Articles | ArtSlant https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/show en-us 40 Under the Radar: Winnie Chan | Suzanne Dittenber | Young Eun Kang <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/477835-winnie-chan?utm_source=WinnieChan&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Winnie Chan &ndash; London &amp; Exeter</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1033362?utm_source=WinnieChan&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1033362/u3azr9/20170301000653-DSC_0210.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1033352?utm_source=WinnieChan&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1033352/mf2ji7/20170301000530-IMG_5352.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1033359?utm_source=WinnieChan&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1033359/mf2ji7/20170301000641-2013_Two_pillows.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1033345?utm_source=WinnieChan&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1033345/mf2ji7/20170301000510-london_bucket_list.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/477960-suzanne-dittenber?utm_source=SuzanneDittenber&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Suzanne Dittenber &ndash; Indiana </span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1033830?utm_source= SuzanneDittenber&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1033830/u3azr9/20170302045407-6.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1033833?utm_source=SuzanneDittenber&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1033833/mf2ji7/20170302045409-7.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1033831?utm_source=SuzanneDittenber&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1033831/mf2ji7/20170302045407-5.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1033832?utm_source=SuzanneDittenber&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1033832/mf2ji7/20170302045408-10.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/477834-young-eun-kang?utm_source=YoungEunKang&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Young Eun Kang &ndash; Seoul</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1033333?utm_source=YoungEunKang&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1033333/u3azr9/20170301000021-______c.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1033558?utm_source=YoungEunKang&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1033558/u3azr9/20170301145658-___1_MG_9135_1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1033555?utm_source=YoungEunKang&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1033555/u3azr9/20170301145550-_MG_9139_1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1033556?utm_source=YoungEunKang&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1033556/u3azr9/20170301145623-_MG_9156_1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/s?marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Fri, 24 Mar 2017 08:21:23 -0400 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Portrait: Director Daniel Hug Gets Ready for the World’s Oldest Art Fair <p><em>This photo portrait was originally published as a longer feature on <a href="http://bit.ly/2nYodIc" target="_blank">Freunde von Freunden</a></em><em>&nbsp;under the title &ldquo;Daniel Hug, director of Art Cologne, on the Cologne art scene and the Germans&rsquo; passion for collecting.&rdquo;&nbsp;</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;Cologne wasn&#39;t cool when I got here&mdash;everyone wanted to go to Berlin,&rdquo; Daniel Hug, the Managing Director for Art Cologne recalls. Yet this &ldquo;uncool&rdquo; city on the Rhine has a long and important history with art. Hug explains:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">Starting in the &rsquo;60s, Cologne was the art capital of Germany. The Cologne-based art collectors Peter and Irene Ludwig were collecting Pop Art before the Americans themselves had even thought about it. Even today, the city has a very strong art scene. There are important and established galleries here. Cologne is a large city and at the same time intimate. You can build and maintain personal relationships and friendships within the industry and have more opportunities for exchange than anywhere else.</p> <p>As the Managing Director of Art Cologne since 2008, Hug has made some crucial changes to the fair, making it more competitive, but also championing young galleries and artists. He reduced the number of exhibitors from nearly 300 down to around 190 galleries, and introduced new, logical structures: small stalls at cheaper rents for emerging galleries and more space for established exhibitors. &ldquo;Critical thinking,&rdquo; claims Hug as he describes his approach, &ldquo;you find creative ways to solve a problem. And don&#39;t go by the book.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170323144209-Freunde-von-Freunden-Daniel-Hug-2961.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In particular, he wants to use Art Cologne to better promote and support young galleries. Calling it the &ldquo;Neumarkt&rdquo; (new market), this year Hug is introducing a private area in which young exhibitors can present individually or as part of a group. He&rsquo;s keenly aware of trends, but also his responsibilities in the capricious business of art: &ldquo;If you&rsquo;re not a young gallery owner anymore, you&#39;re no longer interesting. The expiration date of a gallery is about five years nowadays. A trade show has about 10&ndash;12 years before they start having difficulties.&rdquo; Yet as the oldest art fair in the world, celebrating its 51st season this April, Art Cologne has long left this limit far behind.</p> <p>Leading up to Art Cologne, which runs April 26&ndash;29, photographer Michael Englert trailed Daniel Hug at his home, office, and gallery in Cologne for Freunde von Freunden. You can read the whole profile <a href="http://http://bit.ly/2nYodIc" target="_blank">here</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170323144250-Freunde-von-Freunden-Daniel-Hug-2494.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170323144317-Freunde-von-Freunden-Daniel-Hug-2651.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170323144747-Freunde-von-Freunden-Daniel-Hug-2756.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170323144721-Freunde-von-Freunden-Daniel-Hug-2977.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170323144844-Freunde-von-Freunden-Daniel-Hug-2673.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170323144855-Freunde-von-Freunden-Daniel-Hug-2449.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170323144655-Freunde-von-Freunden-Daniel-Hug-2390.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170323144812-Freunde-von-Freunden-Daniel-Hug-3037.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Photography: Michael Englert<br /> Adapted from text by: Sascha Abel; Translation: Brenton Withers<br /> See the full portrait on <a href="http://http://bit.ly/2nYodIc" target="_blank">Freunde von Freunden</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Fri, 24 Mar 2017 07:59:15 -0400 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list ARTSLANT PRIZE IX - ROUND 2 JURIED WINNERS ANNOUNCED <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 956.667px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="line-height: 30px; width: 948.889px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170104153040-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 200px; height: 200px;" /></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><b><i>Check out the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/showcases/showcase?listtype=showcase&amp;sublist=59%5Ejuried+winners" style="color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration-line: none;" target="_blank">Round 2 Juried Winners</a>!</i></b></font></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><font face="helvetica" size="4">Special thanks to this round&#39;s amazing jurors! &lt;3</font></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><b><i>Round 3 is now open! Apply today for your chance at $5k in prizes!</i></b></font></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><i><strong>To apply</strong>, go to your ArtSlant profile and click&nbsp;<strong>enter contest</strong>.</i></font></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="3"> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;"><em><strong>ROUND 2 JURORS:</strong></em></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td align="center" width="600"> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.printscreenfestival.com/" style="color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration-line: none;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170224132948-Lior_Zalmanson_New_Profile.jpg" style="float: left; padding-right: 10px; width: 200px;" />Lior Zalmanson</a></strong>&nbsp;is a writer, new media artist, curator and researcher. His works focus on digital culture, online behavior and the information society. In 2011, Lior founded Print Screen Festival, Israel&rsquo;s digital arts festival, which explores themes of digital culture in the audio-visual arts. Acting as the artistic director of Print Screen, Lior has curated dozens of new media exhibitions and performances. In regards to his own art practice, Lior&rsquo;s first play, Yingale, won the Haifa Fringe festival in 2009 and was produced in both Israel and Serbia. His latest works in film, theater and new media were showcased at the Tribeca Film Festival, The Jewish Museum in New York, The Israel Museum in Jerusalem and the 14 Street Y. In 2016, Lior joined to Metropolitan Museum Media Lab to curate &ldquo;Intentionally Unfinished&rdquo; symposium on the notion of unfinished-ness in the digital arts. Lior is also a Fulbright visiting scholar and lecturer to NYU, researching online engagement, participation and maker-led practices of creative experimentation. His research and writings were published in Wired UK, Art &amp; Science, and Sloan MIT Review, and have received the prestigious Dan David Prize Scholarship.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td align="center" width="600"> <p style="text-align: left;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: left;">&nbsp;</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td align="center" width="600"> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://carlesmithgallery.com/" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170224133001-Meghan_Gordon_Portrait_web.jpg" style="float: left; padding-right: 10px; width: 200px;" /><strong>Meghan Gordon</strong></a>&nbsp;(b. 1985, New York) is a Los Angeles-based artist who creates unusual exhibition contexts in order to foster short, but intensive working relationships with other artists, resulting in hybrid projects with complicated authorship. Gordon&#39;s primary platform for this work is her project some times, an itinerant, performative project space that takes the form of a bar. She has received support from several organizations including: The Artist Project Los Angeles, New York Foundation for the Arts, Victorian Society of America, Sculpture Space, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, Dieu Donné Papermill, Wave Hill, MacDowell Colony, Burlington City Arts, and the Fine Arts Work Center. Gordon is also the Associate Director of CES Gallery.