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All Insignificant Things Must Disappear - The Social Sphere and the Post-Economic Landscape

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CASH ME, CASH ME, 2010 LED Sculpture, Wood, Acrylic, Mirror, Led-rotator Height 20", Length 15", Width 15" © Andrey Bartenev
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Resist Resisting God, 2009 Mirror Mosaic 59" X 39.5" © Slavs and Tatars
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Incased, 2008 Video on 40" Lcd Screen 24" X 42" © Ryan Roa
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Untitled, 2010 Oil on Canvas 70"x 59" © Jo Wilmot
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Observatory, 2009 Solid State Display Screen, Metal, Wood, Glass 11" X 8" X 9" © Joseph Farbrook
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Trinity (detail), 2010
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Trinity (detail), 2010
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Trinity (detail), 2010
All Insignificant Things Must Disappear - The Social Sphere and the Post-Economic Landscape

Broadway at Wall Street
New York, NY 10006
November 13th, 2010 - December 31st, 2010
Opening: November 12th, 2010 6:00 PM - 8:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://www.phenomenaproject.org
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
tribeca/downtown
EMAIL:  
darren@phenomenaproject.org
PHONE:  
646 206 4933
OPEN HOURS:  
Monday–Friday: 9am–12pm | 1-5pm Closed during midday services, 11:45am-12:45pm Saturday: 9:30am–3pm Sunday: 1–3pm
TAGS:  
mixed-media, digital, video-art, conceptual, pop, sculpture
COST:  
Free

DESCRIPTION

The global economy while rarely stable has undergone a recent seismic shift. All Insignificant Things Must Disappear is an attempt to uncover new ways of thinking about what has become an encompassing event. Thirteen dynamic international artists present their work within this context. Jo Wilmot’s lush, degrading environments melt off the canvas to expose the artifice beneath; Ryan Roa examines the functionality of consumer products, raising them to new levels of desirability, while Sandra Eula Lee’s innovative footwear intrigues by suggesting how we can keep track of any future steps we may take. Elsewhere in this exhibition Jo Yarrington asks us to put our hands together as she engages with the architecture of Trinity Museum through light and image, Slavs and Tatars take a reflective approach and Joseph Farbrook invites you inside his head.

This almost unprecedented crisis has opened up a range of social and cultural consequences that we are still struggling to comprehend. Artists, so often acting as barometers for society’s evolution have a role to play in navigating this latest challenge. By offering alternative ways of seeing the volatility of recent times, All Insignificant Things Must Disappear aims to foster discussion and consideration for the road ahead.

A catalog to accompany the exhibition is available. A related panel discussion, The Nature of Creativity, will take place in December at Trinity Church with participants from the fields of art, finance and theology; details to follow.

www.trinitywallstreet.org