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Cheim & Read

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20160815133721-cbr

Flipping the Gaze: How Do Women Artists Look at Men?

by Olivia B. Murphy
In 2009, Cheim & Read hung the provocative group show The Female Gaze: Women Look at Women, which showcased women artists taking control of their own images. In an encore presentation this summer, women artists turn their gaze this time toward men, reversing one of art’s most long-standing power structures. The Female Gaze Part II: Women Look at Men brings together work from 32 artists, all utilizing the subject of men, or the male body, as a way to confront, or even turn the tables on the Male Gaze, which has historically objectified and excluded women from art. The three rooms of the ga... [more]
Posted by Olivia B. Murphy on 8/15
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Peel Slowly and See

by Bradley Rubenstein
There was a time in modern music when the role of the artist changed from being the custodian of cultural knowledge to something more of an autobiographer. We might choose that moment in the late sixties when Lou Reed abandoned the writing of pop ditties about boys and girls, to focus on his own, more personal interests, like boys and girls and heroin. In other art forms this sea change was happening—in comedy, where once jokes were shared, un-authored, between performers in Vegas, the Catskills, and New York City clubs, Lenny Bruce made comedy suddenly personal—talking about race, p... [more]
Posted by Bradley Rubenstein on 4/29/15
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Peel Slowly and See: Bill Jensen's Ego-less Abstraction

by Bradley Rubenstein
There was a time in modern music when the role of the artist changed from being the custodian of cultural knowledge to something more of an autobiographer. We might choose that moment in the late sixties when Lou Reed abandoned the writing of pop ditties about boys and girls to focus on his own, more personal interests, like boys and girls and heroin. In other art forms this sea change was happening; in comedy, where once jokes were shared, un-authored, between performers in Vegas, the Catskills, and New York City clubs, Lenny Bruce made comedy suddenly personal—talking about race, polit... [more]
Posted by Bradley Rubenstein on 4/29/15
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Last But Not Least

by Taylor Ruby
Joan Mitchell's abstractions erupt like floral fireworks against a misty, overcast sky.  Splotches of color, aggressive brush strokes, and wet drips of paint soar, zigzag, and transform into blurry interpretations of light, atmosphere, and pastoral countryside.  Having come into her own as a member of the New York School's band of Abstract Expressionists, an early influence by Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline, and Jackson Pollock can be detected in the gestural application of paint and the grandness of her canvas' scale.  However, it was her time in France during the second half of her life tha... [more]
Posted by Taylor Ruby on 11/27/11
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Diametrically Unopposed

by Taylor Ruby
Spanish artist Juan Uslé's dynamic abstract canvases in the current show at Cheim & Read are about the controlled study of color and texture within the practice of painting.  With works radiating pools of cobalt blue, fields of kelly green, and hints of burnt sienna, this exhibition echoes the vibrant, steady pulse native to Uslé's homeland, while also calling to mind the geometric paintings of Joan Miró and the graphic, minimalist patterns of Frank Stella. The visual wholeness of these mostly jewel-toned abstractions is entirely dependent upon Uslé's fragmented feeling of dislodgement, a sensa... [more]
Posted by Taylor Ruby on 4/17/11
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Still Echoes

by Frances Guerin
The blurb in the New Yorker calls Louise Bourgeois’ latest show at Cheim and Read a coda to the exhibition conceived by the Tate Modern, which traveled to Europe and the Guggenheim, New York. For me, the series of haunting sculptures and gouaches were a continuation of my experience of the larger retrospective. However, Bourgeois’ work has a tendency to emphasize isolation, usually of the human condition, but it is an isolation echoed in sculptures and two dimensional works themselves. Even for the uninitiated, the works in Echo are moving and intriguing, and need no prior knowledge of Bourgeo... [more]
Posted by Frances Guerin on 10/12/08
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re:FORM event a success!

NEW YORK-The Drug Policy Alliance (DPA) raised more than $100,000 during re:FORM, an art auction and cocktail party benefit at Cheim & Read gallery in New York last week.   "Many, many thanks go out to our honorees, everyone who attended, and especially our event co-chair, George Soros,  We want to express our gratitude to those who placed bids and bought art, and, of course, special thanks to the artists who donated their work," said Ethan Nadelmann, executive director of the Drug Policy Alliance. "DPA is honored to have such friends-the creators of such powerful visions- who share our understa... [more]
Posted by Tony Papa on 9/8/08
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I Will Not Grow Up, I Will Not Grow Up...

by John Daquino
I Won't Grow Up's curatorial juxtaposition of older or dead, well-established artists, such as Louise Bourgeois and Andy Warhol, with the likes of a much younger generation (Ryan McGinley, Scott Reeder, etc.) makes this group show one that could easily have taken place inside a museum. But what's great about exhibits like this is that you can get much more up-close and personal with the work on display, without the defensive glare of museum guards or the droves of tourists getting in your way.Inspired by a Louise Bourgeois quote regarding the similarities between children and artists, the wor... [more]
Posted by John Daquino on 8/17/08