</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td align="center" width="600"> <p style="text-align: left;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: left;">&nbsp;</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td align="center" width="600"> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.theresaganz.com/" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170224132924-unnamed__20_.jpg" style="float: left; padding-right: 10px; width: 200px;" /><strong>Theresa Ganz</strong></a>&nbsp;(ArtSlant Prize 2015 Winner) was born in New York City in 1980. She earned her BA from Vassar College in Film and her MFA from San Francisco Art Institute in Photography. She works in photo-based collage, installation and video. Her work has shown nationally and internationally at, among others, The Datz Museum of Art in Korea, the Museum of Craft and Design in San Francisco, The Bell Gallery at Brown University, San Francisco CameraWork and The John Michael Kohler Arts Center in Wisconsin and at various commercial spaces in New York and San Francisco. Her work is included in the 2016 DeCordova Biennial. Her work has also been featured and reviewed in publications including ArtForum, Mousse Magazine, Outpost Journal and Magazine Gitz. She is a founding member and director at Regina Rex in Brooklyn. She currently resides in Providence, RI where she is faculty at Brown University.</span></p> <hr /> <p>&nbsp;</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" style="text-align: center;"> <p><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase; background-color: rgb(0, 207, 166); color: rgb(255, 255, 255); padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px;">ROUND 2 JURIED WINNERS:</span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1030912"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1030912/u3azr9/20170218021410-My_Heart_is_a_Flower_1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></p> &nbsp; <p><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 255); padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; background-color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">PAINTING:</span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/384042-deborah-druick" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">DEBORAH DRUICK,&nbsp;<i>MY HEART IS A FLOWER</i>, 2017.</a></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1034186"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1034186/u3azr9/20170303174240-2.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> &nbsp; <p><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 255); padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; background-color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">DRAWING:</span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/323319-james-connors" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">JAMES CONNORS,&nbsp;<i>BUFFALO</i>, 2015.</a></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1034349"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1034349/u3azr9/20170304000303-waterfall.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> &nbsp; <p><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 255); padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; background-color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">INSTALLATION:</span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/477577-anna-kim" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">ANNA KIM,&nbsp;<i>YOU WHISPER TO ME IN NUMBERS&hellip;(AUGMENTED PINK-NOISE WATERFALL)</i>, 2013.</a></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1033938"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1033938/u3azr9/20170302160359-A_hyperbolic_square_on_a_0_point_618_relation_with_a_square10.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> &nbsp; <p><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 255); padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; background-color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">NEW-MEDIA:</span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/470530-giovanni-dominoni" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">GIOVANNI DOMINONI,&nbsp;<i>A VECTOR VARIATION OF THE CARMINE SQUARE ON A GOLDEN SECTION RELATION WITH THE CANVAS</i>, 2017.</a></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1029202"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1029202/u3azr9/20170206175919-KAHN_Sophie_Triple_Portrait_of_E.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> &nbsp; <p><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase; color: rgb(255, 255, 255); padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; background-color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">SCULPTURE:</span>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/53159-sophie-kahn" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">SOPHIE KAHN,&nbsp;<i>TRIPLE PORTRAIT OF E</i>, 2013.</a></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1032450"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1032450/u3azr9/20170225002210-From_the_Series_Grow_CG.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> &nbsp; <p><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 255); padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; background-color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">PHOTOGRAPHY:</span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/394561-e-aaron-ross" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">J. JOHN PRIOLA,&nbsp;<i>GROW, CS</i>, 2016.</a></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/808651"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/808651/u3azr9/20140428171842-18-Sitio.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> &nbsp; <p><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 255); padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; background-color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ABSTRACT:</span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/216551-carla-fache" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">CARLA FACHE,&nbsp;<i>OBSERVABLE UNIVERSE</i>, 2014.</a></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2">&nbsp;&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1026124"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1026124/u3azr9/20170121121932-turn_turn_turn_.png" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> &nbsp; <p><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="color: rgb(255, 255, 255); padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; background-color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">MIXED-MEDIA:</span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/466469-almudena-blanco" style="color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">GWEN GERARD,&nbsp;<i>TURN TURN TURN</i>, 2017.</a></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">The ArtSlant Prize is an annual competition hosted by ArtSlant.com. Up for grabs are exhibition and sales opportunities including inclusion in our&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/node/index.html?ie=UTF8&amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Amazon Art Sales Platform</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, and great exposure&mdash;not to mention cash prizes for selected ArtSlant Prize winners. See below for all the details.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><span style="line-height: 21px;">Check out the latest submissions from the ArtSlant Community on our&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase" style="line-height: 21px;">Art page</a><span style="line-height: 21px;">.&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table align="center" style="width: 950px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="3"> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Previous ArtSlant Prize winners have gone on to secure gallery representation and have been purchased by prominent collectors, museum directors and personalities.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Past winners include:</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2016+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2016 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/318334-brigitta-varadi" target="_blank">Brigitta Varadi</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/71495-tiffany-smith" target="_blank">Tiffany Smith</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/280850-sterling-crispin" target="_blank">Sterling Crispin</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/468710-bex-ilsley" target="_blank">Bex Ilsley</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/373164-zzin-jinhee-park" target="_blank">Jinhee Park</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2015+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2015 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/16146-theresa-ganz" target="_blank">Theresa Ganz</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/315939-tina-tahir" target="_blank">Tina Tahir</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/204298-rachel-garrard" target="_blank">Rachel Garrard</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/347173-bryan-volta" target="_blank">Bryan Volta</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2014+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2014 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/45525-edra-soto" target="_blank">Edra Soto</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/246553-adam-douglas-thompson" target="_blank">Adam Douglas Thompson</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/241839-anastasia-samoylova" target="_blank">Anastasia Samoylova</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/378398-oren-pinhassi" target="_blank">Oren Pinhassi</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2013+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2013 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/247077-robin-kang?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Robin Kang</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/238335-maureen-meyer?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Maureen Meyer</a>,&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/334738-alison-pilkington?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Alison Pilkington</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/311414-alexis-courtney?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Alexis Courtney</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-size: large;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2012+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2012 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/135691-veronica-bruce">Veronica Bruce</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/23907-steven-vasquez-lopez" target="_blank">Stephen Vasquez Lopez</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/152389-susan-meyer">Susan Meyer</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/224530-timothy-gaewsky" target="_blank">Timothy Gaewsky</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-size: large;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2011+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2011 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/233718-holly-murkerson" target="_blank">Holly Murkerson</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/36482-jason-irwin" target="_blank">Jason Irwin</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/57515-christine-de-la-garenne" target="_blank">Christine de la Garenne</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-size: large;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2010+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2010 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/18169-chantel-foretich?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Chantel Foretich</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/29757-robert-minervini?