Bigindicator

tagged: artslant prize 2014
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Adam Douglas Thompson: Dialogical Particulars

by Joel Kuennen
—Mikhail Bakhtin, Discourse in the Novel, 1941   Adam Douglas Thompson’s drawings are words. His installed formations are sentences. His words, however, are not defined. His sentences are not linear. They are dialogic imaginations, each image acts a concept which through their relational grouping gains meaning. The groupings can and should be read multidirectionally. This approach is how Thompson believes thought works, a concept trailed by consciousness that couples with nearby conceptual... [more]
Posted by Joel Kuennen on 12/5/14
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A Play on Material: Oren Pinhassi

by Joel Kuennen
Postmodernism is failing. History is a spiral.   These three assumptions underlie Oren Pinhassi’s work. Beginning with the familiar—towels, a backpack, a dwelling—objects are transformed through the addition of another common material, plaster. Through this addition, he transubstantiates the everyday into thematic sculptural and architectural forms, an act that Pinhassi describes as transcendent. There is a key definition being explored through Pinhassi’s work: transformation vs.... [more]
Posted by Joel Kuennen on 12/5/14
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Anastasia Samoylova: On Facebook Everyone Is on Holiday

by Caroline Picard
Anastasia Samoylova does not go out into summer fields when she begins a new work of landscape photography. She goes online, haunting public domain photosites for images of picturesque landscapes: sunsets, waterfalls, forests, oceans, and flowers. Despite the seductive vistas each calendar image portrays, they are so common they become redundant. “I’m almost monumentalizing them in my installations,” Samoylova said during a recent (Skyped) studio visit, “otherwise they would just be these... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 12/4/14
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Edra Soto: Selling a Fantasy

by Stephanie Cristello
Luxury is so often determined by a price tag. But commerce is rarely how we interact with the phenomena of high-end merchandise—its excessiveness, its indulgence; its extravagance is almost always (and exclusively) experienced visually. We feel the texture of opulent velvets and silks first with our eyes, the metallic gleam of a smooth reflection through its cool touch on our sight, in jewels that refract their prismatic color back onto our gaze. There is something intensely tactile in the... [more]
Posted by Stephanie Cristello on 12/4/14