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Summer Show

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20140712081357-unnamed__2_
(He turns on him suddenly, reaches out a hand), 2014 © Courtesy of the Artist and Angles Gallery
Summer Show

2754 S. La Cienega Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA 90034
July 12th, 2014 - August 30th, 2014
Opening: July 12th, 2014 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.anglesgallery.com/
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
other
EMAIL:  
info@anglesgallery.com
PHONE:  
310.396.5019
OPEN HOURS:  
Closed since January 31st 2015
TAGS:  
painting, photography

DESCRIPTION

Judy Fiskin, prominently featured in the 2014 Hammer Biennial exhibition, "Made in L.A.," will be represented by her exquisite photographs. Diminutive, graphic and pure, her serialized works ("Desert," "Dingbat," "Portraits of Furniture," "Military Architecture" among them) are the essence of a long-lost art. Simmering under the radar for many years, Fiskin's profound influence on the medium has been acknowledged by museums around the world. Her photographs and films are held in the collections of the National Gallery of Art, Washington; Stedelijk Museum; LACMA; MoCA Los Angeles; SF MoMA; J Paul Getty Museum; and Bibliothéque Nationale, Paris, among others. A catalogue raisonné was produced by Getty Publications in 2011.

Ori Gersht will be represented by a single image from his 2005 series Liquidation. Although geometrically larger in scale than works by Judy Fiskin, Gersht's Liquidationseries illuminates his ability to draw ethereal images from seemingly benign landscapes without using digital technology. His most potent tool is the power of observation, letting the camera capture what the eye might not see in a casual glance. The depth of time and space presented in this work take the viewer into a deep well of history. Gersht has captured the beauty of the landscape while drawing out the brutality of historical events long since past and now invisible to the naked eye.

Soo Kim continues her interest in the materiality of photography with her new seriesBacklight, which evolved out of her previous body of work, Invisible Cities. Each print starts with a crease made by folding a straight line informed by a line found in the photograph: the side of a building, a power line, a lamp post. The print is flattened, and additional folds are made in this fashion until the entire print is marked with creased fold lines throughout. The geometric spaces made by the fold lines are then cut out of the print, alternating cut spaces and spaces left intact. The neon colored back of the photograph bounces back into the empty spaces cut in the photograph. Though the back of the photograph is unseen as a surface, it can be seen through the reverberation of the color reflecting off the wall, and filling in the voids of the negative spaces in the composition.

Matt Lifson's new work aims to harness the suggestiveness of painting. A representational painting on canvas is veiled with a field of gestural marks and color on transparent synthetic silk fabric. Each painting is essentially two paintings in one: the silk painting provides limited access to the photo-based painting beneath. The effect is a disjointed harmony that breaks up the image into multiple pictorial fragments, suggesting apparitions and reflections of unknown origins, placing the "real" into an ethereal pictorial plane while complicating storytelling through the production of alternate narratives of a single image.  

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