current exhibitions & events | ArtSlant https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/show en-us 40 - The Jewish Museum - April 11th, 2003 - December 31st, 2035 <p>At the heart of The Jewish Museum is its permanent exhibition, <i><a target="_blank" href="http://www.thejewishmuseum.org/exhibitions/CultureAndContinuity">Culture and Continuity: The Jewish Journey</a></i>, representing one of the world's great opportunities to explore Jewish culture and history through art. This vibrant two-floor exhibition features 800 works from the Museum's remarkably diverse collection of art, archaeology, ceremonial objects, video, photographs, interactive media and television excerpts. It examines the Jewish experience as it has evolved from antiquity to the present, over 4,000 years, and asks two vital questions: How has Judaism been able to thrive for thousands of years across the globe, often in difficult and even tragic circumstances? What constitutes the essence of Jewish identity? <br /><br />The exhibition traces the dynamic interaction among three catalysts that have shaped the Jewish experience: the constant questioning and reinterpretation of Jewish traditions, the interaction of Jews and Judaism with other cultures, and the impact of historical events that have transformed Jewish life. <i>Culture and Continuity: The Jewish Journey</i> proposes that Jews have been able to sustain their identity, despite wide dispersion and sometimes tragic circumstances, by evolving a culture that can adapt to life in many countries and under various conditions. Survival as a people has depended upon both the continuity of Jewish ideas and values and the flexibility to adapt to changing circumstances.<br /><br />We invite you to visit the Museum and see <i>Culture and Continuity: The Jewish Journey</i> in person. Visitors to the Museum can enjoy random access audio guide tours of the exhibition, including a "Director's Highlights" audio guide featuring Joan Rosenbaum, Helen Goldsmith Menschel Director of The Jewish Museum, and a special audio guide for children and families. Audio guides are free of charge with Museum admission and were made possible by Bloomberg.<br /><br /><i>Bring a <a target="_blank" href="http://www.thejewishmuseum.org/exhibitions/CultureAndContinuity">copy of the exhibit's web page on the Jewish Museum's Web site </a>to The Jewish Museum Admissions Desk with your e-mail address and you will receive one 50% admissions discount.</i></p> Wed, 08 Jul 2009 02:05:47 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list WM ROSE - ARTBREAK - August 17th, 2009 - August 17th, 2020 <p>THE GALLERY IS AT  WWW.ARTBREAK.COM    WHERE YOU MAY SEARCH FOR</p> <p> </p> <p>WILLIAM RO-SEY       THERE YOU MAY CONTACT  WCD207@GMAIL.COM TO OFFER THE FAMILY A PRICE IRREGARDLESS OF PRICE MARKED</p> Thu, 24 Dec 2009 14:12:51 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Peter Borgese - PETER BORGESE MODERN ART GALLERY - September 19th, 2013 - January 6th, 2034 <p>A new chapter of surrealism created by Borgese, painter of modern conceptualism,&nbsp;to captivate, stimulate, and motivate the senses of the viewer for a life time; is exhibited in this body of work at gallery&nbsp;Borgese. There are over 30 original fine art&nbsp;paintings and 20 drawings&nbsp;framed and hung for you to view, purchase, take home or have delivered.</p> Sun, 02 Mar 2014 09:46:25 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - Housatonic Museum of Art - August 15th, 2011 - October 20th, 2020 <p>The Housatonic Museum of Art is pleased to announce <em>Polaridad Complementaria: Recent Works from Cuba, </em>an exhibition that<em> </em>introduces North America to the new generation of influential artists from Cuba. <em> </em><em>Polaridad Complementaria </em>is on view in the Burt Chernow Galleries at the Housatonic Museum of Art from <strong>August 15</strong> through <strong>October 20, 2011<br /> </strong> <br /> Developed by the Centro de Arte Contemporaneo Wifredo Lam, Havana, <em>Polaridad Complementaria</em> offers audiences the opportunity to become acquainted with the island’s current and upcoming artistic talent. More than 40 works of painting, drawing, sculpture, photography, video and installation art provide a sense of the serious aesthetic and conceptual concerns that characterizes Cuban art today. The 24 artists presented here are mainly young artists who have attained international recognition. The majority of these artists have taken part in fairs and biennials abroad and all have exhibited in Europe, Latin America and were featured in various editions of the Havana Biennial. Several have exhibited in the United States, including René Peña, Abel Barroso, Aimeé García, Yoan Capote, Eduardo Ponjuán, Lázaro Saavedra, Sandra Ramos and Roberto Fabelo.<br />  <br /> Often compared to American photographer Robert Mapplethorpe, artist René Peña explores the relationship between individuals within society and the struggle for their own identity. Abel Barroso carves three-dimensional pieces using wood and various printing methods to create a conversation about technology and the third-world. From Zulueta, Cuba, Duvier del Dago takes things one step further, combining drawing with handmade 3D design examining the unattainable, whether it be the material or the ideal. From simplistic to intricately fabricated, these artists create a narrative of Cuba today.<br />  <br /> Diverse in both medium and themes, the artists featured in <em>Polaridad Complementaria</em> understand the power of their art to address a wide range of social issues. The exhibition highlights works that connect the local context with global concerns and universal human issues. After many years, <em>Polaridad Complementaria</em> opens a pathway for dialogue and cultural exchange between Cuba and the United States, two countries with historic ties and common cultural processes, despite troubled relations.<br /> <br /> <strong>Margarita Sánchez Prieto</strong> is curator, researcher and art critic at Centro de Arte Contemporaneo Wifredo Lam in Havana and recipient of the National Prize of Curatorship at the 2000 Havana Biennial. She has curated various exhibitions and lectured extensively on Cuban and Latin American art throughout South America, Europe and Canada. Her work has been published in various art magazines and she is the author of the anthology <em>An Outlook of Latin American Art in the Decade of 1980</em>.  <br /> <br /> Director of the Wifredo Lam Contemporary Art Centre and curator and art critic of the Havana Biennial, <strong>Jorge Fernandez Torres</strong> has curated over 15 major exhibitions in Cuba, Spain, Central, and South America. He was a member of the Commission for Cuban Cultural Development of UNESCO in 1997 and on the Advisory Council for the Arts of the National Library of Cuba in 2000 and 2001 as well as Vice Rector of the Higher Institute of Arts in Havana for the past ten years. He is the Author of several texts in catalogues of Cuban art and as professor of contemporary art at the Higher Institute of Arts (ISA), and has lectured all over the world. <br /> <br /> <em>Polaridad Complementaria: Recent Works from Cuba</em> was developed by the <strong>Centro de Arte Contemporáneo Wifredo Lam</strong>, Havana and is toured by International Arts &amp; Artists, Washington, DC. </p> Sun, 09 Oct 2011 18:50:07 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Molly Dilworth - The James Hotel - May 1st, 2013 - January 1st, 2023 <p>Painting for the garden at The James Hotel, 27 Grand Street, NYC. Opening May 1, 2013.<br /><br />Ghost acreage is extraterritorial land annexed for production. Historically, American land was used to produce cotton for space-constrained Europe; today variations of this practice can be found everywhere in industrial production from food to electronics.<br /><br />The designs for the Urban Garden pillar at The James Hotel were generated by sampling from visual and historical markers on 6th Avenue immediately adjacent to the pillar. Examples include the multicolored z-shaped crosswalk pavers, the Avenue of the Americas lamppost medallions and the statue of Juan Pablo Durate who helped found the Dominican Republic and establish its independence from Hati.<br /><br />During the colonial period, residents of Lower Manhattan and Carribean countries shared the experience of being subjects and revolutionaries. While mostly invisible today, evidence of these histories can be found just outside the Urban Garden.</p> Thu, 09 May 2013 13:03:07 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - Queens Museum of Art - November 9th, 2013 - November 9th, 2023 <p>The Queens Museum will always be inextricably linked to the 1939 and 1964 World&rsquo;s Fairs, and with a collection of more than 10,000 objects pertaining to the two expositions, the Museum is a key resource to both scholars and fans. In an effort to provide visitors with a greater understanding of the scope of the Museum&rsquo;s enormous holdings of 1939 and 1964 World&rsquo;s Fair artifacts and memorabilia, the newly installed World&rsquo;s Fair Visible Storage and Gallery on the second floor displays more than 900 three-dimensional pieces arranged by the date of each World&rsquo;s Fair, and within these categories, arranged by donor. The dense installation provides an opportunity to study a large number of related works of World&rsquo;s Fair objects up close, and to compare and contrast a wide range of items from 1939 and 1964. The Visible Storage provides unprecedented access to students, scholars, and the general public to explore the collection that was formerly hidden in the Museum&rsquo;s art vault, off-limits to the public. Many of these objects have never been displayed in the history of the Queens Museum.</p> <p>Visible Storage addresses the challenge of organizing a public exhibition space while fulfilling the traditional purpose of safely displaying and storing an important cross-section of the Museum&rsquo;s collections in a climate-controlled and easily accessible environment. Light sensitive objects, such as documents, photographs and textiles, remain stored in dedicated low-light facilities.</p> <p>These large glass cases now house more than 90% of the three-dimensional objects in the Museum&rsquo;s World&rsquo;s Fair collection. New acquisitions and private collections that, in most cases, have been donated to the Museum, will be added to the Visible Storage allowing visitors to gain new insight into the history and evolution of the World&rsquo;s Fairs through a visual understanding, and a palpable sense of place by exploring these artifacts and memorabilia. Furthermore, with all the objects donated by a particular collector displayed as a group, the collections within the collection become evident.</p> <p>As milestone anniversaries of both the 1939 and 1964 World&rsquo;s Fairs near, Visible Storage pays homage to momentous events in the history of Flushing Meadows Corona Park and the Queens Museum. These objects simultaneously evoke the past and a yearning for tomorrow. Linking thematically with the beloved Panorama of the City of New York and its slightly more modest relative, the Relief Map of the New York City Water Supply System, the Visible Storage completes the triumvirate at the heart of the NYC Building&rsquo;s rich history as a World&rsquo;s Fair pavilion. The World&rsquo;s Fair collection is ever-growing, those interested in donating artifacts can email worldsfair@queensmuseum.org or call 718.592.9700 x122.</p> <p>Also on view within the World&rsquo;s Fair Gallery is <em>ChronoLeap: The Great World&rsquo;s Fair Adventure</em>, a virtual experience and game that transports visitors back in time to the 1964 World&rsquo;s Fair. The World&rsquo;s Fair offered a glimpse of the future, with different pavilions featuring exhibitions showcasing the latest innovations in science and technology as an avenue for better lifestyles. <em>ChronoLeap</em> allows for a virtual experience of the Fair, complete with pavilion tours and a conversation with Fair President Robert Moses. <em>ChronoLeap</em> is organized by Dr. Lori C. Walters, a Research Assistant Professor with the Institute for Simulation and Training and Department of History at the University of Central Florida. Funded by both the National Endowment for the Humanities and the National Science Foundation, the project explores the use of 3D virtual environments as an educational tool to expand the understanding of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education.</p> Sun, 08 Dec 2013 13:54:47 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Anselm Kiefer - Mass MOCA - September 29th, 2013 - December 1st, 2028 <p>In a major collaboration with the Hall Art Foundation, the keystone of which is a large and long-term exhibition of sculpture and paintings by Anselm Kiefer, MASS MoCA opens a 10,000 square-foot building at MASS MoCA specially re-purposed by the Hall Art Foundation and devoted to the art of Anselm Kiefer.</p> <p>The exhibition includes <em>&Eacute;troits sont les Vaisseaux (Narrow are the Vessels)</em> (2002), an 82-foot long, undulating wave-like sculpture made of cast concrete, exposed rebar, and lead; <em>The Women of the Revolution (Les Femmes de la Revolution)</em> (1992), comprised of more than twenty lead beds with photographs and wall text; <em>Velimir Chlebnikov </em> (2004), a steel pavilion containing 30 paintings dealing with nautical warfare and inspired by the quixotic theories of the Russian mathematical experimentalist Velimir Chlebnikov; and a new, large-format commission created by the artist specifically for the installation at MASS MoCA.