when images of my father were scarce: a few blurry Polaroids from occasional visits my mom and I made over the 17 years that he was incarcerated. I have been dealing/not dealing with my non/relationship with my absent biological father for decades. Now dead, he lingers even more.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170504121140-20170503215941-DSC02964.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Amanda Joy Calobrisi, <em>Solitary Surveyor</em>, 2017, Acrylic on canvas</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you currently working on?</strong></p> <p>I have most recently been working on a series of paintings made from photos taken in the 1920&ndash;30s by an amateur photographer whose&nbsp;<em>nom de guerre</em>&nbsp;was&nbsp;Monsieur X. The looking that goes into the painting of these photos is a form of, albeit imagined, camaraderie. Through painting I attempt to understand and try on the feelings of these liberated anonymous women to reveal their sense of humor, frank sensuality, prowess, and courage. I have little interest in exactitude&mdash;instead the photos are starting points, departures into paint.&nbsp;Her expressions, the eye behind the lens, and my reading of the body language mutate on the canvas allowing for painterly discoveries to interject. The heightened color, patterns, and textures are an attempt to create a commotion that works against the stillness inherent in painting. The figures take on a new life in paint celebrating physical intimacy with their own bodies. The man behind the camera is gone. The revealed vulva now represents the figure&rsquo;s interiority, functioning as a symbol of introspection and the complexity of her private life.</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p><a href="http://charleseroberts3.com/home.html" target="_blank">Charles E. Roberts III</a>, <a href="http://www.chinatsuikeda.net" target="_blank">Chinatsu Ikeda</a>, and <a href="http://mayumilake.com" target="_blank">Mayumi Lake</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <div> <hr align="left" noshade="noshade" size="0" width="100%" /></div> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Amanda Joy Calobrisi, <em>Vulva Numinous (Sacra Vulva) (Anasyrma 1)</em>, 2014, Oil on canvas)</span></p> Mon, 08 May 2017 06:25:57 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: Arthur Machado <p><a href="http://tuukz.glitchartistscollective.com/" target="_blank">Arthur Machado</a> is a Brazilian new media artist who is better known pseudonymously as <a href="https://www.facebook.com/tuukz/" target="_blank"><em>T&ugrave;.&uacute;k&rsquo;z</em></a> and <a href="https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100011037582393&amp;fref=nf" target="_blank">አርተር ጥቁ</a>. Machado&rsquo;s earliest experiments with digital art were through glitch art and that hyperactive influence can still be seen throughout his work. Machado&rsquo;s digital collages of found materials deftly walk the line between lush beauty and informational anarchy. In a way, these artworks are like paintings, with programs standing in for brushes and the internet itself as the paint. Absorbing varied obsessions of net art culture, Machado&rsquo;s work transcends these influences to feel like a fresh and natural progression of the form.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170503195959-hellshells.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: Your Facebook name makes it hard to find any information about you. Can you tell us a little about yourself?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>Arthur Machado:</strong> My name is&nbsp;<span style="color:#ff33ff;"><em>Arthur Machado</em></span>, I&rsquo;m a 25-year-old Brazilian, based in Bel&eacute;m, Par&aacute; (Amazonia, Brazil). I live in a small apartment with my mother <span style="color:#00FF00;">&hearts;</span>, my wife (who is pregnant <span style="color:#0000FF;">&hearts;</span>), and my brother <span style="color:#00FF00;">&hearts;</span>.</p> <p><strong>CP: Why have you chosen to create a mysterious digital persona? I saw one of your works said: &ldquo;I don&rsquo;t know why people are so keen to put the details of their private life in public, they forget that invisibility is a superpower.&rdquo; Is that why it&rsquo;s important to you?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>AM:</strong> Well, I enjoy being anonymous. I think it&rsquo;s important to me because when I started learning about Glitch Art, at that time in my social media network, there were few anonymous accounts&mdash;one of them was Od Niwr&mdash;and those mysterious accounts always inspired me. I guess I&rsquo;m subversive. I don&rsquo;t like things as they are&mdash;I like to question them. To question my own perception all the time.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170503200118-word.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What is the difference between </strong><strong>አርተር</strong> <strong>ጥቁ</strong><strong> and <em>T&ugrave;.&uacute;k&rsquo;z</em>?</strong></p> <p><strong>AM:</strong> አርተር ጥቁ&nbsp;is just a fake account to control my artistic page&nbsp;<em>T&ugrave;.&uacute;k&#39;z&nbsp;</em>and to post/interact on Facebook Communities about digital arts and such. And to keep seeing what my digital friends are doing, of course. I learn almost everything from them. I used to have an older account but Facebook removed it and I don&rsquo;t really know why. So I don&rsquo;t care thaaaat much about Facebook anymore. They kind of pissed on me.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How does your digital life relate to you &ldquo;real&rdquo; life?</strong></p> <p><strong>AM:</strong> Yea&hellip; they kinda relate! In my real life, I work as a clerk in an electronic store, and I often work at parties or festivals doing VJ or DJ stuff, where they also know me as&nbsp;<em>T&ugrave;.&uacute;k&#39;z.&nbsp;</em>In my digital life I&rsquo;m just someone that keeps posting crazy imagery.</p> <p>And I actually have affection for the friends I&rsquo;ve made from 2013 till now in the digital world. Facebook can delete profiles, but they can&rsquo;t remove friendships. I&rsquo;m really proud of my friends and for the communities of digital arts on Facebook.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170503195640-cngw.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What were your first experiences of using a computer creatively?</strong></p> <p><strong>AM:</strong> Obviously using Glitch Art techniques to disrupt files, and Photoshop to create visual content. Really, there were lots of different techniques I&rsquo;ve passed through. I actually gave few workshops, in places like Zagreb, about Glitch Art techniques and my own process.</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you decide to focus on digital art? Why did that interest you more than other creative disciplines?</strong></p> <p><strong>AM:</strong> I focused on it because it was fast, it was dynamic, it was impressive to me! Glitch Art really caught me. I used to do freehand drawing, I used to paint, but when I encountered glitch and digital arts I just left everything behind for a moment. I don&rsquo;t really know why yet, but it really caught me. I got really immersed in the digital arts world in 2013 and I haven&rsquo;t stopped yet.</p> <p>I just love it because in the Digital World you can be everything; there are no limitations like the limitations of a real life, in the real world. Like the body for example. In the digital world, in social media, in the screen, you can be and do as you please. You can express yourself as you want, even if nobody even cares or sees. The internet is just like an empty space that people fill with their interests, emotions, feelings, etc.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170503200150-seter.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What does social media mean to you as an artist and what impact do you think it&rsquo;s had on art generally?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>AM:</strong> Well, social media is all about visualization: to see and to be seen. And obviously there will be interaction. The impact of it? Tremendous! Social media is a powerful catalyst. You can build a web, a network, from zero and from nowhere. If people react positively or not to what you are doing it will echo to other networks. There are some cases of isolation as well. Facebook is a good example of a social media that isolates their participants. If you are not good enough to be on the top, maybe you get a little bored.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Your work almost feels like you are painting with digital objects and artifacts. Can you talk a little about the process of making your work?</strong></p> <p><strong>AM:</strong> I could not agree more! First, my wife and I, we navigate through the internet gathering images that we are interested in and that we think might work well together. After that I collage and paint it into Photoshop, blending it in different ways. After that I use a software called Texture Maker that my good friend and one of the best artists I have ever known, Mitch Posada gave me. I use Texture Maker to distort the image and to apply effects. Sometimes I enjoy using 3D Scenarios and Objects. I often use Cinema 4D, Zbrush, and Daz3D.&nbsp;I love to do that. I have influences including abstract art and Surrealism. But for real, I&rsquo;m really inspired by the work of Don Elektro, Mitch Posada, Donnie Fredericks, Helin Sahin, Motorola Beeper, Gergő Kov&aacute;cs, and many others.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170503200251-BREE.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Your work also often uses collage. Is that something you experimented with in its physical form (as in paper) before you began to do it digitally?</strong></p> <p><strong>AM:</strong> I&rsquo;d never done collage before and I actually don&rsquo;t have any interest in doing it on paper. My stuff is on the screen.</p> <p><strong>CP: There is usually a lot going on in your images&mdash;a visual overload. Why is that, and does it reflect your personality?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>AM:</strong> Yes, its true. A lot of information.., I think it reflects two things: first, the internet&mdash;the internet is kind of an overload&mdash;and second, my persona. As I said before, I&rsquo;m subversive, and really kind of confused sometimes. So many thoughts and issues are going in my head&hellip; So yeah, maybe my art is a reflection of who I am, or who I&rsquo;m trying to be.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170503195432-sop.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Would you describe your work as psychedelic? Is that something you are interested in?</strong></p> <p><strong>AM:</strong> Definitely! I really enjoy psychedelic arts in it many forms. I actually believe the use of psychedelic substances such as LSD and mushrooms may help many people to get out from traumas and other marks from childhood. I&rsquo;m not saying to use drugs&mdash;I&rsquo;m just saying that using it, for some people, with the right guidance, could help.