ArtSlant https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/show en-us 40 The Trouble with “Neighbors”: Ai Weiwei, the Istanbul Biennial, and Forced Migration <p>Last month Public Art Fund in New York opened Ai Weiwei&rsquo;s citywide exhibition, <em><a href="https://www.publicartfund.org/ai_weiwei_good_fences_make_good_neighbors" target="_blank">Good Fences Make Good Neighbors</a></em>. The project entails steel, fence-like architectural interventions and large-scale banners depicting photographs of Syrian refugees from the artist&rsquo;s time in Lesbos, Greece. The exhibition is not alone in its use of domestic language to address global issues of mass forced migration. The 15th Istanbul Biennial, which concluded last week and was curated by Danish-Norwegian artist duo Elmgreen &amp; Dragset, took the title <em><a href="http://15b.iksv.org/home" target="_blank">a good neighbour</a></em>.</p> <p>The conceit of &ldquo;neighbor&rdquo; brings us to the scale of the home without quite entering <em>our</em> home: a neighbor, after all, is our closest foreign element. Today, both Turkey and the US find themselves embroiled in internal debates over policies concerning both external borders and internal relations between communities. The invocation of neighbors addresses&mdash;though to what end varies between these exhibitions&mdash;geopolitical issues over borders and boundaries and the legal designations that determine the futures of populations displaced by war and famine. In Ai&rsquo;s installation borders are evoked by fences and images of refugees installed in public spaces around the city. The Istanbul Biennial, on the other hand, nods to Turkey&rsquo;s status as hosting one of the highest populations of displaced Syrians more intimately, focusing on the private rather than public spaces.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117153513-12.-GoodFencesPhoto_JasonWyche_4027_ed.jpg.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ai Weiwei, <em>Arch</em> from <em>Good Fences Make Good Neighbors</em>, 2017, Galvanized mild steel and mirror polished stainless steel. Courtesy of Ai Weiwei studio and Frahm &amp; Frahm. Photo: Jason Wyche</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Last March Angela Merkel negotiated what has since been termed the &ldquo;EU-Turkey Deal,&rdquo; offering Turkey 6 billion Euro in refugee aid in exchange for the country preventing further crossings to Europe, particularly via Greece. Anyone arriving &ldquo;irregularly&rdquo; to Greece&mdash;even those seeking asylum&mdash;would, according to the deal, be returned to Turkey and made to apply from there. In Turkey, however, only asylum seekers originating from Europe qualify as &ldquo;refugees&rdquo; in any legal sense, as the country signed the 1951 Geneva Convention with a &ldquo;geographical limitation.&rdquo; The three million asylum seekers currently in Turkey, and any held in transit to Europe, are instead deemed &ldquo;<a href="https://www.loc.gov/law/help/refugee-law/turkey.php" target="_blank">persons of subsidiary protection</a>&rdquo;&mdash;a designation that nefariously keeps would-be asylum seekers outside of the international refugee system that would protect them.</p> <p>While many asylum seekers are living in camps in the south of Turkey, others have made it to cities, and Istanbul reflects its new population. In the months preceding the exhibition, promotional posters for the Biennial introduced the &ldquo;good neighbor&rdquo; theme in a series of questions: <em>Is&nbsp;a good neighbor&nbsp;your friend on Facebook?</em> <em>Is&nbsp;a good neighbor&nbsp;someone who lives the same way as you? Is&nbsp;a good neighbor&nbsp;a stranger you don&rsquo;t fear?</em> The inquisitive framework&mdash;<i>what is a good neighbor anyway?&mdash;</i>contrasts the aphoristic &ldquo;good neighbor&rdquo; in Ai&rsquo;s title, which references an ironic and <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2010/05/sarah-palin-misinterprets-robert-frost/57248/" target="_blank">often misunderstood</a> line from Robert Frost&rsquo;s 1915 poem &ldquo;Mending Wall.&rdquo; In both cases, however, the notion of neighbor works to &ldquo;domesticate&rdquo; debates about migration, to bring them down to the scale of the local, the neighborhood, the family, the home&mdash;at least ideologically. In its iterations since the the Gezi Park protests of 2013, the Istanbul Biennial has included works that take a wide-angle analysis of global socio-economic changes, featuring artists and collectives whose practices offer broad analyses of the socio-economic actors at work in the changing city. In its 2017 edition, the Biennial instead &ldquo;zoomed-in&rdquo; to show art that takes the home and interiority as its jumping-off point.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117153712-TP2_4648Ai_Weiwei_on_Porcelain__Sakip_Sabanci_Museum__Istanbul__2017__courtesy_of_Sakip_Sabanci_Museum_.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117184706-IMG_4287.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Ai Weiwei on Porcelain</em>, Sakip Sabanci Museum, Istanbul, 2017. Courtesy of Sakip Sabanci Museum</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Ai, who has been praised for addressing the migration crisis and critiqued for his tone-deaf or misguided attempts at doing so, opened the show <a href="http://www.sakipsabancimuzesi.org/en/page/exhibitions/ai-weiwei-porcelain" target="_blank"><em>Ai Weiwei on Porcelain </em></a>at the Sabanci Museum in Istanbul timed with Biennial. The exhibition includes many of his most recognizable works as well as recent work addressing the Syrian refugee crisis. Many newer works on view use domestic objects as materials and canvases&mdash;including pottery, dishes, and wallpaper emblazoned with black-and-white vignettes of refugees in makeshift camps, in transit, or running from the police. In one particularly distressing instance this wallpaper stretches around a huge atrium space, serving as a backdrop to larger-than-life documentation of Ai&rsquo;s notorious performance work, <em>Dropping a Han Dynasty Urn </em>(1995). Similarly the work <em>Study of Perspective</em> (1995&ndash;2003), in which Ai photographs his hand &ldquo;flipping off&rdquo; various architectural symbols of power around the world, reads as a kind of tone-deaf bad boy move when placed in the context of aestheticized images of refugees, people to whom the option to move around the globe so freely is all but impossible.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117153925-Screen_Shot_2017-11-15_at_10.55.11_AM.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ai Weiwei on eBay</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Prior to the Public Art Fund opening in New York, the organization opened a Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign and it is currently offering limited editions of the artist&rsquo;s work on eBay, including small prints of the wallpaper included in the Sabanci exhibition. No portion of the proceeds have been announced as directed toward organizations working to aid victims of forced migration, nor were donation options offered on the crowdfunding campaign menu. Rather than instrumentally benefitting refugees, the resulting &ldquo;good fences&rdquo; around New York City are aesthetically pleasing passageways and architectural interventions that offer seating and social space in parks and art venues including Washington Square, the Queens Museum, Cooper Square, and Central Park. According to the artist, the artworks are meant to &ldquo;raise awareness&rdquo; of the global refugee crisis and to the bordered and bounded lives of individuals. Instead, they materialize as convivial social projects in a city central to the international power structures that produce global inequalities&mdash;further pointing to questions about Ai&rsquo;s relationship to the state powers he aims to critique. If indeed this project is intended to &ldquo;raise awareness,&rdquo; how does that function within a leisure space? And what does it mean to do so using &ldquo;neighbor,&rdquo; in a place like New York, where, unlike Turkey, it is largely rhetorical? Ai&rsquo;s interventions do little to interrogate their namesake. Who <em>are </em>these neighbors&mdash;us or them? What makes a neighbor good or bad? Who, if anyone, is implicated or educated by this artwork?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117154044-14.-GoodFences_CircleFence_TimothySchenck_05.jpg.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ai Weiwei, <em>Circle Fence</em> from <em>Good Fences Make Good Neighbors</em>, 2017, Powder coated mild steel, polypropylene netting. Courtesy of the artist. Photo: Timothy Schenck</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Last Year Ai was &ldquo;<a href="http://www.artnews.com/2016/10/31/political-reactions-a-testy-ai-weiwei-speaks-with-tania-bruguera-at-the-brooklyn-museum/" target="_blank">testy</a>&rdquo; in a talk with Tania Bruguera at the Brooklyn Museum, responding to her criticisms of his now infamous photograph of himself reenacting the death of three-year-old Alan Kurdi on a beach in Bodrum, Turkey. He reprimanded Bruguera for not knowing the exact count of those who&rsquo;d lost their lives in passage. The trouble with counting the dead and depicting only their loss or desperation is that the refugee &ldquo;crisis&rdquo; isn&rsquo;t just a moment: it is an ongoing situation that continues even as Ai builds his beautiful fences in New York. To count is a process of memorialization we enact when a war is over, and those numbers can be put to wicked use. While Ai aggregates objects&mdash;life vests, clothing, shoes&mdash;to materialize the vast numbers of dead or displaced people, FRONTEX, the European Union&rsquo;s border agency, and its supporters use the same numbers to argue for further limitations on passage and harsher criminalization, which leads desperate people to attempt even more risky routes in order to avoid detection.&nbsp; Ai&rsquo;s 2016 installation of 14,000 life jackets on the columns of the Konzert Haus in Berlin was tagged with #safepassage which may have raised some awareness of refugees&rsquo; plights, but it also overwhelmed that hashtag&rsquo;s use by Medicine Sans Frontiers and aid groups who often used it for updates on travel conditions. The image of the thousands of bright orange life jackets became a favorite social media share and was retweeted and praised by some of the same officials who supported the EU-Turkey Deal (which further restrained refugees coming from Syria). Keeping refugees in Turkey has been instrumental in Europe, leaving already vulnerable people in a much less protected position&mdash;good neighbors indeed!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Powerful art installation by Chinese artist <a href="https://twitter.com/aiww?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@aiww</a> draping 14k refugee life vests from Greece to <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Berlin?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Berlin</a> concert hall <a href="https://t.co/kHbDvEAchI">pic.twitter.com/kHbDvEAchI</a></p> &mdash; Sebastian Ernst (@seb_ernst) <a href="https://twitter.com/seb_ernst/status/698823489864736768?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 14, 2016</a></blockquote> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Converse to spectacles of horror and vignettes of tragedy on fine china, the Istanbul Biennial stepped away from the directly political, particularly from the limited ways in which Turkey&rsquo;s art scene has come to be read as a go-to site for geopolitical catastrophizing. Without artwork directly critical of the government, the exhibition has been <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/sep/15/istanbul-biennial-hires-provocative-curators-but-wheres-the-political-art" target="_blank">critiqued</a> as lacking in political art. To say the work included is not political, however, misses the strength and subtlety of the exhibition. In contrast to the more broadly critical artworks presented in past biennials, Elmgreen &amp; Dragset have largely included artists and artworks that address daily life or engage in the making of domestic space and the borders that surround and divide it. Many works point to the ways in which the home is not a haven from the political but the seat of its entrenchment. None does this more clearly than Lee Miller&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.leemiller.co.uk/media/Lee-Miller-in-Hitler-s-apartment-at-16-Prinzregentenplatz-Note-the-combat-boots-on-the-bath-mat-now-stained-with-the-du/WDCDbTDMLParKJghr89Pdw..a" target="_blank">haunting photographs</a> made in the home of Adolf Hitler.</p> <p>Around the corner from Miller, in the Pera Museum, <a href="http://www.pacegallery.com/artists/507/fred-wilson" target="_blank">Fred Wilson</a> draws on materials common to stately old Istanbul homes to interrogate the erasure of Black and Afro-Turk histories from official Ottoman and Republican Turkish histories and Ottoman Turkey&rsquo;s connection to slave routes through Vienna. He commissioned two intricate chandeliers that utilize both Turkish and Venetian glass methods&mdash;in one, the two styles seem to be engulfing the other. On the surrounding walls are Ottoman Turkish-style tiles painted in Arabic script with the phrases &ldquo;Mother Africa&rdquo; and &ldquo;Black is Beautiful.&rdquo; The most powerful of his works are the smallest: etchings Wilson purchased from local souvenir art shops depicting Ottoman-era images of the city. He overlaid these in translucent velum, carefully excised to obscure all but the small and often singular black figures hidden among crowds.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117154140-IKSV_15B_Sahirugureren_307.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117164829-IMG_4225.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Fred Wilson, <em>Afro Kismet</em>, 2017, Historic photographs, engravings and oil paintings; contemporary acrylic paintings and miniatures, late 19th century Othello poster; Anthropomorphic terracotta flask from the 3rd century BC, glass pendants from the 5th century BC; contemporary Iznik tile panels, carpet, chandelier sculptures, globe sculpture, blown glass sculptures; mid 20th century wooden African mask, late 20th century African figures, wooden false wall, birdcage, antique chair and table, wall vinyl, mounted photo scans, cowrie shells, Dimensions variable. Courtesy of Pace Gallery and the artist. Sponsored by the Denver Art Museum. Photo (top): Sahir Uğur Eren. Photo (below): the author</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>While few works address the refugee crisis directly, there are strong pieces that address the precariousness of &ldquo;home,&rdquo; be it house or country. Mahmoud Obaidi&rsquo;s&nbsp;<em>Compact Home Project</em>&nbsp;consists of archives of sketches, newspaper clippings, and other ephemera he has collected since leaving Iraq.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.pedrogomezegana.net/" target="_blank">Pedro G&oacute;mez-Ega&ntilde;a&rsquo;s</a>&nbsp;<em>Domain of Things</em>&nbsp;is a darkly beautiful performance installation in the Galata Greek School: an elevated domestic space suspended on rails is slowly shifted and disrupted by performers uncomfortably entangled among the supports.<a href="http://www.officinedellimmagine.com/lungiswagqunta_bio.html" target="_blank">&nbsp;Lungiswa Gqunta</a>&rsquo;s&nbsp;<em>Lawn</em>&nbsp;reproduces the very stage of neighborly relations, the lawn, in the green hues of broken pop bottles, filled with oil to evoke the small homemade fire bombs of riots.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117154236-IKSV_15B_Sahirugureren_235.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Pedro G&oacute;mez-Ega&ntilde;a, <em>Domain of Things</em>, 2017, Metal structure, wooden panels, furniture, sound, performance Dimensions variable Courtesy of the artist Produced with the support of Arts Council Norway, Office for Contemporary Art Norway, City of Bergen Norway, Faculty of Fine Art, Music and Design, University of Bergen and BIT Teatergarasjen. Presented with the support of QP Magazine. Photo: Sahir Uğur Eren</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117154342-IKSV_15B_Sahirugureren_058.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Lungiswa Gqunta, <em>Lawn 1</em>, 2016/17 Wood, 3,168 broken Coca Cola glass bottles, petrol, ink, 25.5 x 484 x 366 cm. Courtesy of the artist. Photo: Sahir Uğur Eren</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In both the Biennial&rsquo;s domestic sensibilities and Ai&rsquo;s fences-cum-playgrounds and images of toiling refugees, what is most conspicuously missing is an investigation into the lives of communities. While, as Ai&rsquo;s work makes clear, thousands have died in transit at sea or remain in danger, millions of people are now living in new places. And millions of Turks now find themselves with new neighbors in the midst of an already turbulent and suspicious political climate that strains trust among even established relations.</p> <p>Across Istanbul there are many groups, both art and community projects, addressing these issues. <a href="http://www.pagesbookstorecafe.com/" target="_blank">Pages</a>, a bookstore founded by a Syrian children&rsquo;s book author and his wife, is a home not only for other refugees but also a space in which to welcome those wanting to learn more about Syrian culture, including evenings of live music. It made an appearance in the biennial, if only as the site where the artist Victor Leguy met Syrians and collected their personal artifacts. These were then displayed in the Istanbul Modern, hung and partially obscured by a line of white paint. It is a beautiful work but one that also troubles the continued question of why is it that refugees are so often represented as absences or artifacts, when they aren&rsquo;t being portrayed en mass. There are, by most counts, between two and three million refugees from Syria quietly going about their lives in Turkey, as well as many more from Libya, Iraq, and Afghanistan. Their lives are not limited to the hour of border crossing, or to the suffering and loss they have experienced; their representations should not be limited to death and loss of home.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117165846-IKSV_15B_Sahirugureren_244.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Victor Leguy, 2017, Istanbul Modern, 15th İstanbul Biennial. Photo: Sahir Ugur Eren</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>One work in the Biennial addresses another population weathering the precarity of globalization, though their displacement is more economic than violent. Chinese photojournalist Sim Chi Yin&rsquo;s <em>The Rat Tribe </em>is a portrait series depicting migrant low-wage workers in their underground living spaces within the 6,000 basements and air raid shelters around Beijing. Despite the bleak conditions and cramped quarters depicted, these images work to show the realities of people in migration. Their home lives, relationships, personal proclivities, and even joys are evident.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117184331-image1.jpeg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Sim Chi Yin, 2017, Pera Museum, 15th Istanbul Biennial. Photo: the author</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Critiques that the 15th Istanbul Biennial lacks political edge ring false. That the domestic or interior is somehow apolitical is an old-fashioned assertion, one no longer fitting, lest we suggest that it is only bodies in the street, only public action made visible that can be deemed truly political. Rather now, <em>how</em> we consider the domestic, the interpersonal, dare I say, the feminine, remains a central question. The obvious, if hollow, political&mdash;the zoomed-out scale, the representations of borders and bodies so often present in the work of &ldquo;political&rdquo; artists&mdash;is everywhere, and as Ai&rsquo;s exhibitions show, highly popular and profitable.