Bigindicator

Alfredo Jaar

Profile  |  Artworks  |  Exhibitions  |  Network  |  Reviews  |  Comments
20130716142349-jaar_1
[VIDEO] Alfredo Jaar: Venezia, Venezia / Pavilion of Chile at Venice Biennale 2013   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
by
Alfredo Jaar at La Biennale di Venezia (Venice Biennale) June 1st, 2013 - November 24th, 2013
Posted 7/16/13
Alfredo Jaar is representing Chile at the 55th International Art Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia in Venice, Italy. His work is a detailed model of the Biennale Giardini with all the art pavilions, placed in an enormous water tank. In regular intervals, the pavilions slowly sink and reappear again. Alfredo Jaar was born in Santiago, Chile in 1956. He has lived in New York since 1982. Alfredo Jaar has participated in the Venice Biennale (1986, 2007, 2009), São Paulo Bienal (1985, 1987,... [more]
20130606063034-pasolini01
History in Transformation   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
by
Maria Barnas, Daya Cahen, Dina Danish, Willem de Rooij, Alfredo Jaar, Alon Levin, Aernout Mik, Rob Schröder, Jan Svankmajer, Jasmijn Visser, Felix Weigand at Castrum Peregrini April 25th, 2013 - June 23rd, 2013
Posted 6/6/13
Amsterdam’s histories are revisited in the present in ways ranging from the spectacle of the Amsterdam Dungeon to more serious approaches like those of the Anne Frank Huis. Every tourist knows the way to the latter and I can understand why. The hiding place where a girl penned her gripping diary captures the imagination. Anne Frank’s story might be the most famous, but she was just one of many forced to hide during the German occupation. Another former hiding place, less well known but equal in... [more]
20120417084117-bruce
Illuminating   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
by
Adel Abdessemed, Saâdane Afif, Jean-Michel Alberola, He An, Stephen Antonakos, John Armleder, Fiona Banner, Jean-Pierre Bertrand, Pierre Bismuth, Monica Bonvicini, Nathalie Brevet, Stefan Brüggemann, Marie José Burki, Pier Paolo Calzolari, Hsia-Fei Chang, Chryssa, Stéphane Dafflon, Cédric Delsaux, Frédéric Develay, Carlos Cruz Diez, Laddie John Dill, Tracey Emin, Cerith Wyn Evans, Ian Hamilton Finlay, Daniel Firman, Dan Flavin, Sylvie Fleury, Claire Fontaine, Lucio Fontana, Michel François, Kendell Geers, Gun Gordillo, Douglas Gordon, Laurent Grasso, Jeppe Hein, Bethan Huws, Alfredo Jaar, Anne Marie Jugnet, Jeff Koons, Gyula Kosice, Joseph Kosuth, Piotr Kowalski, Brigitte Kowanz, David Kramer, Sigalit Landau, Bertrand Lavier, Thomas Lélu, Claude Lévêque, Glenn Ligon, Jill Magid, Pierre Malphettes, Xavier Mary, Adam McEwen, Tse Su Mei, Mathieu Mercier, Mario Merz, Eric Michel, Jonathan Monk, Francois Morellet, Thomas Mulcaire, Maurizio Nannucci, Bruce Nauman, Ivan Navarro, Melik Ohanian, Fritz Panzer, Laurent Pernot, Mai-Thu Perret, Martial Raysse, Pedro Cabrita Reis, Delphine Reist, Jason Rhoades, Hughes Rochette, Sarkis, Franck Scurti, Frank Scurti, Alain Séchas, Miri Segal, Keith Sonnier, Vassiliki Tsekoura, jan van munster, Alan Suicide Vega, Giancarlo Zen at La Maison Rouge February 17th, 2012 - May 20th, 2012
Posted 4/17/12
On the face of it, this exhibition, Néon. Who’s Afraid of Red, Yellow and Blue? is just plain fun. With the Maison Rouge all lit up in different colored neon lights, both industrially produced and hand-crafted  tubes bringing the walls to life, inviting us to walk into spaces saturated in impossible colors. A visit to Néon is ostensibly a joyful, light way to spend an afternoon. Then as we quickly realize, neon has more to it than meets the eye. Neon lights may look pretty, but they... [more]
20110623005453-321
Naturally Human   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
by
Vito Acconci, Petah Coyne, Andy Goldsworthy, Jane Hammond, Alfredo Jaar, Joan Jonas, Rosemary Laing, Anna Maria Maiolino, Gordon Matta-Clark, Cildo Meireles, Ana Mendieta, Hélio Oiticica, Dennis Oppenheim, Ann Carlson and Mary Ellen Strom, Krzysztof Wodiczko, Catherine Yass at Galerie Lelong & Co. June 23rd, 2011 - August 5th, 2011
Posted 7/25/11
“Interventions in the Landscape,” the group exhibition at Galerie Lelong, is an examination of the rather acrimonious relationship humans have with the natural world.  Documenting their creations, performances, and investigations through the uses of photography and film, seventeen artists expose the social, political, and emotional implications man-made actions have on our surroundings. In each of the works, made between 1968 and 2010, not only has a human presence been unceremoniously forced... [more]
- At the opening of Alfredo Jaar’s Marx Lounge at the Stedelijk Museum Bureau Amsterdam, members of the art community walked gingerly around a large table filled corner-to-corner with books. For the first ten minutes or so no one touched anything. The books seemed so shiny, new, pristine – and they were, after all, art. When a number of young Amsterdam artists waltzed in and unquestioningly began flipping through the titles as they schmoozed, it became clear that lounge visitors were welcome,... [more]
01
Culture: Yours or Ours?   Pick-button-f22fa879042524f5c7b8d2278b2983b8
by
Vito Acconci, Richard Artschwager, Matthew Barney, Alfredo Jaar, Mike Kelley, Sharon Lockhart, Richard Long, Richard Prince, Lorna Simpson, Tony Tasset, Gillian Wearing at Museum of Contemporary Art (MCA) March 13th, 2010 - September 5th, 2010
Posted 5/18/10
        It’s impossible to enter the Museum of Contemporary Art’s (MCA) current exhibition “Rewind: 1970s to 1990s, Works from the MCA Collection” without first encountering Kay Rosen’s new work Yours/ours, 2010.  Rosen’s language-based works explore the significant shifts in meaning that can happen to words or phrases when seemingly insignificant shifts in their presentation are made.  At the MCA, Rosen presents the word “YOURS” divided by the entrance to the galleries in such a way so... [more]
Papageorge_namibia_dunes121
Shiny Things  
by
Yto Barrada, Cláudia Cristóvão, Alfredo Jaar, Georgia Papageorge, Berni Searle at Fowler Museum at UCLA February 22nd, 2009 - June 14th, 2009
Posted 3/13/09
Today when I walked into this exhibit I stopped dead in my tracks and just grinned.  It's so shiny and pretty.  The first part is mainly... wall art, I guess is the best term?  There's painting and more modern things I don't know the name for and this crazy cool metal "fabric" made of alcohol labels.  It ripples along the wall and it's great to get up close and walk along its length. Makes it flow. The second part is a maze of videos, which was definitely the more crowded part of the exhibit. ... [more]