</p> <p><strong>CP: You also <a href="https://soundcloud.com/tuuukz">make music</a> how does your music relate to your visual art? Do you explore similar ideas and themes in both? </strong></p> <p><strong>AM:</strong> Yep! My music is still developing, so I cannot say if it really relates with my visual work. I think the use of electronic elements mixed with organic sounds, all in a slow ritualistic vibe, is the right description for my sounds.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170503195917-rddl.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Japanese culture is referenced a lot in your work. Can you talk about your interest in that and its influence on your work?</strong></p> <p><strong>AM: </strong>I&rsquo;m in love with Japanese culture and so is my wife. One of my biggest dreams is to visit Japan. I just enjoy everything too much that comes out from over there: all the arts, all the culture, the anime, everything!&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Would you describe your work as political?</strong></p> <p><strong>AM:</strong> I think everything is political. Even if it is saying it&rsquo;s not, it is! I don&rsquo;t have any intention to describe my work as such, but my work refers a lot to subversive cultures and anarchy maybe. I&rsquo;m not real sure about that. I didn&rsquo;t study politics so much.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170503200341-newsignal.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Is science fiction an influence on your work?</strong></p> <p><strong>AM:</strong> Obviously. As I said, I was born in the sea of information. Science fiction is nothing more than the next days of our lives, our children&rsquo;s lives, and so on. What do we expect to happen in the next ten years? Does it sound science fiction? I think it does.</p> <p><strong>CP: What does the internet mean to you?</strong></p> <p><strong>AM:</strong> The internet is the huge web we are inserted into. It is a social network full of information. My work is based in the internet. Without it, we wouldn&rsquo;t be here now. I&rsquo;m a child from the internet. To me, it means everything, but we need to stay aware. There are people with power using the internet to manipulate the masses. I think we should do everything we can to hide in our own spaces, to hack everything we can (not in bad way), to do our own internet. Not the big and corporate financial web we are in. We need a free and open source space. Maybe it is just utopia, but I might fight for that dream.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170503200614-itzodi.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What does &ldquo;post-internet&rdquo; mean to you?</strong></p> <p><strong>AM:</strong> Post-Internet is something that is happening to describe or even to analyze the behavior of the internet from the past years. Based on that, we can project the future. It is maybe the arts and technologies that people are using, creating, and developing without a technical guide. It is a huge experiment, using software and ideas as they are not meant to be used. This is a concept I call <em>Arthacktivism.</em></p> <p><strong>CP: What does success as an artist mean to you?</strong></p> <p><strong>AM:</strong> To make the difference in the scenario I&rsquo;m in with knowledge. Even if you don&rsquo;t have money or visibility, you can be successful. Success does not depends on status, nor on money&hellip; It depends on how much you can help others have success. This is success to me.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170503200436-klost.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Anything else you want to say?</strong></p> <p><strong>AM:</strong> I would like to thank everyone that was with me from the beginning and also the new fellows that just arrived. My work means nothing without every one of you. And I&rsquo;m just starting&mdash;there are a lot of things still to happen.&nbsp;Special thanks to Mitch Posada, Don Elektro, and Lloyd Newell.&nbsp;And to the Glitch Artists Collective, to the <a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/articles/show/47804-wednesday-web-artist-of-the-week-spamm" target="_blank">SPAMM</a> (SuPer Art Modern Museum), to the Gallery T. and to The Wrong.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&#39;re interested in what&#39;s happening with art on the web. We invited online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, to write a bi-monthly column for us. Every other Wednesday he selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(All images: Courtesy of the artist)</span></p> <style type="text/css">p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 14.0px 'Apple Color Emoji'} span.s1 {font-kerning: none} </style> <style type="text/css">p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 14.0px 'Apple Color Emoji'} span.s1 {font-kerning: none} </style> <style type="text/css">p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 14.0px 'Apple Color Emoji'} span.s1 {font-kerning: none} </style> <style type="text/css">p.p1 {margin: 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px 0.0px; font: 14.0px 'Apple Color Emoji'} span.s1 {font-kerning: none} </style> Thu, 04 May 2017 00:53:48 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Pablo Carpio Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/46138-b-stylecolor-333333under-the-radar-helen-oleary-pablo-carpio-brigitta-varadib" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/344302-pablo-carpio" target="_blank">Pablo Carpio</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>Dissent.</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>Being truthful and honest with your work.</p> <p>Respect every person who takes a sincere moment to observe a work of art.</p> <p>Admire the ones who allow you to talk about your dreams.</p> <p>Be thankful for all the wonderful moments that you may experience in life thanks to art.</p> <p>And most important of all, do not take it too seriously.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170501091155-20170127005111-Lineas_y_espacios_No._5_Pablo_Carpio.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Pablo Carpio,&nbsp;<em>Lines and spaces. No. 5</em>, 2017, Acrylic on canvas and wooden stretcher,&nbsp;59.8 X 49.6 In.&nbsp;&copy; Pablo Carpio</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art or not)?</strong></p> <p>I haven&rsquo;t made it yet.</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>To draw a line that circles the earth.</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p>I&rsquo;m afraid that you guys probably know more artists that I should know and I don&#39;t know yet.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <div> <hr align="left" noshade="noshade" size="0" width="100%" /></div> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Pablo Carpio,&nbsp;<em>Lines and spaces. No. 1</em>, 2017, Acrylic on canvas and wooden stretcher,&nbsp;68.5 X 61 In.&nbsp;&copy; Pablo Carpio)</span></p> Mon, 01 May 2017 06:14:04 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Pablo Helguera: Club Americano <p>New York-based artist and educator Pablo Helguera opens <em><a href="http://www.mfa.org/exhibitions/club-americano?utm_source=artslant&amp;utm_medium=cpc" target="_blank">Club Americano</a></em>, the culmination of the artist&rsquo;s residency at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.</p> <p>This intimate one-room exhibition and shared space explores the historic foundations and contemporary definitions of American identity. Here, the term &ldquo;American&rdquo; is understood in the Pan-American sense: its Spanish translation, <em>americano</em>, can refer to anyone or anything from either North <em>or</em> South America. Helguera takes aesthetic inspiration from 19th-century Bostonian university clubs and gentlemen&rsquo;s lounges, which were premised on racial and gender exclusivity. He inverts such tradition by welcoming people of all backgrounds, providing a clear counterpoint to the racist and classist foundations of American culture.</p> <p>At the center of the gallery is a 19th-century dining table, surrounded by paintings, photographs, prints, textiles, and decorative arts from the Museum&rsquo;s world-renowned collection of art from the Americas. Selected by Helguera in collaboration with MFA curators, these artworks serve as the subject of three performances that examine their histories through a present-day&nbsp;lens. Modeled on the tradition of the 19th-century &ldquo;after-dinner speech,&rdquo; each program features a range of voices, including local academics, artists and activists, as well as members of the MFA&rsquo;s Teen Arts Council. Additionally, the MFA has invited select community advocacy groups to organize public events in the space on Wednesday evenings, when admission to the Museum is free. Helguera welcomes you to gather, lounge, read, experience the performances, and participate in the community-organized events. For a complete schedule, visit the exhibition <a href="http://www.mfa.org/exhibitions/club-americano?utm_source=artslant&amp;utm_medium=cpc" target="_blank">website</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170428171007-MFA-Social-Club-Performance-28.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Pablo Helguera,&nbsp;<em>What Is a Club</em><em>?</em>, April 21, 2017, Performed as part of&nbsp;<em>Club Americano</em>, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Photo: Shane Godfrey</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Performance Series</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.mfa.org/programs/performance-art/what-is-a-club?utm_source=artslant&amp;utm_medium=cpc" target="_blank"><strong><em>What Is a Club?</em></strong></a></p> <p>Friday, April 21, 6:30 pm</p> <p><a href="http://www.mfa.org/programs/performance-art/worldly-and-otherworldly-perspectives?utm_source=artslant&amp;utm_medium=cpc" target="_blank"><strong><em>Worldly and Otherworldly Perspectives</em></strong></a></p> <p>Friday, May 19, 6:30 pm</p> <p><a href="http://www.mfa.org/programs/performance-art/inventing-america?utm_source=artslant&amp;utm_medium=cpc" target="_blank"><strong><em>Inventing Am&eacute;rica</em></strong></a></p> <p>Friday, June 2, 6:30 pm</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Organized by Liz Munsell, Assistant Curator of Contemporary Art and Special Initiatives, position supported by Lorraine Bressler; with Dennis Carr, Carolyn and Peter Lynch Curator of American Decorative Arts and Sculpture; and Layla Bermeo, Kristin and Roger Servison Assistant Curator of Paintings, Art of the Americas.</p> <p>Performance Art at the MFA is supported by Lorraine Bressler.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170428171039-MFA-Social-Club-Performance-30.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">Pablo Helguera,&nbsp;</span><em style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">What Is a Club</em><em style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">?