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Robert Rauschenberg: Untitled

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Soviet / American Arrays
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Robert Rauschenberg: Untitled

59 Wooster Street
New York, NY 10012
May 2nd, 2012 - June 28th, 2012

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Tuesday-Saturday, 10-6
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editions, contemporary, Art, prints

DESCRIPTION

Lithographs: 1962-65
Photogravures: 1988-91

Brooke Alexander is pleased to announce Robert Rauschenberg: Untitled, a survey of two distinct periods in the artist’s career.
 
The front gallery is dedicated to lithographs Rauschenberg created between 1962 and 1965. In works such as Rival (1963)Spot (1964) and Breakthrough I(1964) Rauschenberg began to radically apply new techniques, combining the use of salvaged photoengraving plates (discarded by the New York Times) with gestural additions.  
 
Rauschenberg introduced an innovative level of technology and new materials as he pushed the limits of what was thought possible in printmaking at the time.  His use of photo-silkscreens in the development of lithographic images was groundbreaking, and  Shades  (1964) is a culmination of these applications.
Moving from monochromatic to vibrant color, the completeSoviet / American Array (1988-91) series is on view in the main gallery.  Enormous in scale, this group of seven colorful photogravure prints represent Rauschenberg's return to primarily utilizing his own photographs as source material.
 
This series was the natural evolution of the artist's ROCI (Rauschenberg Overseas Culture Interchange) program, in which he documented his travels to third-world and Soviet-bloc countries.  Based on his own photographs of both New York and Moscow, the Soviet / American Array works portray a moment in time when the Cold War was ending.
 
With their colorfully collaged imagery and physical stature, these prints reflect the tall New York skyscrapers and Soviet monuments that they display.