Bigindicator

tagged: film
20141125221036-nice_magic_lantern_image_from_wiki_

Alchemists, Necromancers, and Magicians: An Alternative History of Illusion and the Moving Image

by Guy Parker
The moving image has a long-standing relationship with trickery: deceiving the eye, suspending disbelief, displaying the impossible. In fact, it's devilishly good at it. Everybody's heard about the audience who ran screaming from the oncoming train at the premiere of the Lumiere Brothers’ (1895). I recently read a suggestion that they ran partly to avoid being crushed by a steam train and partly because they knew doing so offered them bit parts in an anecdote that would last the ages. The... [more]
Posted by Guy Parker on 11/25/14
20141006211918-8

Interview with Wendelien van Oldenborgh: Between cinematic reality and polyphonic clash

by Edo Dijksterhuis
She felt honored to have been nominated for the Dr A.H. Heineken Prize for Art. The list of previous recipients is impressive: Carel Visser, Peter Struycken, Mark Manders, and Daan van Golden are among them. With a cool 100,000 euro attached in prize money, it’s one of the biggest art awards in Europe (for comparison: Turner Prize winners get 40,000 pounds, roughly half of that amount). But Wendelien van Oldenborgh did not expect to win the award, which she received last Thursday in... [more]
Posted by Edo Dijksterhuis on 10/6/14
20140826162219-screen_shot_2014-08-26_at_08

(cosmic) love and coffee in the times of digital alienation: Gia, Amalia, Rosetta, Marina

by Elise Lammer
is the color of teenagers' cheeks when they’re secretly falling in love   For the third time in Palo Alto by Gia Coppola, they meet. It’s daytime. They study at the same high school but not the same class. So much has happened since that disastrous party, they both thought it was over, their untold love would not survive. Walking towards each other, they pretend to not notice the disturbing presence of the other getting closer. They slow down their pace, in perfect harmony—look at each... [more]
Posted by Elise Lammer on 8/23/14
20140706065053-flm_3568

Circling Time

by Deepika Sorabjee
In , filmmaker Ashish Avikunthak presents several conceits. A single take of 102 minutes in a 105-minute film, screened as a very large projection at Chatterjee & Lal, has Rati, the Goddess of Love in Hindu mythology explored as the notion of desire through the ages, and Chakravyuh (a military formation mentioned in the Hindu epic Mahabharata that consists of a labyrinth of concentric circles) used as a defense mechanism. It’s a gauntlet that Avikunthak throws down from the start—a tight... [more]
Posted by Deepika Sorabjee on 7/6/14
20140625124543-3

Out of the white cube; into the darkness

by Guy Parker
When I think of Midnight Movies I timeslip to the early 90s and all-nighters at the Scala in London's Kings Cross. The imagery is that of , Eraserhead, Vanishing Point, and Blue Sunshine. The aroma is of popcorn and hashish, the taste—cheap stimulants and vodka. I think of a motley crew of film geeks and freaks who have stumbled out of the pub at closing, dashed to the off license, and now gather inside the crumbling flea pit for an all night fix of kitsch, action, and high weirdness on the big... [more]
Posted by Guy Parker on 6/25/14
20140515224153-carrollfletcherwh0039310x102011lg

The Media Man Around Town (and the World): Li Zhenhua and Art Basel Hong Kong’s Film Sector

by Katherine Grube
Li Zhenhua began our conversation with a gentle correction: he had three exhibitions opening in one month, not three exhibitions opening over as many months. I was reminded of these words as Li’s disembodied voice greeted me at Chronus Art Center in Shanghai last week during the opening of a satellite exhibition for “Pandamonium: Media Art from Shanghai,” an exhibition co-curated with David Elliott in Berlin. Unable to attend the show’s simultaneous openings in Berlin and Shanghai, Li... [more]
Posted by Katherine Grube on 5/15/14
20140426185316-259

From Deep and the Rise of the Dunkadelic Era

by Brad Phillips
The first three weeks of April in Toronto are host to the 27th incarnation of the Images Festival, which bills itself as the largest festival in North America for "experimental and independent moving image culture." It offers a much needed and relieving, counter to the Toronto International Film Festival. The Images Festival focuses primarily on video art, far too often only seen in the rarefied spaces of contemporary art galleries, and smaller independent films that would perhaps not be... [more]
Posted by Brad Phillips on 4/26/14
20140402170522-richter_01_ghosts

Were the Dadaists Time Travellers? and other questions I’d like to ask Hans Richter

by Guy Parker
The movie camera – that bastard son of a thousand alchemists, illusionists, inventors, and old showmen – could have been purpose built for the Dadaists and the Surrealists. If it had slipped into obscurity or been written off as gimmick after they had made use of it, its journey into existence could have been said to be worthwhile. It's as if their paths were always destined to cross. In the Hans Richter show at Martin-Gropius-Bau you can see the very genesis of avant-garde film. Richter, a... [more]
Posted by Guy Parker on 4/2/14
20140331083310-schulnik_in5803_stlouisman_sm

Glitter and Doom: Allison Schulnik + Bradley Rubenstein

by Bradley Rubenstein
Allison Schulnik’s second New York solo exhibition at ZieherSmith, Eager, included a startling array of painting, sculpture, drawing, and film, creating a beautiful, yet haunting world. Her work is currently on view in a solo exhibition at the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art in Hartford, Connecticut. Schulnik talks with Bradley Rubenstein about her new show, her dance background, the difference between working in New York and Los Angeles, and, of course, cats. Allison Schulnik, Blue Dancer... [more]
Posted by Bradley Rubenstein on 3/31/14
20140322155112-kalmar

The Everyday Takes Control: Stefan Constantinescu's Films on Love

by Olga Stefan
In the first of seven films in a series dealing with love between men and women (started in 2009 and proposed to end in 2019), a man sits down on a bus in Bucharest, Romania and telephones his wife or girlfriend. He becomes increasingly threatening and verbally violent, compulsively repeating the same questions and accusations over and over in a sort of trance-like loop. (Bus number 92) (2009) depicts a very private and intimate conversation that is played out in the public space, turning the... [more]
Posted by Olga Stefan on 3/21/14
ArtSlant has shutdown. The website is currently running in a view-only mode to allow archiving of the content.

The website will be permanently closed shortly, so please retrieve any content you wish to save.