</p> <p>How and when does the domestic encounter and engage its already political place? How can kinship be reordered, and by whom? It is in these questions that we find the politics within the social and physical markings of the home, and where we open up an important assumption at the heart of the conceit of &ldquo;neighbor&rdquo;: the given-ness, the taken-for-granted acceptance of borders, at any level. Porosity marks lives in cosmopolitan centers; food, culture, faith, music, and language travel across borders the way sounds and smells travel through walls. Our relationships within walls are never hermetically sealed to what is outside. The domestic, the home, its neighbors and its fences, are not merely metaphors for the nation, its borders, and those outside its boundaries. Instead the domestic is itself always already engaged in the production and contestation of those systems in question. Just as the public produces our private selves, so too does the private produce a public, a national, an international; the very notion of who has a private life not only reflects but reinforces divisions of value in world politics and policy.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/200738-danyel-ferrari?tab=REVIEWS">Danyel Ferrari</a></p> <p><em>Danyel M. Ferrari is an artist and writer based in Brooklyn and Istanbul. She is a current PhD candidate at Rutgers University in Media Studies.&nbsp;</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Promotional poster for the 15th Istanbul Biennial, Curated by Elmgreen &amp; Dragset. Photos by Lukas Wassmann, Graphic design by Rupert Smyth)</span></p> Sat, 18 Nov 2017 07:14:28 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Genevieve Goffman | Katrina Majkut | Sheelah Mahalath Bewley <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/490681-genevieve-goffman?utm_source=GenevieveGoffman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Genevieve Goffman &ndash; Portland, OR</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1063863?utm_source=GenevieveGoffman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1063863/u3azr9/20170916202813-101216_GGoffmage-4__1_.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1063870?utm_source=GenevieveGoffman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1063870/mf2ji7/20170916202843-111316_GGoffman-31.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1063867?utm_source=GenevieveGoffman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1063867/mf2ji7/20170916202824-111316_GGoffman-1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1063868?utm_source=GenevieveGoffman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1063868/mf2ji7/20170916202826-111316_GGoffman-9.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/181750-katrina-majkut?utm_source=KatrinaMajkut&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Katrina Majkut &ndash; Brooklyn</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1073135?utm_source= KatrinaMajkut&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1073135/u3azr9/20171031200101-Consent_Is_Asking_Every_Time_Condom.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1073592?utm_source=KatrinaMajkut&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1073592/mf2ji7/20171101131912-Step_7_Vaginal_Swabs_and_Smears.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1073583?utm_source=KatrinaMajkut&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1073583/mf2ji7/20171101131906-Kit_Cover.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1073589?utm_source=KatrinaMajkut&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1073589/mf2ji7/20171101131910-Step_4_Debris_Collection.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/490547-sheelah-mahalath-bewley?utm_source=SheelahMahalathBewley&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Sheelah Mahalath Bewley &ndash; UK</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1061425?utm_source=SheelahMahalathBewley&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1061425/u3azr9/20170830093923-2_bra.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1061447?utm_source=SheelahMahalathBewley&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1061447/mf2ji7/20170830095529-3_lighten_up.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1061449?utm_source=SheelahMahalathBewley&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1061449/mf2ji7/20170830095600-9_Wreath.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1061448?utm_source=SheelahMahalathBewley&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1061448/mf2ji7/20170830095541-2_running_scared.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/sp?_encoding=UTF8&amp;asin=&amp;isAmazonFulfilled=&amp;isCBA=&amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;orderID=&amp;seller=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;tab=products&amp;vasStoreID=#" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Fri, 17 Nov 2017 06:08:06 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: The Wrong Edition <p><a href="http://thewrong.org/" target="_blank">The Wrong</a> is a decentralized biennial exhibition, the largest of its kind, dedicated to contemporary digital art and culture. Now in its third edition, simply titled <em>(biennale)</em>, The Wrong features a tremendous number of curated exhibitions, projects, and events&mdash;both online (in &ldquo;<a href="http://thewrong.org/filter/pavilion/" target="_blank">pavilions</a>&rdquo;) and off (in &ldquo;<a href="http://thewrong.org/filter/embassy/" target="_blank">embassies</a>&rdquo;).</p> <p>Because of the sheer magnitude of content, tackling the biennial can be an overwhelming prospect, even for the initiated. For this week&rsquo;s Wednesday Web Art column, we&rsquo;re easing you into the world of The Wrong, sharing some of our favorite work from the 2017 edition. But as you&rsquo;ll quickly learn, with such an extensive exhibition at your fingertips&mdash;1,400 artists across 70 pavilions and nearly 30 embassies&mdash;it&rsquo;s hard to stop here. Consider these works as launching points for charting your own path into the seemingly endless corners of The Wrong.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/HuMcfHjiVTg" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Aleksandra Kovačević &amp; Jelena Nikolić</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="https://wrongprostheticco.wordpress.com/portfolio/aleksandra-kovacevic-jelena-nikolic/" target="_blank">meetme@heaven</a></em><br /> This strangely calming, perpetually rotating marble slab carved with inspirational messages is the perfect way to start your Wrong adventure. It can be a challenging, emotional journey, but as the artists of this piece state: &ldquo;&lsquo;Life is full of problems, and the only way to improve our chances of overcoming most of these problems is to optimize how we think about them.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="https://wrongprostheticco.wordpress.com/" target="_blank">Prosthetic</a></em>, Curated by Darko Vukic<br /> This pavilion is inspired by the quote from political theorist Hannah Arendt: &ldquo;Our life is prosthetic. We assume that through these variety of processes we can realize our desires which themselves are becoming prosthetic. We also assume other life through this prosthetization of our current endeavors.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Q-kkh_jaDcY" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Karin Ferrari</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="http://postinternet.art/pages/karin.html" target="_blank">Hyperconnected (The Whole Picture)</a></em><br /> Ferrari&rsquo;s work is an exploration of the explosion of conspiracy culture in the internet age. The fact that this video is specifically about the &lsquo;truth&rsquo;&nbsp; behind the symbolism of the internet means the it functions brilliantly on multiple levels of paranoia and digital creation.</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="http://postinternet.art/index.html" target="_blank">Postinternet.art</a></em>, Curated by Juha van Ingen &amp; Jarkko R&auml;s&auml;nen<br /> The contributing artists were only given the name of the pavilion as inspiration for their work, leading to an eclectic mix of art dedicated to this ubiquitous term.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171115155435-Lara_Joy_Evans.png" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Lara Joy Evans</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <a href="https://lightlitecoin.info/lje" target="_blank">https://lightlitecoin.info/lje</a><br /> The primal woman&mdash;part neural network, part Neanderthal, part mud, according to DNA panel results&mdash;joyfully connects with internet life. Evans&rsquo; work, comprising &ldquo;photographs altered by AI and neural network,&rdquo; is a welcome moment of pure human vitality among the digital hive-mind.</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <a href="http://lightlitecoin.info" target="_blank"><em>Light Lite Coin</em></a>, curated by Coleman Mummery<br /> Described by the curator as, &ldquo;self help for collective paranoia,&rdquo; the artworks in this pavilion are all programs. &ldquo;There are bio-social implications to running these programs on yourself and sharing them with others.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/137466365" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Morgan Beringer</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="https://www.thenormalpavillion.xyz/morgan-beringer" target="_blank">Abstraction 47</a></em><br /> An endlessly morphing, mysterious and beautiful vision that evokes something between an unfathomable alien storm and a haunted impressionist watercolor.</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="https://www.thenormalpavillion.xyz/" target="_blank">Normal</a></em>, curated by Ilavenil Jayapalan<br /> This enigmatic pavilion interrogates what constitutes &ldquo;Normality.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xlanYJwnuvw" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Elizaveta Perebatova</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="http://proteytemen.com/diapavilion/perebatova/" target="_blank">ATTENTION</a></em><br /> Perebatova suggests that &ldquo;we have worked out ways of interacting with the world and have stopped notice the moment of interaction [sic]. We are automatic and enslaved by our habits.&rdquo; Her witty and enchanting video presents cryptic illustrations of banal design objects, with instructions to &ldquo;listen to reality, to look at it as if we are doing it for the first time.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="http://proteytemen.com/diapavilion" target="_blank">Diapavilion</a></em>, Curated by Protey Temen<br /> The artists in this pavilion are students of fine arts and contemporary illustration at HSE Art and Design School in Moscow, Russia. Most of works they have created are surreal and inventive pastiches of social and scientific instructional films.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171115155220-MutantClub.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artwork &amp; Pavilion:</strong> Various Artists, <em><a href="http://www.mutantclub.net/" target="_blank">Mutant Club</a></em>, Curated by Enrique Salmoiraghi<br /> One of the few pavilions where the collected contributions of the artists seamlessly form a single piece of art. They have provided the dancers and decorations for the titular intergalactic u.f.o. nightclub. This just might be the most universal, engaging, and downright entertaining pavilions in the whole biennale.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171115155134-Renee_Cox.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Renee Cox</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artworks &amp; Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="http://gisdejeunersurlherbe.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">Gis Dejeuner Sur L&rsquo;Herbe</a></em>, Curated by Jeroen Bouweriks<br /> This is one of the most successful pavilions shaped by a singular concept. The idea itself basically overwhelms the contributions of the artists, making it the curator&rsquo;s work more than anything else. Bouweriks asked a long list of artists, theorists, curators, gallerists, and designers&rdquo; in iPhone chats to Google Manet&rsquo;s painting<em> Le D&eacute;jeuner sur l&rsquo;Herbe</em> and then send him the &ldquo;original&rdquo; as an attached image. This prompt inspired reactions ranging from delight to confusion, with most contributors following his instructions exactly. Some deviate from the plan a little and send work adapted from or inspired by the famous painting, like this response (above) from the brilliant Renee Cox.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/QByGFQBiV20" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Peter Rahul</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="http://gfxfreeerror.com/peter-rahul.html" target="_blank">Phase 2</a></em><br /> A hypnotic abstract exploration of vintage computer graphics and CRT technology, this piece finds the right balance between warm nostalgia and an alternative future in a parallel universe where analogue conquered digital.</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="http://gfxfreeerror.com/index.html" target="_blank">GFX Free Error</a></em>, Curated by Haydi Roket<br /> Named after the error warning given to a malfunctioning video card, this pavilion features works that question the effects of broken technology on our perception of reality. The curator asks: &ldquo;Do we merely create new realities from these faults? If it&#39;s the sole truth, then what happens to those broken realities around us?&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/bXn1xavynj8" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artists:</strong> Signe Pierce &amp; Alli Coates</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="https://q-safe-q.tumblr.com/tagged/signepierceandallicoates/" target="_blank">American Reflexxx</a></em><br /> A modern masterpiece of documentary art: the reaction these artists got for simply being &ldquo;different&rdquo; among those who consider themselves &ldquo;normal&rdquo; is truly horrifying. The film presents a perfect representation the soul-crushing culture of trolling and bullying that is now synonymous with being online. The subject was highlighted and compounded by the fact that the abuse continued when <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXn1xavynj8" target="_blank">the video was posted online</a>. Pierce says, &ldquo;It did feel similar to the mob scene all over again, only yes, people had the opportunity to bash me anonymously.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>Pavilion: </strong><em><a href="https://q-safe-q.tumblr.com/tagged/home/chrono" target="_blank">Safe</a></em>, curated by Christopher Clary<br /> This pavilion explores the concept of being &ldquo;safe&rdquo; and &ldquo;safe spaces&rdquo; in network culture. The artists have each contributed work that &ldquo;questions the validity of safety through expressions of intersectional trauma&mdash;personal, familial, collective, and systemic.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/234747372" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Josefin Jonsson</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="http://pinkpinkmoon.altervista.org/josefin-jonsson/" target="_blank">Falling Stars</a></em><br /> According to <a href="https://www.instagram.com/pastelae/" target="_blank">her Instagram</a>, Jonsson creates &ldquo;pastel original artworks with dream layers and soft pink internet feelings.&rdquo; This descriptor barely prepares you for this unsettling slice of futuristic, new-age hypnotherapy.</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="http://pinkpinkmoon.altervista.org/" target="_blank">Pink, Pink Moon</a></em>, Curated by Fabio Paris<br /> An all-women pavilion that is also one of the biennial&rsquo;s most compelling and subversive. The artists have made work that presents &ldquo;the pink as nexus of contemporary aesthetics and not as a feminist reading.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171115154831-Mani_Nilchiani.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Mani Nilchiani</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="http://foreverfornever.xyz/" target="_blank">You-Eye</a></em><br /> A clever, minimalist, motion-activated interactive piece that questions the value and meaning of familiar symbols of modern life. It&rsquo;s also a lot of fun to play with!</p> <p><strong>Pavilion: </strong><em><a href="http://foreverfornever.xyz/" target="_blank">Forever Fornever</a></em>, Curated by Chris Romero<br /> This pavilion looks at the disappearing line between our digital personas and our physical bodies. The artworks &ldquo;portray the present, a hyper-technological world, and hypothesize the future&mdash;a dream caught between utopia and nightmare.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&#39;re interested in what&#39;s happening with art on the web. We invited online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, to write a bi-monthly column for us. Every other Wednesday he selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Thu, 16 Nov 2017 04:45:40 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Rebecca Kaufman Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/48461-under-the-radar-haya-ogura-rebecca-kaufman-lesley-blakelock" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/489829-rebecca-kaufman" target="_blank">Rebecca Kaufman</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>I am trying to communicate a re-evaluation of perception using the ancient&nbsp;technology&nbsp;of painting to reflect on the addictive visual technologies we rely so heavily upon today.</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>An artist&rsquo;s&nbsp;responsibility is to visually and conceptually communicate life experience&nbsp;within their community, connecting consciousness across space and time. As a mentor of mine once put it, &ldquo;the micro is always a&nbsp;reflection&nbsp;of the macro.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)?</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171113085046-IMG_1060.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I don&rsquo;t know if this is the&nbsp;greatest thing I have ever made, but it&rsquo;s one of the greatest things I have had part in making. This mural was a collaboration between myself and a peer in graduate school, Greta Anderson, for a group exhibition we had&nbsp;titled <em>Psychedelia</em> at the Swell Gallery in San Francisco in 2016. The image was taken from a Bridget Riley painting, then mirrored vertically and horizontally and projected into the corner of two 16-foot-high walls. We easily logged 30 hours painting and installing the show, just to have to paint white over it 10 days later&mdash;but it was absolutely worth it.</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>If I want to make something, I will make it. No&nbsp;matter&nbsp;how monumental, or how many years it takes to complete, it will happen. Never say never!</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p><a href="http://laurarokas.com" target="_blank">Laura Rokas</a>, <a href="http://tcolcord.wixsite.com/tomcolcord" target="_blank">Tom Colcord</a>, and <a href="http://www.maryamyousif.com" target="_blank">Maryam Yousif</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: <em>End of Line</em>, 2017,&nbsp;Acrylic on Canvas, 67 x 84 x 1.3 inches)</span></p> Mon, 13 Nov 2017 00:53:33 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list “Good Art Always Gives”: Alvaro Barrington’s Generous First Solo at PS1 <p>Brooklyn-based artist <a href="https://www.instagram.com/alvarobarrington/?hl=en" target="_blank">Alvaro Barrington</a> views Marcus Garvey as &ldquo;an abstract avatar...like a saint or a north star of some sort.