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Jeff Jacobson, Photographs from “Melting Point” and “The Last Roll”

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20110720083135-shanghai_eye-72dpi
Shanghai, China, 2009 Archival Pigment on Papewr 17" by 22" © Jeff Jacobson
20110720083337-fromlastroll1-72dpi
from the "Last Roll, 2010 Archival Pigment on Paper 17" by 22" © Jeff Jacobson
Jeff Jacobson, Photographs from “Melting Point” and “The Last Roll”
Curated by: Karen Davis

114 Warren St.
Hudson, NY 12534
August 5th, 2011 - September 4th, 2011
Opening: August 13th, 2011 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://davisortongallery.com
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
other (outside main areas)
EMAIL:  
mark@davisortongallery.com
PHONE:  
518.697.0266
OPEN HOURS:  
Fri thru Sun - Noon to 6 PM and by appointment
TAGS:  
photography
COST:  
free

DESCRIPTION

Jeff Jacobson, photographer

Photographs from “Melting Point” and “The Last Roll”  

Melting Point:

Jeff Jacobson’s photographs are are disorienting, mysterious and beautiful. Composed in the camera with no additional manipulation, they pull us in to an unreal world that emerges from the every day. In his book, Melting Point (Nazraeli Press, 2006), Jacobson writes of over 20 years observations of what he describes as “a meltdown period, when old norms of politics, religion and even photography are changing.... In working from the paradox of a curious melding of beauty and fear these photographs emerged.”

Of Melting Point, Mark Feeney in the Boston Globe writes: “For all his theatricality, Jacobson is as much realist as expressionist. In strictly visual terms, these images are highly arresting. Seen also in technical terms, they become objects of wonder.”

The Last Roll:

In 2004, Jeff Jacobson was diagnosed with lymphoma.  After each chemo session, he and his wife, Marnie Andrews, would retreat to their home in the Catskills from their apartment in New York.  By 2005 they gave up their apartment and moved to the mountains, permanently.  As Jeff recovered, “my photographic universe expanded to the yard, the street, the river and into Woodstock.” In 2006, Kodak announced it had discontinued the film, Kodachrome, that Jeff had used throughout his career.  He purchased and stored as much film as he could. “Coming to the twin realizations that my time on the planet and my supply of film are both finite had a liberating effect on me.”  Since then, Jeff has concentrated on what he holds most dear: his family, home and the earth.  

The Last Roll is a project that is just about complete and will be the content of his next book. Many of the images from this series will be seen for the first time at the Davis Orton Gallery.