Bigindicator

tagged: picasso
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The Problem of Art's Morality

by Joel Kuennen
This is a question that has plagued me the past few months, egged on by a resurgence in the use of “politically correct” or PC as a pejorative in American culture. The term PC first came to political prominence in a speech given by George H.W. Bush during a commencement speech at the University of Michigan in 1991. In it, he was quick to align “political correctness” with intolerance, claiming it to be a force for the abuse of individuals based on their race (read “whiteness”) or class... [more]
Posted by Joel Kuennen on 2/24/16
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Is the Internet Living Up to Its Promise as Democratic Equalizer of the Art Market?

by Edo Dijksterhuis
On June 20, the Berlin-based online auction house Auctionata sold an 18th century Chinese clock. Created by a Guangzhou workshop, the musical and automaton clock is ivory-mounted and adorned with figurines and pagodas set in a mountain scene. The bidding started with 300,000 euro. A mere ten minutes later the final bid of 3.37 million euro was made, setting a new online auction record. The buyer is an art world fixture: businessman Liu Yiqian, owner of the Long Museum in Shanghai. More... [more]
Posted by Edo Dijksterhuis on 7/15/15
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The Rockefeller Family Estate's Idiosyncratic Picasso Tapestries

by Tara Plath
Sleepy Hollow, a small Hudson Valley town best known for its place in Washington Irving’s 1820 tale of the headless horseman, is also home to another lesser-known oddity: 15 incredibly detailed large-scale, hand-woven tapestries that painstakingly imitate Picasso paintings. Commissioned by Nelson Rockefeller in 1955 for his family’s Kykuit Estate, the tapestries are the work of atelier Madame J. de la Baume Dürrbach, though they are often attributed to Picasso himself, who worked in... [more]
Posted by Tara Plath on 11/3/14
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What Do We Owe Picasso?

by Sarah Hamilton
There is no shortage of Pablo Picasso exhibitions in our world right now – a good half-dozen major shows have opened and closed across the U.S. in the past three years, exploring everything from Picasso’s relationship with women to his relationship with other artists. Now, the Art Institute of Chicago has opened their own exhibition, “Picasso and Chicago,” adding Picasso’s relationships with cities to that list. The premise of the exhibition is a celebration of the 100th anniversary of the... [more]
Posted by Sarah Hamilton on 3/7/13
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50 Shades of Gray

by Bradley Rubenstein
Claiming once that color weakened his work, being merely an addition to an already finished canvas, Picasso eliminated it from his palette during many phases of his well-documented career. If one wanted to make the case that the haunting blue period and the sugary rose one were the painterly equivalents of tinted photos, then there might be a case to be made for it being a lifelong practice with which Picasso demonstrated the supremacy of drawing above all else in his work. Clearly the... [more]
Posted by Bradley Rubenstein on 11/12/12