Bigindicator

tagged: installation
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Naira Mushtaq Answers 5 Questions

by The Artslant Team
  What are you trying to communicate with your work? My work is a study of relationship between a found object and the emotion it evokes, leading to narratives in a different space. My specific interest lies in the deconstruction and re-framing of vernacular photographs. In working with these, I have found how essentially similar family structures are across cultures. Family albums have disappeared with the advent of digital photography; these fragile prints inadvertently document... [more]
Posted by The Artslant Team on 5/15
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Announcing: ArtSlant Prize IX Round 3 Juried Winners!

by The Artslant Team
Check out the Round 3 Juried Winners! Round 4 is now open! Apply today for your chance at $5k in prizes! To apply, go to your ArtSlant profile and click enter contest.   Round 3 Jurors: Miguel Leal Rios is the director and curator of the Leal Rios Foundation | Contemporary Art. Junho Lee is the Director of the NARS Foundation. Kerry Doran is a writer, editor, and curator based in New York. She is the director at Postmasters Gallery.   Round 3 Juried... [more]
Posted by The Artslant Team on 4/24
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Anicka Yi: Life is Cheap

by Joel Kuennen
Anicka Yi, the recipient of the 2016 Hugo Boss Prize, opened consisting of three works, Lifestyle Wars, Immigrant Caucus, and Force Majeure, at the Guggenheim on April 21, 2017. The exhibition title is one part indictment, one part plea. “Life is cheap” is usually said with a quiet lilt; eyes down, a slight shake of the head. The disgust is projected both outward and inward. It’s a gesture of shame. But Yi hints at perhaps another invocation of the saying—that life is in fact cheap and easy... [more]
Posted by Joel Kuennen on 4/21
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Under the Radar: Denise Treizman | Tadasuke Jinno | A.M. Hanson

by The Artslant Team
Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your watchlist. Denise Treizman – New York Tadasuke Jinno – New York A.M. Hanson –... [more]
Posted by The Artslant Team on 4/14
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In Search of a Body: A.K. Burns’ Ode to Endurance

by Osman Can Yerebakan
One of the most unassuming artworks in A.K. Burns’ exhibition and residency, , is perhaps also the best reflection of the artist’s three-month tenure at the New Museum and her concurrent Callicoon Fine Arts exhibition, Fault Lines. Nestled at the end of a corridor on the museum’s fifth floor, Post Times (drop open) straddles the rift between utility and inertia, the body and environment, endurance and decay. A thin wooden latch, running the length of two closet doors is fully plastered with... [more]
Posted by Osman Can Yerebakan on 3/14
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At Locust Projects, a Tale of Two Factories and Two Artists

by Neil Vazquez
As we seemingly find ourselves spectators to the acceleration of political and environmental decline, two Israeli artists, Rotem Tamir and Omri Zin, are targeting industrial factory processes in an exploratory, performative project. The husband-and-wife team are collaborating for the first time in at Locust Projects in Miami. The piece encompasses two independent, modular “factories,” each managed and operated by the respective artists. Tamir’s factory produces helium-filled latex balloons,... [more]
Posted by Neil Vazquez on 3/10
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They Had Whole Buildings For That (Now We Use Diapers)

by Christina Catherine Martinez
Only 90s kids would know. Only 80s kids would know. Only Gen-X or Y or Z-ers would know. Jon Rafman might know, but he also knows that prolepsis, anachronism, and non-location are more suitable benchmarks for this twisted ouroboros we’ve made of time. At Sprüth Magers in Los Angeles, the juxtaposition of immersive films by Rafman and Stan VanDerBeek, made decades apart, charts a rising threshold of popular vision that correlates to a kind of political decline—the history of cinema as... [more]
Posted by Christina Catherine Martinez on 3/6
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Tiffany Smith: The Perpetual Tourist

by Suhaly Bautista-Carolina
  When Tiffany Smith enters a home, she looks at every item, searching for clues to reveal identity and personal history. She combs the space for intimate hints that work together to tell a story. Raised between Nassau, Bahamas, and Miami, Florida, by her Caribbean parents, Smith has put her faith in photography, using the camera to confront stereotypes about Caribbean culture and identity formation. While earning her BA in photography at the Savannah School of Art and Design, Smith... [more]
Posted by Suhaly Bautista-Carolina on 2/27
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Hannah Black Conjures a New Dawn in the Timeless Loop of History

by Audrey L. Phillips
Berlin-based artist Hannah Black’s solo presentation at New York’s Bodega lingers like a heavy fog drawn from today’s political climate. The title, short for Socialism or Barbarism is borrowed from Rosa Luxemburg’s early twentieth century wager on the future of capitalism. Its prescience is foreboding. Entering the gallery, I am confronted by a clay audience of roughly shaped creatures. Black’s fingerprints define and add texture to these tiny spectators, most of which are wearing cotton... [more]
Posted by Audrey L. Phillips on 2/25
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Digital Pioneer Lynn Hershman Leeson Walks Us Through Her Groundbreaking “Firsts”

by Olivia B. Murphy
I recently met with septuagenarian artist Lynn Hershman Leeson just after the opening of her latest solo show, , at Bridget Donahue Gallery. Her first solo with the gallery in 2015 sparked something of a rediscovery of her groundbreaking work, even though she has spent her decades-long career pioneering in the realm of technology in visual art. In 2016, a comprehensive retrospective entitled Civic Radar at ZKM in Karlsruhe, Germany, charted her career from its early performative days in the 70s... [more]
Posted by Olivia B. Murphy on 2/3