Bigindicator

tagged: african-american
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Kehinde Wiley's Empire of Vulnerability

by Joel Kuennen
“Kehinde Wiley is everywhere right now,” said Eugenie Tsai, John and Barbara Vogelstein Curator of Contemporary Art, Brooklyn Museum, as the small press tour began. This was not an exaggeration by any means; Wiley garnered recent attention when his paintings appeared as backdrops in Fox's , a highly stylized melodrama from Lee Daniels and Danny Strong that collages black stereotypes while positioning black bodies into a King Lear-like drama, and for his fashion week photoshoot with New York... [more]
Posted by Joel Kuennen on 2/20/15
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Hyper-Pluralities for a New Becoming: The Exhibited Body in Contemporary Art

by Caroline Picard
“The body is always a body that is an unfinished entity.” —Lisa Blackman, Berg, 2008   “We have a whole history of representation in which the black body was not the privileged body,” Kerry James Marshall said in an interview a few years ago. “So there was no crisis of representation for me, because the black figure is underrepresented.” Marshall has patiently, and masterfully installed black figurative paintings in predominantly white institutions for his entire career; this past fall he... [more]
Posted by Caroline Picard on 1/16/15
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Filling in a blank in the image bank

by Edo Dijksterhuis
In the eyes of European curators and collectors, Kerry James Marshall is a quintessentially African-American artist, dealing with the idiosyncrasies of a place far removed from the Old World. Maybe I’m exaggerating, but this can be the only explanation for the complete absence of Marshall’s work in European museum collections. Only two private collectors, one in London and one in Amsterdam, have actually bought paintings by the artist who in the United States is considered one of the greats of... [more]
Posted by Edo Dijksterhuis on 11/29/13
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Thinking Through Recess: Blackness Now and Then

by James Pepper Kelly
–Archibald Motley Jr. in a 1978 interview, describing the figures in his paintings Recess, the current exhibition from guest curator Tempestt Hazel at the South Side Community Art Center (SSCAC) in Bronzeville, taps into both the past and the present. In the show, the work of seven contemporary artists is presented alongside pieces from nine artists from the SSAC’s permanent collection. According to the promotional write-up: Recess is a group exhibition that uses images associated with youth... [more]
Posted by James Pepper Kelly on 10/18/13
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John Brown Song! : an Interview with Laylah Ali

by Max Nesterak
Laylah Ali isn’t a media guru by any means. Traditionally a painter, Ali is more at home poring over paint samples than messing with pixels. But after being asked by the Dia Art Foundation to create an online piece, she decided to venture outside her familiar mediums of paint and paper to explore the life and legend of militant abolitionist John Brown. In John Brown Song! Ali assembled some nineteen videos of her friends, relatives, fellow artists, co-workers, and acquaintances singing... [more]
Posted by Max Nesterak on 10/7/13
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My Country Has No Name: Interview with Toyin Odutola

by Alexandra Giniger
Since receiving her MFA from California College of the Arts one year ago, Toyin Odutola has garnered much buzz as a young artist on the rise who maintains a fresh perspective on the flexible natures of race, identity, and nationality. Her process and progress are readily visible through her many social media outlets, which display her painstakingly prolific self-portraits. But who is the woman behind the work? From where has she sprung? Born in Nigeria, Odutola currently lives and works in... [more]
Posted by Alexandra Giniger on 7/14/13
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Subverting Society: Autonomy in the Portraiture of Barkley L. Hendricks

by Alexandra Giniger
One might assume that the power of the artist lies in his ability to create his subjects. The series of portraits shown in Barkley L. Hendricks’ Heart Hands Eyes Mind, however, finds its unique authority in the artist’s capacity to allow his characters to define themselves. Rather than dictating the terms of their appearances, Hendricks seems to paint his subjects as they themselves would elect to be seen. The result is exhilarating; there is something fundamentally liberating in the... [more]
Posted by Alexandra Giniger on 3/12/13