Articles | ArtSlant https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/show en-us 40 Refugee Artists Take Control of Their Representation in a New Exhibition <p>&ldquo;A piece of hell,&rdquo; is how&nbsp;one refugee, stranded in legal limbo on the isolated Pacific island of Nauru, describes the situation. It&rsquo;s a mild epithet for the ordeal that asylum seekers endure to achieve their right to not be persecuted or annihilated. Not since the Second World War has there been such a massive number of displaced people&mdash;the number is currently larger than the entire population of the United Kingdom. But we seldom hear or see these people individually, and even less often without mediation or intervention from a third party.</p> <p><a href="http://art.uts.edu.au/index.php/exhibitions/the-invisible/" target="_blank"><em>The Invisible</em></a>, currently at UTS Art Gallery in Sydney, uniquely features the work of five artists who are themselves refugees: Khadim Ali, Elyas Alavi, Avan Anwar, Rushdi Anwar, and Abdul Karim Hekmat. Together their work offers a direct, multidimensional narrative of the dire circumstances pushing people to leave everything behind and migrate to another country.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171016151355-03._Avan_Anwar__Fragile-1__Plaster___Installation_Dimensions_Variable__2015.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Avan Anwar, <em>Fragile-1</em>, 2015, Plaster,&nbsp; Installation Dimensions variable</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The title of the show makes reference to an 18th-century Persian poem by Hatef Esfehani, who wrote &ldquo;Whatever your ear has not heard, hear that / What your eyes have not seen, see that.&rdquo; Indeed, the work of the five artists, including the curator, comes unfiltered, and their scars and hopes are made to be seen and heard.&nbsp;<span background-color:="" font-size:="" new="" style="font-family: Georgia, Times, " times="">They are survivors of ongoing hatred and intolerance.</span></p> <p>Their plight also gives light to an inexcusable injustice, specific to Australia. Outsourcing its international obligations, Australia currently imprisons thousands of asylum seekers in camps on Pacific islands. Life in these camps is appalling beyond belief, pushing some asylum seekers to suicide. But even worst is the exploitation of legal loopholes by which the Australian government to justify the detention camps: it sets a dangerous precedent that undermines the tenets of international law concerning refugees and asylum seekers, to say nothing of common decency and benevolence.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171016151334-06._Abdul_Karim_Hekmat__Nauru_Refugee_Voices__video_with_sound__2017.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Abdul Karim Hekmat, <em>Nauru Refugee Voices,</em>&nbsp;2017, Video with sound</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This is evident in <em>Nauru Refugee Voices</em> (2017), by Abdul Karim Hekmat, an artist who first came to Australia by boat from Afghanistan in 2001 and lived in an immigration detention facility for five months. The work comprises three documentary videos, based on the first-hand testimonies of refugees fleeing from human rights abuses in Bangladesh and Pakistan. <em>Refugee Voices</em> is a testimony of their deep despair, and how, through poetry and hope, refugees can withstand the callous violence and ostracism they face in the Nauru Processing Centre.</p> <p>The sufferings of &ldquo;boat people&rdquo;&mdash;those who attempt to arrive to Australia by sea&mdash;is represented in the outstanding work of miniaturist and painter, Khadim Ali, who trained in Lahore and Tehran. In <em>Untitled, </em>from<em> The Arrival </em>series (2016), executed with classical miniature painting techniques and materials, Ali represents several demons cramped on the deck of a ship, all wearing life vests. &nbsp;Some appear seasick, others talk and are friendly with each other, a few stare inquisitively towards the horizon, some are inward looking; all seem to be in a state of risk.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171016151255-01._Khadim_Art__Untitled__from_The_Arrival_series___gouache__ink_and_gold_leaf_on_wasili_paper__134_x_154__2016.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Khadim Ali, <em>Untitled</em> (from <em>The Arrival</em> series), 2016, Gouache, ink and gold leaf on wasili paper, 134 x 154</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In traditional Persian literature, a <em>dev</em>, or in Arabic, a <em>djinn</em>, from which the English word genie is derived, is not necessarily an evil being. Although they are often represented as malignant forces, djinns are also portrayed as playful magical creatures, wise and beautiful, with powers that summon more surprise than mischief. In any case, these supernatural creatures serve specific allegories, and as such, see their meanings change throughout time. In Iran, for example, in the years leading to the demise of the Qajar period in the early twentieth century, demons represented the oppression of ruling classes in the revolutionary press. It is ironic that in all their powerlessness, asylum seekers are portrayed as dreadful demons, a regrettably and common perception to be found not only in the media but also in the halls of parliament.</p> <p>Like Khadim Ali, fellow artist Elyas Alavi is also a member of the Australian Hazara diaspora. A Shiite Muslim religious minority, Hazara people live mainly in Afghanistan and Pakistan, where they are constantly targeted, expelled, and killed. In <em>Fading Faces</em> (2017), Alavi uses acrylic paint on glass to portray the faces of those affected by a bomb attack that he witnessed during a visit to Kabul in 2016, in which 90 Hazara protestors were killed. The paintings are rough, like a brutal memory; the contrast between a sudden burst of ruthless violence and the fragility of glass serve as reminder of the weakness and vulnerability that certain groups face day to day.