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Lecture by Timon Screech; Collecting and Viewing in the Edo Period: Some Thoughts on the Ownership and Display of Paintings

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Flowers_1995_001_0
Flowers of the Four Seasons, late 18th–early 19th century, Japan (detail) Ink And Color On Gold Leaf 36.7 X 95.2 In. © Clark Center for Japanese Art and Culture, 1995.001
Lecture by Timon Screech; Collecting and Viewing in the Edo Period: Some Thoughts on the Ownership and Display of Paintings

2155 Center Street
94720 Berkeley
CA

August 26th, 2010 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
EVENT TYPE:  
Lecture
WEBSITE:  
http://www.bampfa.berkeley.edu
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
Other (outside areas listed)
EMAIL:  
bampfa@berkeley.edu
PHONE:  
510.642.0808
OPEN HOURS:  
Wednesday–Sunday, 11am–7pm
SCHOOL ASSOCIATION:  
University of California Berkeley
TAGS:  
Lecture, education, collecting, viewing, Art, japanese_in_australia painting, traditional
COST:  
Included with museum admission: $8 for adults (18-64), $5 for non-UC Berkeley students, disabled persons, young adults (13-17) and senior citizens (65 & over); Free for BAM/PFA members, children under 12, and UC Berkeley students, faculty and staff

DESCRIPTION

Lecture
Timon Screech
Collecting and Viewing in the Edo Period: Some Thoughts on the Ownership and Display of Paintings
Thursday, August 26, 7 p.m.
Museum Theater

Edo painting is greatly admired today and is studied in detail, but little attention has been given to how painting was considered during the period itself. This talk focuses on objects in the Clark Collection that let us consider how and why, at the time, people bought these works of art and where they displayed them, as well as how they might have been shocked to find the objects—in the hands of the “wrong” people—placed, out of admiration, in inappropriate places.

Timon Screech is the author of ten books on the visual culture of the Edo period, including works on the effect of the “scientific gaze” on popular imagery, erotic images, and the writings of eighteenth-century travelers to Japan. He has taught the history of Japanese art at the School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London, since 1991, and in 2006 he was elected to a chair in the history of art. After receiving his B.A. at Oxford, he completed his Ph.D. at Harvard in 1991. His current research project relates to the deification of the first Tokugawa shogun Ieyasu and the cult established for him at Nikko.

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