</em><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">, April 21, 2017, Performed as part of&nbsp;</span><em style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">Club Americano</em><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Photo: Shane Godfrey</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Pablo Helguera (b. 1971, Mexico City) is an artist working with installation, sculpture, photography, drawing, socially engaged art, and performance. Drawing from his experience as an educator, Helguera&rsquo;s artistic projects often incorporate pedagogical devices such as the classroom setting and lecture format. In 2008 he was awarded the John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship and also was the recipient of a 2005 Creative Capital Grant. Helguera is the author of <em>Education for Socially Engaged Art </em>(2011) and <em>The Pablo Helguera Manual of Contemporary Art Style </em>(2007), among numerous other publications, and is the maker of <em>Artoons</em>, a series of cartoons poking fun at the art world. He has exhibited widely in museums and biennials internationally, most recently at Manifesta 11 in Zurich, and is currently the subject of a mid-career survey at the Museo Jumex in Mexico City.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.mfa.org/programs/performance-art?utm_source=artslant&amp;utm_medium=cpc" target="_blank">Performance Art at the&nbsp;MFA</a></strong></p> <p>The MFA is one of the first encyclopedic museums in the US to integrate performance art into its collection, exhibitions, and programs. Performance art at the MFA encompasses a spectrum of live and participatory experiences and features a range of works by international, national, and local&nbsp;artists. Since the opening of the Linde Family Wing for Contemporary Art in 2011, the MFA has acquired three performance-related artworks for its permanent collection and organized dozens of performance-based events, including works that unfold in the Museum&rsquo;s galleries and engage with its collection, performances that form part of multimedia contemporary art exhibitions, and fleeting interventions that appear in unexpected spaces inside the Museum or&nbsp;outdoors. Further information and documentation of past works can be viewed through the <a href="http://www.mfa.org/programs/series/performance-art?utm_source=artslant&amp;utm_medium=cpc" target="_blank">Performance Art Archive</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>This post is sponsored by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;<span style="text-align: center;">Pablo Helguera,&nbsp;</span><em style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">What Is a Club</em><em style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">?</em><span style="text-align: center;">, April 21, 2017, Performed as part of&nbsp;</span><em style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">Club Americano</em><span style="text-align: center;">, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Photo: Shane Godfrey)</span></span></p> Sat, 06 May 2017 16:57:06 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Girl on Girl: The New Book Exploring the Female Gaze in Photography <p>What does it mean for a woman to pick up a camera and point it at herself, or at another woman? Is there something unique to be found behind the lens, in the gaze of the female photographer?</p> <p><a href="https://www.amazon.com/Girl-Age-Female-Gaze/dp/1780679556" target="_blank"><em>Girl on Girl: Art and Photography in the Age of the Female Gaze</em></a> is an ambitious new book that sets out, if not to resolve this question, then to open it up, to unfold it through the exercise of prolonged looking. Over a year and a half, arts journalist Charlotte Jansen (who is, full disclosure, a former editor of this publication) interviewed 40 female artists from 17 countries who are making photographs of women today.</p> <p>With works largely spanning the last five years, <em>Girl on Girl</em> is not an exhaustive or historical anthology. Instead, it&rsquo;s a contemporary register of a unique moment and image economy, one in which we are seeing&mdash;or at least liking, commenting on, sharing, or swiping past&mdash;more images than ever before. And more than ever before, these images have been made by women.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170413140912-9781780679556._Main.png" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In her candid introduction, Jansen writes about &ldquo;learning to look at women&rdquo; at a time when the images we typically see of women are much more complicated than the circumstances in which we view them: ads, magazine covers, social media. She writes:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">Photographs taken by women do not only exist as a counterpoint to the male narrative. A photograph is an impulse&mdash;and challenge&mdash;to enquire, not a representation of truth. More often than not, I find that the photographs of women by women I see point me back to my own prejudice and misconceptions. Thanks to the generosity of the photographers on these pages, I had the chance to question my viewing habits and dig below the spectacle of surface.</p> <p>Over nearly 200 well-illustrated pages, Jansen asks us to consider a broad catalogue of photography: we find selfies and self-portraits; works that embrace overt feminism (and #feminism), and others that eschew it entirely; there&rsquo;s fashion, glam, and beauty; there are formal exercises, post-internet investigations, conceptual and documentary undertakings; there&rsquo;s humor, even horror! What Jansen&rsquo;s book smartly makes clear is that there is no singular female gaze. And it would be unfair to assume there were: why would the photographic output of 40 women be anything other than 40 unique practices?</p> <p>&ldquo;<em>Girl on Girl</em>,&rdquo; writes Jansen, &ldquo;is ultimately a meditation on the agency women are taking over the images that are made of them.&rdquo;</p> <p>In anticipation of the <a href="https://www.amazon.com/Girl-Age-Female-Gaze/dp/1780679556">U.S. book launch on April 18th</a>, we&rsquo;re sharing the first interview in <em>Girl on Girl</em>. For South African photographer Zanele Muholi, the stakes of visibility and representation of women&mdash;particularly black, lesbian, queer, and transgender women&mdash;are high. From Muholi&rsquo;s gaze to ours, the art of photography, and the art of looking itself, can be a life-affirming act.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>ZANELE MUHOLI: A LIVING ARCHIVE</strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:22px;"><em>&ldquo;It&rsquo;s about claiming the spaces, taking back power, owning our voices and our selves and our bodies, without fear of being judged.&rdquo;</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170413141229-ZANELE_MUHOLI_Katlego_Mashiloane_and_Noshipo_Lavuta_Ext._2_Lakeside_Johannesburg_2007.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Zanele Muholi,<em> Katlego mashiloane and Noshipo Lavuta, Ext. 2, Lakeside, Johannesburg</em>, 2007</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In autumn 2016, I was walking around the exhibition <em>Zanele Muholi: Isibonelo/Evidence</em> at the Brooklyn Museum, New York, the most significant museum survey of the award-winning artist&rsquo;s work to date. A young boy was there visiting with his mother. I watched him put the headphones on and stare up at the screen that was showing Muholi&rsquo;s 2012 video <em>Being Scene</em>, depicting blurry footage of bodies&mdash;lesbian couples, including Muholi and her long-term girlfriend&mdash;making love. I looked at his mother, who shrugged and laughed. The was probably the boy&rsquo;s first encounter with sex, and it was an interracial, lesbian couple. It was a rare moment in which I realized how art can shift our perceptions of gender, sexuality and identity. &ldquo;I am hoping to break down those notions around what is to be seen and what is not,&rdquo; said Muholi in an interview about the exhibition at the time. &ldquo;I want to encourage young artists to think of photography as a possibility, as work&mdash;to think of art for consciousness, and in turn, museums as spaces where we can carve a new dialogue that favours us.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170413141518-ZANELE_MUHOLI_Beloved_I_2005.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Zanele Muholi,<em> Beloved 1</em>, 2005</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Photography in South Africa has long been intertwined with its political turbulence, and Muholi, the first black, gay, South African photographer to make a significant space in the country&rsquo;s cultural history with her work, is part of a legacy of photographers who have challenged their reality from the inside, from South Africa&rsquo;s first black photographer, Ernest Cole, to David Goldblatt, George Hallett and Peter Maguabane. In post-apartheid South Africa, however, inequalities persist.</p> <p>With a background in journalism and activism for women&rsquo;s empowerment, in 2006 Muholi embarked on her best-known work to date, the ongoing project <em>Faces and Phases</em>, photographing members of the LGBTI community she belongs to, in townships of South Africa and the African diaspora. As an active, involved member of this community, Muholi is not distanced from her subjects: over the years, Muholi has returned to shoot follow-ups of them&mdash;an affirmation in a place where black lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people are persecuted.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170413141552-ZANELE_MUHOLI_Xana_Nyilenda_Los_Angeles_2013.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Zanele Muholi,<em> Xana Nyilenda, Los Angeles</em>, 2013</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>To the outsider, what is striking about <em>Faces and Phases</em>, made up of more than 250 portraits, is not only the content of the images but also their quantity: this living archive of women has a powerful presence that contradicts the pandemic belief that being gay is un-African. Muholi explains: &ldquo;It&rsquo;s about claiming the spaces, taking back power, owning our voices and our selves and our bodies, without fear of being judged. Saying that we are here, without fear of being displaced.&rdquo;</p> <p>South African constitutionally has the most liberal attitude towards homosexuality on the African continent&mdash;same-sex marriage is legal, and anti-discrimination laws exist&mdash;yet brutal violence, corrective rape and murder are a daily reality for LGBTI people, and Muholi raises these tragic failures against her people through her work. Each portrait represents a different story&mdash;a struggle and a triumph&mdash;but together they are part of a powerful collective force. Muholi&rsquo;s work is firmly rooted in the local, and her perspective of the situation she is living in, here and now. Yet a portrait in itself does not tell us the complexity of its subject&rsquo;s story. What we see first, and foremost, in Muholi&rsquo;s work, is the humanity common to all women, irrespective of their sexuality, gender or race. For Muholi, as a visual activist, photographs can change our world.