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Robert Minervini</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-size: large;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2009+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2009 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/103857-michael-zelehoski?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Michael Zelehoski</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/46020-yo-fukui?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Yo Fukui</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/10432-julie-davidow?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Julie Davidow</a></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Thu, 23 Mar 2017 10:01:23 -0400 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: Tea Strazicic <p><a href="http://flufflord.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">Tea Strazicic</a> is a Croatian new media artist currently based in Los Angeles. Much of her work is heavily influenced by Japanese popular culture but distorted through a tripped-out lens of western internet art youth culture.</p> <p>The cuteness of the Kawaii influences is generally offset by a subversive tension that is further explored in her more sculptural digital creations. Strazicic&rsquo;s feverish visions collide slick digital surfaces with alien cyber organics and contemporary emoji culture. Her work offers a vital reflection of the myriad obsessions of a rapidly rising generation of digital artists.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170322110516-tumblr_o7rd3b1AwZ1rs4tkio1_r2_1280.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: Tell us a little about yourself.</strong></p> <p><strong>Tea Strazicic:</strong> Hello! I&rsquo;m from Croatia. I grew up on the Adriatic coast switching between Dubrovnik and Biograd. It was just at the time of war between Croatia and Serbia.</p> <p>Croatia is so pretty, and it is quite intense for such a small country. Zagreb is a dirty European town, but it is filled with interesting gorgeous people who throw great events and film festivals.</p> <p>Our government sucks like any other.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170322110553-SWAMP03.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: </strong><strong>What were you like as a teenager?</strong></p> <p><strong>TS:</strong> Savage. But not all the time. I was a small bookworm level 1 goth kid. Used to listen to Korn, play &ldquo;Fallout,&rdquo; took a lot of photos, was into sword fighting for a while. Most of the time I was drawing or painting. Actually I&rsquo;m still basically the same&mdash;the only difference is that I listen to remixed Korn.</p> <p><strong>CP: What are you first memories of computers?</strong></p> <p><strong>TS:</strong> My dad is techno-dad. The first games I played on his laptop were &ldquo;MDK,&rdquo; &ldquo;Abe&#39;s Escape,&rdquo; &ldquo;Myst,&rdquo; and &ldquo;Freddi Fish.&rdquo; Now my mom and him video call me from five different devices at the same time, and they have a strange thing in the kitchen that talks to them about weather when they ask it. Sometimes it plays music but they don&rsquo;t like music.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170322110618-tumblr_o5fqswyQvm1rs4tkio1_1280.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first realize that you could use them creatively?</strong></p> <p><strong>TS:</strong> In &ldquo;Freddi Fish&rdquo; you had the option to create custom maps, then &ldquo;RollerCoaster Tycoon&rdquo; came up and absorbed me. Photoshop and Corel Paint where my first actual digital painting programs.</p> <p>Once I had to PS paint an &ldquo;Unreal Tournament&rdquo; character&rsquo;s camo skin into rainbow skin so I could spot and shoot him in the dark forest more easily. To be honest I didn&rsquo;t know what creativity was back then and I was never proud of being an artist until it became fashionable (and annoying), but whatever I did then influenced my style a lot.</p> <p><strong>CP: How did you get into working with 3D? What attracted you to it?</strong></p> <p><strong>TS:</strong> Hollywood&rsquo;s highly professional pyrotechnic 3D was never my cup of tea. It took a lot of research, social media friendships, and growing apart from Academy art to find out about other possibilities 3D animation can offer. Recently that art is part of the academic world. Now I kind of leaned towards making VR pyrotechnics myself. Circle of life. I have to thank my sister Marta&mdash;<a href="https://www.instagram.com/pirate_sheep/" target="_blank">@pirate_sheep</a>&mdash;the most for pushing me towards all the different software. Our first <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1oeN6kCWn0A" target="_blank">music video collaboration</a> was made for <a href="https://soundcloud.com/strahinja-arbutina" target="_blank">Strahinja Arbutina</a>. She just started using Maya and Poser and I combined it into a fake TV report. It was insanely fun. Otherwise I hate animating on my own&mdash;it&rsquo;s so much hard labor.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170322113711-hellovatican_01.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What were your first experiences of the internet? </strong></p> <p><strong>TS:</strong> Neopets and stupid chats. Those where such suspicious times.</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first realize you could use the internet as a platform for your ideas?</strong></p> <p><strong>TS:</strong> If Facebook was like &ldquo;World of Warcraft,&rdquo; I would be over level 90. The best thing I brought there is my diverse link sharing habit, ranging from art cinema to rare SoundCloud links. I like communicating through images more than words so it is like a utopian thing for me already. Wish Mr. Mark would pay me for it :(</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170322111623-SWAMP02.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: That&rsquo;s true&mdash;it&rsquo;s notoriously hard for new media artist to earn money from their work. Do you think that will ever change?</strong></p> <p><strong>TS:</strong>&nbsp;I work hard on getting paid for my work. Last September I was in a collective (Slavic only) exhibition curated by&nbsp;<a href="http://www.netdotcube.org/" target="_blank">NetDotCube</a>&nbsp;around the theme &ldquo;Economy of the virtual world.&rdquo; My work was based on the primitive exchange of my visual services to&nbsp;<a href="https://soundcloud.com/filipscekic" target="_blank">SZCH&rsquo;s</a>&nbsp;music services. Now we published that work on a DIY cassette tape you can buy on&nbsp;<a href="https://lowincomesquad.bandcamp.com/" target="_blank">Low Income Squad</a>. I still don&rsquo;t know anything about earning money and I wish someone can manage me so I don&rsquo;t die in a standard poor artist way.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170322110818-LeMakeup_AlbumArt.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Cover art for Le Makeup&rsquo;s EP</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first realize that there was a &ldquo;new media&rdquo; community&nbsp;online that you could be a part of? </strong></p> <p><strong>TS:</strong> My IRL friends and URL life have merged by now. For example I live with artist <a href="https://www.facebook.com/iiqopii?fref=ts" target="_blank">Nick Zhu</a> who I first got introduced to about three years ago while he was making an online art museum. Even before that, being a resident VJ for <a href="https://www.facebook.com/zivamuzika/" target="_blank">Živa Muzika</a> connected me to a lot of great musicians touring through Zagreb in the same &ldquo;new media&rdquo; community as visual artists, filmmakers, and meme creators. Now that I&rsquo;m in LA everything makes so much sense and everyone knows each other already.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170322110051-tumblr_o3c3wl7SCt1rs4tkio1_1280.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: A lot of your work is influenced by Japanese art and culture&mdash;how did your interest in that begin?</strong></p> <p><strong>TS:</strong> I think Sailor Moon and Dragon Ball are masterpieces that influenced so many people. Anime to me was a passage through the other side of a mirror considering&nbsp;all I&rsquo;ve been surrounded by was originating from western ideas and storytelling. Starting with Osamu Tezuka and Studio Ghibli, micro to macro narratives, to the diverse ethics of <em>One Piece</em> saga, anime by far offers the most advanced package of speculative, practical, and spectacular. It&rsquo;s so relatable too (and it&rsquo;s sooo much work). I&rsquo;ve finished new media school with a great focus on experimental cinema and art cinema, but every theory professor ignored the fact (good) anime existed. It didn&rsquo;t stop it from becoming the primeval forest of all fandom today. Other than that I was largely influenced by Hentai and Ero-Guro.</p> <p><strong>CP: How would you describe your aesthetic?</strong></p> <p><strong>TS:</strong> <em>Heavy Metal Magazine</em> meets emotional Catholic kid in Koreatown.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170322110208-tumblr_om2puz6cqa1rs4tkio1_1280.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Your work ranges from super cute and fun to&nbsp;serious, strange, and distorted. Do these different styles</strong> <strong>represent different aspects of your personality?</strong></p> <p><strong>TS:</strong> Yes, I&rsquo;m still struggling with that. It feels like pulling a large medieval cropper over the potato field while what I should be doing is concentrating on one thing and pushing it to the end as advised by successful men. But I think that way works for hard working men and I&rsquo;m too wavy for that, I wouldn&rsquo;t feel happy, it wouldn&rsquo;t be really me.</p> <p>So right now I&rsquo;ve been working on a <a href="https://www.instagram.com/beefycakegastronaut/" target="_blank">cute graphic space saga,</a> making album art, planning a clothing line, and writing exhibition proposals.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/lgw8iRwbTR0?rel=0&amp;controls=0" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What artists in the new media community do you particularly admire and why?</strong></p> <p><strong>TS:</strong> <a href="https://www.facebook.com/hellyfalcon" target="_blank">Helin Sahin</a>, Marta Strazicic, Dina Karadzic, <a href="http://mayabendavid.net/" target="_blank">Maya Ben David</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/l.tavi.666" target="_blank">Tavi Lee</a>, Holly Herndon, <a href="https://www.instagram.com/inomoxo/?hl=en" target="_blank">Filip Ugrin</a>, <a href="https://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1193550956" target="_blank">Motorola Beeper</a>, <a href="http://www.nicholaszhu.com/" target="_blank">Nicholas Zhu</a>, Berliac Yungqin, Mario Udzenija, Ashida Park, Low Income Squad, BB5000 and The Garden Ceremony, Katrin Krumm, Lara Joy Evans, Donnie Fredericks, Dar&iacute;o Alva, Klara Vincent-Novotna, Pax Lyorn, Bora Akinciturk, Caterpillart Ludvicat, Lea Anic, <a href="https://soundcloud.com/vilentsiolence" target="_blank">Violence</a>, Chino Amobi, Svengali, Swan Meat, xo.nighttime.xo&hellip; I&rsquo;m already feeling guilty for not mentioning all the names but you can look up <a href="https://www.facebook.com/FeltZine/" target="_blank">Felt Zine </a>and find some there. Or just text me <a href="https://www.instagram.com/flufflord/" target="_blank">on Instagram</a>.</p> <p>I admire them because they are all honest. Their art is not ruled by stock markets and white walls; their language is in tune with the time we live in; they create the most independent and diverse art one can imagine. I&rsquo;m so grateful every day to be able to see their content on my timelines and even share the table with some of them.