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Between Picture and Viewer: The Image in Contemporary Painting

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Alexander the Great, 2008-2009 Gesso, Acrylic and Vinyl Polymers, Epoxy, Aqua Size, Palladium Leaf on Canvas 80 X 80 Inches © Courtesy of the artist. Photograph by Tom Warren
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Snowman, 2008 Oil on Linen 72 X 57 1/2 X 1 1/2 Inches © Courtesy of the artist and David Zwirner
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Green Goddess I, 2009 Oil on Canvas 60 X 78 Inches © Courtesy of 303 Gallery, New York
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Untitled (Amalienburg #2) , 2010 Acrylic and Oil on Canvas 60 X 48 Inches © Courtesy of the artist
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Untitled, 3 Part Variation , 2010 Acrylic on Canvas and Wood Panels 68 1/2 X 125 Inches © Courtesy of the artist. Photograph by Kevin Noble.
Between Picture and Viewer: The Image in Contemporary Painting
Curated by: Tom Huhn, Isabel Taube

601 West 26th Street
15th floor
New York, NY 10001
November 23rd, 2010 - December 22nd, 2010
Opening: December 2nd, 2010 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.sva.edu/about-sva/galleries/c...
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
chelsea
EMAIL:  
gallery@sva.edu
PHONE:  
212.592.2145
OPEN HOURS:  
Monday - Saturday 10am - 6pm
SCHOOL ASSOCIATION:  
SVA (School of Visual Arts New York)
TAGS:  
mixed-media, conceptual, abstract, figurative, modern
COST:  
Free and open to the public

DESCRIPTION

School of Visual Arts (SVA) presents “Between Picture and Viewer: The Image in Contemporary Painting,” an exhibition of recent work by 19 established and emerging New York artists examining the relationship between contemporary painting and the notion of “the image” in today’s increasingly hyper-visual culture. Curated by Tom Huhn, chair of the BFA Visual and Critical Studies Department at SVA, and faculty member Isabel Taube, the exhibition is the result of a collaboration between Huhn, a philosopher, and Taube, an art historian. Rejecting the claim that the traditional image is now obsolete, Huhn and Taube point to a renewed interest and relevance in painting, one that makes a compelling argument for the materiality of art at the current moment, despite a preponderance of ephemeral and performance-based works in contemporary art practice.  Click here for more information.