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170413141339-ZANELE_MUHOLI_ZaVa_III._Paris_2013.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Zanele Muholi,<em> ZaVa III, Paris</em>, 2013</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Charlotte Jansen is an arts and culture journalist and editor-at-large at <em>Elephant</em> magazine. </strong></p> <p><em>From </em>Girl on Girl: Art and Photography in the Age of the Female Gaze<em> (April 2017). Reprinted with permission of Laurence King Publishing. </em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Zanele Muholi,<em> Zinzi and Tozama II Mowbray</em>, 2010. All images:&nbsp;From <em>Girl on Girl: Art and Photography in the Age of the Female Gaze</em> (2017) by Charlotte Jansen.&nbsp;&copy; Zanele Muholi, courtesy of Stevenson Cape Town and Johannesburg.)</span></p> Wed, 19 Apr 2017 15:03:24 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: Martina Menegon <p><a href="http://martinamenegon.tumblr.com/">Martina Menegon</a> is an Italian new media artist and educator currently based in Vienna, Austria. <a href="http://martinamenegon.tumblr.com/bio">Her art explores</a> &ldquo;the instability and ephemerality of the human body as well as the alienation from physicality in today&rsquo;s digital age, questioning the gap between real and virtual, flesh and data.&rdquo; Menegon&rsquo;s expression of these ideas range from uncanny scenes of endless, undulating fleshy figures to far more personal depictions of her own digitally distorted physical form. Her work reveals the ever-evolving relationship between all of us and the inescapable digital world, as well as a complex, autobiographical representation of one artist&rsquo;s journey through it.</p> <p>I asked Menegon about her history of using computers to make art, the origins of her fascination with the human body, and the difference between selfies and self-portraits.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111132734-2.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>Virtual Narcissism</em>, 2016&ndash;ongoing, Various multimedia installations</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: What were your earliest memories of computers?</strong></p> <p><strong>Martina Menegon:</strong> Some years ago my mother was a graphic designer, often freelancing, so as far as I can remember, we always had a computer at home for her to work. Me and my brother were allowed to use it when she didn&rsquo;t need it for work. I remember once I wanted to clean up the desktop and somehow I trashed everything (including the Macintosh HD icon) and the computer never started up again. It was terrifying and I must admit, back then I blamed my little brother (shame on me!).</p> <p><strong>CP: When and why did you first go online?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I honestly cannot remember. It must have been early and probably just because it was finally possible to go online at home. My earliest memory of going online is during my first year of high school, when I opened my first blog where I was writing and posting pictures everyday (back then I was very much into writing little poems or short texts). But I already knew how to use the internet so I must have been online way before this memory.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><br /> <img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111131135-3.I_ll_Keep_You_Warm_and_Safe_in_My_People_Zoo__3.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111131024-5.I_LL-KEEP-YOU-WARM-AND-SAFE-IN-MY-PEOPLE-ZOO-x-Paper-Thin-V2.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon, <em>I&rsquo;ll Keep You Warm and Safe in My People Zoo</em>, 2016, VR installation Sounds by&nbsp;Stefano D&rsquo;Alessio</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first think about computers as a creative tool?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I guess it always was for me. My mother&rsquo;s computer only had software she needed for work (Illustrator, Photoshop, etc.) and she also installed for me and my brother the amazing &ldquo;<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kid_Pix">Kid-Pix</a>.&rdquo; I was always playing and drawing and creating with it since I can remember. I always treated computers as creative tools somehow.</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you start to experiment with 3D?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> It was in 2008 during my study in Visual and Performing Arts at the IUAV University in Venice. I followed a 3D animation class where I learned how to model and animate and render in Cinema4D. It was such a fun experience, and I never stopped working with 3D since then. I think I even repeated the class just for the fun of it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111132915-7.SPLITS-ARE-PARTED.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>Splits Are Parted</em>, 2016, Interactive installation,&nbsp;sounds by&nbsp;Stefano D&#39;Alessio</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How and why did the human body, and your own body, become such a constant theme in your work? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I think it always was. I can&rsquo;t say why. I think many different aspects and events of my life brought me to focus a lot on the human body: growing up as a synchronized swimmer, going to art school, experimenting with some performance art, studying performance and interactive art in Venice, being in Second Life, etc.</p> <p>In general I am quite a shy person, always scared of exposing myself publically. This is way I rarely ended up performing in real life. But for some reason, exposing myself in a digital realm does not bother me much. Maybe the only challenge for me is at openings, where people watch or interact with my 3D-scanned body and I am next to it. I sometimes try to blend in with the gallery walls :-P</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111131341-1.Virtual_Narcissism_-_making_of.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>Virtual Narcissism</em>&nbsp;(making of), 2016&ndash;ongoing, Various multimedia installations</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How has the digital age changed our relationship with the human body? How do you think the digital age has changed your relationship with your own body?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I will not speak for others, but for me, the digital age gave me the possibility of exploring my body in many different ways: through audio, photo, videos, slow-mo, 3D, etc. It made it possible for me to augment and expand the relationship I had with my body. Sometimes I think it&rsquo;s my body that changed my relationship with the digital age: as I am more and more anxious in memorizing its changes and visualizing its data, I feel the urge to explore different techniques and tools.</p> <p><strong>CP: Do you think Virtual Reality will distort this relationship even further? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I think VR is going to create another way for us to relate to our body and it is not going to be necessarily a distortion, just another form. And I am definitely interested in exploring this.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Pzd2UI9_pHg?rel=0&amp;controls=0" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Your project <em><a href="http://martinamenegon.tumblr.com/post/144465199907/virtual-narcissism-various-multimedia" target="_blank">Virtual Narcissism</a></em> feels very autobiographical.</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> <em>Virtual Narcissism</em> is definitely autobiographical. It started as an experiment and ended up being an ongoing project, based on my digital archive of 3D-scanned selfies. In real life, I am generally a very shy person: I feel very uncomfortable being photographed or filmed. When I am alone I am of course less self-conscious, and it&rsquo;s virtually sculpting those moments that interests me the most at the moment.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" class="giphy-embed" frameborder="0" height="360" src="//giphy.com/embed/3o6ZtnBPZyoiR2c9tS" width="480"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>Virtual Narcissism</em>&nbsp;(making of), 2016&ndash;ongoing, Various multimedia installations</span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <p><strong>CP: What do you think is the difference between a self-portrait and a selfie? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> When I 3D scan myself, I never really think ahead about what kind of pose or where to sit. I usually plug in my Kinect, open the software, and it gives me 10 seconds to find a pose before the scan starts. I want to be as spontaneous as I can, given that a scan takes a bit longer than a photograph to be done. The results are untouched; all my <em>Virtual Narcissism</em> scans are uploaded as the software puts them out. There is no selection. All my scans are going to be uploaded in my Sketchfab account. So if we stick with the common distinction that sees self-portraiture as a representation of a person and a selfie as an insight into a person&rsquo;s life, then I should consider my work as selfies. But I am not sure this distinction is valid anymore.</p> <p><strong>CP: You regularly collaborate with certain artists. Why is collaboration important to you and your work? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I always loved collaborating with other artists, I think it is a great way to grow artistically as well as share knowledge. I am very fond of this. I never hide my process in art making&mdash;I believe in sharing. I guess this is also why I love teaching. Of the many collaborations I do with artists, two are regular and very important to me and my art. One is with <a href="http://cargocollective.com/stefanodalessio/" target="_blank">Stefano D&rsquo;Alessio</a>, with whom I create interactive installations and some performances. Even when we work separately, I regularly ask him for support in programming or audio design. My collaboration with <a href="http://www.exile.at/ko/" target="_blank">Klaus Obermaier</a> started back in 2010, after I took his <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_(software)" target="_blank">Max/MSP</a> workshop in Venice, where I learned how to create interactive tools for art practice. It was an important event in my artistic career, a major turning point. His works have been influencing me since then.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/KzDifurF9wQ?rel=0&amp;controls=0" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Klaus Obermaier, Stefano D&rsquo;Alessio, and Martina Menegon, <em>EGO</em>, Interactive installation, 2015</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Tell us about your experience playing Second Life? