Bigindicator

tagged: activism
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The Russian Terrorist: Petr Pavlensky

by Dasha Filippova
[1] Thus wrote Petr Pavlensky, the so-called "mind, balls and conscience"[2] of Putin's Russia in his December 15, 2015 letter from Butyrskaya Prison to a Radio Svoboda journalist.[3] Pavlensky was detained after his November 9, 2015 aktsiya[4], titled "Threat," which consisted of lighting the doors of Moscow's Federal Security Bureau (FSB), housed in the historic Lubyanka, on fire. At the time of the letter, the St. Petersburg-based political artist was facing up to three years in prison.... [more]
Posted by Dasha Filippova on 6/13/16
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The Exhibition Speaking Out Against Honor Killings in Kuwait

by Andrea Alessi
Five thousand women are murdered annually by their fathers, sons, brothers, or husbands in so-called honor killings. Or at least that’s the most widely cited number, derived from a UN estimate in 2000, the last time an official study was done. The real number, according to experts like Jordanian journalist Rana Husseini, who has covered the subject for over 20 years, is likely much larger. Honor killings are often considered an internal family issue; they’re a highly sensitive topic, and few... [more]
Posted by Andrea Alessi on 4/28/16
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Mourning As Political Act: Women Artists from Turkey Seek What's Hidden in Loss

by Pınar Üner Yılmaz
“Will women always die? Let some men die too. I killed him for my honor,” uttered Çilem Doğan, defending herself with a heartfelt statement. Arrested for murdering her abusive husband, who beat her—even while she was pregnant—and forced her into prostitution, Doğan resisted the long-term abuse one day and shot her husband with bullets originally aimed at her. Doğan’s story isn’t unique within Turkey’s long history of violence—domestic and otherwise—though she is one of the lucky ones who... [more]
Posted by Pınar Üner Yılmaz on 4/12/16
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In Ryan Mendoza’s Detroit House, Debris of a Financial Collapse Turns into Relief Aid

by Edo Dijksterhuis
Is it a sculpture? A political indictment? A social activist gesture? Or maybe some form of contemporary historiography? It’s not really clear how to define or classify Ryan Mendoza’s . One thing’s for sure, though: it’s not a house.  You could easily be fooled into thinking it is. It’s got a roof, walls, a porch, windows, and a door you can enter through. It lacks, however, neighbors, a path or driveway leading up to it, a connection to the local power grid, a foundation—in short: physical... [more]
Posted by Edo Dijksterhuis on 2/11/16
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The Personal Is Political: Ellen Rothenberg at Sector 2337

by James Pepper Kelly
In experiencing , Ellen Rothenberg’s solo exhibition at Sector 2337, there’s a moment when you realize that you’re not going to get any answers. Nothing conclusive, that is. Rothenberg’s approach to making—performative, research-based explorations of personal/political history—has no time for neat folding-up. The plethora of media on display—ranging in scale from large lean-tos to shifting photocopies of books—all of these give the impression of a slowly shifting organic system complex as a... [more]
Posted by James Pepper Kelly on 5/27/15
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Ai Weiwei and Joan Baez Receive Amnesty International Honor

by Nadja Sayej
For the first time, Amnesty International awarded their annual Ambassador of Conscience Award to a visual artist. Ai Weiwei received the international honor, which was presented at an award ceremony Thursday night at the Berliner Festspiele in Berlin, in absentia. The artist can’t leave China, being under government surveillance and having his passport revoked. In place, he designated London’s Tate Modern curator Chris Dercon to accept the award on his behalf. The award is devoted to human... [more]
Posted by Nadja Sayej on 5/23/15
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Hong Kong Protest Art: the Facebook group documenting activist artworks

by Char Jansen
Last week, as demonstrations in Hong Kong intensified with police and mafia clashes, Artnet reported on the ensuing panic at auction houses in the wake of the political situation. They questioned the possible impact on the art market given that the protests were strategically placed to paralyze some of HK’s most important business areas. This weekend, the Asia Contemporary Art Show took place as scheduled at the Conrad in Pacific Place, an area occupied by protestors. “We are pleased with the... [more]
Posted by Char Jansen on 10/7/14
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The Sahmat Collective: Politics and Performance in India

by Alicia Chester
Mounted on a red wall, a large black-and-white photograph of a funeral procession carrying a coffin draped in a hammer and sickle flag greets visitors to The Sahmat Collective: Art and Activism in India since 1989. This striking first visual and the room that follows set the premise and tone of the exhibition with plentiful wall text, reading materials, and documentation to supplement and contextualize the work to come. The exhibition introduces an American audience to an Indian art collective... [more]
Posted by Alicia Chester on 3/21/13
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Parallel & Simultaneous: The Association of Human Excellence Likes to Strike Thrice

by Sarah Lehrer-Graiwer, Jeff Hassay
Established in 2009, the Association of Human Excellence (AOHE) is a Los Angeles-based collective that aims to enact social change by using alternative means of reinforcement, both positive and negative. Operating according to a similar theory by which one trains a dog, the Association rewards good behavior by giving fancy treats and discourages bad behavior by scolding the animal and, in extreme circumstances, resorting to rubbing its face in its own filth. The group’s implementation of... [more]
Posted by Sarah Lehrer-Graiwer, Jeff Hassay on 5/9/11