Bigindicator

tagged: ArtSlant Editions
20160622150836-20160621033010-egg-winky-2

The Taste Issue: An Introduction

by Andrea Alessi
Table of Contents: The Matter of Molecular Practice: Sean Raspet | Joel Kuennen Ferran Adrià Unpacks the Tools of Creativity | Edo Dijksterhuis Taste With the Body and Without | Zachary Cahill Squeezing Social Commentary into a Luxury Beverage | Nadja Sayej   “Made hickory smoked salmon with rose and squid ink rice tonight... :)” This is an email sign off I received from my fellow editor, Joel Kuennen, the other day. Touching base about what we’ve been making and eating is not... [more]
Posted by Andrea Alessi on 6/22/16
20160621011630-onkawara_sollewitttelegram-1940x1439

Taste With the Body and Without

by Zachary Cahill
People are stupid.  Don’t misunderstand me: People are stupid in the ways that I am stupid. We are stupid in common: over-worked, over-tired, over-extended—distracted by 21st century life's whizzing communications, the decentralized self, and efforts to keep the barricades from being completely overrun by life’s ghoulish troubles. This being so, we possess precious little attention left to really know what someone's talking about who is actually sitting across the table from us or who just... [more]
Posted by Zachary Cahill on 6/22/16
20160413142406-event_listeners

As Authentication, Currency, and Inspiration, Bitcoin Finds a Growing Share in the Art Market

by Edo Dijksterhuis
It took a crisis to spark off the next revolution in technology. In 2009, a year after Lehman Brothers’ disastrous crash and its subsequent domino effect on the rest of the financial sector, the Bitcoin was launched. The concept of cryptocurrency, cashless and operating in a peer-to-peer network, had been around for some ten years but until the dawn of the New Great Depression no one had felt the need to explore it in depth. Its stability—the conversion rate has been hovering around $382 per... [more]
Posted by Edo Dijksterhuis on 4/20/16
20160413122311-hw_s_night

Revisiting LA’s Contested Development: Hauser Wirth & Schimmel Shapes Its New Neighborhood, for Better and Worse

by Lauren McQuade
Walking down the nonlinear streets in Downtown’s Arts District, Traction Avenue looks about the same today as it did two weeks ago, but it’s changed a lot from how it looked last summer, when I first reported on the gentrification and development of the area.  Storefronts and tenants continue to shuffle—the retail space 12345 once occupied has sat empty with a “For Lease” sign in its window since August; District Gallery is gone; Traction Avenue Gallery closed down a few months back. And these... [more]
Posted by Lauren McQuade on 4/20/16
20160225140409-christian-resistance

The Resistance Issue: An Introduction

by Andrea Alessi
Table of Contents: The Problem of Art's Morality | Joel Kuennen Body as Material in the Surveillance State | Tara Plath Queering Film Production | Lauren McQuade Bringing Self-Defense Performance into the Community | Joel Kuennen   If resistance hasn’t been on your mind lately, you haven’t been paying attention. In an explosive presidential primary season, the loudest voices on both sides of the aisle flaunt their outsider statuses, reacting against the mainstream. While appeals to the... [more]
Posted by Andrea Alessi on 2/25/16
20160224183936-museepicassoparis_seatedwoman-cropped-2

The Problem of Art's Morality

by Joel Kuennen
This is a question that has plagued me the past few months, egged on by a resurgence in the use of “politically correct” or PC as a pejorative in American culture. The term PC first came to political prominence in a speech given by George H.W. Bush during a commencement speech at the University of Michigan in 1991. In it, he was quick to align “political correctness” with intolerance, claiming it to be a force for the abuse of individuals based on their race (read “whiteness”) or class... [more]
Posted by Joel Kuennen on 2/24/16
20151221092714-screen_shot_2015-12-21_at_10

ArtSlant Editions: Looking Back on the 2015 Issues of Our Inbox Magazine

by Andrea Alessi
Exhibition reviews and artist interviews have long been central to our editorial focus, but this year—in part as a reflection of how we see arts writing shifting in the digital age—we expanded the scope of ArtSlant's editorial project, exploring and introducing a much greater variety of content. In 2015 our Paris artists-in-residence blogged more than ever and we learned about art and audience in the ArtSlant podcast; we ran a popular series on non-profit art spaces and highlighted artists’... [more]
Posted by Andrea Alessi on 12/19/15
20151119173455-screen_shot_2015-11-19_at_10

Moving Past the Circular Logic of Terrorism

by Joel Kuennen
Another ISIL attack in the West, a threat on Washington D.C. and New York City, and the false sense of security that allows for the prosperity of the West to continue is shaken. The combination is just enough to entice xenophobic trolls to get the people’s blood boiling, again. These tragic moments of terror recur with a frequency that has become divorced from, yet prescriptive of our current state of reality. The regime of safety, the Pax Modern, has long been predicated on the fear of an... [more]
Posted by Joel Kuennen on 11/19/15
20151119171612-diary-dance_600px

LOOPS: An Introduction to ArtSlant Editions, Issue 7

by Andrea Alessi
Table of Contents: Closing the Loop: Does Art Require an Audience? | Gillian Dykeman Maintaining a Clean and Healthy Image for 120 Years | Guy Parker OOO: Three Loops to Unite Them All! | Jamie Keesling The Circular Logic of Terrorism | Joel Kuennen Closed Circuits and Bodies Electric | Janet Oh   Rafia Santana, , 2015   What does a loop look like? It’s not really a shape, is it? More than a steady form, a loop implies gesture, movement, directionality. It’s a vector that returns you... [more]
Posted by Andrea Alessi on 11/19/15
20151119185435-20151116151921-loop

The Latham Loop: Maintaining a Clean and Healthy Image for 120 Years

by Guy Parker
Never forget the loop The first time I encountered the loop was whilst using a Chinon Super 8 projector manufactured in the late 70s. Within seconds of my roll of Kodachrome entering the “auto-loading” machine the projected image began to jitter and convulse. After several further attempts the film buckled, broke, and bunched up in the gate where it was toasted by the searing hot halogen lamp. The instruction booklet explained that although the film lacing process was totally automated, the... [more]
Posted by Guy Parker on 11/19/15