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> Second Life has been and still is a big and important experience and influence for my art. It was the first place where I experienced tridimensional glitches, the frustration of being stuck in a wall, having an arm passing through my body, etc. It was also the place where I started socializing, as I had a little shop where I was selling clothes and furniture. I was part of a design community that created amazing artistic events, and I was always trying to go to art performances and installations there as well.</p> <p>I was a Second Life resident for almost 10 years, and the only reason I am using the past tense is because I somehow destroyed my poor virtual me for an art project: I wanted to record the result of me attaching everything I owned in Second Life to my avatar (thousands of different hair styles and colors, clothes, shoes, animations, furniture, houses, etc.). I somehow overloaded the system and my avatar started changing, then transformed into a white cloud, and then the software crashed. Since then, whenever I try to open Second Life, the app crashes. I tried some solutions I found online but nothing worked. I will try to contact the Linden Lab soon, because I have to admit, I miss being in Second Life.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-ibWVK9QBco?rel=0&amp;controls=0" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon, <em>Ouch!</em>, 2014</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How is the new media art scene in Vienna ?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I have to admit most new media works I see here in Vienna are mainly in university exhibitions or small art spaces. In general I have the feeling there is not really a community here for new media, yet. But I guess it&rsquo;s just a matter of time. Just before Christmas, for example, at the Angewandte Innovation Lab (AIL) there was a very nice exhibition, <em><a href="http://www.ailab.at/archive/the-age-of-experience/" target="_blank">The Age of Experience</a></em>, featuring among others <em>The Legible City</em> by Jeffrey Shaw and a great work by Ip Yuk-Yiu, <em>S for Sisyphus</em>. I have to say I felt almost &ldquo;at home&rdquo; while visiting.</p> <p><strong>CP: What do you have coming up in 2017?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> Apart from exhibitions and teaching, I will definitely keep working on new developments in&nbsp;<em>Virtual Narcissism</em>. I am currently working on a VR version of it, struggling around with some intricate scripting in Unity3D. I plan to play around with some augmented reality projects as well, as soon as the VR one is done. In general, I will keep working.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&#39;re interested in what&#39;s happening with art on the web. We invited online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, to write a bi-monthly column for us. Every other Wednesday he selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>I&#39;ll Keep You Warm and Safe in My People Zoo #2</em>, 2016, Video loop. All images: Courtesy of the artist)</span></p> Wed, 11 Jan 2017 13:01:05 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Natalia Zuluaga Kicks Off ArtCenter/South Florida’s Latest Chapter with “An Image” <p>When <a href="http://www.artcentersf.org/" target="_blank"><strong>ArtCenter/South Florida</strong></a> opened on Lincoln Road in 1984, in the heart of South Beach, the street was &ldquo;nearly abandoned and severely dilapidated.&rdquo; Today the center, which hosts exhibitions, classes, and a studio residency program, is credited with kickstarting the revitalization of the mall and its surrounding area. Following the appointment of Natalia Zuluaga as Artistic Director this August, ArtCenter itself is getting something of a revitalization. Dynamic changes are underway as the promising Bard Center for Curatorial Studies graduate begins her tenure with an ambitious exhibition that rethinks the space&#39;s programming structure&mdash;and the very shape of what an exhibition can be.</p> <p>Part of an emerging generation of local creatives that have been actively distinguishing Miami&rsquo;s cultural identity through art&mdash;challenging stereotypes about the city and bringing it visibility outside of the annual art fair invasion&mdash;Zuluaga will oversee programming, education initiatives, and artist residencies. In addition, she works on a variety of collaborative curatorial and publishing projects such as <a href="http://namepublications.org/" target="_blank"><strong>[NAME] Publications</strong></a> and PDP/PLP, a transdisciplinary &ldquo;think tank&rdquo; co-run by <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/334661-alan-gutierrezhttps://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/334661-alan-gutierrez" target="_blank"><strong>Alan Gutierrez</strong>,</a> <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/228798-patricia-margarita-hernandez" target="_blank"><strong>Patricia Margarita Hernandez</strong></a>, and <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/223455-domingo-castillo" target="_blank"><strong>Domingo Castillo</strong></a>. &nbsp;</p> <p>For her debut ArtCenter exhibition, she worked with Castillo, an artist and co-founding <a href="http://noguchibreton.net/" target="_blank"><strong>Noguchi Breton</strong></a> gallerist, to co-curate <a href="http://www.artcentersf.org/fall2016/animage/" target="_blank"><strong><em>An Image</em></strong></a>, which runs through December 18. Together, they organized an exhibition that deconstructs, subverts, and reasserts notions of <em>the image</em>: what it is, what it could be, and how it functions in culture. The exhibition title is borrowed from Harun Farocki&rsquo;s film, included in the show, and the installation presents a smart selection of video art, objects, performance, and talks.</p> <p>I spoke recently with Zuluaga and Castillo about their conceptual framework and the intricacies of their robust exhibition, which is a must-see during Miami Art Week next month.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161121180139-ArtCenter_An_Image_Exterior_View.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Exterior view of <em>An Image</em>,&nbsp;ArtCenter South/Florida. Photo: Zack Balber</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Audrey Phillips: Natalia, what led to your move to ArtCenter/South Florida and what shape do you see things taking with future exhibitions? &nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>Natalia Zuluaga: </strong>My move to ArtCenter was really the result of a confluence of things, and luckily so. I think the institution is going through an interesting transition period and was a great place from which to explore my own interests in &ldquo;institutional forms&rdquo; and programming. So the invitation to come in and re-imagine the way ArtCenter&rsquo;s many pieces fit together (exhibitions, residencies, pedagogy) was particularly exciting for me.</p> <p><em>An Image</em> reflects a way of programming that allowed us to think through ideas over longer periods of time. So, instead of thinking about an exhibition schedule that included 10 exhibitions a year, I figured we could shorten that down to 3-4, and instead unpack the ideas over longer periods of time and through a variety of engagements. This is where the thinking behind an exhibition in the shape of objects, lectures, screenings, and using the exhibition space as the site where most of these things happen came into fruition. So future programs at ArtCenter may not be exhibitions at all, and instead focus on the necessary outputs for the content we want to engage with and breaking with the demands we place on ourselves to produce (or overproduce!) in one particular way.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161121181003-ArtCenter_An_Image_Barbara_Kasten__2_.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 467px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Barbara Kasten,&nbsp;Installation view of&nbsp;<em>An Image</em>&nbsp;at ArtCenter/South Florida.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 14px; text-align: center;">Photo: Zack Balber</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AP: The exhibition seems so thoughtful, even the design of the </strong><a href="http://www.artcentersf.org/fall2016/animage/" target="_blank"><strong>web page</strong></a><strong>&mdash;which is beautiful. I imagine it was also approached as an image in and of itself. Could you talk about the process of selecting works and how they operate in relation to one another?</strong></p> <p><strong>NZ: </strong>Domingo and I really did want to think about all of the components in the exhibition as images, or as contributing factors to the construction of an image. We wanted to move beyond the representational force of an image which had dominated so much of &ldquo;image&rdquo; discourse/politics and think about the way an image is both imbricated and a catalyst for a number of social/political processes. So yes, the website, and especially the installation was important for this because we knew that the exhibition space as an image would travel further than the amount of people who could possibly access it in person.</p> <p>As a project we like to think that it works on two registers: that the exhibition space itself works as the place where the construction of an image is set to play, and that the public programs were a way of thinking through effects and gamuts of temporalities. In the space you have works by Harun Farocki, Enrique Castro-Cid, Barbara Kasten, and Suzan Pitt as immediate examples bolstered by the exhibition design and by the lighting, which Alan Gutierrez so carefully designed. Each one of these pieces does something slightly different: Farocki gives you the careful construction of desire in an image; Pitt&mdash;the presence of the hand in her very rich imagery; Castro-Cid in the relation between reality, computer-aided design, and painting. &nbsp;</p> <p>I think together the pieces are more than individual images&mdash;and this is important because we weren&rsquo;t interested in <em>importing </em>images; we wanted to create one too.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161121180257-ArtCenter_An_Image_Alan_Gutierrez.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 467px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Alan Gutierrez, Installation view of&nbsp;<em>An Image</em>&nbsp;at ArtCenter/South Florida.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 14px; text-align: center;">Photo: Zack Balber</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Domingo Castillo:</strong> We looked at <a href="http://arquitectonica.com/blog/portfolio/residential/the-pink-house/" target="_blank">ARQUITECTONICA&rsquo;s Pink House</a> as a case study of a project that literally reprogramed the visual identity of Miami for the 80s and made ARQUITECTONICA an instant global architecture firm. The house, which perfectly exemplifies the &ldquo;post-modern&rdquo; in architecture, won multiple awards before it was even built. The proposal of which was first designed by Laurinda Spear and Rem Koolhaas, showed a return to the hand-painted and romanticized rendering which clearly highlighted their admiration of the Bauhaus thinking but begins to do something else.