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Rachel Uffner Gallery

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A World's Fair tribute in a New York neighborhood mash up

by Lee Ann Norman
New York City has always been a draw for an eclectic mix of artists working across the visual and performing arts. Its underground pubs and speakeasies, expansive loft spaces, museums, sidewalks, and streets have served as creative inspiration for all kinds of movements including jazz, expressionism, Fluxus, hip-hop, and punk. Despite all of that creative energy and expression, the city has also been a beautiful breeding ground for social and cultural dissonance. While New York may not be known for the kind of territorial neighborhood culture akin to a highly segregated “city of neighbo... [more]
Posted by Lee Ann Norman on 8/24/14
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Getting the Waterlog Treatment

by Charlie Schultz
Sarah Greenberger Rafferty might be described as a meta-photographer or even a New Mannerist. She photographs altered photographs, many of which are distorted representations of the human figure. Like the artists in the MOMA’s 2009 New Photography exhibition, Rafferty’s work is the product of a process structured around image appropriation and manipulation. What sets her apart, however, is a cultivated aesthetic characterized by a loose, painterly style full of color that spreads and seeps and bleeds, threatening now and again to obliterate the image. Rafferty calls this technique “waterlogging,”... [more]
Posted by Charlie Schultz on 10/10/11
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Gone Body Gone

by Will Rawls
Rachel Uffner Gallery presents the sculptures of Jennifer Cohen and the photography and collage of Vlatka Horvat.  Taken together the two artists destabilize the wholeness of the human figure and render it into hybridic and subdivided forms.  These bodies are missing parts or are missing completely from an image but manage nevertheless to propose mobility for what they leave behind. A former dancer, Cohen has devised sculptures in cement, bronze and found objects, like jazz shoes, that abstract the body and bring its geometry and gestural precision into focus.  Grey Line in Seven Parts describes a three-... [more]
Posted by Will Rawls on 12/14/08