Bigindicator

tagged: feminism
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In 1,000 Text Paintings, Betty Tompkins Proves Words Are As Provocative As Porn

by Sola Agustsson
The media floods us with words and images aimed to categorize women. In Betty Tompkins’ new Los Angeles exhibition , the artist best known for her Fuck Paintings repaints some of these common labels, creating a feminist space for her pieces to expose and confront everyday sexist language and representations. On the walls of GAVLAK Gallery, 1,000 small textual paintings hang salon-style, presented as a cohesive installation. Their texts are derived from responses Tompkins got in an email thread... [more]
Posted by Sola Agustsson on 7/25/16
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İnci Eviner in Retrospective: “There Is No Woman, Only Symbols, Images, and Representations”

by Pınar Üner Yılmaz
only in dark the light,only in dying life:bright the hawk’s flight on the empty sky.             —The Creation of Ea Ursula K. Le Guin, Tehanu   İnci Eviner is a gatherer: she collects the memory of crowds, unearths folk narratives, and retells their stories in her own language. She is a hunter: she traces misogyny, detects hierarchy, and targets it with the tools of a unique feminist visual lexicon. Although she doesn’t specifically identify her work as feminist, Eviner dissolves... [more]
Posted by Pınar Üner Yılmaz on 7/7/16
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Angela Washko: Talking Feminism in the Spaces Most Hostile to It

by Christian Petersen
We have discussed the rapidly growing intersection between new media art and feminism with a number of artists in previous columns. This week we take a deeper look at that phenomenon in an interview with artist, writer and facilitator Angela Washko who is at the forefront of the movement. She famously interviewed the notorious pick-up-artist Roosh V for her project which resulted in an overload of attention for her, both positive and horribly negative. Washko’s work consistently tackles vital... [more]
Posted by Christian Petersen on 4/20/16
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Mourning As Political Act: Women Artists from Turkey Seek What's Hidden in Loss

by Pınar Üner Yılmaz
“Will women always die? Let some men die too. I killed him for my honor,” uttered Çilem Doğan, defending herself with a heartfelt statement. Arrested for murdering her abusive husband, who beat her—even while she was pregnant—and forced her into prostitution, Doğan resisted the long-term abuse one day and shot her husband with bullets originally aimed at her. Doğan’s story isn’t unique within Turkey’s long history of violence—domestic and otherwise—though she is one of the lucky ones who... [more]
Posted by Pınar Üner Yılmaz on 4/12/16
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#NotYetDead: Beyond the Selfie

by Jessica Lynne
–Alice Walker I am not asking who I am. I’m a Black woman and expansive in my Blackness and my queerness as Blackness and queerness are always already expansive. –E. Jane I first encountered Alice Walker’s womanist theory as a sophomore in college. I was wide eyed and enrolled in a bunch of Africana Studies courses trying to “find” myself as they say. It was a glorious journey which, in hindsight, was capstoned by my introduction to Walker and womanism. I was introduced to the concept at a... [more]
Posted by Jessica Lynne on 3/17/16
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Third Annual Edit-a-thon to Bring More Women Artists, and Editors, to Wikipedia

by Jade Angeles Fitton
Art+Feminism started their Wikipedia “edit-a-thons” on March 1, 2014, on International Women’s Day, as a response to the enormous quantity of information now available to us and the evident lack of information about women in the arts. The under-representation of women is not a product of the digital age and the predominantly male editorship of Wikipedia—which we’ll return to shortly; the digital age is merely, in its current state, a continuation of how things have always been. In the past this... [more]
Posted by Jade Angeles Fitton on 2/26/16
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Catching Up with A.I.R. Gallery: An Advocate for Women Artists for Over 40 Years

by Anni Irish
Generation X: Razzle Dazzle featuring the work of two hundred female artists. As a pioneering New York City gallery, A.I.R's mission and alternative model has been setting precedents for the art world for decades. Also forthcoming are concurrent solo shows by the artists Nancy Azara and Fanny Allié. Founded in 1972, in New York City, A.I.R. Gallery began as the brainchild of artists Barbara Zucker and Susan Williams, who cofounded the gallery with 18 other women artists. Zucker and Williams... [more]
Posted by Anni Irish on 1/7/16
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Feminists on Film: Documenting the 4th Wave

by Char Jansen
Feminism is "trending": but, as we've written before, that's not necessarily a bad thing. There's no doubt that we're experiencing a fervent new wave of visual feminism that has seen wider exposure than ever before thanks to online platforms. The “4th wavers,” a new generation of feminist practioners who are choosing to use visual activity as a core means for resolving their thinking, have forged an unprecedented symbiosis between experimental and formerly marginal forms of culture and the... [more]
Posted by Char Jansen on 10/24/15
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The Feminist Art Group Fighting Misogyny in Japan and Korea

by Natalie Hegert
“I’m scared to go back.” We were all squeezed into wooden folding chairs with a crowd standing around the perimeter of the room at Last Projects, on the second floor, where an old air conditioner, inadequately exhaling intermittent wafts of cool air, and a set of heavy Venetian blinds blocked out the sights and sounds of Hollywood Boulevard below. It was nearing 10pm. Their screening was over, and Pink, as she would like to be called, was at the front of the room, standing with her compatriot... [more]
Posted by Natalie Hegert on 9/8/15
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Faith Holland's Cum "Paintings" Aren't Your Usual Cum Paintings

by Joel Kuennen
First, apologies for the puns to come. It’s difficult to talk about sexuality and eroticism without making a bad pun or two. Sexuality has seemingly always been a site of discomfort in our culture: through it, we are laid naked and bare, both literally and via the fetishes that express the darkest sublimations of gendered relations. The advent of a communication tool and platform for largely consequence-free expression—the internet—has greatly affected the role pornography and sexuality play in... [more]
Posted by Joel Kuennen on 6/19/15