Bigindicator

tagged: language
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Magic & Language: Exhibitions to See During Armory Arts Week

by Stephanie Cristello
Magic and language share a few essential qualities: they are both transformative in nature, and in the experience of each, information is lost along the way. They are mutually systems of artifice. Words make ideas out of things, an approach to understanding the world around us that often goes unnoticed, just as an unexplained phenomenon creates a distortion, precisely causing it to go noticed, to resonate. Though there is potential to reach each result on similar grounds through different... [more]
Posted by Stephanie Cristello on 3/3/16
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Uttering "Other": Across Berlin Slavs and Tatars Parse Language and Difference

by Vanessa Gravenor
Raised plastic titles display Arabic lettering. The text is slightly enlarged so that it imitates brail—raised to suggest that the shapes could be read with hands—turning texture into thought. A red exclamation point disrupts the script—a western interruption bordering on fusion. These are some of the constructed artifacts on display in the Preis der Nationalgalerie exhibition at Hamburger Bahnhof by the collective Slavs and Tatars, who were nominated for this year’s award. The collective... [more]
Posted by Vanessa Gravenor on 10/14/15
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The Biennale collateral events: a few remarks around the stones of Venice

by Federico Florian
This is the description of Venice that the British writer and art historian John Ruskin gives in the incipit of his famous three-volume The Stones of Venice, published in London from 1851 to 1853. In the following lines, the author expresses the real reason of a treatise about Venetian art and architecture: I would endeavour to trace the lines of this image [the fading, feeble reflection of the city on the sea] before it be for ever lost, and to record, as far as I may, the warning which... [more]
Posted by Federico Florian on 7/31/13
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[VIDEO] Interview with Yasmin Meinicke

by The Karte
When the intersolar spaceship Pioneer 10 was launched in 1972, it was equipped with a gilt metal plate – a message to potential extraterrestrial intelligence. The plate showed the schematic depiction of a man and a woman in relative proportions to the space shuttle, an interstellar map, and a model of the hyperfine transition of hydrogen. These signs were meant to be “universally” comprehendible, even for those potential life forms in outer space. The exhibition at the Kleine Humboldt... [more]
Posted by The Karte on 1/16/13
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The Recognitions: the Reader

by Jessica Powers
  In Elias Hansen's companion essay for , The Reader’s first exhibit in a commercial art venue, he remarks that The Reader has “...studied graphic design from a consumer, street-level approach...a workingman, and a workingman’s artist....” I would argue that Read is not just a workingman, but a self-taught master. It would be wrong to pigeonhole someone who is so clearly a talented grifter of words and images as a mere street-artist crossover. Certain circles of the anonymous-for-legal-reasons... [more]
Posted by Jessica Powers on 5/4/11
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Dealing with the Reality of Things

by Frances Guerin
In a sketch in this 40 year retrospective exhibition of the American conceptual artworks of Lawrence Weiner at the K21 Kunstsammlung in Düsseldorf, ”, a headless cartoon woman asks: “How do you deal with the reality of things? When things themselves are the reality?” And the answer comes in a bubble attached to another headless woman in the same image: “Just change the the to A A.”  This question, and the woman’s apparently logical response, captures the tenor and significance of Lawrence... [more]
Posted by Frances Guerin on 12/18/08
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