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170322111032-Cell_AlbumArt.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What music and musicians influences your work the most and why?</strong></p> <p><strong>TS:</strong> I mentioned some of them before, but I missed out on <a href="https://soundcloud.com/eande" target="_blank"><u>Elysia Crampton</u></a>. Her music evokes empathy and her sounds can travel through memories.</p> <p><strong>CP: What do you think makes something &ldquo;new media&rdquo; as opposed</strong> <strong>to other types of art? </strong></p> <p><strong>TS:</strong> What used to be distinctive passed from Yves Michaud&rsquo;s art in a state of vapor to a very fluid understanding of new media that depends on how deep your personal knowledge is. Not even the curators of, for example, the Whitney Biennial know what is exactly happening, and they are supposed to be most informed about it&mdash;what is the real NEW. New can be hidden from them deep in Shanghai&rsquo;s underground club and they will never notice it. It can be in an insignificant Polish village connected to SoundCloud. My knowledge of New can last only for so long to be witnessed. If it gets noticed it slides into some institution where it&rsquo;s frozen. The state of frozen art is viewed mostly by white people with little notebooks. Also maybe there is something so new media that I can&rsquo;t see because I don&rsquo;t have money for it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170322111753-SwS_4_EA_1_1_SV_.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: New media has become a vital home for the expression of feminist, sexuality and gender ideas. Why do you think that is?</strong></p> <p><strong>TS:</strong> People scroll through content more than ever. Our diet is full of info. I hope it helps to correct injustice done to so many people and reaches the minds of ones with a lesser gift of compassion. We don&rsquo;t rely on the same structure people relied on before the internet. Next generations will be so insane, smart and caring too.</p> <p><strong>CP: What else do you do you have coming up?</strong></p> <p><strong>TS:</strong> I hope my art visa comes up. Also there is a SwS [Smut with Substance] issue for <a href="https://news.feltzine.us/" target="_blank">Felt Zine</a> in April, music video for <a href="https://soundcloud.com/shashakimbo" target="_blank">Sha Sha Kimbo</a> and some album artwork for <a href="https://soundcloud.com/gnucci" target="_blank">Gnucci</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170322111103-BGSSR02.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&#39;re interested in what&#39;s happening with art on the web. We invited online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, to write a bi-monthly column for us. Every other Wednesday he selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(All images: Courtesy of the artist)</span></p> Wed, 22 Mar 2017 10:13:21 -0400 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Works Available for Purchase from the ArtSlant Prize Exhibition <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%; float: center;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="line-height: 30px; width: 100%; float: center;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p><em><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large;">Thank you to SPRING/BREAK Art Show and all the wonderful visitors we got to chat with at our ArtSlant Prize 2016 Exhibition!</span></em></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <hr style="display: block; border: solid; border-width: 3px;" /> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td width="33%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170321174126-IMG_0380-sm.jpg" /></td> <td width="33%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170321174056-IMG_4602-sm.jpg" /></td> <td width="33%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170321174435-IMG_4532-sm.jpg" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp; <p><font face="helvetica" size="4" style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-align: center;"><i>Works available from our ArtSlant Prize 2016 Exhibition are&nbsp;<strong>for sale</strong>&nbsp;through April at&nbsp;<a href="https://springbreakartfair.com/collections/black-mirror" target="_blank">springbreakartfair.com</a>.&nbsp;</i></font><i style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-align: center;">You can buy works from&nbsp;<strong><a href="http://springbreakartfair.com/collections/black-mirror/brigitta-varadi" target="_blank">Brigitta Varadi</a></strong>,&nbsp;<strong><a href="http://springbreakartfair.com/collections/black-mirror/tiffany-smith" target="_blank">Tiffany Smith</a></strong>,&nbsp;<strong><a href="http://springbreakartfair.com/collections/black-mirror/sterling-crispin" target="_blank">Sterling Crispin</a></strong>,&nbsp;<strong><a href="http://springbreakartfair.com/collections/black-mirror/bex-isley" target="_blank">Bex Ilsley</a></strong>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<strong><a href="http://springbreakartfair.com/collections/black-mirror/jinhee-park" target="_blank">Jinhee Park</a></strong>!</i></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td width="33%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170321175943-IMG_0374-sm.jpg" /></td> <td style="text-align: center;" width="33%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170321180532-IMG_0376-sm.jpg" /></td> <td width="33%"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170321180008-IMG_0379-sm.jpg" /></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr style="display: block; border: solid; border-width: 3px;" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large;"><i>Round 3 of the 9th annual ArtSlant Prize is also underway! </i></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><i style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large;">To apply, go to your ArtSlant profile and click <strong>contest entry&nbsp;</strong>or go to the</i></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><i><strong>Contest tab </strong>of your account page.</i></font></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170104153040-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="text-align: center; width: 200px; height: 200px;" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="text-align: center;"><em style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="font-family: helvetica;">ARTSLANT PRIZE IX</span></strong></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">1st Place: $3000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">2nd Place: $1000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">3rd Place: $1000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">Honorable Mention &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: small;"><span style="color: #00cfa6;">see below for more details</span></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">The ArtSlant Prize is an anual competition hosted by ArtSlant.com. Up for grabs are exhibition and sales opportunities including inclusion in our&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/node/index.html?ie=UTF8&amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Amazon Art Sales Platform</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, and great exposure&mdash;not to mention cash prizes for selected ArtSlant Prize winners. See below for all the details.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><span style="line-height: 21px;">Check out the latest submissions from the ArtSlant Community on our&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase" style="line-height: 21px;">Art page</a><span style="line-height: 21px;">.&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></span></p> <hr /> <table align="center" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="3"> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 21px;">Previous ArtSlant Prize winners have gone on to secure gallery representation and have been purchased by prominent collectors, museum directors and personalities.</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2016+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2016 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/318334-brigitta-varadi" target="_blank">Brigitta Varadi</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/71495-tiffany-smith" target="_blank">Tiffany Smith</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/280850-sterling-crispin" target="_blank">Sterling Crispin</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/468710-bex-ilsley" target="_blank">Bex Ilsley</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/373164-zzin-jinhee-park" target="_blank">Jinhee Park</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2014+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2015 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/16146-theresa-ganz" target="_blank">Theresa Ganz</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/315939-tina-tahir" target="_blank">Tina Tahir</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/204298-rachel-garrard" target="_blank">Rachel Garrard</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/347173-bryan-volta" target="_blank">Bryan Volta</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2014+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2014 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/45525-edra-soto" target="_blank">Edra Soto</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/246553-adam-douglas-thompson" target="_blank">Adam Douglas Thompson</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/241839-anastasia-samoylova" target="_blank">Anastasia Samoylova</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/378398-oren-pinhassi" target="_blank">Oren Pinhassi</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2013+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2013 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/247077-robin-kang?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Robin Kang</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/238335-maureen-meyer?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Maureen Meyer</a>,&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/334738-alison-pilkington?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Alison Pilkington</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/311414-alexis-courtney?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Alexis Courtney</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2012+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2012 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/135691-veronica-bruce">Veronica Bruce</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/23907-steven-vasquez-lopez" target="_blank">Stephen Vasquez Lopez</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/152389-susan-meyer">Susan Meyer</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/224530-timothy-gaewsky" target="_blank">Timothy Gaewsky</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2011+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2011 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/233718-holly-murkerson" target="_blank">Holly Murkerson</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/36482-jason-irwin" target="_blank">Jason Irwin</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/57515-christine-de-la-garenne" target="_blank">Christine de la Garenne</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2010+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2010 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/18169-chantel-foretich?