Bigindicator

Austrian Cultural Forum New York

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Surveil Says

by Yaelle Amir
The Austrian Cultural Forum has been consistently staging politically oriented exhibitions for a few years now, surrounding pertinent historical events and current conundrums.  NineteenEightyFour follows suit with a collection of works that consider surveillance methods and structures of control. This topic is treated in a very liberal and often puzzling way, though the quality of most of the works is generally high. Referring to George Orwell’s famous book 1984, the exhibition captures several associations to the issue of surveillance in contemporary society—the manner in which... [more]
Posted by Yaelle Amir on 8/22/10
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Critical Troublemakers

by Alison Levy
The Austrian Cultural Forum is a beautiful skinny sliver of a contemporary art building in midtown Manhattan. Its fluid floors include an exhibition space, a performance venue (mostly free programs), a massive library on Austrian art and culture, offices, and a penthouse for the Director.  Its current show is, but for one exception, not about artists gone wild, as the title may suggest, but in fact of artists providing institutional critique by creating ideal museum spaces that questioned social, educational, and historical constructs. The show highlights various projects in which the artist's actions cha... [more]
Posted by Alison Levy on 1/11/09
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Does the Personal and the Political Make For Good Art?

by John Daquino
Cutting Realities: Gender Strategies in Art is perhaps a year too late, and after having endured the plethora of feminist-inspired exhibitions (some very good and some very bad) in and around New York City during 2007, I question the importance of yet another. One could argue that what makes this exhibit different is its focus on central Europe, a traditionally neglected region in the canon of art history. The curator of the exhibit, in all the didactic materials, emphasizes the political and social climate that has shaped gender and sexuality in central Europe, going on to explain how one... [more]
Posted by John Daquino on 10/26/08