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the other side of Roy Lichtenstein

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Roy Lichtenstein's Stretcher with Crossbars © A&D Gallery
the other side of Roy Lichtenstein

51 Chiltern Street
Marylebone
London W1U6LY
United Kingdom
February 13th, 2013 - April 13th, 2013

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.aanddgallery.com
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
mayfair
EMAIL:  
info@aanddgallery.com
PHONE:  
02074860532
OPEN HOURS:  
10.30-19.00 Monday thru Saturday
TAGS:  
Ivan Karp. Leo Castelli, Tate Modern, Roy Lichtenstein, pop
COST:  
Free

DESCRIPTION

The exhibition features prints, artist's posters, and ephemera spanning five decades of Roy Lichtenstein’s career.

Highlights include: both pre-pop prints from 'Polemic' issued in 1957 and 1959, 

a selection of the posters created for the artist's shows at Leo Castelli's gallery, 

and the rare champagne flutes created for Tattinger in the 80's. The exhibition also features a selection of source materials for Lichtenstein's earliest Pop Art Paintings.

The A&D Gallery's last Lichtenstein exhibition was in 2008, and celebrated the publication by Prestel of the catalogue raison: Lichtenstein Posters. Since that time the gallery has been researching and acquiring works from the unique and very intimate world of Lichtenstein's 'alternative' output. Some are relatively well known such as the Paper Plate (1969) for Bert Stern's On First store and Paper Hat (1968) for Bill Copley's S.M.S. project. Others are more personal such as Lichtenstein's cover and sticker design for Dorothy Herzka's (later Dorothy Lichtenstein) book  POP ART ONE, and his lithograph for the Frank O'Hara commemorative publication In Memory of my Feelings. 

Lichtenstein, also created book covers. The first for Doobie Doo , the extraordinary novel by Ivan Karp, who was perhaps the first to exhibit and support Lichtenstein's work and two for his close friend Frederic Tuten including TinTin in the New World.  

The exhibition provides a rare opportunity to view important but lesser known works, which offer insight into the working practices of an artist described by Michael Kinsman as "…a saboteur, offering 1990's irony in the 1960's. And if in later years he was sometimes taken for granted, it was partly because his ideas had so infiltrated art that they were no longer only his".

The exhibition has been curated by A&D Gallery, with the assistance of The Roy Lichtenstein Foundation.

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