</p> <p>Anselm Kiefer, who first visited MASS MoCA in 1990 when it was still in the early planning stages, ranks among the best-known and most important of post-World War II German artists living and working today. Born in 1945 in southern Germany during the final days of the collapse of the Third Reich, Kiefer experienced divided postwar Germany firsthand. Across his body of work, Kiefer argues with history, addressing controversial and even taboo issues from recent history with bold directness and lyricism. Kiefer often turns to literature and history as prime source material for his work, as he did, for example, in the suite of paintings that comprise <em>Velimir Chlebnikov </em>(2004).</p> <p>The artist often builds his imagery on top of photographs, layering his massive canvases with dirt, lead, straw, and other materials that generate a &ldquo;ground&rdquo; that reads literally of the earth itself. Within these thick, impastoed surfaces Kiefer embeds textual or symbolic references to historic figures or places: these become encoded signals through which Kiefer invokes and processes history.</p> <p>A law student, Kiefer switched his studies to art in 1965 and held his first solo exhibit in 1969. During the early 1970s he studied with conceptual artist Joseph Beuys, whose interest in using an array of cultural myths, metaphors, and personal symbolic vocabulary as a means to engage and understand history inspired Kiefer. The artist has described his own art-making process as stimulated by Beuys&rsquo; philosophies: &ldquo;Painting, for me, is not just about creating an illusion. I don&rsquo;t paint to present an image of something. I paint only when I have received an apparition, a shock, when I want to transform something. Something that possesses me, and from which I have to deliver myself. Something I need to transform, to metabolize, and which gives me a reason to paint.&rdquo; Like Beuys, whose works were often constructed of fragile, organic materials (including blood, fat, and honey), Kiefer&rsquo;s works often incorporate unusual, fugitive materials such as ash, clay,and dried plant materials. With their rough-hewn textures and expansive narrative formats that often evoke charred landscape and historical, sometimes apocalyptic settings, Kiefer&rsquo;s work did not conform to the pared-down Minimalist or Conceptualist movements that were becoming mainstream at the time he was a student. Instead he created massive, dark paintings, books constructed of large sheets of lead, and figurative works that explored German folklore and were inspired by Caspar David Friedrich, among others.</p> <p>Kiefer&rsquo;s works are often realized in large formats, which in turn demand special exhibition spaces. MASS MoCA is adept at collaborating with artists, collectors, foundations, and cultural institutions to bring important bodies of art to the public, best exemplified by its 2008 partnership with Yale University Art Gallery, the Williams College Museum of Art, and the studio of Sol LeWitt, which realized a 25-year exhibition devoted to LeWitt&rsquo;s monumental wall drawings, a landmark quasi-permanent installation that was named "#1 Museum Exhibition of the Year" by Time magazine. The museum is proud to host an array of distinct curatorial points of view, within its renovated 19th singular factory campus.</p> <p>The Hall Art Foundation makes available works of postwar and contemporary art from its collection and from the collection of Andrew and Christine Hall for the enjoyment and education of the public. In addition to the dedicated gallery space at MASS MoCA, the Hall Art Foundation operates a contemporary art space in Reading, Vermont.</p> Sun, 13 Apr 2014 18:26:48 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - MASS MoCA, North Adams, MA - September 28th, 2013 - December 1st, 2028 <p>In a major collaboration with the Hall Art Foundation, the keystone of which is a large and long-term exhibition of sculpture and paintings by Anselm Kiefer, MASS MoCA opens a 10,000 square-foot building at MASS MoCA specially re-purposed by the Hall Art Foundation and devoted to the art of Anselm Kiefer.</p> <p>The exhibition includes <em>&Eacute;troits sont les Vaisseaux (Narrow are the Vessels)</em> (2002), an 82-foot long, undulating wave-like sculpture made of cast concrete, exposed rebar, and lead; <em>The Women of the Revolution (Les Femmes de la Revolution)</em> (1992), comprised of more than twenty lead beds with photographs and wall text; <em>Velimir Chlebnikov </em> (2004), a steel pavilion containing 30 paintings dealing with nautical warfare and inspired by the quixotic theories of the Russian mathematical experimentalist Velimir Chlebnikov; and a new, large-format commission created by the artist specifically for the installation at MASS MoCA.</p> <p>Anselm Kiefer, who first visited MASS MoCA in 1990 when it was still in the early planning stages, ranks among the best-known and most important of post-World War II German artists living and working today. Born in 1945 in southern Germany during the final days of the collapse of the Third Reich, Kiefer experienced divided postwar Germany firsthand. Across his body of work, Kiefer argues with history, addressing controversial and even taboo issues from recent history with bold directness and lyricism. Kiefer often turns to literature and history as prime source material for his work, as he did, for example, in the suite of paintings that comprise <em>Velimir Chlebnikov </em>(2004).</p> <p>The artist often builds his imagery on top of photographs, layering his massive canvases with dirt, lead, straw, and other materials that generate a &ldquo;ground&rdquo; that reads literally of the earth itself. Within these thick, impastoed surfaces Kiefer embeds textual or symbolic references to historic figures or places: these become encoded signals through which Kiefer invokes and processes history.</p> <p>A law student, Kiefer switched his studies to art in 1965 and held his first solo exhibit in 1969. During the early 1970s he studied with conceptual artist Joseph Beuys, whose interest in using an array of cultural myths, metaphors, and personal symbolic vocabulary as a means to engage and understand history inspired Kiefer. The artist has described his own art-making process as stimulated by Beuys&rsquo; philosophies: &ldquo;Painting, for me, is not just about creating an illusion. I don&rsquo;t paint to present an image of something. I paint only when I have received an apparition, a shock, when I want to transform something. Something that possesses me, and from which I have to deliver myself. Something I need to transform, to metabolize, and which gives me a reason to paint.