</p> <p>When the house is finally constructed it&rsquo;s redesigned by the newly established firm. It begins getting highlighted for its five Shades of Pink and it continues to get awards through all the photography-based architectural magazines. Luxury brands use the house as a stage for their advertisements, becoming the actual post-modern moment. The functionality of the house as a house comes second to it functioning as a stage where images are created. Due to the sheer amount of images that are generated through the house and its positioned branding of the image, the City of Miami starts to pivot towards the lifestyle, colors, and aesthetics laid out by the house and the images of its use. That to this day continues informing a &ldquo;luxurious&rdquo; understanding of the city, as per <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jKbR7u8J5PU" target="_blank">Pitbull and Chris Brown&rsquo;s &ldquo;Fun&rdquo; music video.</a></p> <p>This is the grounding logic we wanted to work through with the exhibition as a whole. Instead of bringing in archival material, the logic is re-performed and our study of the house gets incorporated into the exhibition design and promotional apparatus of the exhibition.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161121180722-ArtCenter_An_Image_Enrique_Castro_Cid.jpg" style="width: 467px; height: 700px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Enrique Castro-Cid,&nbsp;Installation view of&nbsp;<em>An Image</em>&nbsp;at ArtCenter/South Florida.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 14px; text-align: center;">Photo: Zack Balber</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AP: You mention that the exhibition is &ldquo;an inherent political project&rdquo; that looks at &ldquo;image in relation to power structures and pseudo-agency&rdquo; referencing a &ldquo;history of anxiety,&rdquo; then tie these themes to the image of Miami as &ldquo;colonial fantasies of Latin America&rdquo; in your press release. Further to that, you assert that &ldquo;images are coded by different cosmologies in order to reconfigure the politics of visibility and presence.&rdquo; I&rsquo;m curious to know how or where these different cosmologies exist and am also interested in your thoughts related to these aspects of your statement.</strong></p> <p><strong>NZ: </strong>Alan Poma&rsquo;s <em>La Victoria Sobre el Sol </em>[Victory Over the Sun], which is the multi-media opera we are presenting at the conclusion of the exhibition that re-appropriates the Russian futurist play by the same name, is a good example of what we mean by the way in which different cosmologies code images. The play translates the opera both visually and linguistically to incorporate both Andean visions of the last moments of the solar system -- a story that has its origins in pre-columbian cultures. This incorporation is not in effect to translate the story, but to reclaim and decolonize the notion of futurity as a narrative that is strictly european in origin and in doing so re-situates the way in which that narrative has a <em>presence</em>, and is made <em>visible</em>; and that is inherently a political act.</p> <p>It&rsquo;s great that you picked up on the &ldquo;colonial fantasies.&rdquo; This was a slight jab at the idea that Miami is the &ldquo;gateway to the Americas&rdquo; or the &ldquo;capital of Latin America.&rdquo; This is language that has been disseminated by economic and tourist development boards in an effort to really sell Miami as that; but for us that idea pointed to a kind of colonial fantasy that doesn&rsquo;t play out through the dispossession of land or the acquisition of it for a nation state, but through a more pervasive form of economic colonialism. One key example that Domingo and I are always talking about is <a href="http://www.verizonenterprise.com/infrastructure/data-centers/north-america/nap/nap-americas.xml" target="_blank">NAP of The Americas</a>. This data site located just north of downtown Miami is where a large amount of internet traffic from the Americas is funneled through. So if you send an email, say, from Brazil to Chile, there&rsquo;s a chance it has to travel up here before reaching its destination. This subtle crossing of territories says more about Miami as a gateway and capital and the power structures that support and propel this vision forward than palm trees and sunsets do.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161121180826-ArtCenter_An_Image_Installation_shot.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 467px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Installation view of&nbsp;<em>An Image</em>&nbsp;at ArtCenter/South Florida.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 14px; text-align: center;">Photo: Zack Balber</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AP: What makes Miami unique in relation to other &ldquo;art worlds&rdquo;?</strong></p> <p><strong>DC:</strong> Miami is just another node within the larger network of Contemporary Art. A place of constant contestation, natural disasters, racial inequality, financial inequality, constant land (re)development, and the ecological harmony of the Everglades are a few things of many that constantly rub up against each other and have to be constantly negotiated. The politics of the image become almost obvious if we start thinking about the way that art has always been instrumentalized within the creation and development of this city&rsquo;s imagery. When used with this kind of awareness and agency images and art can be used as a great vehicle where one can act and possibly change the course or at least the conversation towards more radicalized and empowered futures.</p> <p><strong>AP: What are your top Miami picks for Art Basel week?</strong></p> <p><strong>NZ: </strong>To see:&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/mia/events/show/427723-an-image" target="_blank"><em>AN IMAGE</em></a> :) and <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/433501-sometimes-random" target="_blank">Lynne Golob Gelfman</a> at Noguchi Breton.</p> <p>To eat: <a href="http://www.chefcreole.com/" target="_blank">Chef Creole</a> (200 NW 54th Street in Little Haiti), <a href="http://www.lapalapahondurena.com/" target="_blank">La Palapa</a> (2699 Biscayne Boulevard in Edgewater), and <a href="http://www.lacamaronera.com/" target="_blank">La Camaronera</a> (1952 W Flagler Street in Little Havana).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;Audrey L. Phillips</p> <p><em>Audrey Phillips is a Toronto-based writer. She is a regular contributor to AQNB.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:14px;">(Image to top: Installation view of <em>An Image</em> at ArtCenter/South Florida. Harun Farocki and Alan Gutierrez. Photos: Zack Balber. All images courtesy of ArtCenter/South Florida)</span></p> Tue, 29 Nov 2016 15:23:06 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list The Artist Positioning Himself as Richter’s Crown Prince <p>Next year Eberhard Havekost turns fifty: time to balance the books. The press release for his current solo at KINDL positions Havekost &ldquo;among the most important German artists of his generation.&rdquo; The artist himself probably doesn&rsquo;t agree with an accolade this generic, especially when it&rsquo;s accompanying the kind of self-confident display of painterly power that is <em>Inhalt</em>. The show takes up two full floors and doesn&rsquo;t leave much wall space unused. The works on show are so diverse, they could have been created by three or four different artists.</p> <p>Most recognizable as Havekost&rsquo;s are the flat figurative paintings of everyday objects and scenes. They&rsquo;re based on photographs, either Havekost&rsquo;s own or found footage, which have been digitally enhanced and transferred to canvas with a minimum of depth or visible brushstroke. A lipsticked mouth blowing out smoke, a close-up of a sugar cube, a bent, tanned leg framing the ocean behind. It&rsquo;s imagery with a pop-art charm, somewhere between social and photo realism. And it is what it is. Only occasionally does Havekost allow himself an ironic wink, like in the <em>Transformers</em>-titled depiction of a car wreck.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161120222950-KINDL_Havekost_01_300dpi.jpg" style="width: 413px; height: 700px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Eberhard Havekost, <em>Baum, B15</em>, 2015, Oil on canvas, 270 x 160 cm.<br /> Courtesy of Galerie Gebr. Lehmann and Anton Kern Gallery. Photo: Werner Lieberknecht</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Havekost&rsquo;s most vacant paintings are of dead screens, of TVs, computers, or mobile phones. The vast pools of grey nothingness hold promises of light and pigment but they turn out to be the dull opposite of everything painterly. In their off mode it&rsquo;s almost impossible to imagine we spend hours every day looking at them, our windows to the world. With sardonic delight Havekost exposes the soul of the virtual world in <em>Baum</em>: the colorful electronic bits inside a cracked iPhone are more real than the numb screen.</p> <p>With a series of iridescent works Havekost bounces to the other side of the spectrum. One triptych is even called <em>Light</em>. It&rsquo;s a depiction of basic physics but the result is both kitschy and hysterical. Havekost offsets these luminary explosions with measured color schemes, rhythmic compositions of six shades of secondary colors with titles such as <em>Copy + Property</em> or <em>Sch&ouml;ner Wohnen</em>. Here, the natural force of light and reflection has been categorized and domesticated.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161120222918-KINDL_Havekost_M1_02_300dpi.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 518px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Eberhard Havekost, Installation view of <em>Inhalt</em> at KINDL&rsquo;s Power House (first floor, M1). Photo: Jens Ziehe, 2016</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Up to this point the works in <em>Inhalt </em>can somehow be linked together, however diverse they may be. But Havekost rudely breaks this logic by adding half a dozen semi-abstract expressionist paintings, scattered across the walls, often right next to the flattest images in the presentation. The palette is geared towards contrast, the paint seems to have been forcefully smeared onto the canvas, attacked with sharp objects. To see <em>Zimmerpflanze</em> (House plants), a violent clash of sweeping greens, blacks, and yellows, right next to the perfectly realistic flowers in <em>Poison</em>, is nothing short of shocking.