&rdquo; It&rsquo;s one of the things that drew him to London, where he attended the Slade School of Fine Art for graduate school in 2015&mdash;and where I befriended him. He describes his time there as a &ldquo;pilgrimage,&rdquo; often citing Garvey&rsquo;s life in London in relation to the body of work he made there:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">[Garvey] died poor in London. It wasn&rsquo;t until decades later that Jamaica&mdash;where he was born&mdash;realized his influence and began to celebrate him. I imagine London being where the first real shift in his radical thinking early on in his life took place, and later [where] he had to take in his failures and the forces that destroyed his movement.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107142916-0E9A2187.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">All images: Installation view of&nbsp;<em>Alvaro Barrington</em>. On view at MoMA PS1 in New York from October 22 to December 31, 2017. Courtesy MoMA PS1. Photos: Pablo Enriquez</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Alvaro&rsquo;s painting, <em>Garvey loves flowers too </em>is the header image for <a href="https://www.moma.org/calendar/exhibitions/3901" target="_blank">his first (ever) solo show, at MoMA PS1</a> in New York, which opened October 22 and runs through December 31. The painting is large and arresting, made on burlap and partially woven with brown yarn using techniques orally passed on to him by his Grenadian aunts. The series represents the progression of Garvey&rsquo;s life. Alvaro described the process to me:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">I used really high quality paint, Old Holland, in [<em>Garvey loves flowers too</em>] so the colors are vibrant; the last painting will be made of cheap quality house paint that will lose color and vibrancy quickly. It will be [Garvey] at the end of his life, confronting himself and where he might have went wrong.</p> <p>After a studio visit, Klaus Biesenbach invited Alvaro to show his work at PS1 shortly after he graduated. The intention of the exhibition is to reproduce the same energy of that visit and capture Alvaro&rsquo;s approach to painting, one that is more process-oriented and less product-based. Alvaro decided to include two works he did not make that are important to him: <em>Transaction in the sky</em>, a painting by Brooklyn-based artist <a href="http://www.ttfarrell.com" target="_blank">Teresa Farrell</a> and <em>A clock with no hands</em>, a porcelain sculpture I made. I was curious about his decision to include Teresa&#39;s and my work but mostly wanted to discuss his own. As the resulting conversation shifted back and forth between our practices it became clear how much we influence each other&rsquo;s work, and also how much the very act of dialogue and exchange are paramount to Alvaro&rsquo;s practice.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107142943-0E9A2255.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Alvaro Barrington: </strong>As a way of making, everything comes from a personal place. All my material choices are things that were part of past experiences. The imagery&rsquo;s usually taken from something, then I push it. For example, I am making this dick painting based on Chris Ofili&rsquo;s <em>Pimping ain&rsquo;t easy. </em>I thought maybe I could do something with it, &lsquo;cause I got where Chris was coming from but didn&rsquo;t feel the same way. So I took the graphic structure, which is just a black dick that goes from the top to the bottom of the canvas, and as I was sewing it, I remembered my grandmother used to hang clothes outside to dry and I thought maybe I needed to bring some clothespins into the painting. But also before I got the idea to make a dick painting, I had bleached burlap thinking about Helen Frankenthaler and her staining, and my grandmother bleaching clothes to remove stains so I thought it would be cool to make a painting that starts with my grandmother, goes into a dick, then ends with my grandmother.</p> <p>I started sewing &lsquo;cause I remember my aunt had made me a tablecloth when I was like 15, which at the time I didn&rsquo;t really appreciate but kept using it for months &lsquo;cause I knew she would appreciate that I used it. The memory of her color choices always stuck with me and now I realize she was actually a quite brilliant artist.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107143148-0E9A2214.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table align="center" width="600"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;Art is always about visibility and being seen.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Cristine Brache: </strong>It&rsquo;s interesting how you weave canonical works in with your personal history. It feels like you start with a purpose when making work but the purpose functions more as a point of departure, allowing the subconscious to consciously creep in.</p> <p><strong>AB: </strong>The studio is really the place that I process my own subconscious thinking, like, what images I pay attention to. Then I spend a year or two working through that particular image till it becomes something and in turn, my ideas change in the process too.</p> <p><strong>CB: </strong>I can relate to that.</p> <p><strong>AB: </strong>I remember you being very slow in your making. There is something important about your speed. I always think about your work in relationship to time, which is why I asked if I could put <em>A clock without hands</em> in the show.</p> <p><strong>CB: </strong>I&rsquo;ve never considered the actual time I&rsquo;ve spent making work in relation to its conceptual framework. Time, or more specifically, lost time, really resonates with me because it comes with feelings of erasure or non-being, yearning, and memory loss.</p> <p>The way you use material maternal figures in your life did also speaks to time and the preservation of being, almost as a way to canonize your family and give them space to be seen. Your decision to accentuate the presence of time in your paintings is what I chose to make absent with <em>A clock without hands</em>. Its inclusion in your show is poignant and poetic.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107143452-0E9A2221.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AB: </strong>Art is always about visibility and being seen. It&rsquo;s what makes hip hop so powerful, it&rsquo;s the voice of people that society may not see. I was raised by mostly women and incorporating the materials they use is my way of trying to see them. It&rsquo;s like taking that journey with them and listening or being ready to listen cause I have a hint of what they went through.</p> <p><strong>CB: </strong>How do you think about time in relation to your own work?</p> <p><strong>AB:</strong> Time more recently is something that sits in an abstract place for me because I have the privilege of choosing how I exist in it. When I was working shitty jobs&ndash;&ndash;getting paid $5.15 an hour&ndash;&ndash;it was deeply tied to the idea of time as having a monetary value because it dictated so many aspects of my life. In the studio though, it&rsquo;s not so much about time but about what the work needs and sometimes it needs a quick gesture. Other times it needs a slow working that can take months.</p> <p>The cultural history in my work is very romanticized because I left Grenada when I was 8 and it&rsquo;s no longer the Grenada that I knew. But I make paintings that reflect that my early childhood was formed there. I&rsquo;m a lot of cultures blended together &lsquo;cause I think that reflects the immigrant experience. Cultures become a tool for me to use, to pick up and drop off, to think about my experiences. I guess because paintings get preserved, it&rsquo;s automatically a preservation of that.</p> <p>Maybe somewhat like you being Puerto Rican but not quite being Puerto Rican. I remember years ago us talking about what some would call code switching, but I think when you talked about it&mdash;about existing in these different cultural spaces in Florida, then China&mdash;it felt like you were talking about you and not the label of an action. It was like you were talking about things that can be labelled but really it was about you, not the label.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107143610-0E9A2173.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CB: </strong>I think it&rsquo;s hard to feel rooted anywhere when my parents moved to the U.S. to raise me. Miami is particular in that it&rsquo;s a microcosm of Latin America. So almost everyone I grew up with was a first generation American, taking on both Latino and American cultural characteristics. My identity is very specific to Miami but it changes when I go to Puerto Rico or when I&rsquo;m in places outside of Miami in the U.S., or like China and Europe. In China people often didn&#39;t believe I was American because I don&#39;t have blonde hair or blue eyes, in Europe people were surprised when I told them I was Puerto Rican because they thought Puerto Ricans were all black. In other parts of the U.S. I was often put in the position to defend my identity often hearing &ldquo;Where are you <em>really</em> from?&rdquo; when I&#39;d first say I was from Miami. It&#39;s a burden and a gift.</p> <p><strong>AB: </strong>It always leaves me at a place of comfort and discomfort &lsquo;cause I like the mobility aspect of my identity and as an artist I get to play with it. But I imagine it&rsquo;s very different when your identity is grounded. Like, I see my two youngest brothers who were born in Brooklyn, and it&rsquo;s amazing to see how very secure in their narrative they are. I look back at when I was 20 and I felt so lost.</p> <p>But I&rsquo;m curious about how you end up with your material choices and also your reduction of specific objects, like <a href="http://cristinebrache.info/beware.html" target="_blank"><em>Beware of Dog</em></a>. It feels like they hint at things that you don&rsquo;t give away... I&rsquo;m glad we are having this conversation &lsquo;cause I never really want to ask you about your work. I think your work is the thing that people need to look at, not your personal history.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107143546-0E9A2161.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CB: </strong>I think about material so much. It&rsquo;s very important to me that the material contradicts the objects it occupies, pointing to a space between (English) words. I think about what weight certain objects carry, associations that people typically project onto them and then think about how I can heighten that mood by making the object using an equally thought out material.</p> <p>Most successful work tends to open up and poke at emotional coordinates within psyches without being too explicit or arriving at any categorical statements. It also gives the viewer an opportunity to take a step into the grey area people often have so much trouble sitting still in. It&#39;s great to talk about methodologies and process but it&#39;s important that the conversation doesn&#39;t make the work. Ultimately, the work needs to complete itself.</p> <p>I felt that sense of completion the first time I saw your work. You have such a firm grasp on the formal qualities of painting, its history, and use of color and composition. When you add how carefully considered your subject matter and choice of material are, like the burlap and yarn, I am left with a strong feeling of closure with regards to the inner motions that occur in viewing it. It feels like an ardent trip that is very big and present yet doesn&#39;t dominate me. I think the way you handle abstraction and figuration helps navigate this process for the viewer.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107143639-0E9A2216.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AB: </strong>Giving is really important in art in that it&rsquo;s the artist&rsquo;s personal experience of making it, but someone who is experiencing it feels like they have space in there. I think that&rsquo;s what holds me to your work &lsquo;cause it actually situates itself far less personally than my work does. I&rsquo;m always screaming for attention.</p> <p><strong>CB: </strong>[laughs] But you manage the demands for attention well. The big presence, both visually and emotionally don&rsquo;t dominate or try to control me.</p> <p><strong>AB: </strong>I think that&rsquo;s the presence part &lsquo;cause as I was an orphan, I never felt quite seen after my mom died. But I also want to be someone who can move without responsibility to stay. Control is tied to responsibility for me.</p> <p><strong>CB:</strong> Your install at PS1 is a very immersive feat.</p> <table align="center" width="600"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;One of my cousins who never goes to museums or galleries said he felt comfortable in the room and that meant everything to me. &rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107143850-0E9A2168.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AB: </strong>It was meant for folks to question their own experiences so that it has to go back to the viewer. A lot of young artists make the mistake of thinking art means doing what they want to do and you look at the work and it takes from you emotionally &lsquo;cause it&rsquo;s not very giving. The artist is very selfish, but good art always gives. So when you say you&rsquo;re thinking about the materials in terms of how folks understand it, you&rsquo;re having a conversation with people about possibilities in their life.</p> <p>I always make so that I don&rsquo;t have to explain to my brother too much. So that he gets it from his own experiences or can just look and get enough of it. The intention with the work and the installation was for him and the community I grew up in could be in PS1 and feel like there is a space there for them. One of my cousins who never goes to museums or galleries said he felt comfortable in the room and that meant everything to me.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107144021-0E9A2221.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CB: </strong>Yeah I think I remember a conversation we had about that, I remember saying something along the lines of &ldquo;if my grandma can take something away in the viewing of the work then I&rsquo;ve succeeded.&rdquo; Art became a language through its history and context, hence its study. It is so niche it winds up alienating a lot of people who haven&#39;t learned its language and history when the work is solely operating on a conceptual level. I really don&rsquo;t like to make people feel stupid, which is why I think layers are important. They allow the work to be accessible to different kinds of viewers. It&rsquo;s confusing because art is often considered universal, though, contemporary art rarely is. It&rsquo;s a parallax that needs to be accounted for depending on the level of connectivity you&rsquo;re after.</p> <p><strong>AB: </strong>Art always happens in a community and that history has told the wrong story. It often isolates artists, especially black artists. You and Teresa [Farrell, also in the PS1 show] along with a lot of other folks are in my community. Your ideas and how you make helps push me. Like you and Teresa work opposite of each other in that she is a maximalist like Hieronymus Bosch and anything can end up in her work, including gum or a guy she had a relationship with, a TV show she saw, music she listens to. It can all end up in a single painting. And you&rsquo;re a minimalist in that you reduce things through a very considered deliberation. I like working between the two of you.</p> <p>I don&rsquo;t arrive at my ideas out of nowhere. It comes from our conversations about life and art, the same with my community and ways of seeing. The show is really about looking.</p> <p><br /> &mdash;Cristine Brache<br /> &nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(All images: Installation view of <em>Alvaro Barrington</em>. On view at MoMA PS1 in New York from October 22 to December 31, 2017. Image courtesy MoMA PS1. Photo by Pablo Enriquez.)</span></p> Wed, 08 Nov 2017 01:10:50 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Gregory Eddi Jones Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/48370-under-the-radar-alphonso-dunn-traci-mims-gregory-eddi-jones" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers fro</em><em>m <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/487178-gregory-eddi-jones" target="_blank"><em>Gregory Eddi Jones</em></a></em><em>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>I generally manipulate appropriated images to critique the politics of original image sources. With my newest work, I&rsquo;m making Dadaist digital collages that signify their own futility as reflections of political spectacle.</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>I tend to shun that sort of mysticism, and I think if you think about the inverse of that question, what defines an irresponsible artistic act, there&rsquo;s little that could be mentioned aside from maybe the guy who shot a dog in the 70s. So I guess my conclusion is that the artist&rsquo;s responsibility is to not shoot dogs.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)?</strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171106133754-Untitled_Screen_Cap__12__the_fourth_wall_--_Gregory_Eddi_Jones_2017.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Gregory Eddi Jones, <em>Untitled Screen Cap #12 (the fourth wall)</em>, 2017</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>This probably doesn&rsquo;t count, but one time I wrote out a list of instructions, kind of like a Sol Lewitt thing, that people have to follow by using a camera in various utilitarian kinds of ways. One is that the reader must wait until nighttime, go outside, and throw their car keys as far as they can into the dark. Then they have to take photographs with a camera flash to find them and print the resulting photos. It&rsquo;s a pretty stupid thing, and I will never do it. (But if you want to do it, you have the instructions, and I would be happy to review your results.)</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p>Well, I publish artists so I don&rsquo;t know if I want to point to individuals. All the artists published on <a href="http://www.inthein-between.com/featured-artists/" target="_blank">In the In-Between: Journal of Digital Imaging Artists</a> are worth knowing in my mind.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: <em>Flowers for donald </em>&nbsp;#<em>16 (press room [with sponsored content])</em>, 2017, Digital Collage)</span></p> Mon, 06 Nov 2017 05:43:00 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Jill Pauline Smith | Will Peck | Janna Dyk <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/493030-jill-pauline-smith?tab=PROFILE?utm_source=JillPaulineSmith&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Jill Pauline Smith &ndash; Toronto</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1068725?utm_source=JillPaulineSmith&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1068725/u3azr9/20171016230350-_MG_9295.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1068724?utm_source=JillPaulineSmith&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1068724/y8wnrh/20171016230349-_MG_9276.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1068727?utm_source=JillPaulineSmith&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1068727/y8wnrh/20171016230355-_MG_9310.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1068728?utm_source=JillPaulineSmith&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1068728/y8wnrh/20171016230359-_MG_9316.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/493115-will-peck?utm_source=WillPeck&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Will Peck &ndash; Norwich</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1069839?utm_source=WillPeck&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1069839/u3azr9/20171023152503-Will_PeckPhotopaper_sceen_shots_9.