Bigindicator

tagged: landscape
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Simon Birch’s 14th Factory Mirrors the Decline of Globalization

by Joel Kuennen
As the European Union signals its distancing from a seven-decade transatlantic alliance, as the United States joins Nicaragua and Syria as the only other nations to demure from the Paris Climate Agreement, as a realignment of global hegemonies occurs before our eyes, there is no better time to reflect on the narrative of globalization. , a warehouse-sized installation currently open in Los Angeles, is the culmination of a life’s work for Simon Birch. A Brit, transplanted to Hong Kong for the... [more]
Posted by Joel Kuennen on 5/31
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Beverly Buchanan and the Architecture of Blackness

by Jessica Lynne
Ruins and Rituals and Marilyn Minter’s Pretty/Dirty.   How might we understand a spatial and architectural discourse that marks a black subjectivity? This is the question that lingers in my thoughts as I reflect on Ruins and Rituals, a retrospective exhibition presenting the work of the late Beverly Buchanan, now on view at the Brooklyn Museum’s Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art. Sackler Family Curator Catherine Morris considers Buchanan a game changer, which is not untrue; I... [more]
Posted by Jessica Lynne on 11/9/16
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Where Is the Beach? Is It Under the Paving Stones?

by Nicole Rodríguez Woods
The very notion is deeply romantic. A location of perfect tension, where the weather is honest and the sounds are cyclical. The Beach is that point in space where time and energy laps onto a surface, reworking it; constructing and deconstructing; giving and taking away. No less romantic is the notion that a “beach” surrounds us all under the tiles, asphalt, and paving stones of the city, beneath the constructs of our society. That it is always there, ever present, pushing up against the... [more]
Posted by Nicole Rodríguez Woods on 8/17/16
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Looking at, and Through, Photography

by Peter Cochrane
Ivan Iannoli uses photography as a catalyst. He uses its unique scientific, artistic, and mechanical histories: as the standardization of the width of a film negative begat photographic paper sizes; as precut acrylic sheets fit perfectly into manufactured frames; as the industrial revolution set into motion the uniformity of items that were previously made to order. He taps into the ways in which artists before him have advanced photography beyond its material constraints—in the way that, say,... [more]
Posted by Peter Cochrane on 7/5/16
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Three Shows on Deconstructing Main Street, Blackness, and the American Landscape

by Olivia B. Murphy
Upon entering at the Studio Museum in Harlem, brisk piano notes float out over the exhibition space followed by an almost euphoric serenade by Erykah Badu. Her voice is emanating from a video near the entrance of the gallery where a T-Rex puppet bops around a stage singing along, mouthing out every trill with his toothy jaw gaping open and shut. On the puppet-sized podium hangs a banner reading “The Neshoba County Fair Assc.—Giant House Party.” Then the loop starts over, and T-Rex/Erykah Badu... [more]
Posted by Olivia B. Murphy on 6/6/16
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In Fact and Fiction, Almagul Menlibayeva Imagines Kazakhstan's Repressed Cultural History Today

by Neil Vazquez
Kazakhstan is caught between worlds. A prominent part of Alexander the Great’s Hellenistic Empire, the territory served as a middle ground between east and west—a crossroads where traders, warlords, and conquerors projected their will, forever altering the landscape and people of the region. Most recently the 60-year Soviet occupation, which ended in 1991, left an indelible mark on the Central Asian nation.   Kazakh video artist Almagul Menlibayeva unpacks the mixed cultural and political... [more]
Posted by Neil Vazquez on 2/4/16
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Haunting Analogue Photographs of Ship Graveyards Speak to the Afterlife of Technology

by Deepika Sorabjee
How do objects "end" their "lives"? Where do they go to die? How does an object have this presence beyond the monumental, a soul that is passing through time and place? Can both history and the ahistorical be dialectics in the same image? What is the afterlife of a technological process? Shumon Ahmed's , a show of photographic prints at Project 88, captures in its title a multitude of interpretations. These are images that speak for themselves over and over again. The “when” is when ships... [more]
Posted by Deepika Sorabjee on 10/6/15
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Immersive Light Artworks to Illuminate Chicago's Garfield Park Conservatory

by The Artslant Team
Chicago’s century-old Garfield Park Conservatory—one of the largest greenhouse conservatories in the country—has been referred to as “landscape art under glass.” This fall, landscape art will meet contemporary art when Luftwerk, the artistic vision of Petra Bachmaier and Sean Gallero, brings a series of large-scale, responsive light and sculptural installations to the horticultural monument. Check out our interview with the artists from 2014 here. Luftwerk’s , presented in collaboration with... [more]
Posted by The Artslant Team on 8/14/15
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Wonder and Connection: On Fabricating Nature in Art

by Alex Anderson
One issue that weighs on my psyche as an artist working in the realm of realism is that of understanding the attraction to and value of created nature in art. In my own work, I create and preserve moments from nature as a statement on the transience of life. But, during my wanderings through picturesque parks and other abundantly verdant spaces in Seattle, my current city of residence, I began to question why we seek to recreate imagery from the organic world when it already appears perfectly... [more]
Posted by Alex Anderson on 7/1/15
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The Very Last of Youth Subcultures

by Edo Dijksterhuis
In early 2012 Icelandic post-rock band Sigur Rós challenged filmmakers to create videos for their album . Photographer Ryan McGinley chose the song “Varúð,” an eight-minute dream narrated by a raspy head voice over an unsteady piano and transparent strings. In his video a barefoot girl in a glittery gold wig and a washed-out blue nightie skips through the streets of New York City in slow motion. She passes trucks, taxicabs, construction workers, and business men, moves along highways and park... [more]
Posted by Edo Dijksterhuis on 6/2/15