&rdquo; Like Beuys, whose works were often constructed of fragile, organic materials (including blood, fat, and honey), Kiefer&rsquo;s works often incorporate unusual, fugitive materials such as ash, clay,and dried plant materials. With their rough-hewn textures and expansive narrative formats that often evoke charred landscape and historical, sometimes apocalyptic settings, Kiefer&rsquo;s work did not conform to the pared-down Minimalist or Conceptualist movements that were becoming mainstream at the time he was a student. Instead he created massive, dark paintings, books constructed of large sheets of lead, and figurative works that explored German folklore and were inspired by Caspar David Friedrich, among others.</p> <p>Kiefer&rsquo;s works are often realized in large formats, which in turn demand special exhibition spaces. MASS MoCA is adept at collaborating with artists, collectors, foundations, and cultural institutions to bring important bodies of art to the public, best exemplified by its 2008 partnership with Yale University Art Gallery, the Williams College Museum of Art, and the studio of Sol LeWitt, which realized a 25-year exhibition devoted to LeWitt&rsquo;s monumental wall drawings, a landmark quasi-permanent installation that was named "#1 Museum Exhibition of the Year" by Time magazine. The museum is proud to host an array of distinct curatorial points of view, within its renovated 19th singular factory campus.</p> <p>The Hall Art Foundation makes available works of postwar and contemporary art from its collection and from the collection of Andrew and Christine Hall for the enjoyment and education of the public. In addition to the dedicated gallery space at MASS MoCA, the Hall Art Foundation operates a contemporary art space in Reading, Vermont.</p> Wed, 22 Jan 2014 07:10:19 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Michael Oatman - Mass MOCA - October 23rd, 2010 - October 31st, 2020 <p><em>all utopias fell</em> is a project in three interrelated parts: <em>The Shining</em>, <em>The Library of the Sun</em>, and <em>Codex Solis</em>.</p> <p><em>The Shining</em> is a 1970s-era &lsquo;satellite&rsquo; that has crash-landed at MASS MoCA. This beautifully reflective, repurposed Airstream trailer &ndash; with large parachutes and active solar panels &ndash; is inspired by an earlier era of pulp aeronauts like Buck Rogers, Tom Swift and Tom Corbett: Space Cadet, as well as the works of Giotto, Jules Verne, NASA, and Chris Marker&rsquo;s 1962 film <em>La Jet&eacute;e</em>. Visitors can climb a staircase in the Boiler Plant and enter into the craft where they will encounter <em>The Library of the Sun</em>. Hybridizing a domestic space, a laboratory and a library, it has the feel of a hermitage, where the occupant will &lsquo;be right back&rsquo;, only it is 30 years later. Videos relating to the sun and its mythology flicker to life on the cockpit&rsquo;s instrumentation panels. In addition to these elements, visitors will be stunned by a stained glass window in what was once the windshield of the vehicle. Once inside the craft, visitors will also be able to view <a href="http://www.massmoca.org/event_details.php?id=371" target="_blank" rel="nofollow"><em>Codex Solis</em>, a massive field of photovoltaic (PVs) or solar panels</a>. At 50kw, the field will generate 7% of the power consumed by MASS MoCA. In addition to this 230-foot long grid, mirrors are interspersed in the middle of the field, and suggest an absent text. The arrangement of mirrors and solar panels is based on a specific quote by an unnamed author, and will not be revealed by the artist; instead the public will be encouraged to spend time with the piece, watch the reflected sky, and solve the riddle as birds and planes, inverted, fly by.</p> <p>Supported by the Massachusetts Technology Collaborative's Renewable Energy Trust and the Massachusetts Cultural Council.</p> Tue, 21 Jan 2014 18:44:50 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - The Metropolitan Museum of Art - June 7th, 2018 - September 22nd <div class="rich-text"> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family:serif;"><span style="font-size:18px;">The history of Korean art spans more than five thousand years. Korea&#39;s cross-cultural contacts with neighbors near and far&mdash;especially China&mdash;have played a significant role in shaping its rich and diverse artistic traditions. Korean culture has also provided important inspiration to others, notably Japan. This exhibition offers a window into the essentials of the peninsula&#39;s creative output, past and present. Arranged in loosely chronological order are major works from The Met collection, augmented by significant loans from the National Museum of Korea. The pieces represent key genres and themes of Korean art; they include strikingly modern-looking pots and glittering jewelry from ancient burial sites; exquisite Buddhist icons; refined green-glazed celadon; understated white porcelain; and pictorial images, both sophisticated and whimsical, that feature a range of motifs from nature.</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family:serif;"><span style="font-size:18px;">The Met received its first gift of a Korean object in 1893. The Arts of Korea Gallery opened in 1998. Today, the collection and gallery afford New Yorkers and the Museum&#39;s global visitors ongoing explorations of Korea&#39;s cultural traditions and innovations.</span></span></p> </div> Tue, 24 Jul 2018 07:24:11 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Gerard de Lairesse, Margareta Haverman, Rembrandt van Rijn - The Metropolitan Museum of Art - October 16th, 2018 - October 1st, 2020 <div class="rich-text"> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family:serif;"><span style="font-size:18px;">Dutch paintings of the seventeenth century&mdash;the Golden Age of Rembrandt, Hals, and Vermeer&mdash;have been a highlight of The Met collection since the Museum&#39;s founding purchase in 1871. This exhibition will bring together some of the Museum&#39;s greatest paintings to present this remarkable chapter of art history in a new light. Through roughly sixty-five works of art organized thematically, the exhibition will orient visitors to key issues in seventeenth-century Dutch culture&mdash;from debates about religion and conspicuous consumption to painters&#39; fascination with the domestic lives of women.</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family:serif;"><span style="font-size:18px;">The exhibition will provide a fresh perspective on the canon and parameters of the Dutch Golden Age by uniting paintings from The Met&#39;s Benjamin Altman, Robert Lehman, and Jack and Belle Linsky bequests. Works typically displayed separately in the Museum&#39;s galleries&mdash;such as Rembrandt&#39;s <em><a href="https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/459082">Gerard de Lairesse</a></em> and Lairesse&#39;s own <em><a href="https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/436843">Apollo and Aurora</a></em>&mdash;will be presented side by side, producing a visually compelling narrative about the tensions between realism and idealism during this period. The presentation will also provide the opportunity to conserve and display rarely exhibited paintings, including Margareta Haverman&#39;s <em><a href="https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/436634">A Vase of Flowers</a></em>&mdash;one of only two known paintings by the artist and the only painting by an early modern Dutch woman currently in The Met collection. The exhibition takes its title from one of the period&#39;s major works of art theory, Philips Angel&#39;s <em>The Praise of Painting</em> (1642), a pioneering defense of realism in art.