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1069832?utm_source=WillPeck&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1069832/y8wnrh/20171023152414-Will_PeckPhotopaper_sceen_shots_4.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1069838?utm_source=WillPeck&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1069838/y8wnrh/20171023152501-Will_PeckPhotopaper_sceen_shots_10.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1069848?utm_source=WillPeck&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1069848/y8wnrh/20171023152626-Will_PeckPhotopaper_sceen_shots_19.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/493505-jannadyk?tab=PROFILE?utm_source=JannaDyk&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Janna Dyk &ndash; New York</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1070277?utm_source=JannaDyk&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1070277/u3azr9/20171024195412-janna_dyk_this-lr.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1070261?utm_source=JannaDyk&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1070261/y8wnrh/20171024192604-DykJanna_Certain_People-HD_IMG_5981-lr.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1070259?utm_source=JannaDyk&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1070259/y8wnrh/20171024192352-janna_dyk_is-lr.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1070272?utm_source=JannaDyk&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1070272/y8wnrh/20171024194250-DykJanna_YouAreMySunshine_lr.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/sp?_encoding=UTF8&amp;asin=&amp;isAmazonFulfilled=&amp;isCBA=&amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;orderID=&amp;seller=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;tab=products&amp;vasStoreID=#" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Sun, 05 Nov 2017 06:58:07 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: Tom Galle <p>Belgian-born, New York-based <a href="http://tomgalle.online/">Tom Galle</a> is the epitome of the contemporary web artist. His work is saturated with the very essence of hyper-digital nowness. He has created an online persona that is at once supremely infatuated with and deeply questioning of the profound impact that the internet has had on all of our bodies and brains.</p> <p>Galle creates art that operates on two distinct levels: it is philosophical and political but also instant and accessible, effortlessly walking the line between academic art and internet meme cultures. In this way, his dark humor-laced practice can be seen as a telling indicator of the nature of successful art in the internet (and post-internet) age.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-version="7" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:57.22222222222222% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BV5jUEKgwgi/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: Were you a rebellious kid? </strong></p> <p><strong>Tom Galle:</strong> Funny question, I indeed wasn&rsquo;t the easiest kid. I was very uninterested in school&mdash;everything seemed so boring and I turned to trolling teachers (not in an aggressive way) to find a source of excitement. As a result I was kicked out of a few schools, and ended up in private school by the time I was 16. Through a sort of alternative educational system I ended up getting my high school diploma at 18 and went off to art school. I&#39;ve always felt a bit complex compared to other people since I never had the &ldquo;basic&rdquo; education, but recently I feel like I actually learned trolling back in those days, which I&rsquo;m using often in my work&mdash;so I&#39;m very thankful to all those teachers that made things very boring and never believed in me.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-version="7" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:50.0% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BV0kBPEjrMs/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by </a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first become aware of the existence of the Internet?</strong></p> <p><strong>TG:</strong> Probably when my parents installed it at home : ) I was still very young but I remember a huge amount of excitement and anticipation around the idea that people now suddenly have access to &ldquo;anything&rdquo;&mdash;all we had to do was search for it. At that time it felt like no one could really grasp the complete idea of it and where it was going. The excitement only grew with chat apps, gaming, and early social media platforms.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-version="7" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:49.907407407407405% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BTFTz6PjhAd/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by </a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What did you imagine it to be before you used it?</strong></p> <p><strong>TG:</strong> I literally had no idea, but the idea of it being such a new, free landscape of opportunities, connections, and obscurities&mdash;it felt overwhelming and exciting at the same time. Like whole a new free world, it had an anarchistic side to it. There were no rules. Obviously that was an entirely different time. We&rsquo;re surfing in a corporate landscape these days.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-version="7" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:50.0% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BNczmbIjanA/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What early experiences of the internet are most memorable to you?</strong></p> <p><strong>TG:</strong> <a href="http://rotten.com/">rotten.com</a>. Connecting with strangers on chat platforms or games. I loved <em>Worms</em>, <em>Command &amp; Conquer</em>, <em>Counterstrike</em>, etc. Connecting to random people for chatting and gaming was one of the first things that blew me away&mdash;things we take for granted now. That general feeling of <em>anything is possible here</em> was very exciting.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-version="7" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:50.0% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BN-Qk1Lj2nL/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you start re-appropriating the common language and aesthetics of the internet into your work?</strong></p> <p><strong>TG:</strong> I started my career in the creative agency/advertising world and was lucky to end up in a forward-thinking agency. That was around 2008, and advertising seemed pretty boring and conservative in my eyes&mdash;a lot of TV ads and stuff. As a counter-reaction I started making internet-focused work. The work was very much focused on speaking the language people speak on the internet to get them engaged. Work that takes part in the culture on the internet. I made a couple of brand projects that worked really well in that regard, and at the same time I was very attracted to the internet art world. I started making side projects such as <em><a href="http://tomgalle.online/Graffiti-Loop" target="_blank">Graffiti Loop</a></em>, the <a href="http://tomgalle.online/1000000-for-iPhone" target="_blank">$1000000 app</a> for iPhone, and these simple one-off websites, things I&rsquo;m still very proud off. I think both practices enforced each other; they&rsquo;re both very conceptual and had a similar approach in taking part in online culture, which is what I still do today.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-version="7" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:57.08333333333333% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BU5GCINDiHZ/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Do you think the internet has lived up to its initial promise?</strong></p> <p><strong>TG:</strong> I don&rsquo;t think there was any promise. It was just a plain new playground full of opportunity and without many rules. You could say that the way the internet was envisioned by its creators didn&rsquo;t live up to its promise. They envisioned it to stay free&mdash;without state interference or corporate powers overtaking it. That obviously didn&rsquo;t happen, as we all know. I think that&rsquo;s just the world we live in unfortunately. As if state and corporate powers would leave the internet and all its opportunities untouched, lol&mdash;they&#39;re mostly doing with the internet what they do in real life.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-version="7" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:50.0% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BWLo2QDjjZo/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What does &ldquo;trolling&rdquo; mean to you?</strong></p> <p><strong>TG:</strong> Trolling has a very negative connotation on the internet. &ldquo;Real&rdquo; internet trolls are pretty hardcore bullies that get off on hurting people on online platforms. In my work I try to approach it very differently&mdash;it&rsquo;s much more about finding a precise tone of voice that tries to poke fun at touchy subjects without going too far. It challenges people to be somewhat self-deprecating. <em><a href="http://tomgalle.online/Goodbye-Unfollower" target="_blank">Goodbye Unfollower</a></em> is a good example. People got unsolicited tweets about touchy subject like unfollowing; because it is a loaded subject taken out of context, that&rsquo;s what makes it funny.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-version="7" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:50.0% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BC6YqOBkO2s/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How would you describe your sense of humor? </strong></p> <p><strong>TG:</strong> Dry humor? Satire? Irony? I love to find the humor in the sad things on the internet. Unfollowers, Tweets that don&rsquo;t get attention, negative comments. It&rsquo;s sort of a depressing, self-deprecating tone of voice I guess. A lot of it is also based on meme-humor. Things like <em><a href="http://tomgalle.online/Tinder-VR" target="_blank">Tinder VR</a></em> or the <a href="http://tomgalle.online/Jesus-Christ-Fidget-Spinner" target="_blank">crucified Fidget Spinner</a> try to capture that language and take part in that cycle.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-version="7" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:50.0% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BUzZTM8DIpu/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: You work shows a love/hate relationship (fascination and fear) with the rise of digital culture. Do you&nbsp;think the internet is ultimately a positive influence on humanity? </strong></p> <p><strong>TG:</strong> That fascination and repulsion is exactly how I feel about it. There are a lot of positive aspects to the internet, but at the same time we&rsquo;re accepting weird behavior we never thought we would years ago. Think of an idea like Tinder where you&rsquo;re simply swiping through people in a way to find a potential lover. We accepted all these behaviors at an amazingly fast pace.</p> <p>I love creating surreal scenes that express my feeling about these behaviors and poke fun at them, in an effort to confront people with it and make them feel uncomfortable, intrigued, or even repulsed. It&rsquo;s not unusual for people to get angry about my work. All I want to say to them then is, &ldquo;You&rsquo;re angry at (your) internet behavior. I&rsquo;m just the messenger.&rdquo; None of my work tends to judge or make bold statements about things. It&rsquo;s just a reflection on what we are doing and the way we are consuming the internet.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-version="7" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:50.0% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BXLcTNEDPmc/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Is the internet&rsquo;s pressure on creative people to constantly produce content healthy? </strong></p> <p><strong>TG:</strong> I think it&rsquo;s a very exciting time for creatives on the internet. We get a constant stream of inspiration and can create and release an idea in a couple of hours and get immediate feedback. It can have a very positive effect. The excitement turns into more ideas and before you know it you&rsquo;re on a streak. I think my work comes to life in that sort of cycle&mdash;which is bordering on the edge of healthy excitement and addictive, obsessive behavior. I remember very overwhelming moments when things go viral and I got carried away by unhealthy behavior, but over time I learned the importance of taking breaks and distancing myself from the internet to keep the work genuine and not purely audience-guided.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-version="7" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:50.0% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BR2Ax2Dj3dr/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: You describe yourself as a &ldquo;meme-artist.&rdquo; When did you first become aware of the term &ldquo;meme&rdquo; and its meaning?</strong></p> <p><strong>TG:</strong> It was actually a friend of mine who coined this term for me. At a dinner I struggled to introduce myself to a group of people and my friend just jumped in and said &ldquo;He&rsquo;s a Meme-Artist.&rdquo;</p> <p>I liked how that sounded; it felt broad enough and I like to roughly define it as &ldquo;work that speaks the language of the internet.&rdquo; Meme language is the commonly spoken language of the internet, transcending culture and language. Not only in imagery but also in the way people talk and behave online. It&rsquo;s incredible how it is completely integrated in almost all aspects of the internet. My work tries to interpret aspects of meme culture and its language, and integrate/transform it into ideas that themselves become memetic and take part in that cycle.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-version="7" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:50.0% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BHFDSw1DX1y/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What do you think the art &ldquo;establishment&rdquo; thinks of internet art? Have you had any interest from that side of things?</strong></p> <p><strong>TG:</strong> I can start feeling an interest from the art world now, but it&rsquo;s very recent. I think the art world always had difficulties with internet art in a gallery context but they had their love story with internet/media art a couple of years ago with Cory Archangel, Petra Cortright, Jon Rafman, and co. Some really interesting artists found their way in and became established artists now, and it seems like their practice is somewhat adjusted to that audience.</p> <p>With the rise of social media and this whole new generation of artists doing such interesting things, it feels like we&rsquo;re way underrepresented in the art world. The art world is probably somewhat scared, and it&rsquo;s not unjustified. Platforms offer a voice to everyone and similar meme-language gets spoken by all users so it all blends into one melting pot.</p> <p>It&rsquo;s probably time to redefine what an &ldquo;artist&rdquo; is these days. It seems like the art world can&rsquo;t find an appropriate way to deal with this generation, and the artists are having too much fun on the internet to even bother.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-version="7" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:50.0% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BS1voF-DVnG/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first become aware of the concept of corporate culture and its negative effects?</strong></p> <p><strong>TG:</strong> When I moved to the US : ) Europe is somewhat moderate since the government sets some limits to what corporations can do. Here the culture feels so focused around corporate money and power, sold to people under the idea of the American dream. I found it very confrontational and it made me feel isolated and scared. I started thinking of how free we really are, where our opinions come from and how we live in a society of mass compliance to a system that seems doomed to fail, probably not in a good way. It felt like something I wanted to address and my friends and I started thinking and talking about those subjects.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-version="7" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:50.0% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BWbDB2_D8OP/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What inspired your new series of <a href="http://tomgalle.online/Corp-Gear" target="_blank">corporate logos recreated as weapons</a>?</strong></p> <p><strong>TG:</strong> Corporate culture became a common subject amongst me and my friends, and my friend and frequent collaborator Moises Sanabria and I came up with the idea of creating weapons that somewhat represent or visualize the oppressive/aggressive aspects of corporate institutions. The objects at the same time could be symbols for revolt against them, which gave them an interesting tension. We loved the idea and worked with Alyssa Davis from <a href="https://www.instagram.com/crucible.nyc/" target="_blank">@crucible.nyc</a> and Brian Yudin. We designed the weapons and Alyssa and Brian made them in a specialized metal studio. We like to see &ldquo;Corp Gear&rdquo; as a concept that could keep evolving into different things that translate a similar idea, and our friend Devon Halfnight Leflufy was brought into the conversation to also make some sort of <a href="http://tomgalle.online/Devon-SS17-Presentation" target="_blank">fashion line</a> around it. So we&rsquo;re planning on more releases under this umbrella :)</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-version="7" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:50.0% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BYtQ3_QDDcl/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Your work can be very political but also works as easily digested meme art. How do you create that balance?</strong></p> <p><strong>TG:</strong> I&rsquo;m just not into straightforward art that presses specific messages upon you. I think the best art is work that leaves things open for interpretation and doesn&rsquo;t tell you what to think&mdash;at that point you&rsquo;re making communication/advertising work. I think that&rsquo;s what makes it easy to digest. It sets a tone of voice and probably triggers some people, but it doesn&rsquo;t tell you exactly what to think or how to feel. They can fill that in themselves.&nbsp;Another reason could be that my work speaks a language that people are familiar with on the internet.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="instagram-media" data-instgrm-version="7" style=" background:#FFF; border:0; border-radius:3px; box-shadow:0 0 1px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.5),0 1px 10px 0 rgba(0,0,0,0.15); margin: 1px; max-width:658px; padding:0; width:99.375%; width:-webkit-calc(100% - 2px); width:calc(100% - 2px);"> <div style="padding:8px;"> <div style=" background:#F8F8F8; line-height:0; margin-top:40px; padding:50.0% 0; text-align:center; width:100%;"> <div style=" background:url(data:image/png;base64,iVBORw0KGgoAAAANSUhEUgAAACwAAAAsCAMAAAApWqozAAAABGdBTUEAALGPC/xhBQAAAAFzUkdCAK7OHOkAAAAMUExURczMzPf399fX1+bm5mzY9AMAAADiSURBVDjLvZXbEsMgCES5/P8/t9FuRVCRmU73JWlzosgSIIZURCjo/ad+EQJJB4Hv8BFt+IDpQoCx1wjOSBFhh2XssxEIYn3ulI/6MNReE07UIWJEv8UEOWDS88LY97kqyTliJKKtuYBbruAyVh5wOHiXmpi5we58Ek028czwyuQdLKPG1Bkb4NnM+VeAnfHqn1k4+GPT6uGQcvu2h2OVuIf/gWUFyy8OWEpdyZSa3aVCqpVoVvzZZ2VTnn2wU8qzVjDDetO90GSy9mVLqtgYSy231MxrY6I2gGqjrTY0L8fxCxfCBbhWrsYYAAAAAElFTkSuQmCC); display:block; height:44px; margin:0 auto -44px; position:relative; top:-22px; width:44px;">&nbsp;</div> </div> <p style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; line-height:17px; margin-bottom:0; margin-top:8px; overflow:hidden; padding:8px 0 7px; text-align:center; text-overflow:ellipsis; white-space:nowrap;"><a href="https://www.instagram.com/p/BXI03z_jTRC/" style=" color:#c9c8cd; font-family:Arial,sans-serif; font-size:14px; font-style:normal; font-weight:normal; line-height:17px; text-decoration:none;" target="_blank">A post shared by</a></p> </div> </blockquote> <script async defer src="//platform.instagram.com/en_US/embeds.js"></script> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What else do you have coming up?