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585,000 m2 – A Mixed Media Exhibition on the History of the Jewish Quarter of Budapest

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© Courtesy of WhiteBox
585,000 m2 – A Mixed Media Exhibition on the History of the Jewish Quarter of Budapest

329 Broome Street
New York, New York 10002
April 7th, 2016 - April 21st, 2016
Opening: April 7th, 2016 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://whiteboxny.org/
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
east village/lower east side
EMAIL:  
info@whiteboxny.org
PHONE:  
2127142347
OPEN HOURS:  
Tue-Sat 11-6
TAGS:  
mixed-media

DESCRIPTION

BALASSI INSTITUTE – HUNGARIAN CULTURAL CENTER AND WHITEBOX PRESENT

585,000 m2
Mixed Media Exhibition on the History of the Jewish Quarter of Budapest

585,000 m2 examines the symbolic spaces and the inscriptions of history —from the pre-World War 2 period to the present—found in the Jewish Quarter in the 7th district of Budapest, through visual art statements. The title is a reference to the surface area of the Quarter – a dense urban neighborhood, as overflowing with signifiers as the number in the title suggests.

The curators invited nine young Hungarian artists to reflect on buildings and discover the stories behind them, in their own artistic tone, using mainly visual media to mediate between past and present, history and art, and artist and society. The mixed media and conceptual installations operate as visual manifestos to alert the audience to both the history-defying existence of the Quarter itself, where Jews and non-Jews now once more converge, and the revival of cultural, religious, and social life, rooted in the history of cohabitation before and after the Shoah.

Zsuzsi Flóhr | Zsófia Szemző | Márton Szirmai | Dániel Halász | István Illés
Levente Csordás in collaboration with Miklós Mendrei and Benjamin Kalászi, Balázs Varjú Tóth, Mátyás Csiszár, Milán Kopasz
along with Csaba Kalotás (music) and Éva Szombat (photography)

Curated by:
Andrea Ausztrics, Historian and Media Artist
Zita Mara Vadász, Curator, Balassi Institute – Hungarian Cultural Center, New York