</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family:serif;"><span style="font-size:18px;">#MetDutchMasterpieces</span></span></p> </div> Tue, 24 Jul 2018 07:42:47 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - The Metropolitan Museum of Art - October 4th, 2018 - October 6th <div class="rich-text"> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family:serif;"><span style="font-size:18px;">This landmark exhibition in the Museum&#39;s American Wing will showcase 116 masterworks representing the achievements of artists from more than fifty cultures across North America. Ranging in date from the second to the early twentieth century, the diverse works are promised gifts, donations, and loans to The Met from the pioneering collectors Charles and Valerie Diker. Long considered to be the most significant holdings of historical Native American art in private hands, the Diker Collection has particular strengths in sculpture from British Columbia and Alaska, California baskets, pottery from southwestern pueblos, Plains drawings and regalia, and rare accessories from the eastern Woodlands.</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family:serif;"><span style="font-size:18px;">#ArtofNativeAmerica </span></span></p> <div class="rich-text"> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family:serif;"><span style="font-size:18px;">The exhibition is made possible by The Peter Jay Sharp Foundation, the Diane W. and James E. Burke Fund, the Enterprise Holdings Endowment, and the Walton Family Foundation.</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family:serif;"><span style="font-size:18px;">The catalogue is made possible by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.</span></span></p> </div> </div> Tue, 24 Jul 2018 07:51:13 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Brooke Shaden - JoAnne Artman Gallery - June 13th - August 31st <p>JoAnne Artman Gallery<br /> 511A West 22nd St. | New York, NY 10011<br /> Contact:&nbsp; JoAnne Artman<br /> Telephone:&nbsp; 949-510-5481 | E-mail: joanneartman@aol.com&nbsp;<br /> Website: www.joanneartmangallery.com</p> <p>BEGIN AGAIN</p> <p>Imaginative, versatile, and a master of concept, Brooke Shaden is a fine art photographer specializing in staged photography that combines allegorical symbolism with personal narrative. Utilizing props as well as commonplace objects, Shaden transforms the world around her into compelling, intricate dreamscapes that combine the strange with the familiar. JoAnne Artman Gallery is pleased to present an exhibition of recent work by the artist at the gallery&rsquo;s NYC location, focusing on a new body of work that explores notions of permanence, survival, as well as the classic theme of man versus nature.&nbsp;</p> <p>In her new series, Shaden portrays a dystopian future, emphasizing the improbable odds of humankind in the face of the vastness of nature. Yet despite some of the darker elements, the tone of Shaden&rsquo;s new body of work maintains a sense of optimism and a playful lightness. Aptly titled, Begin Again depicts a rebirth of self. Alluding to a reimagined future, reevaluated preconceptions, and a reinvention of the artistic process, Shaden thoroughly explores the idea of renewal. Culminating in an expressive awakening, her photographs embody an alternate reality of surrealism and fantasy where the disturbing is made beautiful.</p> <p>Shaden&rsquo;s definition of her medium is both candid and pragmatic. According to her, &ldquo;fine art is simply defined as personal work, something you do for yourself.&rdquo; This directness is evident in her approach, and enables her to fully immerse herself in her practice, creating stunningly surreal, compelling images rooted in personal investigation.&nbsp; Shaden&rsquo;s surrealism is based in reality and filtered through personal experience. Tonally and thematically, the work is evocative of the drama, palette, and representations of the sublime in nature of late 18th century Romanticism. The impactful, alluringly disconcerting compositions are created through fundamental changes to everyday objects resulting in uncanny, extraordinary images and stories. Shaden shapes the world to her vision utilizing only natural, practical lighting, and builds the final image via a layering process. In past explorations, Shaden&rsquo;s work has posed probing questions of our collective anxieties, dreams, and nightmares. The imagery is often allegorical as well as visceral, seductive, and instantly relatable.</p> <p>One of the main themes is the eternal struggle of survival, of human nature versus mother nature, of the fragility human life and endurance of the human spirit. Allusions to this classic theme abound throughout the work, evoking ancient stories, myths, and records on the subject of the human condition. In a famous quote from As You Like It by Shakespeare the state of the human condition is presented: &ldquo;All the world&rsquo;s a stage; And all the men and women merely players.&rdquo; In the same spirit, Shaden&rsquo;s dreamscapes can be seen as fashioning of a new reality, a means of taking control of life&rsquo;s uncertainties and anxieties.&nbsp;</p> <p>Brooke Shaden&rsquo;s work will inspire, provoke, engage and mesmerize. With visual perceptions always changing, peek behind the stories told and you&#39;re sure to find the right artistic expression</p> Fri, 19 Apr 2019 13:18:40 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Ierimonti - Ierimonti Gallery - November 15th, 2018 - January 3rd, 2020 <p><span style="font-family:cambria; font-size:10.000000pt">Ierimonti Gallery is pleased to present </span><em>Floating Garden</em><span style="font-family:cambria; font-size:10.000000pt">, Motoi Yamamoto&rsquo;s first solo exhibition in NewYork. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family:cambria; font-size:10.000000pt">The mainspring of Yamamoto&rsquo;s work derived from the death of his sister at a young age, and the death of his wife in the fall of 2016.<br /> His works is represented by large &ndash; scale labyrinths and patterns for the loved ones who passed away as well as his strong desire to hold on to his memories with them. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family:cambria; font-size:10.000000pt">Motoi Yamamoto has been using salt for his installation for nearly 25 years since his sister passed away in 1994.