Bigindicator

tagged: black
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Black as midnight on a moonless night

by Natalie Hegert
"Black as midnight on a moonless night." That’s how Special Agent Cooper likes his coffee, and that’s what I thought of when viewing by Jordan Tate, at Transformer Station in Cleveland, Ohio. “That’s pretty black,” says Pete Martell, as he pours a cup of coffee for Cooper in that first episode of Twin Peaks. SUPERBLACK is pretty black all right. In fact it’s the blackest black you’ll ever see. It’s… excuse me… really fucking black. Tate became fascinated by the concept of the blackest black... [more]
Posted by Natalie Hegert on 4/12/14
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My Avatar and Me: An Interview with Jacolby Satterwhite

by Stephanie Berzon
The digital age is currently facing certain adaptations that bring into question the modern’s faithfulness to understanding the past; texting incoherent typos being confused with Freudian slips was not considered by the original teacher and therefore could nullify the slip of the tongue theory. Psychological models in human development did not anticipate dualism in identity formation: the physical being and the digital projection of it via an online profile. Jacolby Satterwhite welcomes all to... [more]
Posted by Stephanie Berzon on 12/1/13
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Thinking Through Recess: Blackness Now and Then

by James Pepper Kelly
–Archibald Motley Jr. in a 1978 interview, describing the figures in his paintings Recess, the current exhibition from guest curator Tempestt Hazel at the South Side Community Art Center (SSCAC) in Bronzeville, taps into both the past and the present. In the show, the work of seven contemporary artists is presented alongside pieces from nine artists from the SSAC’s permanent collection. According to the promotional write-up: Recess is a group exhibition that uses images associated with youth... [more]
Posted by James Pepper Kelly on 10/18/13
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Portraying the Power of the Persona

by Eduardo Alexander Rabel
Photographer Dawoud Bey's impressive retrospective at MoCA surveys more than three decades of work created after his breakthrough project, Bey's bold images combine authenticity with aesthetics, grappling with the question of how photography can convey the "least untrue self." The seven distinct series on view represent the diversity within specific communities—especially African Americans and youth. As a Black artist, Bey has always been acutely aware of the need for images that present Black... [more]
Posted by Eduardo Alexander Rabel on 8/31/13