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Chantel Foretich</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/29757-robert-minervini?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Robert Minervini</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2009+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2009 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/103857-michael-zelehoski?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Michael Zelehoski</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/46020-yo-fukui?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Yo Fukui</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/10432-julie-davidow?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Julie Davidow</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <hr /> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**All participants in the ArtSlant Prize Showcase Series agree to ArtSlant&#39;s&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/5575">Terms &amp; Conditions</a>.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**<em>Fees from the Artslant Juried Showcase competitions will be dedicated to the promotion of our prize winners and the administration of the competition.</em></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Tue, 21 Mar 2017 14:48:58 -0400 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Can Collecting Digital Art Make Museums More Competitive? <p>Exactly one hundred years after Hugo Ball and Emmy Hennings started Cabaret Voltaire, Z&uuml;rich was once again the stage of an art revolution. This time it wasn&rsquo;t Dada, however, but data. On February 13, 2016, <a href="http://muda.co/zurich/" target="_blank">The Museum of Digital Art</a> opened its doors on the ground floor of the monumental Herdern Hochhaus. It&rsquo;s the first physical and virtual museum dedicated to digital art in Europe. Worldwide, there are only a few institutions like it, most of them American. There is, of course, the pioneering <a href="http://www.amoda.org/" target="_blank">Austin Museum of Digital Art</a> (AMODA), founded in 1997 and embellished with a full-fledged exhibition program five years later. And on the West Coast the <a href="http://www.lacda.com/">Los Angeles Center for Digital Art</a> (LACDA) has been going strong since 2006.</p> <p>The fact that these are brick and mortar entities is more significant than one might think. Their physical nature allows them to showcase a much wider range of artworks than any of the online museums dedicated to digital art. Those have been around since the start of the World Wide Web and include the <a href="http://moca.virtual.museum/" target="_blank">Museum of Computer Art</a> (MOCA, since 1993), the <a href="http://dam.org/home" target="_blank">Digital Art Museum</a> (DAM, since 1999), and the <a href="https://dimoda.art/" target="_blank">Digital Museum of Digital Art</a> (DiMoDA, since 2015). They are quite proficient at documenting the fifty-plus-year history of digital art and often put on virtual exhibitions. But the curating and staging is limited to the screen, so what you&rsquo;re looking at is basically net art or documentation. Lenticular prints, 3D-printing, animatronics, and all other varieties of art involving computers in the creation process are excluded. That makes for a very narrow interpretation of an art form that keeps redefining its boundaries as technological evolution speeds forward.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170321103654-Screen_Shot_2017-03-21_at_11.32.41.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Screengrab of <a href="https://dimoda.art/" target="_blank">DiMoDA</a>, Digital Museum of Digital Art</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Another great advantage of a building with the word &ldquo;museum&rdquo; on the fa&ccedil;ade: it&rsquo;s much more visible. Whereas digital traffic tends to become compartmentalized by algorithms feeding us information tailored to our personal preferences and previous behavior, a physical structure is less easily overlooked. Moreover, it&rsquo;s potentially a place where people meet and interact, thus investing the art on display with the humanity necessary for it to be accepted and adopted by the public at large. (This is not to say that online interactions concerning digital art are inauthentic or lack human presence, but they are typically confined to communities who are already aware of or sold on the medium.) Still, while attempting to help along the emancipation of digital art, the museums dedicated exclusively to it tend not to grow beyond the status of oddity. They are well outside the mainstream and attract mostly techies and art geeks, largely failing to cross over into the regular museum-going crowd.</p> <p>Traditional museums, on the other hand, are extremely slow on the uptake where digital art is concerned. While our everyday lives are increasingly saturated with digital technology and many feel it&rsquo;s nearly impossible to even imagine life before the internet, smart phones, and laptop computers, we see very little of that when entering a museum. Some institutions do organize exhibitions by digital natives, post-internet artists, or whatever label they choose to categorize digital artists under, but these tend to be one-offs. The Whitney Museum in New York dedicated a retrospective to <a href="http://whitney.org/Exhibitions/CoryArcangel" target="_blank">Cory Arcangel</a> in 2011, when the artist was still in his early thirties. Chris Bodman curated a number of important shows at the Barbican and Tate Modern in London. And right now, the <a href="http://www.kunsthal.nl/en/plan-your-visit/exhibitions/human-digital-symbiotic-love-affair/" target="_blank">Kunsthal in Rotterdam</a> is presenting the Hugo Brown family&rsquo;s digital art collection: a worthwhile presentation of works produced and collected over the last decade and a half. But after these shows close, the flat screens and heavy-duty hardware go back to the rental shop and the works are returned to their owners.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170321105938-tabor_robak.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Tabor Robak, <em>A*</em>, 2014 14-channel HD video; 8 minutes, Hugo Brown Family Collection. Currently on display in&nbsp;<em>Human/Digital: A Symbiotic Love Affair</em>&nbsp;at Kunsthal Rotterdam</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The number of general art museums collecting digital art on a regular basis is negligible. In recent years MoMA has been catching up, but most of its acquisitions are in the realm of pixel icons and antiquated videogames like Pac-Man, Tetris, and SimCity. Worldwide there is basically only one museum with a sizeable digital art collection spanning the entire history of the medium, and that is, perhaps surprisingly, the <a href="http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/articles/t/v-and-a-computer-art-collections/" target="_blank">Victoria &amp; Albert Museum</a> in London. The museum owes its wealth of digital art to the donation of two private collections: the Computer Art Society Collection and the Patric Prince Archive. Although the V&amp;A regularly stages digital art exhibitions, it too fails to integrate this facet of its collection with the rest and make it part of the museum&rsquo;s DNA.</p> <table align="right" width="400"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: #1f1f1f;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>Focusing on digital art could be a strategy to strengthen a museum&rsquo;s position in an increasingly competitive market.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>One could argue there&rsquo;s no urgency for the V&amp;A to do so: the museum is primarily known for its vast and excellent collections of fashion and design, and presents itself as such. Why develop a new USP when you already have one? The V&amp;A is in the luxury position not having to rethink its position in the light of technological evolution. This is not the case, however, for quite a few modern and contemporary art museums. For them,<strong> </strong>focusing on digital art could be a strategy to strengthen their position in an increasingly competitive market.</p> <p>Case in point is the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam. In the period following World War II this institution qualified as one of the world&rsquo;s top modern art museums. It was one of the first to embrace photography as a legitimate art form, acquired absolute masterpieces by German and American abstract painters and conceptualists in the sixties and seventies, and classifies as an early adopter where video art is concerned. But in the late twentieth century it was overtaken left and right by museums with bigger budgets and more decisive directors. A complicated overhaul and expansion of the building, which took five years, was supposed to help bring the Stedelijk &ldquo;back into the Champions League of museums,&rdquo; as then-director Gijs van Tuyl put it. This is not achieved by focusing on twentieth century art, however. In a world where the likes of the Al Thani family dominate the art market and don&rsquo;t think twice about spending millions of dollars to procure the latest C&eacute;zanne, Rothko, or Warhol at auction, a museum like the Stedelijk doesn&rsquo;t stand a chance.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170321102611-Screen_Shot_2017-03-20_at_16.26.05.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Rosa Menkman, <em><a href="http://rosa-menkman.blogspot.nl/2010/08/vernacular-of-file-formats-2-workshop.html" target="_blank">A Vernacular of File Formats</a></em>, 2010. Work recently acquired by Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam and MOTI, Museum of the Image, Breda</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>It could make a killing in the digital art market, though. This type of art is still relatively cheap. Its makers are eager to acquire recognition by formal art institutes and are probably willing to set aside exclusive works for museums. Even early net art from the 1990s is quite easily obtained. With a modest but earmarked budget the Stedelijk could quickly assemble a consistent and coherent digital art collection, which it could deploy to revitalize its image and redirect its course, setting it apart from the rest of the museum field, ahead of the competition.</p> <p>Not only would such a digital art collection boost the Stedelijk&rsquo;s contemporariness, it could also refresh its permanent collection. The museum has been experimenting with new ways of presenting the collection, most notably in the 2014 Matisse show, which mixed up a monographic blockbuster with more or less forgotten treasures from the storage rooms. How great would it be to see Dominik Starch&rsquo;s flickering screens combined with color field paintings by Ellsworth Kelly, C&eacute;cile B. Evans next to surrealists, or Petra Cortright <a href="https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-petra-cortright-is-the-monet-of-the-21st-century" target="_blank">dialoguing with Claude Monet</a>? These combinations&mdash;and these are only some of the most obvious&mdash;could provide a &ldquo;point of entry&rdquo; for a new audience, viewers conditioned by a digital visual culture. By incorporating their aesthetic and everyday frame of reference, the museum could reinsert itself in contemporary life and regain a sense of urgency.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170321102713-008.SM-JON_RAFMAN_-06-2016-PH.GJ.vanROOIJ.