<br /> Salt has been an essential part of human lives worldwide. In Japan, salt is a sacred substance used for funerals. Japanese use salt after a funeral in order to purify their spirits from the impurity of death. &ldquo;I&rsquo;m also attracted to salt not only because of its cultural and historical background, but also its translucent colors as well as the ocean where it come from as the birth place of all life.</span><span style="font-family:cambria; font-size:10pt">I then began to think that the salt I&rsquo;m using for my artworks might have been in the ocean at one point, supporting our lives, holding the &ldquo;memories of life&rdquo; within itself.&rdquo;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family:cambria; font-size:10.000000pt">Drawing a labyrinth with salt is for the artist a way to follow a trace of his memory. In this way he is able to touch a precious moment in his memory which can not be attained through pictures or writings.<br /> He draws all the lines by himself when he works on installation. He never erase or re-draw the lines</span><span style="font-family:cambria; font-size:10pt">&ldquo;We all live in the real world where life can not be undone or rewind. Lines I draw reflect myself who is alive in this moment&rdquo;. But it depends not only on his psychological or physical condition, but also on the condition of the floor or the level of humidity. He always silently follows the trace, that is controlled as well as uncontrolled from the starting point until completion.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family:cambria; font-size:10.000000pt">The series of works named &ldquo;Floating Garden&rdquo; is similar to lacework, an act of slowly rediscovering pieces of memories tucked quietly in the drawers in the mind of the artist, and weaving them together. He draws countless tiny cells with salt or paint and these cells symbolize pieces of memories and fragments of small daily events that he and his sister and his wife shared. </span></p> <p><span style="font-family:cambria; font-size:10.000000pt">Motoi has been drawing swirls and labyrinths (patterns with lines that intertwine like a maze). Such patterns have been used as a symbols to represent rebirth. Swirls symbolize life and death, resurrection, and rebirth showing a strong vitality and eternity mainly in East Asia. Labyrinths symbolize almost exactly the same aspects in the West, originated from Scotland and Greece. </span></p> <p><em>Motoi Yamamoto born in 1966 in Hiroshima and lives in Kanazawa, Japan. Graduated from Kanazawa College of Art in 1995.<br /> Some of the past exhibitions include MoMA P.S.1., Hermitage Museum (St. Petersburg), Tokyo Metropolitan Museum of Contemporary Art, 21</em><em>st </em><em>Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa, &ldquo;Return to the Sea&rdquo;. </em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Thu, 08 Nov 2018 07:34:06 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - NohoM55 Gallery - August 6th - August 24th Wed, 09 Jan 2019 05:55:18 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Louis C. Tiffany - Queens Museum of Art - October 7th, 2018 - October 6th <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family:serif;"><span style="font-size:18px;"><span class="tL8wMe EMoHub" dir="ltr" id=":4s.co">Austrian immigrants Dr. Egon Neustadt and his wife Hildegard were among the earliest collectors of works by famed American artist Louis C. Tiffany (1848-1933) and they played a critical role in reviving interest in Tiffany&rsquo;s lamps in the mid-twentieth century. In 1935, newly married and living in Flushing, Queens, the Neustadts purchased their first Tiffany lamp &ndash; a small Daffodil, for the incredible price of $12.50 &ndash; from a secondhand shop in Greenwich Village. Tiffany&rsquo;s work was decidedly unfashionable at this time; indeed, Louis C. Tiffany died in 1933 and his Tiffany Studios would declare bankruptcy in 1937. But the Neustadts, undeterred by the current disinterest in Tiffany lamps, were struck by the beauty of the colorful glass and enchanted that the shade had been made by an artist from the beloved country they now called home. Over the course of the next fifty years, their collection grew to include more than 200 lamps of all shapes, sizes, and designs. It remains today the largest and most comprehensive lamp collection ever assembled.</span></span></span></p> <p style="font-weight: 400; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family:serif;"><span style="font-size:18px;">The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass will mount a special focus exhibition this fall exploring Louis C. Tiffany&rsquo;s groundbreaking achievements in iridescent art glass. Presented in The Neustadt Gallery at the Queens Museum, Queens, New York,&nbsp;<em>Tiffany&rsquo;s Iridescence: Glass in Rainbow Hues</em>&nbsp;will open&nbsp;<span data-term="goog_65233141">October 7, 2018</span>. The exhibition will explore the science and artistry behind Tiffany&rsquo;s iridescent sheet and blown glass, and is curated by Morgan Albahary, Assistant Curator, The Neustadt, in consultation with Dr. Gregory Merkel, Research Fellow, Corning, Inc., and Trustee at The Neustadt.</span></span></p> <p style="font-weight: 400; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family:serif;"><span style="font-size:18px;">Vivid colors, hypnotizing patterns, and intriguing textures showcase the vast range of Tiffany&rsquo;s iridescence.</span></span></p> <p style="font-weight: 400; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family:serif;"><span style="font-size:18px;"><span class="tL8wMe EMoHub" dir="ltr" id=":5f.co">In 1995, The Neustadt partnered with the Queens Museum to share its collection with the New York metropolitan area through a permanent Tiffany gallery and educational programming. This partnership has special significance because Tiffany&rsquo;s glass furnace, bronze foundry, and workshops were located in Corona, Queens, less than two miles from the Museum.&nbsp;<em>Tiffany&rsquo;s Iridescence: Glass in Rainbow Hues</em>&nbsp;is organized by&nbsp;<b>The Neustadt</b></span></span></span></p> Wed, 09 Jan 2019 09:49:49 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Arlene Shechet - Kohler Experience Center - March 8th - March 8th, 2020 <p>The Kohler Experience Center is proud to present a selection of work by renowned artist Arlene Shechet, on display March 2019 through early 2020. The display features the molds and two top portions of Shechet&rsquo;s <em>Tall Feather</em> sculpture, a piece in her public art installation <em>Full Steam Ahead</em> on view at Madison Square Park until the end of April. Kohler&rsquo;s display provides a fascinating inside look into the artist&rsquo;s creation process, as she seeks to redefine our perception of public art. Many of Shechet&rsquo;s pieces for <em>Full Steam Ahead </em>were created during her residency at John Michael Kohler Arts Center&rsquo;s Arts/Industry program hosted by the Kohler Co. pottery and foundry, where she was given the time and resources to stretch the limits of sculpture. Kohler believes art is essential to the human experience, having the power to move people to empathize, to question, and to act. Since 1974, the Arts/Industry residency program has been enriching the lives of artists and the Kohler craftsmen who work beside them in the factory.