</strong></p> <p><strong>TG:</strong> My friend Moises and I have our first solo show on December 6 in <a href="https://upforgallery.com/future/" target="_blank">Upfor Gallery</a> in Portland. That&rsquo;s our main focus for now :)</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&#39;re interested in what&#39;s happening with art on the web. We invited online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, to write a bi-monthly column for us. Every other Wednesday he selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Tue, 07 Nov 2017 03:58:49 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list The End of Food and the Art World <p>Catastrophic hurricanes, unprecedented flooding, and constant record-breaking highs and lows make it hard to ignore the very real changes occurring as a result of global warming. <a href="http://nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2017/07/climate-change-earth-too-hot-for-humans.html">David Wallace-Wells&rsquo; popular <em>New York Magazine</em> July cover story</a> details worst-case scenarios that break down exactly how our day-to-day living could be affected. Wallace-Wells claims most of the &ldquo;anxiety about global warming&rdquo; omits the &ldquo;significant adjustment to how billions of humans conduct their lives&rdquo; and goes on to list many examples that go far beyond sea level rise. From the not-so-permanent permafrost melting and releasing methane and prehistoric bacteria into the atmosphere to severe inflight turbulence, the possible outcomes run the gamut. As with all news on climate change, one is left with a disquietude that has absolutely nowhere to go upon finishing the article, echoing only into the vast unknown that is the future.</p> <p>The overwhelming information is austere and wearisome to process, let alone plan for. If you&rsquo;ve never been able to relate to the idiom <em>money is no object</em>, your bewilderment might increase by at least tenfold. If you are an artist who relates to this socioeconomic exponential increase in concern, you might have begun to wonder what your place in the art world will be twenty years from now given such dire circumstances. It&rsquo;s difficult to imagine an art world operating with its current hyper-capitalist metabolism in an environment that promises to kill you. Reading about <a href="https://www.forbes.com/sites/jimdobson/2017/06/10/the-shocking-doomsday-maps-of-the-world-and-the-billionaire-escape-plans/#fa609fb40478">billionaire escape plans</a> might give you some hope. For if the billionaires are out there investing in <a href="http://survivalcondo.com/">luxury underground infrastructure</a> and<a href="https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/01/30/doomsday-prep-for-the-super-rich"> fertile land in Wyoming</a>, then surely your art making might keep your account balance above zero in 2040, as the possibility for exhibiting will remain intact (albeit buried or in the middle of nowhere). Though it might be challenging to maintain a healthy studio practice amidst climate plagues, unbreathable air, or permanent economic collapse.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171030161717-Children_of_Men.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">&ldquo;Couldn&rsquo;t save&nbsp;<em>La Pieta</em>&mdash;smashed up before we got there.&rdquo; Rich people getting by in the end times. Still of &ldquo;The Ark of Art&rdquo; from&nbsp;<em>Children of Men</em>, 2006, Directed by Alfonso Cuar&oacute;n</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>The joke is that artists who aren&rsquo;t rich or connected through nepotism are already struggling today, often working three times harder for half the triumph&mdash;if they&rsquo;re lucky. <a href="http://theenemyreader.org/money-cubicles-the-beast/">Brad Phillips writes extensively on the problematics of the art fair industrial complex</a> stating it &ldquo;is a bad time for art and for (most) artists...Artists cannot keep up production to match the number of fairs; galleries cannot keep up financially to participate.&rdquo; The essay includes a metaphorical comparison of Art Basel Miami and Larry Gagosian to the ocean and a gigantic whale as he points out that all the &ldquo;smaller galleries and fairs that swim along, eating the scraps, happy to accept the benefits of being cheaper and more accessible than Gagosian, will die from exhaustion.&rdquo; Within the context of climate change this figurative statement functions literally as the ocean is currently inching its way over Miami Beach and accelerating gentrification in the city, &ldquo;<a href="https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/high-ground-is-becoming-hot-property-as-sea-level-rises/">potentially bringing the coastline of South Florida closer to Miami&rsquo;s historically black neighborhoods</a>.&rdquo; If small galleries and artists from lower tax brackets are expected to &ldquo;die from exhaustion&rdquo; today as a result of inaccessible blue chip exclusivity, would they have a place to occupy at all in coming times?&nbsp;When the procurement of food and safety overruns one&rsquo;s faculty for expression, art making becomes compromised.</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">First there will be civil unrest. As the water rises and the floods increase in severity and regularity, waterfront and coastal cities will become abandoned. Those who cannot afford to leave will be trapped and those that have been priced out will come flock in. The artists, writers, dancers who fall in this category&mdash;at least those who do not have a trust fund&mdash;will either move to middle America or will be in the thick of this urban decay. The art market by this point would have plummeted and/or potentially collectors may continue to use this free market of ours to move even more money through continents.</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">&mdash;Patricia Margarita Hernandez, Miami-born and New York-based independent curator</p> <p>Surely, South Florida will be greatly affected by the sea level rise, flooding, and hurricanes, as will the artists and art fairs located there. However, to say the art world will cease to exist is to say that rich people will too: wealthy people will always be the last ones to go. As long as society exists, plutocracy exists, as does the tension between cultural stewardship and out-of-touch privilege. When asked about the effects of climate change on the art world Todd von Ammon, Gallery Director at New York&rsquo;s Team, reaffirms this supposition:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">I&rsquo;ve been preoccupied recently by Fredric Jameson and his proposal that it&rsquo;s easier to imagine the end of the world than the end of capitalism. The environment as some kind of waste-mold whose ultimate purpose was to cast the figure of capital and then sort of slough off like dead flesh from bone. The history of art + taste, to me, has always resembled a kind of whistling in the dark&mdash;Matisse painting <em>The Piano Lesson </em>a couple hundred miles from the Battle of Verdun&mdash;just completely out of step with the experience of the greatest number. I think the art world is just as aloof now as it was then. It wouldn&rsquo;t be art otherwise.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171030152650-pianolesson.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Henri Matisse, <em>The Piano Lesson</em>, 1916, Oil on canvas. Collection: Museum of Modern Art, New York, Mrs. Simon Guggenheim Fund, &copy; 2017 Succession H. Matisse / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Historical examples of calamity, such as the First and Second World Wars, can help provide a model for how systemic changes&mdash;be they war or global climate change&mdash;may affect artists from different class strata. Matisse&rsquo;s mother, <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/books/first/s/spurling-matisse.html">Anna G&eacute;rard, was a daughter of a 300-year-long line of well-to-do tanners, his father, a prosperous grain merchant</a>. In spite of completing <em>The Piano Lesson</em>, one of his most famous works, during World War I near Verdun, he did <a href="http://www.henri-matisse.net/biography.html">move to Nice the following year to distance himself from wartime activity</a>. Such a move might prove difficult for non-affluent artists or those who fought in the war. Cubist sculptor Raymond Duchamp-Villon volunteered to fight while his brother, Marcel Duchamp moved to New York City instead. &ldquo;<a href="https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/jonathanjonesblog/2014/jul/24/top-10-arists-who-died-during-first-world-war-jonathan-jones">Trench warfare was lethal not just because of shells and machine gun fire but because of deeply unhealthy living conditions</a>,&rdquo; which led to Duchamp-Villon&rsquo;s exposure to typhoid and his death in 1918. The same year, the Spanish flu pandemic further increased the mortality rate in Europe, taking 20 million lives at the end of the war, along with Egon Schiele&rsquo;s, in Vienna, at the age of 28.</p> <p>The unknown artist Nina Baird is included in a memorial at London&rsquo;s Royal Academy, dedicated to art students who died during the war. The memorial &ldquo;represents the uncountable talents lost...before they had a chance to develop. The first world war occurred at one of the most creative moments in the history of art. There must undoubtedly be unknown geniuses among its dead.&rdquo;</p> <p>Times of crisis also see changes in artistic subject matter. During World War II, the British government&rsquo;s WAAC (War Artists Advisory Committee&mdash;not to be confused with the Women&rsquo;s Army Auxiliary Corps during the First World War) had 400 members; 52 of them &ldquo;<a href="http://www.independent.co.uk/arts-entertainment/art/features/women-at-war-the-female-british-artists-who-were-written-out-of-history-2264670.html">were women, the latter receiving fewer and shorter commissions, lower pay and far less publicity</a>.&rdquo; Dame Laura Knight was a member, and although she came from a bankrupt family, she managed to break through many glass ceilings for women in art. However, Knight&rsquo;s known themes of the ballet, the circus, and Gypsies were interrupted by the war. In a thematic shift she began depicting training camps, recruitment posters, women in factories, and other war-related content. Upon her own request, she was commissioned by the WAAC to paint <em>The Nuremberg Trial</em>&nbsp;(image at top), and spent three months in Germany observing the court. Shortly thereafter she returned to her interest in marginalized communities and individuals.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171030152558-Ruby_Loftus_screwing_a_Breech-ring__1943___Art._IWM_LD_2850_.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Dame Laura Knight, <em>Ruby Loftus Screwing a Breech Ring</em>, 1943, Oil on canvas. Collection: Imperial War Museums &copy; IWM</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In both wars, art exhibitions continued, a handful of careers developed, and collectors collected in the U.S. and Europe as millions of people suffered and died. Despite the art world carrying on, by the end of World War II, many effects and changes were evident in and outside of it. Most notedly, the art capital moving from Europe to the U.S., and the subsequent launch of a new movement, Abstract Expressionism. Not having any battles fought on U.S. soil in the twentieth century has a lot to do with its current status as the world power. Its strategic late entry into the Second World War boosted that favorable outcome and enabled the U.S. to capitalize on its newfound dominance in the arts and otherwise, as Europe, Russia, and Asia rebuilt themselves.</p> <p>Using the two wars as a template, one could safely conjecture that the art world will adjust and adapt to the global effects of climate change no matter how many people suffer. Day-to-day living will be greatly affected, so inevitably, exhibition and art fair culture will be too. Livable land will move with the weather. People who have means will migrate and establish new centers, creating new hubs of commerce and culture. With unbreathable air and extreme weather conditions people may move underground or remain indoors, leaving the house only when necessary. The demand for entertainment media could increase as a result and financially benefit creative industries.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171031154918-The-100-EP-112-The-White-Room-775x435.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">In the teen sci-fi drama,&nbsp;<em>The 100</em>, planet Earth is too toxic to support most life. One group of well-off survivors hoards resources&mdash;and artwork, like&nbsp;<em>The&nbsp;</em><em>Starry Night</em>, apparently&mdash;deep inside a mountain, hermetically sealed off from the rest of the planet and its struggling survivors.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Should the internet remain intact, people will rely more heavily on socializing online, making the art world even more virtualized than it is today. Current benefits of social media, like non-discriminatory accessibility and visibility, have helped marginalized voices be heard and artists with little means be seen. If, in this hypothetical scenario, the art world predominantly utilizes social media for its viewership, and taking topical intersectional politics and awareness into account, marginalized artists could have a more level playing field. That is, if such artists are able to continue to make work in concert with surviving.</p> <p>It <em>is</em> entertaining to envision possible optimistic effects of climate change: the decentralization of the art world and capitalism; remote exhibitions inside luxury bunkers under scenic pastures in the middle of Wyoming and within Oculus Rift headsets; increased market value in networked and digital art; the complete removal of hierarchical institutional structures with a shift towards virtual providence that includes art from all places regardless of status, where the only connection you need to get in is an internet one. The reality of the situation, however, is most people will not be secure enough to make art. Infrastructure is not ready for dramatic environmental changes, and people in power already have plans in place to maintain it in spite of global and economic crises.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171030152445-perez_art_museum_miami_bayside_view_daniel_azoulay.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">&ldquo;Elevating the Museum 10 feet above storm surge requirements allowed parking below the Museum in an unprecedented design that integrates parking, planting beds, irrigation and storm surge storage. The innovative porous-floored garage, paths and rain gardens capture water, funneling it into the ground, reducing local flooding and runoff into Biscayne Bay, significantly reducing infrastructure expenditures.&rdquo; P&eacute;rez Art Museum Miami, bayside view. Photo: Daniel Azoulay photography</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>Nevertheless, just as this essay speculates about the future of art on an inhospitable planet, so too are growing numbers of artists, curators, and institutions making and presenting work about climate change, with varying personal stakes. Maria Elena Ortiz, Associate Curator at the Perez Art Museum in Miami, describes how the architecture of the waterfront museum was built with climate change in mind, and how the museum is using artwork to raise these concerns at the very heart of the commercial art world:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">At PAMM, we are very focused on addressing the social issues of our time, including climate change, which for obvious reason...is a topic of debate in our community. During Art Basel week, the museum will present several projects that take on the subject in relation to the architecture of our building, which was built raised-up to withhold rising sea levels...This among other projects will hopefully generate a poignant conversation on this subject. These initiatives&rsquo; essence is not necessarily about taking...a side on climate change, rather acknowledging it and creating a civil space for discussion.</p> <p>PAMM&rsquo;s fortified building evinces the future is here. The time for speculation has caught up with the time for action. It&rsquo;s one thing to plan and construct a well-considered building, it&rsquo;s another to prepare and protect the artists that create the work that fills it. How accountable should a museum be in providing local artists with succor in times of need? If only galleries and institutions could insure an artist&rsquo;s life <a href="http://salvageartinstitute.org/">as strongly as the objects she produces</a>. Artwork becomes artifact as soon as it enters into a collection just as the maker&rsquo;s death becomes its added value. In a capitalist art market, this removes any financial incentive or commodifiable concern for the artist&rsquo;s life.</p> <p>Climate change could shift the capitalist paradigm as survival is dependent on how well communities work together to subsist. &ldquo;Survival mode&rdquo; is often used to describe the state in which a lot of artists find themselves in today. There are not enough jobs, housing is inordinately expensive. Artists are overeducated, underpaid, and in debt. When you take global warming into account, the situation feels bleak and impossible to plan for. Most people don&rsquo;t have the means and are too consumed by present-day struggles. Perhaps, Nichole Caruso, current Director at Marlborough Contemporary and former Director at Wallspace&ndash;&ndash;which suffered extensive physical damage to property and artwork during Hurricane Sandy in 2012 and took four months to get up and running again&ndash;&ndash;best sums up the difficult position many find themselves in:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">It&rsquo;s essential to consider the impact of climate change in advance of disaster, or else, as I experienced after [Hurricane] Sandy, the life blood of a gallery and its artists is cut off completely. Of course, there&rsquo;s a certain amount of preparation that can be done, but relegating resources to this particular issue is almost impossible knowing how limited bandwidth and finances tend to be.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/472848-audrey-l-phillips?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Audrey L. Phillips</a></p> <p><em>Audrey Phillips is a Toronto-based writer. She is a regular contributor to AQNB.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><br /> <span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Dame Laura Knight,&nbsp;<em>The Nuremberg Trials</em>, 1946,&nbsp;Oil on canvas. Collection: Imperial War Museums &copy; IWM</span><span style="font-size:12px;"><span style="text-align: center;">)</span></span></p> Tue, 31 Oct 2017 09:04:59 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Kelvin Haizel Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/48386-under-the-radar-gwen-gerard-keith-o-anderson-sara-hupas" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/421072-kelvin-haizel" target="_blank">Kelvin Haizel</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>My current practice investigates the contemporary condition of the image. The body of work produced over the past two years allows the object-of-an-image to poke through the surface&nbsp;of the picture to assert its equality. And by so doing it rebels against its utilitarian service in the picture/object composite of the image sanctioned by the current norm.