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171016151223-04._Rushdi_Anwar__The_Notion_of_Place_and_Displacement__2017._Installation_view__UTS_Gallery__Sydney.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Rushdi Anwar, <em>The Notion of Place and Displacement</em>, 2017, Installation view, UTS Gallery, Sydney</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The same fragility is found in Rushdi Anwar&rsquo;s installation <em>The Notion of Place and Displacement</em> (2017), which consists of a UNHCR tent made of fabric patches, in which Iraqi children inscribed their names, an activity the artist undertook while visiting Kurdistan refugee camps in Iraq. In this area, torn by the menace of the Islamic State, up to a million and a half people have been internally displaced. Their daily life, although mitigated by external aid and the eventual containment of ISIS forces, mirrors the tent itself: harrowed rags, unevenly stitched together, poorly attempt to mimic a lasting haven.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171016151151-05._View_of_The_invisible__UTS_Gallery__Sydney__2017.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Installation view of&nbsp;<em>The Invisible</em>, UTS Gallery, Sydney, 2017</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The work of the last, and only female artist, Avan Anwar, also addresses the fate of Iraqi Kurds. In <em>Displacement </em>(2017), Anwar dismantles Kurdish poetry to its minimum unit: letters in Arabic script, made of aluminum foil, which she wrinkles and scatters on the gallery floor. Only those who have been coerced by circumstances to adopt a new language&mdash;more as a survival strategy than a choice&mdash;can attest to the pain of displacing one&rsquo;s original tongue and, with it, gaining a different way of not only understanding others but also of being understood.</p> <p>In a time characterized by forceful migrations, racist misconceptions, and low tolerance towards refugees and foreigners from societies and governments across the world, <em>The Invisible </em>certainly brings to the table poignant questions. Wherever people feel safe they will be indifferent, Susan Sontag wrote. And these artworks work to haunt those who consider themselves out of harm&rsquo;s way, pushing them to question why needless suffering is enforced by governments and tolerated by societies. Despite challenging subject matter, it is refreshing and crucial that the audience of <em>The Invisible</em> can attempt to detangle such contradictions with the assistance and firsthand experience of those who most deserve to be heard.&nbsp;</p> <p><em><a href="http://art.uts.edu.au/index.php/exhibitions/the-invisible/" target="_blank">The Invisible</a> at UTS Gallery, Sydney, continues through November 24, 2017.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>&mdash;</em>Claudia Arozqueta and Rodrigo Azaola</p> <p><em>Claudia Arozqueta is a writer and curator currently based in Sydney. Her writing has been published in various international magazines, books, and journals.</em></p> <p><em>Rodrigo Azaola is an artist and writer specializing Middle Eastern studies and languages. He served as Head of the Political Section of the Mexican Embassy in Tehran.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">Khadim Ali,&nbsp;</span><em style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">Untitled</em><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">&nbsp;(Detail, from&nbsp;</span><em style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">The Arrival</em><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">&nbsp;series), 2016, Gouache, ink and gold leaf on wasili paper, 134 x 154)</span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> Tue, 17 Oct 2017 19:05:58 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Patricia Fietta | Anne Cecile Surga | Danielle Brensinger <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/376318-patricia-fietta?tab=PROFILE?utm_source=PatriciaFietta&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Patricia Fietta &ndash; New York</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/796677?utm_source=PatriciaFietta&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/796677/u3azr9/20140319204210-Guppy.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/796728?utm_source=PatriciaFietta&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/796728/y8wnrh/20140319232621-discovery_17.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/796226?utm_source=PatriciaFietta&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/796226/y8wnrh/20140318202919-deerbird.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/796742?utm_source=PatriciaFietta&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/796742/y8wnrh/20140319234312-Mand_I.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/383978-anne-cecile-surga?tab=PROFILE?utm_source=AnneSurga&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Anne Cecile Surga &ndash; New York</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/830359?utm_source=AnneSurga&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/830359/u3azr9/20140709145809-acsurga7_.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/940709?utm_source=AnneSurga&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/940709/y8wnrh/20150928091210-Fertility_2008__1_.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/888087?utm_source=AnneSurga&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/888087/y8wnrh/20150220193320-Mourneur_2010__1_.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/940711?utm_source=AnneSurga&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/940711/y8wnrh/20150928091227-Fertility_2008__8_.