</p> <p><em>Inhalt</em> is Havekost flexing his painterly muscles. He obviously feels the need to showcase the full range of his skills. And he is explicitly competing with Gerhard Richter, the greatest German painter alive today, the best of not just his own but of all generations. The color schemes, the abstract work, the photorealistic images&mdash;they echo Richter&rsquo;s multi-faceted oeuvre. The standoff between the now 84-year-old Nestor and his would-be crown prince doesn&rsquo;t end favorably for Havekost, though. As Frieze critic Kristy Bell noticed in her review of his 2006 show at the Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg: &ldquo;Richter described the process of painting from photographs as being about making the banal &lsquo;more than just banal,&rsquo; but the problem with Havekost&rsquo;s paintings is that the banal just becomes more banal.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161120222822-KINDL_Havekost_02_300dpi.jpg" style="width: 391px; height: 700px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Eberhard Havekost, <em>Gef&uuml;hl, B15</em>, 2015, Oil on canvas, 80 x 45 cm.<br /> Courtesy of Galerie Gebr. Lehmann and Anton Kern Gallery. Photo: Werner Lieberknecht</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>What holds true for Havekost&rsquo;s photographically inspired paintings, applies to his entire body of work. Richter&rsquo;s works are about history and painting, memory and painting, identity and painting, a lot of different subjects combined with painting. Havekost&rsquo;s are only about painting. His subject matter is of secondary concern; the images are first and foremost shapes and colors. His large-scale reproduction of an illustration from a history book he received as a child might inspire mild bewilderment but his decision to paint it seems random. In that light the show&rsquo;s title, <em>Inhalt</em> (Content), feels deeply ironic. To be counted amongst the truly greatest painters of his age, however, Havekost needs to go beyond his noncommittal game of half-hearted references.</p> <p><em>Eberhard Havekost&rsquo;s </em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/433413-inhalt" target="_blank">Inhalt</a><em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/433413-inhalt" target="_blank"> </a>is on display at KINDL &ndash; Zentrum f&uuml;r zeitgen&ouml;ssische Kunst, Berlin, until February 19. 2017.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/356010-edo-dijksterhuis?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Edo Dijksterhuis</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:14px;">(Image at top: Eberhard Havekost, Installation view of <em>Inhalt</em> at KINDL&rsquo;s Power House (second floor, M2). Photo: Jens Ziehe, 2016)</span></p> Sat, 26 Nov 2016 14:13:28 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Relentlessly Dissecting Beauty, Marilyn Minter Gets at the Guts of Glamour <p><em>October saw the launch of&nbsp;A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum, a yearlong series of ten exhibitions celebrating the 10th anniversary of the museum&rsquo;s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. The series&rsquo; first two exhibitions honor two unique feminisms. Today, we&rsquo;re taking a look at them both: Beverly Buchanan&rsquo;s&nbsp;</em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/46824-beverly-buchanan">Ruins and Rituals&nbsp;</a><em>and Marilyn Minter&rsquo;s&nbsp;</em>Pretty/Dirty<em>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>A woman just beginning to show the signs of a life well-worn, with deeply impressed laugh lines and a made-up face sagging ever so slightly, stares almost seductively, or maybe placidly at you from her bed. A cigarette burns in her liver-spotted hand, the strap of her nightgown barely hangs on to one shoulder. The photograph is titled <em>Coral Ridge Towers (Mom Smoking) </em>(1969/1995), and as titled, along with the eight other photos in the series, it depicts the artist&rsquo;s mother in her Florida home. But there is a reason it took Marilyn Minter over twenty years to print and show this series.</p> <p>On a walk-through of her recently opened retrospective at Brooklyn Museum, Minter stops at the Coral Ridge Tower series, which begins the show, to recall how she didn&rsquo;t feel there was anything special about these photos when she took them&mdash;she was simply snapping photos of her mother in her apartment, doing the things she usually did. But upon showing them to some classmates, she realized that what she&rsquo;d captured was something entirely different. She saw what they saw: a woman defeated by the patriarchal standards of femininity.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110130743-Coral_Ridge_Towers__Mom_Smoking_.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 543px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Marilyn Minter, <em>Coral Ridge Towers (Mom Smoking)</em>, 1969/1995, Gelatin silver print. Collection of Beth Rudin DeWoody</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Pretty/Dirty</em>, Minter&rsquo;s first major retrospective, explores this idea of abject beauty that we see running throughout her entire oeuvre&mdash;from her first student photographs, to her current paintings and videos. As a show, it is concise and clear cut, taking a few choice samples from each era of the artist&rsquo;s history in order to create a trajectory to understanding more fully how she arrived at her current work: the glossy, high production value, artificial colored, painted lips and lacquered nails&mdash;all resulting in what looks almost like Maybelline advertisements on acid.</p> <p>But the early works play an important role in understanding this largely misunderstood artist, because we see that there is a desire throughout to give agency to the unspoken, the overlooked, the scoffed, the embarrassing. Through the photographs, paintings, and videos she dissects this idea of beauty, a beauty that has been forced down the throats of women like her mother, a beauty that she herself would not be consumed by, rather she would turn in on itself, revealing the guts of glamour.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110130636-Big_Girls.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 508px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Marilyn Minter, <em>Big Girls</em>, 1986, Enamel on canvas, 2 panels. Collection of Bill Contente, New York</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The first real hint of this after the early photographs is <em>Little Girls #1 </em>(1986) and <em>Big Girls </em>(1986), both of which depict a deconstruction of women&rsquo;s bodies via the media they are most widely represented in: magazines. Each painting is constructed from source images ripped apart and put back together, representing the scrutiny women&rsquo;s bodies are put through on a daily basis. This is the beginning of Minter&rsquo;s interest in reclaiming oppressive images from the media for her own feminist agenda.</p> <p>Included as well are her photorealist paintings of floors and sinks, mostly taken from her home and in her studio. Here, in a collision of the domestic realm with the workspace, we see that she trained her photorealist eye on the mundane, turning the ordinary into something beautiful, something to look at or even objectify. It&rsquo;s not until later in her career that she brings this technique back, focusing instead on the absurdity of realism&mdash;the freckles the fashion industry takes such pains to erase (<em>Blue Poles,</em> 2007), the stubble still visible in freshly shaved underarms (<em>Armpit</em>, 2006), the unsightly marks binding clothes leave on bodies (<em>Sock</em>, 2005). Even the close-up shots in <em>Plush </em>(2016) are beautiful, taking a kind of professional care to make each individual bush look like a star&mdash;a head shot for your vulva.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110130547-Armpit.jpg" style="width: 467px; height: 700px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Marilyn Minter, <em>Armpit</em>, 2006, C-print. Courtesy of the artist, Salon 94, New York, and Regen Projects, Los Angeles</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This sort of sexual glorification is also visible in her first hardcore porn paintings, like <em>Porn Grid </em>(1989). To a contemporary audience the paintings might seem quaint, portrayed in bright colors, with an almost cartoonish halftone dot matrix, which was actually a laborious hand-painted effect. In fact, the depictions may not even register as &ldquo;hardcore porn&rdquo; anymore, as we see things almost as graphic on HBO these days. But it&rsquo;s important to note that these paintings were coming out of a time wrought with identity politics, and just by daring to go tackle the issue of porn had established Minter as something of a feminist-outcast, a traitor to the rhetoric of the time, shunned as a perceived accomplice of oppression.</p> <p>Looking back we can see that she was taking a feminist stance that was way ahead of her time with these paintings. Minter, as a heterosexual woman, was reclaiming the oppressive images from porn in hopes to turn them on their head with a female sex-positive message. Porn has been a reality of our culture for longer than most like to admit, so by co-opting these images of consensual sex, she was giving women agency over their sexuality, agency to enjoy and indulge in their sexuality. Plus, she noted, &ldquo;no one has PC fantasies, anyways,&rdquo; so we might as well get it all out there in the open. She was also searching for subject matter that would indeed shock and alarm for the very fact that a woman was dealing with it, noting that &ldquo;if Mike Kelley could mine 13-year-old girl culture of mall culture, unicorns, crushes&hellip;&rdquo; the equivalent would be her mining hardcore porn.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110130449-Orange_Crush.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 420px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Marilyn Minter, <em>Orange Crush</em>, 2009, Enamel on metal, 108 x 180 in. Private collection</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Her practice and eye have certainly grown and evolved along with the available technology, now incorporating higher production photo shoots, from which she constructs Photoshopped images, called &ldquo;cobbles,&rdquo; to create the perfect source image, from which she then makes her signature photorealistic enamel on metal paintings. She has moved away from the explicitly sexual, and back into a world of opulent sensuality. In the video <em>Meltdown</em> (2011), a silver-heeled and bejeweled foot dripping in metallic silver, kicks through an invisible plane of glass in slow motion. And paintings like <em>Drizzle (Wangechi Mutu)</em> (2010) and <em>Orange Crush</em> (2009) display similar dripping, metallic, almost ravenous mouths pouring over with glimmering substances.