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>To affectively use reason in the public interest.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171030090702-20171023202102-Haizel_Kelvin_6.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Untitled: Spontaneous Memorials, Antwemamena (on the Accra- Kumasi road)</em>, 2016, Digital photograph</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)?</strong></p> <p>I made a silent covenant with God when I was 15 and we both honored&nbsp;our end of the bargain. I became an artist consequent&nbsp;to that.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>I would love to literally connect the four Islands of the Comoros archipelago with a single rope.</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p>ka ̢r&icirc;&rsquo;kach&auml; seid&rsquo;ou, <a href="https://dutchartinstitute.eu/page/6193/bernard-akoi-jackson">Bernard Akoi-Jackson</a>, <a href="https://iubeezy.wordpress.com/">Kwasi Ohene-Ayeh (IUB)</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: <em>Untitled for now: Memory, Fiction, Religion&hellip;</em>, 2015, Plaster of Paris casts on construction net, Site-specific installation at the Ussher Fort Prisons that calls into question the basis of religious belief systems as a colonial vestige)</span></p> Mon, 30 Oct 2017 02:08:32 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Quantum Natives: Meet the Artist Crew Charting New Digital Terrain <p>It&rsquo;s easy to get lost in the Quantum Natives universe. The global-collective-slash-platform-slash-record-label is tricky to summarize, and even trickier to navigate. Fortunately, though, <a href="http://quantumnatives.com/" target="_blank">there&rsquo;s a map</a>. Inspired by the world-building practices of fantasy and science fiction, this strange, debased Google Map allows the visitor to meander through its wash of dreamy colors and unidentifiable symbols. Each project icon floats ominously above its surface, casting long gothic shadows. This is cartography in flux, a digital d&eacute;rive: click on one icon, and up pops a tweet from <a href="http://www.aqnb.com/2016/01/08/introducing-rosens-portals-a-transmedia-narrative/" target="_blank">transmedia artist Rosen</a>: &ldquo;If u found a portal and couldn&rsquo;t see what was on the other side wud you go in?&rdquo; Some icons bring up CAD drawings, others, SoundCloud clips. Once, although I&rsquo;ve never found it since, I landed in a 3D-rendered art exhibition.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171023143346-Quantum_Natives_map.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">View of the Quantum Natives map, with work by Dane Law</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>As co-founder Awe IX&mdash;who also makes music as Yearning Kru&mdash;tells me, the map reflects the lateral and digital nature of Quantum Natives more generally. &ldquo;It doesn&rsquo;t present something as being the most important, compared to a feed or a timeline,&rdquo; he says. &ldquo;It allows you to separate all these artists like little worlds, with their own idiosyncratic practices, but you can still also draw links between them.&rdquo; Awe IX lives in Taipei, several time zones away from fellow co-founder, James Stringer (aka Brood Ma) in London, as well as others who fall into the Quantum Natives sphere. Digital space, then, has become a necessary stand-in for physical space, with conversations often taking place on Facebook or Skype&mdash;spaces in which Quantum Natives are entirely autochthonous. The rhizomatic nature of online space reflects their porous and globally dispersed offshoots. Unapologetically promiscuous, some artists will work on a single project before disappearing, while others will participate for months, even years.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171023143446-QNICA-YearningKru.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Yearning Kru</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Since its foundation in 2010, around 20 people have been involved to varying degrees. The map allows this milieu of artists to stake a claim to their own aesthetic identities&mdash;whether psychedelic, brutal, industrial, upbeat&mdash;while remaining part of a whole. Although far from cohesive, taken together, they leave you with a creeping sense of disquiet, a dryness in the throat, as though all of the anxieties and contradictions of the present are, quite literally, mapped out in front of you.</p> <p>&ldquo;I mean, obviously I&rsquo;m quite interested in these dystopias,&rdquo; says James, who works under the pseudonym Brood Ma. &ldquo;But I always felt that they were critiques of what I saw as quite a juvenile obsession with the end of the world.&rdquo; Of all the creators associated with Quantum Natives, Brood Ma has perhaps borne the brunt of criticism for his exploration of brutality. Both his visual and aural projects are disheveled, even aggressive; his last album, <em>Daze </em>(released on Tri Angle in 2016), was filled with thunderous crashes and fretful synths. It was met with accusations of poor taste and even worse politics. &ldquo;It was a dark space,&rdquo; he says, &ldquo;and obviously exploring that is tricky.&rdquo; Eager to clarify his position, he later sends me an email. With <em>Daze</em>, he writes, he wanted &ldquo;to explore among other things the absence of morality / empathy within shared digital spaces (particularly games spaces)&mdash;and I used the landscape of Day-Z (an apocalyptic zombie survival horror game) as a way to frame this&mdash;as it is predominantly populated and dominated by juvenile men and teens.&rdquo; Perhaps, however, in a post-Gamergate landscape, and in the face of ascending neofascism, even an ironic, rib-nudging glorification of violence and dystopia misses the beat. For too many people, dystopia is now; it&rsquo;s already here &mdash;&nbsp;just without the sci-fi aesthetic. To use dystopia as a tool for ironic play could, despite the best of intentions, affirm its normalcy.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171023143553-QNICA-BroodMa.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Brood Ma</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Standing amidst broken glass and ruined skyscrapers, both James and Awe IX are eager to leave Quantum Natives&rsquo; dystopian past behind. James is now working with more organic sounds, and spending more time developing immersive Unity game engines, &ldquo;a lot more textural &hellip; audio spaces essentially.&rdquo; Awe IX, whose own music undulates more towards the psychedelic, prefers a quasi-surrealist approach, slipping into unconscious minds to reconfigure the everyday. For him, &ldquo;more abrasive club music&hellip; deliberately tries to be anti-escapist, because it has this very jarring quality to it. It wakes you up. Whereas, I suppose, [my music] lulls you into a trance-like state.&rdquo; Recognizable tropes and pulpy pop culture references, he suggests, prevent this from tumbling into banal escapism. Not so much Lautreamont&rsquo;s chance encounter of sewing machines and umbrellas, but rather Pantene Pro V with a peyote chaser.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171023143625-QNICA-Recsund.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">recsund</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Where the Quantum Natives founders are serious and ruminative, Clifford Sage, or recsund, is unwaveringly cheery and animated. One of Quantum Natives&rsquo; more active members, he began making &ldquo;sound diaries&rdquo; as a teenager, using an incomprehensibly complex system of layering in Windows Sound Recorder. &ldquo;There was a &lsquo;no revert&rsquo; button, but I didn&rsquo;t dare click on it,&rdquo; he says. More recently, however, he&rsquo;s been working on his avatar, ProDance&reg;, a 3D-modeled, Janus-faced avatar who doubles as an intergalactic transmission system. ProDance&reg; began as a joke, a parody of the smooth, clean lines of CAD-sculpted net art, but has since evolved into a fully-fledged character with his own backstory. Clifford is now collaborating with James to integrate ProDance&reg; into a game engine.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/brT09Ye4L8s" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Like other Quantum Natives artists, he&rsquo;s also interested in world-building, and in its potential for blurring the real and imaginary. Recalling a childhood memory, he says:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">I&rsquo;ll never forget my dad getting annoyed with me because we were on a walk and I&rsquo;d be like, &lsquo;oh my god that building is like something out of [computer game] <em>Riven</em>!&rsquo; He&rsquo;d be like, <em>Riven</em> is out of someone else&rsquo;s imagination! This is real life! I didn&rsquo;t really see what was wrong with someone else&rsquo;s imagination. That it could distract me in reality, even in a beautiful place.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ezfFMPhskqI" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>At their <em><a href="http://issueprojectroom.org/event/quantum-natives-grace-nexus-brood-ma-yearning-kru-rosen" target="_blank">Grace Nexus</a></em> performance earlier this year, Quantum Natives used a game engine to create a 3D model of the space (Brooklyn&rsquo;s Issue Project Room), which was tweaked and remodeled before being projected back into that same space. The result was an immersive, constantly shifting alien surface on top of the original; it simultaneously diminished and accentuated that which was familiar. In their own literature, they described the night as &ldquo;an act of tourism&rdquo; into the Quantum Natives universe. This kind of project goes beyond conventional world-building, where that other world is only ever an eternal elsewhere. <em>Grace Nexus</em> pulled that other world into our own.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171023151246-Quantum_Natives_map_with_playlist.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Quantum Natives map with SoundCloud playlist</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This slippage between reality and fantasy is fun, for sure, but it&rsquo;s also a useful exercise. What happens when real space becomes a palimpsest? When you layer new worlds on top of the old? I&rsquo;m wary of overstating the case here, but it does remind me of the quote, variously attributed to Mark Fisher, Frederic Jameson, and Slavoj Zizek, that goes something like, &ldquo;It is easier to imagine an end to the world than an end to capitalism.&rdquo; Maybe we just need the right tools to imagine new worlds.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;Siobhan Leddy</p> <div><em>Siobhan Leddy is a writer and editor based in Berlin.</em></div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(All images: Courtesy of Quantum Natives)</span></p> Tue, 24 Oct 2017 03:09:08 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Keith O. Anderson Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/48386-under-the-radar-gwen-gerard-keith-o-anderson-sara-hupas" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/130651-keith-o-anderson" target="_blank">Keith O. Anderson</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>My attempt is to rewrite these familiar objects with new meaning and currency.</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>To delve inward, outward, on a perilous journey, resurfacing to illuminate all that one has discovered, to solely bring attention to a higher purpose.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171023071201-20170501201116-I_brought_a_Pyramid_from_Egypt_to_our_first_meeting-_Acrylic_paint__cloth_napkins_and_wood-_22_7.8_x_22_in-_20178.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>I brought a Pyramid from Egypt to our first meeting</em>, 2017, Acrylic paint, cotton cloth napkins, china marker and mdf board.&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)?</strong></p> <p>Being a father of two boys has been by far my greatest accomplishment.</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>I am too busy being a maker of things to ever consider this.</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicolas_de_Sta%C3%ABl" target="_blank">Nicolas de Stael</a>, <a href="http://www.adrianpiper.com/" target="_blank">Adrian Piper</a>, <a href="http://sengasenga.com/about.html" target="_blank">Senga Nengudi</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: <em>From the book of Tao</em>, 2016,&nbsp;Archival masking tape, Black wrap aluminum foil and fire residue)</span></p> Mon, 23 Oct 2017 00:43:22 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Ways of Seeing Judy Chicago’s “The Dinner Party” <p>&ldquo;My lifelong goal has been to overcome the erasure that has eclipsed the contributions of so many women,&rdquo; said <a href="http://www.judychicago.com/" target="_blank">Judy Chicago</a> on the occasion of two new exhibitions examining the production of her best-known work, The Dinner Party. These exhibitions, currently at the <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/events/show/454760-inside-the-dinner-party-studio" target="_blank">National Museum of Women in the Arts</a> in Washington, D.C., and the <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/events/show/454635-roots-of-the-dinner-party-history-in-the-making" target="_blank">Brooklyn Museum</a>, uniquely present the seminal artwork in a now unfamiliar way, recalling the authentic grit of the feminist process, and the inclusive approach of its complete original installation design.</p> <p>Some feminists have argued enough ink has been spilled on Judy Chicago. But her banquet-sized table and the surrounding installations which originally encompassed <em>The Dinner Party</em>&mdash;produced from 1974 and 1979 with more than 400 volunteers&mdash;endure as the subject of exhibitions and scholarship. This season&rsquo;s exhibitions each revisit the origins and development of <em>The Dinner Party</em>, best known, a bit incompletely, for its 39 place settings symbolizing the contributions of women throughout Western history.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171019134536-Process04_ROTDP_ThroughTheFlower_14-2_JCatworkonentrywaybanners.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Judy Chicago Designing the Entry Banners for <em>The Dinner Party,</em>&nbsp;1978. Courtesy of Through the Flower Archive</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Time for (Re)Presentation</strong></p> <p><em>The Dinner Party </em>is often described as a monumental icon to women and feminist art, and sometimes, erroneously, to Chicago herself. Monuments, of course, are contested territory, the terrain on which fiery discussions about representation, history, and memory take place: who is celebrated, and who is left out? Some feminist critiques of monuments balk at the very notion of canonizing individuals, of making &ldquo;heroes.&rdquo; Every one of us has an impact on our world, argue these theorists, and crediting individuals promotes the myth of the patriarchal archetype genius. <em>The Dinner Party</em>, conceived as an exercise in counteracting erasure and rethinking history as written, is often critiqued as doing the very opposite. It is in this light, timed with the new exhibitions looking back to the conception and original execution of the work, that a contextual discussion around the (lingering, but often hushed) controversies surrounding Chicago and <em>The Dinner Party </em>seems particularly warranted.</p> <p>In 2007, <em>The Dinner Party</em> became a permanent installation at <a href="https://www.brooklynmuseum.org/eascfa/" target="_blank">The Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art</a> (EASCFA) inside the Brooklyn Museum. Chicago&rsquo;s other work has also been acquired by major institutions in recent years. To some, this institutional recognition throws Chicago&rsquo;s feminism into question, as their goal is to stay outside such hallowed spaces; to others, Chicago has now &ldquo;made it&rdquo; and is thus unworthy of more discussion (despite the fact that it took decades to achieve a permanent home for <em>The Dinner Party</em>). Thus, the complete work remains largely overlooked by feminist and art historical documentation, and highly misunderstood and under-recognized by academia&mdash;despite its popularity with museumgoers. Chicago&rsquo;s oeuvre and legacy are worthy of further discussion, not only for the sake of the artist and <em>The Dinner Party</em>, but in service of fully researching and contextualizing other work by women.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171019135049-Process03_ROTDP_ThroughTheFlower_Runners2.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>The Dinner Party</em> Needlework Loft, 1977. Courtesy of Through the Flower Archive</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Lingering Discontent from a Controversial Tour</strong></p> <p>Chicago may now be seen as museum-approved, though she works outside it. <em>The Dinner Party</em>, too, was created by institutional outsiders, and designed to challenge the traditional, white-walled, &ldquo;solitary genius&rdquo; (typically white male) framing of art history.</p> <p>When <em>The Dinner Party </em>first went on tour from 1979&ndash;1988, controversies around the artwork were well known in mass media and academia. Some major institutions would not even temporarily display the contentious piece&mdash;even <a href="https://www.c-span.org/video/?c4045143/floor-action-dinner-party" target="_blank">The House of Representatives discussed the &ldquo;provocative&rdquo; nature</a>, debating its artistic integrity versus its purported pornography in its liberal (yet abstract) representation of vulvas.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171019134711-EL157.036_ROTDP_JudyChicago_10645-Study-for-Herschel-Anthony-Blackwell-Smyth-Plates.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Judy Chicago (American, born 1939). Study for C. Herschel, S. Anthony, E. Blackwell, and E. Smyth plates from T<em>he Dinner Party</em>, 1978, Ink and collage on paper, 23 x 35 in. Courtesy of the artist. &copy; 2017 Judy Chicago/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. (Photo &copy; Donald Woodman)</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>While conservative critics had problems with its so-called sexual nature, feminists argue the repeated use of the vulva throughout the 39 table settings, essentializes women by reducing them to their biology alone. For second wave feminists like Chicago, the use of feminine iconography celebrated and broadened the discussion of women. At the time, artists were using imagery like the vulva to critique <em>society&rsquo;s </em>reduction of women to their biology&mdash;not the other way around. The essentialist argument today, though not without merit, is truly an argument expressed in hindsight.</p> <p>Despite venue cancellations and widespread <a href="http://people.com/archive/sassy-judy-chicago-throws-a-dinner-party-but-the-art-world-mostly-sends-regrets-vol-14-no-23/" target="_blank">criticisms</a>, <em>The Dinner Party</em> was immensely popular during its international grassroots tour, causing lines lasting hours, breaking attendance and fundraising records. (To note, <em>The Dinner Party, </em>though fragmented from its entire original exhibition installation<em>,</em> is the most popular piece at the Brooklyn Museum.)</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What (and Who) We&rsquo;re Not Seeing Today</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171019134809-2002.10_Donald_Woodman_photograph.