</p> Mon, 04 Mar 2019 08:15:15 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list Group Show - Derfner Judaica Museum + The Art Collection at Hebrew Home at Riverdale - May 5th - August 25th <p>Derfner Judaica Museum + The Art Collection at Hebrew Home at Riverdale is pleased to announce its latest exhibition, From the Eastern Bloc to the Bronx: Early Acquisitions from The Art Collection, on view in the Derfner Judaica Museum from May 5&ndash;August 25, 2019. A reception and curator&rsquo;s talk will be held on Sunday, May 19, 2019, from 1:30&ndash;3 p.m. in the Museum, located at 5901 Palisade Avenue in the Riverdale section of the Bronx. This event is free and open to the public. R.S.V.P. 718.581.1596 or art@hebrewhome.org. Photo I.D. required for entry at all times.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The exhibition is part of the Derfner Judaica Museum&rsquo;s 10th Anniversary celebration, which will include several events and activities throughout the summer.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>From the Eastern Bloc to the Bronx</em> tells the fascinating story of how the Grosvenor Gallery in London promoted artists from Eastern Bloc countries and came to play a central role in shaping the Hebrew Home Art Collection. Some of the first works acquired for The Art Collection were by artists who were included in solo and group exhibitions at the Gallery, which was founded in 1960 by the American sociologist Eric Estorick (1913&ndash;1993). Estorick was instrumental in efforts by the Hebrew Home&rsquo;s former executive director Jacob Reingold (1916&ndash;1999), with the support of a few key donors, to establish The Art Collection in the 1970s. His gallery created a niche for the exhibition of Eastern Bloc artists in the 1960s when art from &ldquo;behind the Iron Curtain&rdquo; was largely unseen and unknown by Western audiences. Living and working during the height of the Cold War in the Soviet Socialist Republics of Armenia and Russia and satellite states Hungary and Czechoslovakia (today the Czech Republic and Slovak Republic), most of these artists were rarely, if ever, exhibited in the West.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This exhibition features works by 35 artists who participated in nine key exhibitions that took place at Grosvenor Gallery between 1961&ndash;1967, before the Hebrew Home began to acquire the artwork about a decade later. Today, some of these artists have well established reputations internationally or in their home countries, or both. For example, Soviet dissident artist Oscar Rabin (1928&ndash;2018), founder of the Nonconformist movement and exiled to Paris in 1978, has been the subject of several major exhibitions and a documentary film; eminent Slovak artist Vincent Hložn&iacute;k (1919&ndash;1997), founder of the highly influential Department of Graphic Art and Illustration at the Academy of Fine Arts in Bratislava, will have a major retrospective at the Danubiana Meulensteen Art Museum, Bratislava, Slovak Republic, in 2020; and the work of Mariam Aslamazian (1907&ndash;2006) is on permanent view at a museum in Gyumri, Armenia, dedicated to the artist and her sister.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Grosvenor Gallery&rsquo;s initial exhibition of Eastern Bloc artists, entitled <em>Lithographs by Twenty-seven Soviet Artists</em>, took place in 1961, and proved to be Estorick&rsquo;s first success in obtaining permission to export Soviet artwork to the West. The exhibition featured Russian printmakers from the Leningrad Experimental Graphics Laboratory (LEGL), a workshop that included master lithographers who used the medium to create intricate images with complex color palettes. Prints by ten artists from that show, Boris Ermolaev (1903&ndash;1982), Grigory Izrailevich (1924&ndash;1999), Anatoli Kaplan (1902&ndash;1980), Vera Matiukh (1910&ndash;2003), Gerta Nemenova (1905&ndash;1986), Alexander Shenderov (1897&ndash;1967), Mikhail Skouliari (1905&ndash;1985), Vladimir Sudakov (1912&ndash;1994), Alexander Vedernikov (1898&ndash;1975) and Alexandra Yakobson (1903&ndash;1966), are among the works later acquired for The Art Collection that are on view in the present exhibition. The London exhibition garnered enough commercial and critical success that it was remounted (with work by all but two of the original artists) in New York City later that same year.&nbsp; Subsequently, The Museum of Modern Art in New York acquired prints by five of the artists, including Ermolaev, Kaplan, Nemenova, Shenderov and Vedernikov.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Following the LEGL exhibition, Estorick mounted a large solo show of Kaplan at the end of 1961 entitled <em>Anatoli Kaplan: The World of Sholem Aleichem and Other Scenes, Tales and Songs of Russian Provincial Life</em>, which included 131 prints. Kaplan worked almost exclusively on Jewish themes and was widely collected both privately and by museums, including The National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C., and The Museum of Modern Art, New York, in the 1960s. He was of particular interest to Estorick, who expanded some of his print editions exclusively for Grosvenor Gallery, including <em>The Little Goat</em> (1958&ndash;1961), a song from the Passover liturgy. Two of <em>The Little Goat</em> prints and three of his other lithographs are on view in the current exhibition. Six portfolios of different print series by Kaplan along with four paintings by the Russian Jewish painter Solomon Gershov (1906&ndash;1989), who appeared in a two-person exhibition with Kaplan in 1967, were the first works acquired by Hebrew Home from Grosvenor Gallery in 1975. These selections likely reflected Estorick&rsquo;s and Reingold&rsquo;s shared interest in promoting Jewish artists working under oppressive conditions.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Gallery held a major retrospective of the master Russian printmaker Vladimir Favorsky (1886&ndash;1964) in 1962. Titled <em>Favorsky</em>, it included linocut prints from the artist&rsquo;s <em>Samarkand</em> series (1942&ndash;1944) realized during the artist&rsquo;s evacuation to Uzbekistan during World War II, among other works from his long career. Three of these rare prints on view depict scenes from everyday life of the Uzbek people among their caravans and camels.