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Numbers in the Dark

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© Courtesy of The Southern Alberta Art Gallery
Numbers in the Dark

601 Third Avenue South
T1J 0H4 Lethbridge
Alberta
CA
December 7th, 2013 - February 2nd, 2014
Opening: December 7th, 2013 8:00 PM - 10:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.saag.ca/
COUNTRY:  
Canada
EMAIL:  
info@saag.ca
PHONE:  
403 327 8770
OPEN HOURS:  
Tue-Wed, Fri-Sat 10-5; Thu 10-7; Sun 1-5

DESCRIPTION

Italo Calvino's short story "Numbers in the Dark" is a captivating tale in which a young boy happens upon an old accountant with a dark secret - the data, the information, upon which entire countries have based their foundations since ancient times is flawed.  A single numerical error now echoes throughout history, and no matter how hard we try, we can never set the sums right.

As we forge ahead in our Information Age, the extent to which we put our faith in inculpable machines and infinite data grows exponentially, but as Calvino pointed out, errors exist, truth is unreliable and the meaning we construct from it is unstable.

This exhibition looks to those processes in whic defunct, arbitrary, obsolete, erroneous, corrupt or marginalized data is being appropriated and re-contextualized in contemporary art offering new meaning and perspectives on the world today.  International in its scope, Numbers in the Dark brings together a broad range of artists who glean information through unconventional means and in doing so, aim to disrupt the implicit trust with which we subsume data.

Connecting knowledge with crisis, Jorge Mendez Blake (Guadalajara) explores the relationship between these two concepts through the idea of imagined libraries composed of voices  that battle against each other, creating a mise en abime: full of interpretationsm annotations and personal implications.  Rosario Zorraquin (Buenos Aires) explores painting through symbols and text, particularly in light of the ways in which we pass on information.  Premiering a new series of work commissioned for this exhibition, her abstract and lyrical paintings will examine how our codes of communication often become cryptic or opaque.  Stephen Kelly (Halifax) incorporates sound, electronics, mechanics, and other media in the creation of thematically diverse and complex systems of cultural exploration.  Often appropriating data that is being transmitted publicly in real time, Kelly adapts and translocates otherwise inaccessible environmental phenomena.

From glitches and anomalies to redactions and hacks, a host of other artists lead us to ask new questions out of old information, offering alternate perspectives of the world.  Above all, the artists approaching these anomalies in their practice urge for change, recognizing that faults demand revision and that revision is movement, dynamism, and transformation.  Numbers in the Dark encourages visitors to consider the seemingly infinite quantities of data and information, to question how technology is shaping our map of knowledge and to shine a light on those social, political and economic systems so deeply enmeshed within these fields such that we are no longer groping in the dark.

Italo Calvino's short story "Numbers in the Dark" is a captivating tale in which a young boy happens upon an old accountant with a dark secret - the data, the information, upon which entire countries have based their foundations since ancient times is flawed.  A single numerical error now echoes throughout history, and no matter how hard we try, we can never set the sums right.

As we forge ahead in our Information Age, the extent to which we put our faith in inculpable machines and infinite data grows exponentially, but as Calvino pointed out, errors exist, truth is unreliable and the meaning we construct from it is unstable.

This exhibition looks to those processes in whic defunct, arbitrary, obsolete, erroneous, corrupt or marginalized data is being appropriated and re-contextualized in contemporary art offering new meaning and perspectives on the world today.  International in its scope, Numbers in the Dark brings together a broad range of artists who glean information through unconventional means and in doing so, aim to disrupt the implicit trust with which we subsume data.

Connecting knowledge with crisis, Jorge Mendez Blake (Guadalajara) explores the relationship between these two concepts through the idea of imagined libraries composed of voices  that battle against each other, creating a mise en abime: full of interpretationsm annotations and personal implications.  Rosario Zorraquin (Buenos Aires) explores painting through symbols and text, particularly in light of the ways in which we pass on information.  Premiering a new series of work commissioned for this exhibition, her abstract and lyrical paintings will examine how our codes of communication often become cryptic or opaque.  Stephen Kelly (Halifax) incorporates sound, electronics, mechanics, and other media in the creation of thematically diverse and complex systems of cultural exploration.  Often appropriating data that is being transmitted publicly in real time, Kelly adapts and translocates otherwise inaccessible environmental phenomena.

From glitches and anomalies to redactions and hacks, a host of other artists lead us to ask new questions out of old information, offering alternate perspectives of the world.  Above all, the artists approaching these anomalies in their practice urge for change, recognizing that faults demand revision and that revision is movement, dynamism, and transformation.  Numbers in the Dark encourages visitors to consider the seemingly infinite quantities of data and information, to question how technology is shaping our map of knowledge and to shine a light on those social, political and economic systems so deeply enmeshed within these fields such that we are no longer groping in the dark.

- See more at: http://www.saag.ca/art/exhibitions/0676-numbers-in-the-dark#sthash.L8moqLOC.dpuf
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