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Judy Chicago, <em>The Dinner Party</em>, 1974‒79, Ceramic, porcelain, textile, 576 x 576 in. Brooklyn Museum, Gift of the Elizabeth A. Sackler Foundation, 2002.10. &copy; 2017 Judy Chicago / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo &copy; Donald Woodman</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The entirety of the original installation of <em>The Dinner Party</em> included displaying Heritage Banners (in a hallway leading up to the table), the artwork table and Heritage Floor tiles, Heritage Panels (a collage contextualizing the 1,038 women featured in the place settings and Heritage Floor), Documentary Panels (showing volunteers working on the piece), Acknowledgement panels (listing volunteers who worked on it), Donor Panels, and, after the first exhibition, portions of <a href="http://louisville.edu/art/facilities-resources/international-honor-quilt" target="_blank">The International Honor Quilt</a>.<a href="#_ftn1" name="_ftnref1" title="">[1]</a> Often, installations would be complemented by a group exhibition of china painters to give context and credit to those who worked on the place settings. The exhibitions were also complemented by local events, exhibits, courses, and other projects which added to the regional context of each tour stop. Some venues could not house all of these elements (or did not want to due to the educational/non fine art aspects). Tellingly, when regarded in documentation today, these elements seem to not exist, ironically leaving behind crucial parts of an installation that was meant to honor those left out of history. That early attention focused on the table likely impacted its permanent installation at the Brooklyn Museum as just the table and Heritage Banners. Art historians today largely recognize it as these elements alone.</p> <p>The International Honor Quilt counters another criticism of <em>The Dinner Party</em>: that it excludes many women by focusing on Western societies and mainly white women of royal status.<a href="#_ftn2" name="_ftnref2" title="">[2]</a> This remains a pertinent critique of <em>The Dinner Party, </em>though it disregards Chicago and her team&rsquo;s research process and intent. Starting from ground zero they considered some 3,000 women in detail, without computers. They were bound to the limited resources about women&rsquo;s history available in the 1970s. Chicago maintains the project is a <em>symbol</em> of the history of women in Western civilizations, not a history in entirety. Still, Chicago heard the critique and responded with The International Honor Quilt. Artists and non-artists alike were invited to contribute a triangle quilt patch honoring the women that made an impact on them. The initiative amounted to hundreds of quilts and added another layer to the expansive artwork.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171019134927-Process01_ROTDP_ThroughTheFlower_J-WorkingonceramictilesfortheHeritageFloor.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>The Dinner Party</em> Workers Painting Names on the Heritage Floor Tiles, 1978. Courtesy of Through the Flower Archive</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>The Dinner Party, </em>thus<em>, </em>is bigger than Chicago&mdash;although she was the leader and designer. The <em>understanding</em> of this tremendous work over time morphed, in some feminist circles, into a perceived aggrandizing monument to the artist. When it is mentioned in textbooks, the collaborative process is occasionally mentioned, but the focus is on the table, craft, its historical intent, criticism for whom it excludes, and Chicago&rsquo;s name itself. The inclusive elements of the original exhibition are scarcely recognized.</p> <p>Today, the permanent installation at The Brooklyn Museum includes just the Heritage Banners and the table artwork; aside from her tiny signature, unlit on the floor, and the museum&rsquo;s wall text, it does not glorify Chicago. Nevertheless, the simplified display overlooks the various people and contextual aspects that originally showcased the monumental work in a multilayered light. This is perhaps due to a slow shift from the original comprehensive environment&mdash;the collaborative studio&mdash;to an institutionalized, canonized display, something that, again, ironically <em>The Dinner Party</em> was fighting against.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171019135002-Process02_ROTDP_ThroughTheFlower_10-NeedleworkLoft.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Judy Chicago and Others Working in <em>The Dinner Party</em>&nbsp;Needlework Loft, 1978. Courtesy of Through the Flower Archive</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Inside <em>The Dinner Party </em>Studio</strong></p> <p>Readings of artworks can change with context and curatorial decisions&mdash;this is not necessarily unique to this installation&mdash;but <em>The Dinner Party</em> perhaps epitomizes this impact. However, viewers now have a truly unique opportunity to see the story behind the collaborative making of the artwork, the situational context behind its design, and the historical information about the women featured.</p> <p>To celebrate the Judy Chicago Visual Archive at the <a href="https://nmwa.org/" target="_blank">National Museum of Women in the Arts</a>&rsquo; Betty Boyd Dettre Library and Research Center, NMWA presents <em>Inside &ldquo;The Dinner Party&rdquo; Studio</em>, an exhibition about the work&rsquo;s creation using archival documentation and film. Curated by Library Director Sarah Osborne Bender, the exhibition is up to the task of interpreting the multi-layered, materials-based project.</p> <p><em>Inside &ldquo;The Dinner Party&rdquo; Studio</em> focuses on the studio space and community led by Chicago, bringing together selected preparatory objects, illustrated letters and drawings, Documentary Panels, contact sheets and photographs, ephemera, and Johanna Demetrakas&rsquo; film, <em>Right Out of History </em>(1980), which documented the making of the artwork. Of note is a sketchbook which includes Chicago&rsquo;s plans for <em>The Dinner Party</em> and peripheral projects like <em>The Dinner Party: A Symbol of Our History </em>(1979), a book chronicling the history of the women featured in the piece and the story of the installation&rsquo;s creation. This exhibition catalogue, available throughout the original tour, was updated in 2007 with <em>The Dinner Party: Restoring Women to History</em>, which included a history of the tour itself. Also telling are Chicago&rsquo;s original plans for the permanent housing for the installation. Contrary to critiques about the work&rsquo;s museum recognition, permanent housing was one of the original goals&mdash;to ensure these women&rsquo;s histories are not lost again.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171020081129-EL157.002_ROTDP_NMWA_2001.3_transp.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Judy Chicago, Study for Emily Dickinson from The Dinner Party, 1977, Ink, photo, and collage on paper, 23 1/8 x 35 in. National Museum of Women in the Arts, Washington, D.C., Purchase, Members&rsquo; Acquisition Fund, 2001.3. &copy; 2017 Judy Chicago / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Lee Stalsworth</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>&ldquo;The Messiness of How It Really Got Done&rdquo;</strong></p> <p>On October 20, the Brooklyn Museum opens <a href="https://www.brooklynmuseum.org/exhibitions/roots_of_the_dinner_party" target="_blank"><em>The Roots of &ldquo;The Dinner Party&rdquo;: History in the Making</em></a>, the final exhibition in the acclaimed <em>A Year of Yes: Reimagining Feminism at the Brooklyn Museum</em>. The Museum calls it &ldquo;the first museum exhibition to examine the formal, material, and conceptual development&rdquo; of <em>The Dinner Party</em>. Including never-before-exhibited objects, the show focuses on the installation&rsquo;s development, its model of collaborative art-making, and how it remains &ldquo;a testament to the power of revising Western history to include women.&rdquo;</p> <p>The exhibition includes test plates, research documents, notebooks, and preparatory drawings from 1971 through 1979, with sections on Chicago&rsquo;s vision and material studies, research documents from Chicago&rsquo;s workshop, and ephemera from the worldwide tour. The exhibit adds depth and context to the visitor&rsquo;s experience of <em>The Dinner Party</em> while &ldquo;unpacking some of the misperceptions surrounding this controversial artwork and its critical reception.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171020080323-EL157.006_ROTDP_JudyChicago_ttf1000-Testing-the-Mound.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Judy Chicago, Testing the Mound for The Dinner Party, 1977, Porcelain and China paint, diameter: 14 in. Courtesy of the artist. &copy; 2017 Judy Chicago / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo &copy; Donald Woodman</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This reflexive focus implies a unique acknowledgement of limitations of and by the Brooklyn Museum, and recognizing that, without additional context, perhaps misconceptions have been easily perpetuated.</p> <p>&ldquo;People might be accustomed to seeing the image of [<em>The Dinner Party</em> table], and part of her project has been aggrandized,&rdquo; EASCFA Curator Carmen Hermo, who curated the exhibition, told me recently. &ldquo;Now, people can see some of the messiness of how it really got done.&rdquo;</p> <p>Of note are displays representing the artists&rsquo; complex experimentation with mediums, containing, for example, broken plates; the evolution of the plates&rsquo; vulva / butterfly designs and the ensuing controversy; and the intense, detailed process the studio underwent to select the women to feature, including original cards listing information on over 3,000 women considered. The exhibition lends perspective into the authentic struggle to bring this idea to fruition; the complexity of feminist issues <em>The Dinner Party </em>brings to the fore; and also how it is interpreted and displayed by the EASFA today.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171020080530-82.165_PS1.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Judy Chicago, Sojourner Truth #2 Test Plate from The Dinner Party, circa 1978. Porcelain and China paint, diameter: 14 in. Brooklyn Museum, gift of Judy Chicago, 82.165. &copy; 2017 Judy Chicago / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. &copy; 2017 Judy Chicago / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photo: Sarah DeSantis, Brooklyn Museum</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Chicago and her original exhibition liaison, Diane Gelon, were both available for questions regarding items or details for the exhibitions. They worked with NMWA to try to identify the original volunteers presented in the Documentary Panels. This grounded readiness points to the continuing presence and interest of Chicago and her team in relation to this work. <em>The Dinner Party</em> remains a distinctive monument to women who remain at the margins of history pages, major institutions, and art gallery walls.</p> <p>After <em>The Roots of &ldquo;The Dinner Party&rdquo;</em> comes down, the surfeit of context will also come down. A printed handout and an interactive tablet will give historical context about the women featured; the Heritage Banners will remain as the &ldquo;hallway of respite&rdquo; before entering <em>The Dinner Party</em> gallery; the table will remain as a provocative centerpiece of the EASFA, contextualizing the feminist exhibitions around it in the Sackler Center, and curatorially encouraging critical thought for feminism and art past and present. Probably it will remain the most popular permanent artwork at the Brooklyn Museum, and aptly so, as women and minority artists remain under- and misrepresented; <em>The Dinner Party </em>reminds us of this, remaining a beautiful testament to overlooked populations.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171020080648-EL157.053_ROTDP_Salon94_Cartoon_10092.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Judy Chicago, Cartoon for Entryway Banner #2&mdash;And She Made for Them a Sign to See from The Dinner Party, 1978, Acrylic on paper, 38 x 60 in. Courtesy the artist and Salon 94, New York. &copy; 2017 Judy Chicago / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Other exhibitions are building on Chicago&rsquo;s artistic impact, such as <em>Judy Chicago&rsquo;s Pussies </em>at the <a href="http://jessicasilvermangallery.com/" target="_blank">Jessica Silverman Gallery</a> in San Francisco, on view through October 28, 2017, and <em>Womenhouse</em> at La Monnaie de Paris from October 20, 2017&ndash;January 28, 2018, which will continue on to the NMWA in the Spring 2018. As Chicago&rsquo;s work gains broader and more contextual repute (let&rsquo;s face it, many people outside art circles can hardly name a woman artist), so will that of other women&mdash;and, if anything, its critics and detractors will hopefully inspire others to take what Chicago started and build on its sentiments, grow it, make it better and even more just. There will always remain room for critique and praise: <em>The Dinner Party </em>can be both imperfect <em>and</em> feminist, an unfinished exercise in representing an incomplete history of women. But let it be accepted for its complexity, for its problems and its achievements&mdash;a simplified narrative, no matter who&rsquo;s doing the oversimplification, just isn&rsquo;t feminist.</p> <p><em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/events/show/454760-inside-the-dinner-party-studio" target="_blank">Inside the Dinner Party Studio</a>&nbsp;runs from September 17, 2017&ndash;January 5, 2018 at the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C.</em></p> <p><em><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ams/events/show/454635-roots-of-the-dinner-party-history-in-the-making" target="_blank">Roots of &ldquo;The Dinner Party&rdquo;: History in the Making</a>, run from October 20, 2017&ndash;March 4, 2018 at the Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art at the Brooklyn Museum in New York.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;Sally Deskins</p> <p><em>Sally Deskins is a writer, artist and curator focusing on women and feminist issues. She blogs at&nbsp;</em><em><a href="http://femmesfollesnebraska.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">femmesfollesnebraska.tumblr.com</a></em><em>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div> <hr align="left" size="1" width="33%" /> <div id="ftn1"> <p><span style="font-size:14px;"><a href="#_ftnref1" name="_ftn1" title="">[1]</a> Sally Deskins, &ldquo;Revealing Judy Chicago&#39;s &lsquo;The Dinner Party&rsquo;: An Analysis of the Curatorial Context,&rdquo; thesis, West Virginia University, 2016, 197 p.; 10110160.</span></p> </div> <div id="ftn2"> <p><span style="font-size:14px;"><a href="#_ftnref2" name="_ftn2" title="">[2]</a> For example in Hilary Robinson, &ldquo;Reframing Women,&rdquo; <em>Circa, 72</em> (1995): 18-23.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">&ldquo;The Dinner Party studio,&rdquo; 1978. Judy Chicago addresses a gathering of volunteers in the Dinner Party studio. Courtesy of National Museum of Women in the Arts. Photo: Amy Meadow)</span></p> </div> </div> Fri, 20 Oct 2017 03:33:50 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Ryan Kearney | Jesse Chun | Aggie Toppins <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/468969-ryan-kearney?utm_source=RyanKearney&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Ryan Kearney &ndash; London</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1016454?utm_source=RyanKearney&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1016454/u3azr9/20161111102840-5.Ryan_Kearney-Martyrdom_of_St_Sebastian_2016.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1016455?utm_source=RyanKearney&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1016455/mf2ji7/20161111102845-Ryan_Kearney_Blades_2016.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1016463?utm_source=RyanKearney&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1016463/mf2ji7/20161111102928-Ryan_Kearney_Untitled_Chemical_etching_on_copper_2016.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1016461?utm_source=RyanKearney&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1016461/mf2ji7/20161111102918-Ryan_Kearney_Rocks_2016.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/492730-jessechun?utm_source=JesseChun&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Jesse Chun &ndash; Brooklyn</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1067588?utm_source= JesseChun&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1067588/u3azr9/20171010034609-R2018_Chun_Worksample04.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1067595?utm_source=JesseChun&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1067595/mf2ji7/20171010034611-R2018_Chun_Worksample10.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1067593?utm_source=JesseChun&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1067593/mf2ji7/20171010034610-R2018_Chun_Worksample08.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1067590?utm_source=JesseChun&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1067590/mf2ji7/20171010034610-R2018_Chun_Worksample06.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/492725-aggie-toppins?utm_source=AggieToppins&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Aggie Toppins &ndash; Chattanooga, TN</span></a></p> <p><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1067528/u3azr9/20171009213231-toppins_sendingscatalog_spread2_web.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; width: 100%;" /></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1067724?utm_source=AggieToppins&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1067724/u3azr9/20171010230324-toppins_sipapu6_web.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1067525?utm_source=AggieToppins&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1067525/u3azr9/20171009213230-toppins_sendings_spread7_web.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1067521?utm_source=AggieToppins&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1067521/u3azr9/20171009213149-toppins_ctcv1_1web.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/sp?_encoding=UTF8&amp;asin=&amp;isAmazonFulfilled=&amp;isCBA=&amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;orderID=&amp;seller=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;tab=products&amp;vasStoreID=#" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Fri, 20 Oct 2017 00:45:52 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: Naomi Cook <p>Montreal-based multi-media artist <a href="http://naomibcook.com/" target="_blank">Naomi Cook</a> says her work has grown out of an interest in &ldquo;engravings, sound, and visual representations of data.&rdquo; Her eclectic work represents a true integration of traditional techniques with modern thinking and concepts. <em><a href="http://naomibcook.com/midi-sketches/" target="_blank">Midi Sketches</a></em>, a series in which Cook digitally scans her drawings and converts them to sound, is but one clear example of this fusion.</p> <p>Her incorporation of multiple mediums into her projects is mirrored by the diversity of her subject matter. These range from interrogating the impact of architecture and surveillance on one another in her work, <em><a href="http://naomibcook.com/spaces/" target="_blank">Spaces</a></em>, to <em><a href="http://naomibcook.com/troika/" target="_blank">Tro&iuml;ka</a></em>, &ldquo;a project centered around the GPS coordinates of members of an online dating site.&rdquo; Cook&rsquo;s work employs and explores technology in unpredictable ways, giving us an unexpected perspective on its role in all of our lives.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171018125554-untitled1.