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/385015-danielle-brensinger?utm_source=DanielleBrensinger&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Danielle Brensinger &ndash; Brooklyn</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/815621?utm_source=DanielleBrensinger&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/815621/u3azr9/20140521033010-brensinger.show.1.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/815611?utm_source=DanielleBrensinger&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/815611/y8wnrh/20140521032020-_DSC7333edit.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/815612?utm_source=DanielleBrensinger&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/815612/y8wnrh/20140521032025-_DSC7338edit.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/903505?utm_source=DanielleBrensinger&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/903505/y8wnrh/20150405233923-DSC_0419edit.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/sp?_encoding=UTF8&amp;asin=&amp;isAmazonFulfilled=&amp;isCBA=&amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;orderID=&amp;seller=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;tab=products&amp;vasStoreID=#" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 16 Oct 2017 09:51:05 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Aimee Gilmore Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/48441-under-the-radar-aimee-gilmore-eva-perez-ann-moody" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/489198-aimee-gilmore?tab=PROFILE" target="_blank">Aimee Gilmore</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>Even now while reflecting back, it is almost impossible to comprehend growing a human life inside me. Carrying her. Nurturing her. Protecting her. My body acclimated; my skin stretched, my womb expanded, my bones strengthened, my mind prepared. What you can only know after is that you will never actually be prepared. Other mothers don&rsquo;t tell you the truth about labor. How can they? It is practically indescribable. It is a visceral experience. It&rsquo;s messy. It&rsquo;s painful. It&rsquo;s unpredictable. It&rsquo;s long. It&rsquo;s very long. I journeyed to an unfamiliar mental space. That was the scariest part, the unknown. Will it hurt? Will I be safe? Will I be able to do this? Will she be safe? Will it take hours? Will it take days? Will I be strong enough to get through it? This array of questioning I imposed on myself revealed the role I was thrust into: Mother. Questioning now performs on a foundational level for my work. I sketch in questions, seeking clarity through examination, yet the answers are immaterial. I allow space for the objects, surfaces, colors, and sounds from my everyday life to enter the work. These are the relics from those first few days, months, and now years of the most significant transformation in my life.&nbsp;Seemingly mundane, commonplace and deep-rooted in their conventional and often clich&eacute;d representation of motherhood, I take inspiration from objects like the breast pump and baby clothes as they operate as the visual cues of the lineage I am now and forever connected to.</p> <p>As she grew within, our first ways of communicating were purely gestural. We moved as one. My body allotted for more space within as needed. As my body grew through connection, her body grew in preparation to separate. For nearly a year, one person exists as two people. Two bodies compressed into one. Two hearts synchronizing rhythms.&nbsp;Two lives sharing breaths. Two strangers cohabiting a sacred space. Intimate strangers. Two lives living solely in a state of waiting. Waiting to separate while growing apart, separating while waiting. The separation is subsequently violent. I was not prepared. For two days, my body strained to release her. I pushed, I ripped, I agonized, I cried, I slept, I moaned, I screamed, I gave up, I recovered, I prevailed. I reached between my legs until I felt her small, slippery body and cradled her in my hand while pulling her to my breast. Separations are never easy but this one was particularly demanding. What I know now after two years is that motherhood exists in a constant state of transitions, a perpetual letting go.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171016091844-20171006183321-IMG_2004.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Milkscape</em>, 2017, Breast milk and ink on mylar</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>After pumping in my studio one of the small containers of breast milk spilled onto my desk covering a page in my sketchbook, a library book, and a sheet of Mylar. The residue intrigued me. The milk dried tracing its own movement across the surface. The milk curdled and cracked all while building a collection of organic forms that retained the appearance of a purposeful mark. The slowness of each subsequent spill allowed me the time to question what exactly the breast milk was acting as in these works. My breast milk performed as the material trace of my transition into my new role as mother&mdash;beautiful but messy, quiet and calm yet chaotic and unpredictable, and profoundly abstract while similarly rooted in reality. Produced for her. Only for her. Only from me. Breast milk is the material created from an intimate exchange of body to body. Once again two bodies physically connected but this time my body inside of her body. Two bodies engaged in a continuous exchange. Breast milk acts as the invisible ink of a secret dialogue between mother and child, only revealing its materialness when separated from the body. I struggle to decode this exchange as its power fades through language. To try and connect my experience through language does not suffice. This is where the making becomes pivotal. I am not asking my breast milk to perform as anything other than what it is and what it can do: a liquid, a bodily fluid, a watery material. It dries, it curdles, it fractures, it thickens. It transforms from liquid to solid. It is an element of the earth, of nature, of my body.