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Installation view of <em>Jon Rafman: I Have Ten Thousand Compound Eyes and Each Is Named Suffering</em>, Installation view at the Stedelijk Museum, 2016. Photo: Gert-Jan van Rooij</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Already the Stedelijk is on the right path. High profile exhibitions like <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/42287-interview-with-ed-atkins-cadavers-telling-you-to-shut-up" target="_blank">Ed Atkins&rsquo; 2015 <em>Recent Ouija</em></a> show and the current <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/434925-part-2-truth-love" target="_blank">Jordan Wolfson diptych </a>bring the 21st century into the museum. And in December 2016, in partnership with <a href="https://www.motimuseum.nl/" target="_blank">MOTI</a>, the Museum of the Image in Breda, the Stedelijk announced its acquisition of seventeen digital artworks by artists ranging from 1990s pioneers JODI and Dutch greats such as Constant Dullaart and Jan Robert Leegte to international mainstays like Jonas Lund and Jon Rafman. But more could be done, and should be done. Digital art should be fully integrated in the presentation of the permanent collection so as to persuade private collectors to donate their works or even help fill in the blanks. Moreover, digital artists should be actively invited to co-curate exhibitions the way Director Willem Sandberg once opened up the doors to CoBrA members, kinetic artists, and other avant-gardists which resulted in legendary exhibitions like <em>Bewogen Beweging</em> (1961) and <em>Dylaby </em>(1962). Digital art could function as a prism to look at both the museum&rsquo;s collection and society as a whole. It could catapult the Stedelijk not only back into Champions League position, but into the heart of contemporary life.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/356010-edo-dijksterhuis?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Edo Dijksterhuis</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Stedelijk permanent collection. Photo: Gert-Jan van Rooij. Illustration: Andrea Alessi and Joel Kuennen)</span></p> Fri, 24 Mar 2017 07:58:42 -0400 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Noe Serrano | Anna Kim | Christopher Squier <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/254880-noe-serrano?utm_source=NoeSerrano&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Noe Serrano &ndash; Spain</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1037732?utm_source=NoeSerrano&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1037732/u3azr9/20170316145704-Screen_Shot_2017-03-16_at_10.54.29_AM.png" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/530663?utm_source=NoeSerrano&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/530663/y8wnrh/20120105182735-Serrano_El_Pastor_2007_Resina_80_5x26_5x54_5cm_n.755_b_low.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/530662?utm_source=NoeSerrano&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/530662/y8wnrh/20120105182313-Serrano_Funcionario_2005_Resina_60x70x25cm_n.385_marcadeagua_low.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/530664?utm_source=NoeSerrano&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/530664/y8wnrh/20120105182942-Serrano_El_Peque_o_Dictador_Grande_2011_Resina_57_5x126x202cm_n.1431low_c.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/477577-anna-kim?utm_source=Anna-Kim&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Anna Kim &ndash; Los Angeles </span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1034376?utm_source=Anna-Kim&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1034376/u3azr9/20170304003408-Tree-Pearl.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1034384?utm_source=Anna-Kim&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1034384/y8wnrh/20170304004021-T_K.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1034382?utm_source=Anna-Kim&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1034382/y8wnrh/20170304003816-Auspices.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1034368?utm_source=Anna-Kim&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1034368/y8wnrh/20170304001516-Forest-yours-and-mine1-1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/428101-christopher-squier?utm_source=ChristopherSquier&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Christopher Squier &ndash; San Francisco</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/919066?utm_source=ChristopherSquier&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/919066/u3azr9/20150610183505-asquier3.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/919067?utm_source=ChristopherSquier&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/919067/y8wnrh/20150610183535-Farewell_Moon_Jar.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1034188?utm_source=ChristopherSquier&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1034188/y8wnrh/20170303175118-Squier_09__2_.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/919071?utm_source=ChristopherSquier&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/919071/y8wnrh/20150610183717-003Squier.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/s?marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Fri, 17 Mar 2017 11:52:08 -0400 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list (In)visibility in New Black Portraiture: Aria Dean and Hamishi Farah in Dialogue <p>In March 2016, Los Angeles-based artist and writer <a href="https://twitter.com/lol_prosciutto?lang=en" target="_blank">Aria Dean</a> penned an essay entitled &ldquo;<a href="https://thenewinquiry.com/essays/closing-the-loop/" target="_blank">Closing the Loop&rdquo; for The New Inquiry</a> about the white monopolization of feminist selfie art. I remember reading the essay and feeling its urgency and necessity at a time when the spotlight on selfie art and culture was (and still is) dominated by white cis-hetero young women. When I think of the canon of feminist art and the &ldquo;trailblazers&rdquo; that paved the way for subsequent generations of women artists, I see a very similar process of erasure repeating itself. &nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p>Women artists of color from the 1970s were sidelined by white feminism, or what is now known as the Feminist Avant-garde in art history, which is gently nestled under the more general but equally white-dominant umbrella of the women&rsquo;s liberation movement. Ana Mendieta&rsquo;s dissatisfaction with the movement, with groups like New York&rsquo;s white-centric A.I.R. collective, is well documented. As is the exclusion of black artists such as Dindga McCannon, Pat Davis, and Carol Blank from the &ldquo;official&rdquo; canon of Feminist Art in America from the 70s. These artists made &nbsp;independent efforts to be visible with the formation of the <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Where_We_At" target="_blank">Where We At</a> (WWA) organization following their 1971 exhibition <em>&ldquo;Where We At&rdquo; Black Women Artists: 1971</em>.</p> <p>What fundamentally separates these groups today remains the same: artists of color have a shared activist focus on intersectional issues while white artists largely continue to prioritize their own privileged ones. There is no room for the &ldquo;other&rdquo; in history books and the heavy baggage that the &ldquo;other&rdquo; carries makes it difficult for marginalized artists to find the right language to speak it in. In the history of art and otherwise all the words belong to White Supremacy: all the pages of history have been written for and in favor of it. Finding one&rsquo;s non-white place within this history becomes a dexterous task that often entails feelings of complicity or guilt. When the extant systems for visibility are moderated, co-opted, and monetized by White Supremacy, it&rsquo;s no surprise that the terrain is difficult to navigate.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170317152737-WPTIR-11.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Aria Dean and Hamishi Farah, <em>White ppl think I&#39;m radical, </em>Installation View at Arcadia Missa, London<br /> Courtesy the Artists &amp; Arcadia Missa. Photo: Tim Bowditch</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>It is in this vein that Aria Dean and Melbourne-based artist <a href="http://hamishi.asia/" target="_blank">Hamishi Farah</a> have worked somewhat allusively in a prefatory effort that seems to propose a definition for New Black Portraiture in art following Dean&rsquo;s 2016 posture. Their two-person exhibition, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/events/show/442440-white-ppl-think-im-radical" target="_blank"><em>White ppl think I&rsquo;m radical</em></a> at London&rsquo;s <a href="http://arcadiamissa.com/white-ppl-think-im-radical/" target="_blank">Arcadia Missa</a> (through April 29) presents an inclusive, more collective idea of self-portraiture. One where the black artist is simultaneously present and absent from the picture, where the self is at once he, she, and they&mdash;an outlook that contradicts western philosophy&rsquo;s emphasis on the ideologically capitalist individual.</p> <p>I spoke with Dean and Farah on the occasion of the exhibition regarding the complicated nature of black portraiture today. In both the show and conversation, the two artists pass on proposing any explicit manifestos, instead choosing to work within a cogitative grey area that isn&rsquo;t as totalizing or burdensome. They give themselves the necessary space to move boundlessly between the intersections and problematics of image and representation.</p> <p>In the exhibition Dean presents two self-produced photographs: one of herself and the other of a woman named Aallyah Wright with whom she collaborated to make <em>Wata</em>, a video of the Yazoo River in Mississippi, where Dean&rsquo;s grandfather was from and where Wright currently resides. Dean found, contacted, and commissioned Wright via Facebook to create the video, saying of Wright, &ldquo;She and I are interchangeable, you can&rsquo;t see our faces.&rdquo; She describes them as &ldquo;blurred out in a way that is a shout out to police footage or CCTV-type surveillance, which perhaps [also] makes us interchangeable with the larger ecosystem of images of black femmes.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170317152831-WPTIR-43.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Aria Dean &amp; Aallyah Wright, <em>Wata (Yazoo, MS)</em>. Courtesy the Artists &amp; Arcadia Missa. Photo: Tim Bowditch</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dean has a specific interest in &ldquo;the problems and violences&rdquo; of portraiture. It is the first time she has ever shown an image of a human body. She is largely against representation in her work, preferring abstraction if she senses her art will be evaluated by placing her identity on a binary or spectrum. &ldquo;I wanted to do violence to portraiture here, in a rather timid way,&rdquo; she says, &ldquo;I guess I&rsquo;m often trying to find that sweet spot between refusal of the figurative image and an artistic program of representation &agrave; la Kerry James Marshall or Mickalene Thomas.&rdquo; Dean views the video &ldquo;as a portrait of Aallyah,&rdquo; but playfully asks: &ldquo;Can seeing through someone&rsquo;s eyes become a portrait of them...or myself?&rdquo;</p> <p>Situated next to Farah&rsquo;s self-portraits in the exhibition, a coded visual language begins to emerge with both artists presenting themselves by proxy. None of Farah&rsquo;s paintings include physical or literal representations of him. In terms of portraiture Farah likes to think about &ldquo;double consciousness, the white gaze and [Frantz] Fanon&rsquo;s ontology of blackness.&rdquo; He doesn&rsquo;t consider the theories themselves, but &ldquo;the lived experiences of them.