</p> <p>There&rsquo;s something insatiable about these paintings and videos. They contain a force that draws you in and pushes you away at the very same time, imploring you to consume them, much like their subjects slurp and taste and lick. Minter is creating seductive, yet off-putting steamy, frosty, wet, crystalized, shiny gem-filled fantasy worlds. You look in and look in, until you pull back, for fear of being consumed. This is the power of subverting the patriarchal gaze, the confinement and rule of imposed femininity&mdash;that the beauty and lust can linger along with the abject and repellent.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/452624-olivia-b-murphy?tab=REVIEWS">Olivia B. Murphy</a></p> <p><em>Olivia Murphy is a writer and editor based in New York, covering arts and culture. Her work has appeared in various publications both in print and online, including&nbsp;</em>L&#39;Officiel Magazine<em>,&nbsp;</em>Freunde Von Freunden<em>,&nbsp;</em>Whitehot<em>,&nbsp;</em>Riot of Perfume<em>,&nbsp;</em>doingbird<em>, and&nbsp;</em>Whitewall Magazine<em>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:14px;">(Image at top: Marilyn Minter, <em>Blue Poles</em>, 2007, Enamel on metal. Private collection, Switzerland)</span></p> Fri, 11 Nov 2016 09:21:50 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Beverly Buchanan and the Architecture of Blackness <p><em>October saw the launch of&nbsp;A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum, a yearlong series of ten exhibitions celebrating the 10th anniversary of the museum&rsquo;s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. The series&rsquo; first two exhibitions honor two unique feminisms. Today, we&rsquo;re taking a look at them both:&nbsp;Beverly Buchanan&rsquo;s </em>Ruins and Rituals<em> and Marilyn Minter&rsquo;s </em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/46826-relentlessly-dissecting-beauty-marilyn-minter-gets-at-the-guts-of-glamour">Pretty/Dirty</a><em>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>How might we understand a spatial and architectural discourse that marks a black subjectivity? This is the question that lingers in my thoughts as I reflect on <em>Ruins and Rituals</em>, a retrospective exhibition presenting the work of the late Beverly Buchanan, now on view at the Brooklyn Museum&rsquo;s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. Sackler Family Curator Catherine Morris considers Buchanan a game changer, which is not untrue; I would consider Buchanan a witness.</p> <p>Beverly Buchanan was a black Southern woman. As a black Southern woman myself, many of those in my personal circles ascribe to this positionality a type of unspoken power. However, as <a href="http://4columns.org/d-souza-aruna/beverly-buchanan">critics</a> have already rightfully articulated, within the parameters of the mainstream (read: New York City) art world during the 1970s, 80s, and early 90s&mdash;the periods during which Buchanan was most active&mdash;to be Southern and black and woman often resulted in an overlooking. Buchanan worked anyway, creating a repository of site-specific earthworks, sculptures, self-portraits, and other assemblage objects that move across the schools of conceptual and land art, while responding to the idiosyncrasies of the geographies in which she lived. So, as the artist traversed multiple landscapes, so too did her ever evolving canon traverse the political histories of the land, which often revolved explicitly around blackness(es).</p> <p>Organized by guest curators Jennifer Burris and Park McArthur, <em>Ruins and Rituals </em>points a critical, unprecedented eye towards Buchanan&rsquo;s multi-disciplined oeuvre. (Full disclosure: I am now employed at the organization where McArthur was once an artist-in-residence.) The exhibition is divided among three galleries, resisting a chronological viewing experience while still offering an obvious thread of conceptual connectivity.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110165731-Untitled__Slab-Works_1_.jpg" style="width: 700px; height: 560px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Beverly Buchanan, <em>Untitled (Slab Works 1)</em>, circa 1978&ndash;80, Black-and-white photograph of cast concrete sculptures with acrylic paint in artist studio. Private collection. &copy; Estate of Beverly Buchanan</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>Upon entering the Sackler Center, one is drawn towards Buchanan&rsquo;s <em>Frustuala</em> series: small, concrete blocks and columns the artist utilized as markers of presence, or, in some cases, the withering away of that which once was. When she began the series in the late 70s, Buchanan was employed in the public health field in New York and New Jersey. She used the stones to respond to the urban decay she was encountering, acutely aware that the materials she used to compose the works were also subject to weathering and aging. In a document on view in the archival section of the exhibition, Buchanan writes that she was &ldquo;...interested in urban walls when they [were] in various stages of decay; walls as part of a landscape.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>Buchanan&rsquo;s topographical engagement embodies critic (and close friend of the artist) Lucy Lippard&rsquo;s meditations on place&mdash;that is, a location in which space meets memory. <em>Marsh Ruins</em> (1981), for example, marks the memory of a group of Igbo slaves who drowned themselves off the coast of St. Simons Island, Georgia, as a way of resisting enslavement. Buchanan built these ruins in the marshes of Glynn, in Brunswick, Georgia, and in the show we encounter them via a video created by Burris, McArthur, and Jason Hirata. <em>Marsh Ruins</em> is a material reckoning with the earth in which its stone are planted, certainly, but also a physical (perhaps even spiritual) negotiation through unseen remnants of time.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110170452-Shack_Stories__Part_I_.jpg" style="width: 531px; height: 700px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Beverly Buchanan, with poet Alice Lovelace, <em>Shack Stories (Part I)</em>, 1990, Unpublished handmade book of ink and crayon drawings with watercolor and collaged typewritten text. Private collection. &copy; Estate of Beverly Buchanan</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>The same might be said of Buchanan&rsquo;s small shack sculptures. It is in these works that we see the artist most vividly address a Southern, black, architectural vernacular. That is to say, the shack, in Buchanan&rsquo;s hands, is not merely a signifier of social status, but rather a framework&mdash;literally and figuratively&mdash;through which we might understand the nuances of black Southern life. The form represents an important site of social and familial interactions such as weddings, births, and religious gatherings. The centering of the shack as structure<em>&nbsp;but also&nbsp;</em>cultural idiom places blackness within the frame of reference for spatial inclusion, as architect Mario Gooden describes in his book&nbsp;<em><a href="https://www.arch.columbia.edu/books/catalog/3-dark-space-architecture-representation-black-identity">Dark Space: Architecture, Representation, Black Identity</a></em>. Through these loaded forms, Buchanan speaks to the particularities of a black Southern subjectivity, past and present.&nbsp;<em>Low Country House</em>&nbsp;(date unknown), a small, unpainted wood shack, is an eloquent illustration of Buchanan&rsquo;s deftness for the subtle processes of commemoration.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110170038-Low_Country_House.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Beverly Buchanan, <em>Low Country House</em>, date unknown, Wood. &copy; Estate of Beverly Buchanan, courtesy of Jane Bridges. Photo: Adam Reich, courtesy of Andrew Edlin Gallery, New York</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>In the 90s, Buchanan also began to make assemblage pieces, often dedicated to or named after close friends, once again embodying experience and memory within material form. In the final gallery we see the bulk of this later work alongside a trove of photos, letters, and other textual ephemera produced by Buchanan throughout her life. In this room, though full of works ostensibly different in form, we still encounter Buchanan&rsquo;s entanglement with space, object, and memory. Here, the artist turns inward, tracing a personal relationship to the people she loved and the spaces she called home. In one black and white photograph, <em>Hunger and Hardship Creek</em> (1977/1994), Buchanan grips a sign pole with her right arm while staring intently at the camera. In an untitled, undated photocopied business card, she has drawn an image of herself as working artist/good cook/drama queen/safe driver. She is naming herself.</p> <p>McArthur and Burris have gifted us with a well-deserved exhibition that offers a full picture of the prolific artist. The curatorial narrative surrounding the exhibition is concise and direct, some may argue approaching the didactic. But, for me, the texts and exhibition materials feel extremely important as a narrative tool, especially when Buchanan is unfamiliar to many who will first encounter her story through this exhibition.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20161110170211-Untitled__The_Doctor_will__if_you_re_lucky__see_you__now_.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:14px;">Beverly Buchanan, <em>Untitled (&ldquo;The doctor will, if you&rsquo;re lucky, see you, now.&rdquo;)</em>, July 1993, Unpublished writing in notebook. Private collection. &copy; Estate of Beverly Buchanan</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>In <em>Dark Space</em> Gooden goes on to remark that &ldquo;...the black female body occupies a space within the matrix of subjectivities and bodies, and as such, its spatial praxes, whether visible or invisible, yield its potential agency to reference its own self.&rdquo; Gooden makes this statement with specific regard to the ways blackness has (or has not) tended to operate within spatial and architectural theories and dialogues. Buchanan then, it can be argued, transgresses the boundaries of seen and unseen in order to map a non-linear grid, a dark <em>place</em>, to borrow again from Lippard, where blackness is represented through memory, structure, or through her own image, her body.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/417193-jessica-lynne?tab=REVIEWS">Jessica Lynne</a>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Jessica Lynne is co-editor of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.arts.black/">ARTS.BLACK</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:14px;">(Image at top: Beverly Buchanan,&nbsp;<em>Untitled (Double Portrait of Artist with Frustula Sculpture) (detail)</em>, n.d. Black-and-white Photograph With Original Paint Marks, 8&frac12; x 11 in. Private Collection. &copy; Estate of Beverly Buchanan)</span></p> Fri, 11 Nov 2016 09:22:37 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list