Bigindicator

Anton Kern Gallery

Venue  |  Exhibitions  |  Reviews
20120812172802-20120812095649-2131

Summer in the City

by D. Dominick Lombardi
August is the toughest month to find a gallery exhibition that will inspire most critics’ fingers to pound the keyboard. With so many galleries closed, and others emphasizing the coming season’s first exhibition in early September, there tends to be a general lack of interest in mounting a show, especially anything substantive. However, there are some good gallery exhibitions here and there, one being “It’s Always Summer on the Inside” at Anton Kern Gallery in Chelsea. Organized by Dan McCarthy, the exhibition features a vast array of two-dimensional works where the artists, as stated in the exhibi... [more]
Posted by D. Dominick Lombardi on 8/12/12
20110417204621-saul_fletcher_untitled__228_landscape_5__2011_

A Stillness through Time

by Taylor Ruby
The bareness of Saul Fletcher's photographs evokes the ghostly, tattered threads of recollection that entwine our personal memories.  Taken over the past 17 years, these small-scale images, which include C-prints, silver gelatin prints, and Polaroid film, document everything from family members and frozen winter landscapes, to gloomy interiors and crusty walls covered in years of layered paint. Though we do not know Fletcher's family and have most likely never visited the bleak, frost-bitten fields in his photographs, the images feel recognizable.  His subjects have, at once, been captured at their m... [more]
Posted by Taylor Ruby on 4/17/11
1_bock_untitled

Whence Derives a Dérive?

by Emily Nathan
  German Artist John Bock’s fifth solo show at Anton Kern Gallery is difficult to summarize.  Consisting of a two-channel video projection, a large submarine-like metal contraption and associated video, a series of hanging “soft sculptures” reminiscent of the jumbled, nostalgic pages of a scrap book, and a lecture-dance-performance which took place on opening night and will replay in the form of a slide-projection installation throughout the run of the exhibition, Bock’s occupation of the gallery feels much like a high-school theatre group’s prop closet.  Though such an impression might i... [more]
Posted by Emily Nathan on 3/14/10
Openbook

An "I" on You

by Emily Nathan
Anne Collier’s first full-scale solo show in New York is clear and concise, engaging with issues of identity and representation that seem somehow new and inspired in her deft hands. The exhibition consists of ten recent photographic works, which are displayed together in one open gallery, and a slide-projection installation, which occupies a second.  Collier gets right to the point: a C-Print entitled Developing Tray #2, which hangs at the entrance to the first room, brings immediately into focus the tension between object and voyeur, private and public, that she explores throughout the re... [more]
Posted by Emily Nathan on 1/24/10
Bonin_pots

Incompleto

by Trong Gia Nguyen
The title of Marepeʼs exhibition Discompleto comes from the wordplay of disco and complete.  The Brazilian artist references the local traditions, customs, activities, and ingredients from his native Salvador de Bahia, re-mixing them into new incarnations.  He refashions common materials and objects like thread, metal pots, vinyl records, and ice cube trays into "funkified" versions that hope to transcend the original. There are nice touches here and there, like Refri, a wall vitrine displaying specimens of eyes made from pinched, embellished plastic lids, and Fome de quê, a sculpture made fro... [more]
Posted by Trong Gia Nguyen on 4/5/09
Ak_5149_mcc_sanblascommune

Life Drawing

by Chris Bors
Dan McCarthy renders his figures in primary colors on a monochrome background, with no attempt to create a space for them to reside. These near life-size paintings and a smaller selection of works on paper in the back gallery make a strong impression with their expressionistic flair and reliance on gesture. The artist’s simple, but virtuoso technique of using luscious dripping and layered washes is employed effectively to create volume. McCarthy’s confidant approach to the human form and his unique rendering style suck you into his seemingly straightforward practice. - Chris Bors (*Image... [more]
Posted by Chris Bors on 11/11/07