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Gallery celebrated its move to a larger space in 1963 with the group show, <em>First Image: Painting and Sculpture by Artists of the Gallery</em>, which included Czech artist Richard Fremund (1928&ndash;1969), who is represented in the current exhibition by two abstract townscape paintings, <em>Easter Landscape</em> (1963) and <em>Blue Landscape</em> (1957). Today, Fremund is frequently shown in galleries in the Czech Republic and his paintings held in private collections. Also included in <em>First Image</em> were Hungarian artists Gyula Konf&aacute;r (1933&ndash;2008) and Mih&aacute;ly Sch&eacute;ner (1923&ndash;2009), who went on to have a two-person exhibition the following year. <em>Gyula Konf&aacute;r, Mih&aacute;ly Sch&eacute;ner: Two Contemporary Hungarian Artists</em>, mounted in 1964, featured 52 paintings. Two works from that show were later acquired for The Art Collection and are included in the present exhibition: Konf&aacute;r&rsquo;s <em>White Cottages, Red Roofs</em> and Sch&eacute;ner&rsquo;s <em>Self-Portrait at Work</em>, both from 1964, which share a dark, expressionistic style.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>One of Estorick&rsquo;s most important exhibitions was <em>Aspects of Contemporary Soviet Art</em>, mounted in 1964, which featured paintings and works on paper. Estorick managed a cultural coup by obtaining permission to export paintings and drawings from the Soviet Union, a task with far greater obstacles than exporting lithographs as he had in 1961. As British art critic Nigel Gosling wrote for <em>The Observer</em> in 1964: &ldquo;The show is a milestone. For the first time in 40 years Soviet paintings are exhibited for sale outside Russia.&rdquo; The Hebrew Home owns 19 of the paintings that were included in <em>Aspects of Contemporary Soviet Art</em>, with selected works on view by Aslamazian, Alexander Dubinchik (1922&ndash;1997), Irina Fateeva (1908&ndash;1981), Moisey Feigen (1904&ndash;2008), Vladimir Gavrilov (1923&ndash;1970), Vladimir Gedikyan (b. 1928), Grigoriev (dates unknown), Mikhail Ivanov (1926&ndash;2000), Pavel Kuznetsov (1878&ndash;1968), Alexey Morosov (1896&ndash;1965), Anatoli Nikitch (1918&ndash;1994), Pyotr Ossovsky (1925&ndash;2015), Albert Papikian (1926&ndash;1997), Alexsei Pisarev (1909&ndash;1970), Igor Popov (1927&ndash;1999), Peter Shlikov (1917&ndash;1920), Galina Solovieva (1908-1984) and Leonid Zakharov (1928&ndash;1986).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Turning to Czechoslovak art, Vincent Hložn&iacute;k was a major solo show comprising paintings and graphics mounted in 1965. Hložn&iacute;k is represented in this exhibition by two linocuts from the series <em>Dreams</em> (1962), a cycle of surrealistic prints that caution about the horrors of war. While a student in Prague, he was present when the Germans occupied the city in 1939 and was dramatically impacted by the atrocities he witnessed. Hložn&iacute;k left a lasting legacy through his students and his humanistic approach to art continues to influence generations of Slovak graphic artists today. His work is on permanent view in galleries and museums in the Slovak Republic.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Rabin, founder of the Nonconformist movement in Moscow in the 1970s and a major international artist today, had his first solo exhibition in the West at Grosvenor Gallery in 1965. The two paintings that represent him in this exhibition, <em>Cats Under Crescent Moon</em> (1963) and <em>Bread and Factory</em> (1964), were included in the original Grosvenor show. Rabin was an organizer of the infamous &ldquo;bulldozer exhibition&rdquo; held outside Moscow in 1974. In an incident that became widely reported internationally, dissident artists who were prohibited from participating in official galleries mounted an exhibition in an empty lot that was brutally shut down by the Soviet authorities with water cannons and bulldozers. Exiled four years later and prevented from returning from a visit to Paris, where he remained until his death in 2018, Rabin and his family were abruptly stripped of their Soviet citizenship. His work is widely collected and held in both private and public collections, including the Zimmerli Art Museum, New Brunswick, New Jersey, The Centre Pompidou, Paris, and The Kolodzei Collection, Highland Park, New Jersey, among others.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>One of the last exhibitions focused exclusively on Soviet Bloc artists, <em>The World of Sholem Aleichem: Kaplan lithographs, Gershov paintings</em>, was presented in 1967. It featured Kaplan&rsquo;s portfolios alongside Gershov&rsquo;s paintings. Gershov painted in an expressionistic style, often on Jewish themes, and was critical of Soviet art policies. He suffered harsh consequences for his views and was arrested twice, once in 1932 and again in 1948, and sent to the Gulag after having his work destroyed. He is represented by the painting <em>Tevye</em> (ca. 1963&ndash;64), an imaginary portrait of the protagonist of Aleichem&rsquo;s series of short stories, <em>Tevye the Milkman</em>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This exhibition highlights rare artworks in the Hebrew Home&rsquo;s Art Collection, which has attracted researchers, curators and dignitaries from around the world, and also provides a fascinating glimpse into the modern art being created during the Cold War in the Eastern Bloc and how it was brought to the West&rsquo;s attention by Eric Estorick. The Grosvenor Gallery&rsquo;s focus on exhibitions of Eastern Bloc artists was concentrated in the period 1961&ndash;1967, according to the Gallery&rsquo;s available records, and coincided with an ambitious general program of a dozen or more exhibitions each year. During this same period, the Gallery organized at least 80 or more exhibitions by other artists, mostly from Western Europe, in solo and group exhibitions. While he moved his focus away from Soviet Bloc artists after 1967, Estorick continued to include some of these artists in other broader, thematic group shows. Many works by Eastern Bloc artists remained in Gallery inventory beyond these critical years in the early to mid-1960s and were thus available for the Hebrew Home to acquire in the 1970s. Although Estorick died in 1993, the Grosvenor Gallery remains active in London to this day.</p> Sun, 28 Apr 2019 15:47:11 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - The Painting Center - January 1st - December 31st Mon, 29 Apr 2019 01:17:15 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list - The Painting Center - January 1st - December 31st Mon, 29 Apr 2019 01:18:58 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Events/list