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>BATS_2012-3-23_2015</em>, 2015, .gif</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: When did you first understand that you were an artistically creative person?</strong></p> <p><strong>Naomi Cook:</strong> I don&rsquo;t think it was a realization for me. When I was probably seven or younger my brother taught me how to draw a tree. I never stopped drawing. In my twenties I realized that making art is the only thing I can do, or am good at, so you could say I realized that I better make this work.</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first become aware of the internet as a tool for creative exploration and expression? What early experiences of the internet made the most impression on you?</strong></p> <p><strong>NC:</strong> I was introduced to the inner workings of the internet early on. In grade three it was my job to run the school server. It was me and one other guy and we got in trouble for hacking into the chat service. Our teacher was furious but let us keep our role, because it was too late in the year and no one knew how things worked.</p> <p>I think that gave me an insight behind the power of a such a large archive and that information can be accessible even when it seems obscured under the many layers that &ldquo;protect&rdquo; data. I was also made aware of the glaring problems around privacy at a ridiculously young age.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171018125231-13-NC_Dap.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Dap</em>, 2016, .gif</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first use the internet to display your own creativity?</strong></p> <p><strong>NC:</strong> Oh I dunno, when was my first website? Early 2000s&hellip; I sound like an early 2000 landing page&hellip; on the internet since 1995&hellip;</p> <p><strong>CP: Can you define the influence that the internet and technology have on your work?</strong></p> <p><strong>NC:</strong> It is a huge source of my research and has been an important tool. Perhaps this has become a norm for all artists. Aren&rsquo;t all artists&mdash;apologies for the use of this problematic term&mdash;&ldquo;post internet&rdquo; at this point? I mean how can we be post- anything? Anyway, the internet is still there and most people are on it more than six hours a day. I think because it has become such a norm, it&rsquo;s inevitably part of our aesthetic. What I have been trying to do in all my work is look at the origins of technology, old and new, and consider how we can learn to navigate the ones we are using now.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171018130801-18.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Space IX Diptych</em>, 2014, Ink on paper, 45.5 x 61 cm</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Your work often combines the traditional medium of drawing with modern technology</strong> <strong>either in subject or execution&mdash;what interests you about this combination?</strong></p> <p><strong>NC:</strong> I think that drawing has a wonderful authority over the unreal, an ability to dictate anything on a two dimensional surface. There is a crossover here: technology is believed, maybe incorrectly, as a way to make anything possible. What I find fun is doing things machines can by hand. Even when using technology&mdash;programs I build, speakers I make, hand-drawn videos, and so on&mdash;it is the hand embodying the technological process.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="427" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/87888328" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="640"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em><a href="https://vimeo.com/87888328" target="_blank">Pianola</a></em>, 2013</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: You describe yourself as a multi-media artist? Why did you first decide to use contrasting mediums in your work? </strong></p> <p><strong>NC:</strong> I always try to find the right tool for the right job and that usually leads to a large learning curve. I enjoy learning.</p> <p><strong>CP: You studied Art and Philosophy at university. What continued influence has that combination had on your art?</strong></p> <p><strong>NC:</strong> I have always tried to combine these disciplines in my practice: object making as thinking. I almost always start with a question. I suppose I am just trying to figure out how things work (or don&rsquo;t!) and maybe that is the philosophical part. How does the world work anyways?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171018124009-3-NC_love_hertz.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Love Hertz</em>, 2015, .gif</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Why did you start experimenting with GIFs as an extension of your drawing?</strong></p> <p><strong>NC:</strong> I have always done animations. I am interested in time, or time in unusual formats&mdash;the non-linear. GIFs are simply a delivery method for the above.</p> <p>CP: <strong>Do you think the internet will ultimately prove to be positive for humanity?</strong></p> <p><strong style="text-align: center;">NC:</strong><span style="text-align: center;"> The internet is a tool. It depends on what we use it for. That said, there are some worrisome concentrations of power&hellip;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171018130605-16.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Dollar bill I</em>, 2015, Ink on paper, 29.25 x 42 cm</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171018132013-5-NC_BATS_timelaps_2015.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><em>BATS_2012-03-23 time lapse</em>&nbsp;<em>1</em>, 2015, Ink on paper, 28 x 21.5 cm</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: You often explore/translate the concept of data in your work.&nbsp;What draws you to it</strong> <strong>as a subject?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>NC:</strong> I am interested in observing the alienation that stems from the digitization of our interactions in the world, and I&rsquo;ve discovered that many people around me feel overwhelmed by it. Thus my interest in systems of quantifying and defining the world through numbers. The internet provides good examples of this.</p> <p>Data, just like language, can be opaque. What I have learned, especially from the work I did with High Frequency Trading and the Stock Market, is you can read data much like a story.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171018124608-14.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">Form XXVI</em><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">, 2014, Ink on paper, 66 x 86.5 cm</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: You&rsquo;ve often explored distorted and transforming human forms in your drawings, as in your <em><a href="http://naomibcook.com/forms/" target="_blank">Forms</a></em> project.</strong> <strong>How would you describe that work?</strong></p> <p><strong>NC:</strong> The <em>Forms</em> series speaks to the more&nbsp;meditative side of my practice. It is more for myself but is still very associated to the binary. There are always only two colors.&nbsp;One reading I appreciated&nbsp;is: they look like bodies being eat up by data.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="360" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/182224568" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="640"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>If there is Smoke there is Fire </em>(detail), 2016, HD video, 9:05 min</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Your piece&nbsp;</strong><strong><em>Tro</em></strong><strong><em>&iuml;</em></strong><strong><em>ka</em></strong>&nbsp;<strong>is based on the Ashley Madison hack. What inspired you to want to make&nbsp;work about that?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>NC:</strong> In the <em>Tro&iuml;ka</em> project I was questioning how the feminist perspective is influenced by hook-up culture and open relationships&mdash;if this has created more empowerment for women or not. We are trying to navigate relationships, often online, post sexual revolution. In rejecting traditional means of relationships old systems have been thrown out and we are navigating the new ones. Social media is an interesting platform for the performative nature of these questions.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171018124810-9_NC_Trokia_installation_2017.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Tro&iuml;ka</em>, 2017, Fabric, 192 x 136 cm</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Why do you think digital art has become a natural home for feminist thinking?</strong></p> <p><strong>NC:</strong> It is a natural home for <em>all</em> thinking. That said, it may have leveled at least a part of the playing field which has been in the ivory tower of male-dominated galleries, museums, etc. Women traditionally were the secretaries of technology. Now that technology is an accessible and useful means for expression, the power dynamic has shifted. Also, not only men can do math.</p> <p><strong>CP: Would you describe your work as political?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>NC:</strong> &hellip; Of course!</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171018124858-untitled2.gif" /></p> <p><strong>CP: What else do you have coming up?</strong></p> <p><strong>NC:</strong> I am in residency until the end of January. Then I will be working on building a mapping program for a session I will be doing with Studio XX in Montreal. I will be working with families to create a video to be exhibited using mapping as art.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&#39;re interested in what&#39;s happening with art on the web. We invited online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, to write a bi-monthly column for us. Every other Wednesday he selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;<em style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">BATS_2012-3-23_2015</em><span style="text-align: center;">,&nbsp;</span>2015, .gif)</span></p> Thu, 19 Oct 2017 00:53:57 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Refugee Artists Take Control of Their Representation in a New Exhibition <p>&ldquo;A piece of hell,&rdquo; is how&nbsp;one refugee, stranded in legal limbo on the isolated Pacific island of Nauru, describes the situation. It&rsquo;s a mild epithet for the ordeal that asylum seekers endure to achieve their right to not be persecuted or annihilated. Not since the Second World War has there been such a massive number of displaced people&mdash;the number is currently larger than the entire population of the United Kingdom. But we seldom hear or see these people individually, and even less often without mediation or intervention from a third party.</p> <p><a href="http://art.uts.edu.au/index.php/exhibitions/the-invisible/" target="_blank"><em>The Invisible</em></a>, currently at UTS Art Gallery in Sydney, uniquely features the work of five artists who are themselves refugees: Khadim Ali, Elyas Alavi, Avan Anwar, Rushdi Anwar, and Abdul Karim Hekmat. Together their work offers a direct, multidimensional narrative of the dire circumstances pushing people to leave everything behind and migrate to another country.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171016151355-03._Avan_Anwar__Fragile-1__Plaster___Installation_Dimensions_Variable__2015.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Avan Anwar, <em>Fragile-1</em>, 2015, Plaster,&nbsp; Installation Dimensions variable</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The title of the show makes reference to an 18th-century Persian poem by Hatef Esfehani, who wrote &ldquo;Whatever your ear has not heard, hear that / What your eyes have not seen, see that.&rdquo; Indeed, the work of the five artists, including the curator, comes unfiltered, and their scars and hopes are made to be seen and heard.&nbsp;<span background-color:="" font-size:="" new="" style="font-family: Georgia, Times, " times="">They are survivors of ongoing hatred and intolerance.</span></p> <p>Their plight also gives light to an inexcusable injustice, specific to Australia. Outsourcing its international obligations, Australia currently imprisons thousands of asylum seekers in camps on Pacific islands. Life in these camps is appalling beyond belief, pushing some asylum seekers to suicide. But even worst is the exploitation of legal loopholes by which the Australian government to justify the detention camps: it sets a dangerous precedent that undermines the tenets of international law concerning refugees and asylum seekers, to say nothing of common decency and benevolence.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171016151334-06._Abdul_Karim_Hekmat__Nauru_Refugee_Voices__video_with_sound__2017.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Abdul Karim Hekmat, <em>Nauru Refugee Voices,</em>&nbsp;2017, Video with sound</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This is evident in <em>Nauru Refugee Voices</em> (2017), by Abdul Karim Hekmat, an artist who first came to Australia by boat from Afghanistan in 2001 and lived in an immigration detention facility for five months. The work comprises three documentary videos, based on the first-hand testimonies of refugees fleeing from human rights abuses in Bangladesh and Pakistan. <em>Refugee Voices</em> is a testimony of their deep despair, and how, through poetry and hope, refugees can withstand the callous violence and ostracism they face in the Nauru Processing Centre.</p> <p>The sufferings of &ldquo;boat people&rdquo;&mdash;those who attempt to arrive to Australia by sea&mdash;is represented in the outstanding work of miniaturist and painter, Khadim Ali, who trained in Lahore and Tehran. In <em>Untitled, </em>from<em> The Arrival </em>series (2016), executed with classical miniature painting techniques and materials, Ali represents several demons cramped on the deck of a ship, all wearing life vests. &nbsp;Some appear seasick, others talk and are friendly with each other, a few stare inquisitively towards the horizon, some are inward looking; all seem to be in a state of risk.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171016151255-01._Khadim_Art__Untitled__from_The_Arrival_series___gouache__ink_and_gold_leaf_on_wasili_paper__134_x_154__2016.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Khadim Ali, <em>Untitled</em> (from <em>The Arrival</em> series), 2016, Gouache, ink and gold leaf on wasili paper, 134 x 154</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In traditional Persian literature, a <em>dev</em>, or in Arabic, a <em>djinn</em>, from which the English word genie is derived, is not necessarily an evil being. Although they are often represented as malignant forces, djinns are also portrayed as playful magical creatures, wise and beautiful, with powers that summon more surprise than mischief. In any case, these supernatural creatures serve specific allegories, and as such, see their meanings change throughout time. In Iran, for example, in the years leading to the demise of the Qajar period in the early twentieth century, demons represented the oppression of ruling classes in the revolutionary press. It is ironic that in all their powerlessness, asylum seekers are portrayed as dreadful demons, a regrettably and common perception to be found not only in the media but also in the halls of parliament.</p> <p>Like Khadim Ali, fellow artist Elyas Alavi is also a member of the Australian Hazara diaspora. A Shiite Muslim religious minority, Hazara people live mainly in Afghanistan and Pakistan, where they are constantly targeted, expelled, and killed. In <em>Fading Faces</em> (2017), Alavi uses acrylic paint on glass to portray the faces of those affected by a bomb attack that he witnessed during a visit to Kabul in 2016, in which 90 Hazara protestors were killed. The paintings are rough, like a brutal memory; the contrast between a sudden burst of ruthless violence and the fragility of glass serve as reminder of the weakness and vulnerability that certain groups face day to day.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171016151223-04._Rushdi_Anwar__The_Notion_of_Place_and_Displacement__2017._Installation_view__UTS_Gallery__Sydney.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Rushdi Anwar, <em>The Notion of Place and Displacement</em>, 2017, Installation view, UTS Gallery, Sydney</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The same fragility is found in Rushdi Anwar&rsquo;s installation <em>The Notion of Place and Displacement</em> (2017), which consists of a UNHCR tent made of fabric patches, in which Iraqi children inscribed their names, an activity the artist undertook while visiting Kurdistan refugee camps in Iraq. In this area, torn by the menace of the Islamic State, up to a million and a half people have been internally displaced. Their daily life, although mitigated by external aid and the eventual containment of ISIS forces, mirrors the tent itself: harrowed rags, unevenly stitched together, poorly attempt to mimic a lasting haven.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171016151151-05._View_of_The_invisible__UTS_Gallery__Sydney__2017.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Installation view of&nbsp;<em>The Invisible</em>, UTS Gallery, Sydney, 2017</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The work of the last, and only female artist, Avan Anwar, also addresses the fate of Iraqi Kurds. In <em>Displacement </em>(2017), Anwar dismantles Kurdish poetry to its minimum unit: letters in Arabic script, made of aluminum foil, which she wrinkles and scatters on the gallery floor. Only those who have been coerced by circumstances to adopt a new language&mdash;more as a survival strategy than a choice&mdash;can attest to the pain of displacing one&rsquo;s original tongue and, with it, gaining a different way of not only understanding others but also of being understood.</p> <p>In a time characterized by forceful migrations, racist misconceptions, and low tolerance towards refugees and foreigners from societies and governments across the world, <em>The Invisible </em>certainly brings to the table poignant questions. Wherever people feel safe they will be indifferent, Susan Sontag wrote. And these artworks work to haunt those who consider themselves out of harm&rsquo;s way, pushing them to question why needless suffering is enforced by governments and tolerated by societies. Despite challenging subject matter, it is refreshing and crucial that the audience of <em>The Invisible</em> can attempt to detangle such contradictions with the assistance and firsthand experience of those who most deserve to be heard.&nbsp;</p> <p><em><a href="http://art.uts.edu.au/index.php/exhibitions/the-invisible/" target="_blank">The Invisible</a> at UTS Gallery, Sydney, continues through November 24, 2017.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>&mdash;</em>Claudia Arozqueta and Rodrigo Azaola</p> <p><em>Claudia Arozqueta is a writer and curator currently based in Sydney. Her writing has been published in various international magazines, books, and journals.</em></p> <p><em>Rodrigo Azaola is an artist and writer specializing Middle Eastern studies and languages. He served as Head of the Political Section of the Mexican Embassy in Tehran.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">Khadim Ali,&nbsp;</span><em style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">Untitled</em><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">&nbsp;(Detail, from&nbsp;</span><em style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">The Arrival</em><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">&nbsp;series), 2016, Gouache, ink and gold leaf on wasili paper, 134 x 154)</span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> Tue, 17 Oct 2017 15:05:58 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list