Bigindicator

tagged: installation
20171213161528-g4_0053

The Traitorous Translator: Power and Representation in Transnational Discourse

by Pınar Üner Yılmaz
My memories of learning a second language date back to my post-elementary school years, what they call the prep-year, in a bilingual school in Turkey. From the first lesson, the struggle to communicate was real: our teacher, who was from Wales, spoke only English, and my class of ten Turkish-speaking students got by with dictionaries and gestures. For many of us in that classroom, and in Turkey more broadly, not knowing English was a failure—and it was something we had better remedy... [more]
Posted by Pınar Üner Yılmaz on 12/13
20171211094229-20171206044830-1

Katya Grokhovsky Answers 5 Questions

by The Artslant Team
  What are you trying to communicate with your work? As a child, I had difficulty in expressing myself verbally, so I used drawing and movement as a way to display my vision to the world. I am still doing that today, utilizing my art to communicate the often invisible, absurd, grotesque, and difficult aspects of human experience as it pertains specifically to a female immigrant person, which is what I inhabit. I am interested in politics of protest to the prescribed notions of... [more]
Posted by The Artslant Team on 12/11
20171204145348-20160927181048-colonycollapse-0158

Christopher Tavares Silva Answers 5 Questions

by The Artslant Team
  What are you trying to communicate with your work? I use the languages of visual art and sound because I’m attracted to their poetic and transformative potentials, and though I enjoy weaving in literal references and representations of things, I’m equally if not more interested in the ways that the pure physical energies of sound, color, and form communicate. It’s precisely because audio/visual languages operate more viscerally and strangely than words, that I continue to experiment... [more]
Posted by The Artslant Team on 12/4
20171128140256-speculative-fetish-12

Faith Holland’s Speculative Fetishism and Digital Self-Care

by Olivia B. Murphy
“Best viewed without underwear,” reads the vinyl on the wall as you walk into the gallery. Below the text is a fishbowl full of what looks like other people’s underthings, left or “donated” to the exhibition. This is by no means a command, rather a “completely consensual suggestion,” says artist Faith Holland. Which is an apt descriptor of much of her show at TRANSFER Gallery in Bushwick. On the opposing wall is her recent collection, Queer Connections (2017). The installation is a punny... [more]
Posted by Olivia B. Murphy on 11/28
20171117154653-1_6000_3000_300dpi

The Trouble with “Neighbors”: Ai Weiwei, the Istanbul Biennial, and Forced Migration

by Danyel Ferrari
Last month Public Art Fund in New York opened Ai Weiwei’s citywide exhibition, . The project entails steel, fence-like architectural interventions and large-scale banners depicting photographs of Syrian refugees from the artist’s time in Lesbos, Greece. The exhibition is not alone in its use of domestic language to address global issues of mass forced migration. The 15th Istanbul Biennial, which concluded last week and was curated by Danish-Norwegian artist duo Elmgreen & Dragset, took the... [more]
Posted by Danyel Ferrari on 11/18
20171107144229-0e9a2228

“Good Art Always Gives”: Alvaro Barrington’s Generous First Solo at PS1

by Cristine Brache
Brooklyn-based artist Alvaro Barrington views Marcus Garvey as “an abstract avatar...like a saint or a north star of some sort.” It’s one of the things that drew him to London, where he attended the Slade School of Fine Art for graduate school in 2015—and where I befriended him. He describes his time there as a “pilgrimage,” often citing Garvey’s life in London in relation to the body of work he made there: [Garvey] died poor in London. It wasn’t until decades later that Jamaica—where he was... [more]
Posted by Cristine Brache on 11/7
20171030090832-20150331162827-08_haizel_kelvin

Kelvin Haizel Answers 5 Questions

by The Artslant Team
  What are you trying to communicate with your work? My current practice investigates the contemporary condition of the image. The body of work produced over the past two years allows the object-of-an-image to poke through the surface of the picture to assert its equality. And by so doing it rebels against its utilitarian service in the picture/object composite of the image sanctioned by the current norm.  What is an artist’s responsibility? To affectively use reason in the... [more]
Posted by The Artslant Team on 10/30
20171023144401-qn_map

Quantum Natives: Meet the Artist Crew Charting New Digital Terrain

by Siobhan Leddy
It’s easy to get lost in the Quantum Natives universe. The global-collective-slash-platform-slash-record-label is tricky to summarize, and even trickier to navigate. Fortunately, though, there’s a map. Inspired by the world-building practices of fantasy and science fiction, this strange, debased Google Map allows the visitor to meander through its wash of dreamy colors and unidentifiable symbols. Each project icon floats ominously above its surface, casting long gothic shadows. This is... [more]
Posted by Siobhan Leddy on 10/23
20171023071352-20170612171958-from_the_book_of_tao-_archival_masking_tape__fire_ressidue_and_black_wrap_foil-_sculpture_11_x_14_x_15_in__sheet_of_black_wrap_foil-_38_x_39

Keith O. Anderson Answers 5 Questions

by The Artslant Team
  What are you trying to communicate with your work? My attempt is to rewrite these familiar objects with new meaning and currency. What is an artist’s responsibility? To delve inward, outward, on a perilous journey, resurfacing to illuminate all that one has discovered, to solely bring attention to a higher purpose.   I brought a Pyramid from Egypt to our first meeting, 2017, Acrylic paint, cotton cloth napkins, china marker and mdf board.    Show us the... [more]
Posted by The Artslant Team on 10/23
20171020080929-_judy_chicago_addresses_a_gathering_of_volunteers_in_the_dinner_party_studio__ca

Ways of Seeing Judy Chicago’s “The Dinner Party”

by Sally Deskins
“My lifelong goal has been to overcome the erasure that has eclipsed the contributions of so many women,” said Judy Chicago on the occasion of two new exhibitions examining the production of her best-known work, The Dinner Party. These exhibitions, currently at the National Museum of Women in the Arts in Washington, D.C., and the Brooklyn Museum, uniquely present the seminal artwork in a now unfamiliar way, recalling the authentic grit of the feminist process, and the inclusive approach of its... [more]
Posted by Sally Deskins on 10/19