Bigindicator

tagged: Women Artists
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Flipping the Gaze: How Do Women Artists Look at Men?

by Olivia B. Murphy
In 2009, Cheim & Read hung the provocative group show  Women Look at Women, which showcased women artists taking control of their own images. In an encore presentation this summer, women artists turn their gaze this time toward men, reversing one of art’s most long-standing power structures. The Female Gaze Part II: Women Look at Men brings together work from 32 artists, all utilizing the subject of men, or the male body, as a way to confront, or even turn the tables on the Male Gaze, which... [more]
Posted by Olivia B. Murphy on 8/15/16
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Art Dubai Modern Turns the Tables on Gender Stereotyping in the Middle East

by Danna Lorch
“Do women have to be naked to get into the Met. Museum?” The Guerrilla Girls have famously been asking the same question since 1989, when the feminist group first pointed out that “Less than 5% of the modern art section [at the museum] are women.” That was in New York, but does the same hold true for the representation and visibility of modern women artists in non-western regions? While the West is quick to slap a “suppressed” sticker on Middle Eastern women as a group, fixating on veiling as... [more]
Posted by Danna Lorch on 3/16/16
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Third Annual Edit-a-thon to Bring More Women Artists, and Editors, to Wikipedia

by Jade Angeles Fitton
Art+Feminism started their Wikipedia “edit-a-thons” on March 1, 2014, on International Women’s Day, as a response to the enormous quantity of information now available to us and the evident lack of information about women in the arts. The under-representation of women is not a product of the digital age and the predominantly male editorship of Wikipedia—which we’ll return to shortly; the digital age is merely, in its current state, a continuation of how things have always been. In the past this... [more]
Posted by Jade Angeles Fitton on 2/26/16
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Emma Hart Wins Max Mara Art Prize for Women: a Look at an Essential Award

by Sam Steverlynck
Last Wednesday Emma Hart won the 6th Max Mara Art Prize for Women, following in the footsteps of internationally acclaimed artists like Laure Prouvost and Andrea Büttner. As the prestigious award finds another winner, we learn more about the practice of an exciting emerging artist. But the announcement is also an opportunity for reflection: is an art prize exclusively for women still necessary in 2016, a time when not just art institutions but also the rest of the world are paying increased... [more]
Posted by Sam Steverlynck on 2/8/16
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The Shows to See in 2016, and Why

by The Artslant Team
What’s on the menu for 2016? In blanket terms, the art we'll be seeing at some of the world's premier spots has a refreshing take on media and artists who have previously remained peripheral, with far more women-fronted institutional exhibitions for a start. We've also noted a continued interest in asserting the relevance of media like textiles, ceramics, video, and performance, showing them on a bigger scale and with contemporary perspectives digging deeper into the overlooked sections of our... [more]
Posted by The Artslant Team on 12/19/15
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Catching Up with A.I.R. Gallery: An Advocate for Women Artists for Over 40 Years

by Anni Irish
Generation X: Razzle Dazzle featuring the work of two hundred female artists. As a pioneering New York City gallery, A.I.R's mission and alternative model has been setting precedents for the art world for decades. Also forthcoming are concurrent solo shows by the artists Nancy Azara and Fanny Allié. Founded in 1972, in New York City, A.I.R. Gallery began as the brainchild of artists Barbara Zucker and Susan Williams, who cofounded the gallery with 18 other women artists. Zucker and Williams... [more]
Posted by Anni Irish on 1/7/16
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Nasher Sculpture Center Establishes Acquisition Fund for Art by Women

by Andrea Alessi
On Monday, the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas announced its establishment of a new acquisition fund dedicated to the purchasing of work by women artists. A seed gift from the Kaleta A. Doolin Foundation will provide an initial $750,000 for the fund's creation. The announcement follows last week’s profile of the Guerrilla Girls—an article that did much to underscore how little has changed in the three decades since the radical collective first began donning gorilla masks and counting the... [more]
Posted by Andrea Alessi on 8/12/15
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Is Street Art Sexist?

by Eva Recinos
When a street piece catches your eye do you ever stop to think:   No survey has tallied the exact number of men versus women street artists, but since its beginning, the major names in New York graf were male. Taggers took on dangerous—often illegal—and arduous physical activities for the sake of getting their names on trains, billboards, and freeway underpasses. As graffiti evolved into street art, so did its expressions of rugged individualism and daring, macho spontaneity. Women stand out... [more]
Posted by Eva Recinos on 1/5/15