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Paul Kasmin Gallery - 10th Ave

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Chronicles of a Fleeting Culture

by Lara Atallah
Famed for her portrayal of the upper class in New York, New England, and Long Island, Tina Barney’s work is an ethnographic study of the bourgeoisie. The eleven works on view in this retrospective are snapshots from a play where if one stares long enough, one might hear the muffled dialogue of Barney’s subjects travel through time. With shots capturing characters in mid-motion, such as  (1985), the viewer is pulled into the scene right before a significant event is about to occur. At first... [more]
Posted by Lara Atallah on 5/18/15
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Stella in Bonds

by Noah Dillon
At Paul Kasmin’s “Geometric Variations,” Frank Stella’s oil and alkyd paintings are front and center. The paintings are materially and conceptually flat, smooth, dry, possessing aggression without force. They tantalize with funny tricks that don’t do much: spirals break free at the corners, but such escape is nothing with the hulking didactic chain left fettered to its ankle. The especially vapid titles do not help. A few small diptychs fare better though. Malcolm’s Bouquet (1965) is exciting... [more]
Posted by Noah Dillon on 10/23/11
Paris_with_eiffel_tower

A Look at Tseng Kwong Chi

by Charlie Schultz
In 1972 Nixon did something no other president had done. He shook Mao's hand and promised greater openness with China. But he backed up his promises with the most typical politician filler: emptiness. Responding to the unfulfilled words of the politician, Tseng Kwong Chi donned a cheap Mao suit and reflective shades, and set out across the world as the ‘Ambiguous Ambassador.' This series of work depicts Tseng as a pseudo Chinese official posing before many of the world's most famous tourist... [more]
Posted by Charlie Schultz on 4/17/08
Awd

A Look at Andy Warhol

by Keith Miller
To walk in off the street and see the drawings in this show one could not be faulted for thinking that they were either the energetic output of a recent MFA grad posing as a faux primitive with skill or a collection of 50’s memorabilia that is being resurfaced in either a genuine or commercial ‘rediscovery’. The numerous drawings here, all from 1949 -1958, show a looseness and a grace which might surprise anyone who either loves or hates Warhol for his surprisingly powerful soup can routine... [more]
Posted by Keith Miller on 3/2/08
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