&rdquo;</p> <p>He explains:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">I approach it this way because my experience of myself in art is very much through how I am seen [by white people]. Even an understanding of my own blackness very much came about through its forced opposition to whiteness. In terms of the portraits, you could think of it as a reclamation [of] my inner ontological life through a black gaze&mdash;that is, one that is aware of how it is viewed by whiteness. I think this is very reductive and annoys white people&mdash;as it should. I believe white ontological life is entirely rooted in or based on anti-blackness so perhaps I am also contesting Fanon&rsquo;s own euro-centrism.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170317152915-WPTIR-28.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Hamishi Farah, <em>Photographer. </em>Courtesy the Artists &amp; Arcadia Missa. Photo: Tim Bowditch</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Farah describes a painting he made of a widely circulated photo of Kanye West&rsquo;s first public appearance after being hospitalized, where he is walking out of Trump Tower after meeting with the then President-elect. The artist differentiates it from his other works:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">I am always hesitant to represent black people...I identify a lot with Kanye, especially in his problem-ness and the way he wields it, but also in his misery in white spaces and obsessiveness. I think a lot of black men do. I can&rsquo;t think of many black men whose audience has such an ubiquitous and violent understanding of the intricacies and contradictions of public black masculinity. His representation might be able to stand in for that alone, and perhaps contextualize some of the other self-portraits.</p> <p>Both artists expressed difficulty in choosing how to represent themselves while maintaining a certain secrecy about the work in an effort to protect it and themselves. There is an inherent relationship between representation and secrecy when there are so many contradictions and violence in black portraiture. When presenting yourself from a marginalized position, there can be a lot of power in remaining invisible in public. If you make yourself visible, you risk giving yourself away to more violence, exploitation, and nonconsensual erasure, the Arcadia Missa collaboration seems to say. Finding a healthy balance is hard. Marginalized groups have been violated on so many levels and yet often still need to pander to a white market in order to speak to other marginalized groups and survive.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170317153101-WPTIR-21.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Hamishi Farah, <em>George. </em>Courtesy the Artist &amp; Arcadia Missa. Photo: Tim Bowditch</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;The remaining invisible thing is such a conundrum,&rdquo; says Farah. He continues:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">Western art is like a history of blowing off black art as white genius. This makes it interesting to think about why so many black artists gravitate towards performance and music. Sometimes all we have is to use that hypervisibility. A lot of the black artists I know are so much more visible than they get paid for. Same goes with viral blackness. Last year I made a painting of this person, Aallyah, who punched this white girl [who had called her the n-word], hoping that when it sells I can send her a stack or two&mdash;kind of as a &ldquo;blacceleration&rdquo; or &ldquo;reparative blackitalism,&rdquo; trying to use the violent gaze to make sure niggas get paid.</p> <p>Dean also grapples with the tensions between the power of invisibility and the simultaneous importance of proliferation. She paraphrases New York-based artist and critic Lorraine O&rsquo;Grady from a conversation she organized between O&rsquo;Grady and New York-based artist and writer Juliana Huxtable last year:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">When your subject matter is so big and cumbersome as blackness then you may feel compelled to attack it from all sides. Black artists have to have the tightest fucking program of attack: writing, performing, making objects, music, etc. I think this is part of why David Hammons is so fucking cool, because somehow he sort of doesn&rsquo;t give into the compulsion to arrive with a thesis, you know? Like he keeps the mystery.</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">Lorraine and Juliana both felt like the body was really important because we can&rsquo;t do away with aberrant bodies before they&rsquo;ve been come to terms with. They talked about the funny timeline where various western philosophical and theoretical trends arrive to conveniently do away with &ldquo;the body&rdquo; or &ldquo;the author&rdquo; at moments when marginalized people are making themselves heard more loudly. Which I agree with but I think I&rsquo;m really preoccupied with the ontology of blackness when it comes to representation&mdash;it&rsquo;s so messy. Blackness doesn&rsquo;t precede the image really and that seems like a really difficult thing to grapple with when you&rsquo;re working with images, or yourself as image in performance.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170317153156-WPTIR-24.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Aria Dean and Hamishi Farah, <em>White ppl think I&#39;m radical, </em>Installation View at Arcadia Missa, London<br /> Courtesy the Artists &amp; Arcadia Missa. Photo: Tim Bowditch</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Dean laughs and continues:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">I think it is important to represent yourself, but my big thing is that politics of representation and theories of representation that were devised, let&#39;s say circa 1970, just don&rsquo;t work when your image can be ripped and bounced across the internet. It stresses me out so much. Because like&mdash;and this is what I was whining about in that selfie article&mdash;I really don&#39;t care very much about selfie artists. A lot of the theories of the body and the image that artists reference just don&rsquo;t fit; it&rsquo;s all wonky. And my whole thing is that critically looking at the (non) ontology of blackness, black theory, black art, black everything can teach us so much about confronting a body and a life that is so so entangled with images.</p> <p>Farah adds:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">I think it is important to note something about the politicization of aesthetics and that aesthetics in &ldquo;the commons&rdquo; are traditionally an anti-black battleground or colonial frontier. What happens when pro-blackness is subsumed into an aesthetic turnstile? I think the black NFL players who won the Superbowl understand this and I support their boycott [of visiting the White House]. I think black critics of Obama also understand this. This is part of the difficulty of even participating in an art dialogue, whether it be institutional spaces or not. I just got the news that I&rsquo;m now represented by two amazing galleries, I love the people who run them and this is definitely about my survival. But it&rsquo;s hard to be happy about it until I actually do something with that survival and those resources. I see contributing to &ldquo;art&rdquo; (in opposition to using art and its culture, agency, and resources as a tool) as being a snitch.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/events/show/442440-white-ppl-think-im-radical" target="_blank"><em>White ppl think I&rsquo;m radical</em></a><em> continues at Arcadia Missa, London, through April 29.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/472848-audrey-l-phillips?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Audrey L. Phillips</a></p> <p><em>Audrey Phillips is a Toronto-based writer. She is a regular contributor to AQNB.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Aria Dean &amp; Aallyah Wright, <em>Wata Proxy (Yazoo, MS). </em>Courtesy the Artists &amp; Arcadia Missa. Photo: Tim Bowditch)</span></p> Tue, 21 Mar 2017 05:35:08 -0400 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Reading Joshua Goode’s Childhood Mythologies in a Post-Fact World <p>If Freud had chosen another profession, he might have become an archaeologist. After all, the mythology of personality has its roots in childhood. Memory is a retroactive alloy, and introspection can sometimes muddy our grasp on the past. Too much nostalgia transforms our beloved childhood mementos (favorite toys, teddy bears, and such) into prescient talismans of the future, justifying our adult delights and detestations. Too much nostalgia and we long for a promised time when America used to be &ldquo;great,&rdquo; forgetting it wasn&rsquo;t so great for everyone. We create and edit our own histories accordingly&mdash;objects of our past are retconned to suit our reality. Fiction becomes reality.</p> <p>Joshua Goode&rsquo;s newest exhibition,<em> <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/442439-origin-of-myth">Origin of Myth</a></em> at Ivy Brown Gallery, is a clever satire on the ability of childhood ephemera to reshape our pasts&mdash;and perhaps, in turn, our understanding of the present. Further, it&rsquo;s a suitable art analogue to the oddly postmodern political debates surrounding truth and &ldquo;alternative facts.&rdquo; Learning about the tools of fiction, or how fiction underscores and replaces the truth, can be read as an important lesson for the Trumpian world.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170316113953-DSCN4667.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Joshua Goode, <em>Origin of Myth</em>, Installation view at Ivy Brown Gallery, 2017. Courtesy of the artist and Ivy Brown Gallery, New York</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Adopting the guise of an amateur archaeologist, Goode &ldquo;excavates&rdquo; his past, animating his simple Texan origins with an alternate history and mythology. He retrofits the objects and images of his childhood into ancient objects, weaponry, and remains from a bygone era that never existed. Trading cards and POG bottle caps become suites of armor; seemingly ancient tusks carry pop cultural references to cartoons like The Simpsons.</p> <p>And through his faux research institute, The Aurora-Rhoman Institute of Archaeology and Cultural Relics, Goode elaborates on his hoaxes with the fallacy of institutional accreditation. If an organization deems his findings legitimate, who&rsquo;s to say they aren&rsquo;t? In reality, Goode&rsquo;s institute is an ode to the many deceptions knowingly and unknowingly committed by other amateur archaeologists who presented forgeries as facts. How are we supposed to trust our most prestigious institutions when they too are susceptible to forgeries? (For example, both the <a href="http://www.getty.edu/art/collection/objects/10930/unknown-maker-kouros-greek-about-530-bc-or-modern-forgery/" target="_blank">Getty Museum</a> and the <a href="http://archive.archaeology.org/online/features/hoaxes/warriors.html" target="_blank">Metropolitan Museum of Art</a> were famously fooled by Greco-Roman forgeries, which were displayed in their galleries among real artifacts for years.) Who are we to trust if not the professionals?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170316113936-DSCN4753.