Bigindicator

tagged: design
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Exploring Bau: A Giant Sketchbook for Ideas

by Bea De Sousa
“We both agree, sometimes archives can be fun!” Just before everyone disappears to their holiday hideouts, I meet with ICA London curator Juliette Desorgues to explore her new exhibition about the Austrian architecture magazine . We browse through the show together and compare personal favorites. Bau: Magazine for Architecture and Urban Planning, Issue 2, 1965   Bau: Magazine for Architecture and Urban Planning (1947-71), similar to the RIBA Journal, existed as a trade magazine for the... [more]
Posted by Bea De Sousa on 8/10/15
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How to Exhibit and Collect Design

by Natalie Hegert
With the scope of art continually expanding to include everything from film to fashion wear, the design world is finding itself on the up and up. More art collectors are including works by iconic designers into their collections, and many major art institutions—MoMA for instance—either have departments dedicated to architecture and design, or they’ve presented major exhibitions of prominent design figures and movements (David Adjaye, for example, is currently having a huge retrospective at Haus... [more]
Posted by Natalie Hegert on 4/15/15
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How to Paint with Snoop Dogg: A GIF Tutorial

by The Artslant Team
Rearrange your sock drawers. Rapper turned painter turned Lion turned hosier Snoop Lion just released a fresh line for your feet. Working with Swedish sock company Happy Socks, Snoop and the creative team at Cashmere Agency developed a collection of three designs inspired by his foray into painting. "The Art of Inspiration" sock collection includes the navy and white paisley-patterned "Snoop Dogg Gin & Juice," the brightly colored paint supply-themed "Snoop Dogg Painter," and "Snoop Dogg... [more]
Posted by The Artslant Team on 10/29/14
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Photo Report: Inside Dutch Design Week

by Andrea Alessi
Recently, a “Stereotypes of the Netherlands” map made its rounds on the Internet, describing how the Dutch conceptualize their small country’s terrain. Down south, in the middle of Brabant’s “Catholic Carnival Country,” a short distance from “Dumb People, Great Beer” (apologies, Belgium), is the technological oasis of “Philipstown,” so named for the diversified technology mega-corporation. If the city is known for innovation in technology and industrial design then Philips is the omnipresent... [more]
Posted by Andrea Alessi on 10/24/14
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Luftwerk in Conversation: Turning Iconic Architecture into Multimedia Installations

by Lee Ann Norman
For more than ten years, Luftwerk (the creative vision of Petra Bachmaier and Sean Gallero) have created art installations that merge elements of light and video with facets of architecture and design. An opportunity to create a new media exhibit for the centennial celebration of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Robie House in 2010 sparked a growing interest in architecture leading to a deeper engagement with space and culturally significant buildings. Luftwerk will have an installation at the Mies van der... [more]
Posted by Lee Ann Norman on 10/14/14
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Bummer: Reflections on the Varieties of Human Folly, Aesthetics, and the 1990s

by Rob Goyanes
For some reason, in the wake of men creating darkness, they also make art: Christ gets crucified, someone paints a scene of it. War with the Japanese, a handmade game called “Kill the Jap.” Stalin shaves off and effectively enslaves a solid percentage of Russian society in order to hoist industrialization upon its weary shoulders—a porcelain plate, so you can eat off his face. Such examples are the art and design found at , a small, eccentric exhibition on view at the Wolfsonian-FIU. Adding to... [more]
Posted by Rob Goyanes on 8/13/14
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Effortlessness, It’s Never Easy if You Try

by Christina Catherine Martinez
Seeking to postpone stock experiences and squeeze them all into our few days together, I avoided visiting the Tower until my mother arrived. We didn’t eat macarons at Ladurée, we didn’t get hot chocolate at Café de Flore, we didn’t jostle for selfies with La Joconde, but we went to the Tower. The visit itself is a symbolic gesture, because the symbol literally haunts no matter where you are in the world. Those curving lines, stretching skyward like a bit of pinched and pulled-up landscape, are... [more]
Posted by Christina Catherine Martinez on 1/21/14
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You Can't Pin Women Down: Designing Modern Women 1890-1990

by Roslyn Bernstein
Three flat-bottomed brown paper bags, so simple, you could easily pass them by, stand dead center in the Kitchen Transformations section of the exhibit at MoMA. On the adjacent label there are two names, Margaret E. Knight, the woman who patented the machine that made the bags in the 1870s-1880s, and Charles B. Stilwell, who, according to Juliet Kinchin, organizer of the exhibit and curator in the Department of Architecture and Design, made “subtle modifications” to the design. Labels play an... [more]
Posted by Roslyn Bernstein on 1/13/14
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Sublime, Banal, and In-Between: SOFA in its 20th Year

by F. Phillip Barash
SOFA takes stamina, a keen and curious eye, and a pair of comfortable walking shoes. A long parade of blown glass, statement jewelry, and iron sculpture can get fatiguing. Else, you’d have to fetishize decorative arts to walk every row of the massive Navy Pier pavilion, densely packed with some seventy dealers’ booths. Entering its 20th year – an important milestone – the fair of Sculpture Objects and Functional Art can feel intensely variegated and unwieldy. A few pieces approach the sublime;... [more]
Posted by F. Phillip Barash on 11/2/13
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Fall Preview: Bright Colours & Rebellious Attitude in London

by Char Jansen
There’s always a back-to-school feeling when September comes round, no matter how long ago you closed that chapter; it brings a certain feeling of dread and sweaty-palmed anxiety, and the peculiar impulse that you should buy a pencil case. Most gallerists no doubt have the same feeling; after a long summer closure, poor souls are forced back to dust down the artworks and open up their doors. Autumn in London in terms of shows can by now be loosely divided into two categories, opening BF... [more]
Posted by Char Jansen on 9/12/13