tagged: conceptual

Kailum Graves Answers 5 Questions

by The Artslant Team
  What are you trying to communicate with your work? I consider my work political, but I prefer the subtle process of reflection over the shoveling of an opinion down a viewer's throat. That's probably because I don't think art is a political or emancipatory force—rather, it is what Fredric Jameson labeled “just another ‘pop’ in an all-pervasive pop-culture.” Thus, I’m not interested in examining or establishing perceived truths; instead, I’m interested in exploring the Absurd—the... [more]
Posted by The Artslant Team on 3/12

The Marginal Labor Left for Humans: Brett Wallace’s AMAZING INDUSTRIES

by Joel Kuennen
SPRING/BREAK Art Show 2018, more than 100 curators will feature artists and exhibitions that consider the theme: Stranger Comes to Town. It’s been said that all great literature boils down to one of two stories: a hero goes on a journey or a stranger comes to town. “Who and what is this Stranger?” ask SPRING/BREAK curators and founders, Ambre Kelly and Andrew Gori. “Is their travel into the unknown always an act of heroism to some, of colonialism or contamination and infiltration to... [more]
Posted by Joel Kuennen on 3/6

daàPo reo Answers 5 Questions

by The Artslant Team
We’re exhibiting two of daàPo’s riotous flag artworks this week in the ArtSlant Prize Exhibition, where the artist recieved an Honorable Mention. Come visit us in Times Square at SPRING/BREAK Art Show, March 6–12, booth 2231. Purchase tickets for the show here.   What are you trying to communicate with your work? For me, it’s about rendering the texture of an experience as closely as possible, much more so than the aesthetic aspect of the work itself. I mean, obviously, I’m... [more]
Posted by The Artslant Team on 3/5

Yvette Kaiser Smith Answers 5 Questions

by The Artslant Team
  What are you trying to communicate with your work? I make wall-based geometric abstractions by inventing systems for visualizing values of numbers, specifically of sequences from the infinite numbers pi and e, by utilizing grids and repetition of simple geometric shapes. Numbers are the direct source of abstraction. The majority of my past works are wall-based, geometric, crocheted fiberglass constructions. In 1996, when these things began, they were based on identity... [more]
Posted by The Artslant Team on 2/22

Lauren C. Sudbrink Answers 5 Questions

by The Artslant Team
Lauren C. Sudbrink.   What are you trying to communicate with your work? As an artist, musician, and performer my work is concerned with the possibilities of social engagement. Drawing on my early work in photography, my practice seeks to examine and assert the notion that art is never passive or static, but a constellation of systems and processes that determine, affirm, and condition our experiences. On account of this, my work is always political and is concerned as much with... [more]
Posted by The Artslant Team on 1/22

The Informers: Ryan Steadman on Better Criticism Through Painting

by Bradley Rubenstein
In this series of interviews for ArtSlant, I wanted to talk to artists who are also involved in criticism or theory. There are any number of “crossovers” across creative and critical disciplines: Julian Schnabel is a painter and a filmmaker; Mel Bochner is a painter who has also been a good art reviewer.  However—using Barnett Newman, and more recently Mira Schor, as examples, as well as the quirky Robert Smithson’s dystopian fantasy world—I’d like to focus on artists who broaden their field... [more]
Posted by Bradley Rubenstein on 1/10

No, Donald Trump Is Not a Conceptual Artist. And Border Walls Are Not “Land Art”

by Andrea Alessi
I read the press release three times back to back, looking for any hint of irony. Or even confirmation of sincerity. I parsed the website, hoping an “about” page or mission statement could set my bearings. What exactly is MAGA, the “non-profit arts organization” petitioning the U.S. Government to designate the eight border wall prototypes erected outside of San Diego a national monument? The eight prototypes, constructed by six firms and built using $3.3 million in federal funds, were... [more]
Posted by Andrea Alessi on 1/5

In 2017, Artists Channeled Pessimism, But Weren’t Defeated

by Andrea Alessi
This summer Jill Lepore, writing for the , declared that we’re living in a “golden age for dystopian fiction.” She described a literature of “radical pessimism” and “submission” (in contrast, she wrote, to a literature of resistance). In an essay for Tin House author Allegra Hyde called for “literature that chases utopia” in the age of Trump. She urged her fellow writers: “Our trade is in rendering the unreal real. We are world builders, after all.” As ArtSlant’s resident pessimist, I’ll be... [more]
Posted by Andrea Alessi on 12/21/17

Artists Chart Evidence of the Inhuman, and the Inhumanity of Evidence

by Benjamin Busch
The group exhibition identifies an ongoing trend in contemporary art, as well as in broader cultural circles, that takes up “evidence” as a material or animating subject matter. Characteristic works deal with social structures that exist to perpetuate crime or to hinder it, to represent or claim authority over certain groups through data or data representations. The exhibition is complimented by a website that includes more than a dozen texts and a handful of artworks not in the Berlin show... [more]
Posted by Benjamin Busch on 12/18/17

The Traitorous Translator: Power and Representation in Transnational Discourse

by Pınar Üner Yılmaz
My memories of learning a second language date back to my post-elementary school years, what they call the prep-year, in a bilingual school in Turkey. From the first lesson, the struggle to communicate was real: our teacher, who was from Wales, spoke only English, and my class of ten Turkish-speaking students got by with dictionaries and gestures. For many of us in that classroom, and in Turkey more broadly, not knowing English was a failure—and it was something we had better remedy... [more]
Posted by Pınar Üner Yılmaz on 12/13/17