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Joshua Goode, <em>Origin of Myth</em>, Installation view at Ivy Brown Gallery, 2017. Courtesy of the artist and Ivy Brown Gallery, New York</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Accordingly, Goode funnels the virtues of craft and professionality into his work, paradoxically announcing himself as a great, bad forger. What catches the viewer&rsquo;s eye here is not the authenticity of Goode&rsquo;s artifacts, but its vagueness, its truthiness. (Similarly, Trump and his administration hardly try to hide their falsehoods. But when they do, they use vague language and untruths to sweeten their bitter insincerity.) We <em>want</em> to believe in the veracity of Goode&rsquo;s forgeries because of the care he invests in them. Even animal parts created with plaster look real. But as soon as you start believing that <em>some</em> part of this exhibition is true, Goode hits you over the head with fiction. That impressively large mammoth tusk? Unbelievable once you notice the MTV Moon Men have been carved into its ivory.</p> <p>Elsewhere, Goode downplays craft to comment on how collecting culture is a defensive impulse. To fabricate <em>Donrus 88 Samurai Armor</em>, Goode ties his baseball trading cards together with sinew and coats their surfaces with a light oil paint, which creates a shiny, metallic effect. Visually, he obscures the faces on his trading cards with paint, reconstituting them as eerie ghosts on a suit of armor meant to ward off foes. Thus, the solaces of a childhood collection calcify as literal defenses against the real world.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170316114028-baseball_cards.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Joshua Goode, <em>Donruss 88 Samurai Armor</em> (detail), 2015, The artist&rsquo;s 1988 Donruss baseball cards, oil paint,<br /> cardboard, sinew, metal, 60 x 20 x 12. Courtesy of the artist</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>More lightheartedly, Goode has also developed a series of crude little monsters composed of melded toys. Dotting the gallery shelves we see the iconography of Goode&rsquo;s new mythology: elephant-giraffes, shark-pterodactyls, and gorilla-horses renamed as long-legged mammoths, sharkysauruses, and three-assed centaurs, respectively. There is something wonderfully boyish about this section of Goode&rsquo;s work. As he creates and collects mythology, we are reminded of our own impulses to believe in spectacle, simply because it captures our eye.</p> <p><em>Joshua Goode&rsquo;s </em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/442439-origin-of-myth">Origin of Myth</a><em> continues at Ivy Brown Gallery, New York, through April 12.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/477123-zachary-small">Zachary Small</a></p> <p><em>Zachary Small is a New York-based genderqueer writer. He&rsquo;s written for many publications including Hyperallergic, BOMB Magazine, Artinfo Magazine, and HowlRound. He was recently named the 2017 recipient of the CUE Foundation&rsquo;s Young Art Critic Mentorship Program. His latest play, /VANITAS/ debuted at Dixon Place. He tweets from @ZSmall93 and can be reached at zsmall93[at]gmail[dot]com.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Joshua Goode, <em>Ceremonial Mastodon Tusk Sword Fragment 13,200 BCE</em>, 2013, Plaster, metal, ink, plastic, gold leaf, 18 x 5 x 5. Courtesy of the artist)</span></p> Thu, 16 Mar 2017 10:03:32 -0400 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list In Search of a Body: A.K. Burns’ Ode to Endurance <p>One of the most unassuming artworks in A.K. Burns&rsquo; exhibition and residency, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/437829-shabby-but-thriving" target="_blank"><em>Shabby but Thriving</em></a>, is perhaps also the best reflection of the artist&rsquo;s three-month tenure at the New Museum and her concurrent Callicoon Fine Arts exhibition, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/441970-fault-lines" target="_blank"><em>Fault Lines</em></a>. Nestled at the end of a corridor on the museum&rsquo;s fifth floor, <em>Post Times (drop open)</em> straddles the rift between utility and inertia, the body and environment, endurance and decay. A thin wooden latch, running the length of two closet doors is fully plastered with pages of <em>The New York Times</em>, a publication that has become emblematic of the country&rsquo;s current political turmoil. From Donald Trump&rsquo;s much discussed visit to its Times Square headquarters following the election, to the paper&rsquo;s blockage from a White House briefing in late February, the<em> Times</em> found itself both reporting on, and in the front row for backlash against (and from) the Trump administration. Shrouding a functional object belonging to the museum&rsquo;s architecture with such a pennant of social and political unrest, Burns blends anima into the building&rsquo;s fa&ccedil;ade, pondering the exchange and resistance between the self and its surrounding.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170314151918-VIEW_23.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Installation view of <em>A.K. Burns: Shabby but Thriving</em> at New Museum, New York, 2017. Photo: Maris Hutchinson / EPW Studio</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Post Times</em> may get to the heart of Burns&rsquo; message, but <em>Living Room </em>is the exhibition&rsquo;s visual and conceptual centerpiece. The latest installment in an ongoing video project that began with 2015&rsquo;s <em>A Smeary Spot </em>at Participant Inc., Burns shot the <em>Living Room</em>&nbsp;inside the New Museum&rsquo;s adjunct building on 231 Bowery, a once crumbling prewar building that now houses the museum&rsquo;s artist-in-residence program. In the video, characters wander within this habitat in a state of unstable equilibrium, reminiscent of Maya Deren-esque existentialism. They strive to communicate with themselves, each other, and their environment, but the possibility for them to find a harmonious state is obstructed by challenges placed en route: one character clumsily wears high heels, a Chelsea Manning name tag on his chest; another, a woman sporting a faux pregnancy belly, lifts a cluster of furniture heavier than she can carry. As they try to ascend the building&rsquo;s narrow stairwell these aloof characters touch, crash, and stumble around the space, struggling to survive or feel comfortable. Is the building&rsquo;s bitter absorption of these characters a microcosm for one&rsquo;s presence within a prevailing political regime? Is it thwarting these human protagonists? Or is <em>the building</em> the hero in this story, bravely resisting an unwanted invasion?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170314155041-VIEW_7_SCREEN_2.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Installation view of <em>A.K. Burns: Shabby but Thriving</em> at New Museum, New York, 2017. Photo: Maris Hutchinson / EPW Studio</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The exchange between the building and its inhabitants is a fluctuating dialogue in which the occupier and its object systematically fuse. The building, with its rooms and niches, reflects a body, exposed, yet resisting; the film&rsquo;s protagonists, hence, wear the shoes of intruders, invading the object&rsquo;s physicality and spirit. In contrast, they seem to equally face challenges, too, embodied in the physical or ethereal strains imposed by the building. The human body&mdash;a target of civic duress and autonomous activism&mdash;finds its empowering celebration at the end of the film when various dancers rejoice in the basement, dancing in broken harmony, their gestures oscillating between army precision and nightclub moves. They wear black, uniform-like attire with various words printed on their shirts: &ldquo;Her&rdquo; and &ldquo;No,&rdquo; for example. The pressure the basement space imposes on their routine is visible on their worn faces; however, once the rhythmic beat winds down, it becomes clear what the exhibition title solidifies: <em>we are all shabby but thriving&hellip;</em></p> <p>Installed throughout the rest of the exhibition space is a series of site-specific mixed-media sculptures combining arbitrary objects such as fish hooks, pennies, feathers, and beads hanging on fishing lines clutched by concrete hands. The fishing baits and lures echo the dynamics of predator and prey. Reinforcing the aforementioned interplay between occupant and body, Burns&rsquo; assemblage speaks to the individual and their body, especially those objectified due to their gender, skin color, or faith, particularly those currently exposed to public investigation and institutionalized aggression.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170314152100-fault_lines_install_view.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">A.K. Burns, <em>Fault Lines</em>, Installation view at Callicoon Fine Arts, 2017. Courtesy of the artist and Callicoon Fine Arts, New York</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Down the Bowery on Delancey Street, the artist&rsquo;s Callicoon Fine Arts exhibition expands the conversation on the fluid borders between individuals and their environments, both in terms of physical hindrances and cerebral challenges. Alluding to sexual liberties, reproductive rights, or religious freedoms, Burns resumes her juxtaposition of the body as a socio-political territory whose autonomy endures scrutiny by authorities. Three sandblasted steel sculptures recall gates. The words &ldquo;Known&rdquo; and &ldquo;Unknown&rdquo; are faintly legible within the metal slats, emphasizing the dilemma of the two opposing words as well as the society&rsquo;s predominant fear for the unfamiliar.</p> <p>The most striking piece in the calmly-hung exhibition is <em>She Was Warned</em>, a cement, concrete, and steel tribute to Greek goddess Artemis, with recycled Gatorade bottles standing in for five pairs of breasts. The solitary right foot supporting the structure is the sole representative of an otherwise abstracted human body, shaped from building materials. Artemis is the mythological symbol of wilderness, nature, womanhood, and birth, but Burns&rsquo; drained dystopian version of the goddess signals dearth and despair. Her breasts, after all, are the empty vessels of an energy drink that not only promotes itself as alternative to water, but also espouses a masculine and virile attitude. The life-sized sculpture encapsulates the systemic dominance of masculine perspectives over women&rsquo;s bodies and identities.</p> <p>Back in the New Museum, disembodied hands hold fishing lines to encapsulate societal tensions. At Callicoon, Burns takes no prisoners calling back to this work: here, in <em>Hand Out (She Was Warned)</em>, a cement hand protrudes from the wall, grasping a necklace embellished with an intrauterine device (IUD) as a charm.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170314152031-Hand_Out.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">A.K. Burns, <em>Hand Out (She Was Warned)</em>, 2017, Cement hydrocal mix, rebar, steel wire, nitrile glove, gold-plated brass<br /> Courtesy of the artist and Callicoon Fine Arts, New York</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/437829-shabby-but-thriving" target="_blank">Shabby but Thriving</a><em>&nbsp;runs through April 23 at the New Museum.</em></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/441970-fault-lines" target="_blank">Fault Lines</a><em> continues through April 9 at Callicoon Fine Arts, Delancey Street.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/216750-osman-can-yerebakan?tab=REVIEWS">Osman Can Yerebakan</a></p> <p><em>Osman Can Yerebakan is a writer and curator based in New York.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Image at top: Installation view of <em>A.K. Burns: Shabby but Thriving</em> at New Museum, New York, 2017. Photo: Maris Hutchinson / EPW Studio</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Wed, 15 Mar 2017 09:52:28 -0400 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list