&nbsp;<em>Milkscapes</em>&nbsp;made from the essence of my body now performing as a mother. These&nbsp;<em>Milkscapes</em>, this collection of imagery reflects this process of archiving a routine through its most essential material and highlights the communication between mother and daughter through abstraction. Perhaps it is through this collection of&nbsp;<em>Milkscapes</em>&nbsp;that I can begin to viscerally suggest the abstract nature of motherhood as the unpredictable nature of breast milk as a material exposes and emphasizes the necessity of letting go.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171016091800-20170802203942-IMG_0246.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Milkscape (Thawed)</em>, 2017, Breast milk and ink on mylar</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>I think the most important responsibility of an artist is to speak their truth. From there, from this sharing, offers an invitation to know more. Know more about a way of thinking, a way of being, a way of understanding, that we may or may not be accustomed to. From this &ldquo;artist&rsquo;s truth&rdquo; comes great responsibility and great opportunity. I think maybe now more than ever, being able to share objects, images, experiences, that hold and contain the multitude of intentions and perspectives from a specific way of thinking is a real privilege. In this way my work speaks not only for me but for anyone who identifies with it in any way. That power is not lost on me.</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;I find that my best works originate from a place of pure imagination and wonder. I try not to put the constraints of the word on any ideas. One of the most magical feelings as an artist is having an idea and delivering it into existence, even though the transition from thought to object is inevitably always a little different and unexpected.</p> <p>I try to allow my ideas to start grand and then scale back as necessary so it&rsquo;s difficult for me to imagine a circumstance where a work I want to make will&nbsp;<em>never</em>&nbsp;happen...but I could imagine one of my huge <em>Milkscape</em> banners waving from the flag pole high above the White House or Congress.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)?</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171016091729-Maya__2017.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Maya, 2017</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.jaykatelansky.com" target="_blank">Jay Katelansky</a>, <a href="http://www.veronicaaperez.com" target="_blank">Veronica A. Perez</a>, and <a href="http://www.aninamajor.com" target="_blank">Anina Major</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>(Image at top: <em>Pushed (Chrome Series)</em>, 2017, Chrome plated baby bottle)</p> Mon, 16 Oct 2017 06:24:46 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Round 8 of the ArtSlant Prize Closes October 23 <p>Round 8 is now open! Apply for your chance at $5k in prizes!&nbsp;<strong>To apply</strong>, sign in to <a href="https://www.artslant.com">artslant.com</a>, click the menu navicon in the upper right&nbsp;and select&nbsp;ArtSlant Prize</p> <p><span style="text-align: justify; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">The ArtSlant Prize is an annual competition hosted by ArtSlant.com. Up for grabs are exhibition and sales opportunities including inclusion in our&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/node/index.html?ie=UTF8&amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="text-align: justify; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Amazon Art Sales Platform</a><span style="text-align: justify; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, and great exposure&mdash;not to mention cash prizes for selected ArtSlant Prize winners.&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><span style="line-height: 21px;">Check out the latest submissions from the ArtSlant Community on our&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase" style="line-height: 21px;">Art page</a><span style="line-height: 21px;">. &nbsp;</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><span style="line-height: 21px;">Previous ArtSlant Prize winners have gone on to secure gallery representation and have been purchased by prominent collectors, museum directors and personalities.</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: 10px;">Image at top:&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/articles/show/47340-announcing-the-artslant-prize-2016-winners-and-exhibition-at-springbreak-art-show" target="_blank">ArtSlant Prize 2016 Exhibition</a>&nbsp;at&nbsp;<a href="http://www.springbreakartshow.com/" target="_blank">SPRING/BREAK Art Show</a>, March 2017.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170104153040-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 200px; height: 200px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">1st Place: $3000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">2nd Place: $1000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">3rd Place: $1000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">Honorable Mention</span></p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2016+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2016:</a>&nbsp;</strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/318334-brigitta-varadi" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Brigitta Varadi</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">,&nbsp;</span><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/71495-tiffany-smith" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Tiffany Smith</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">,&nbsp;</span><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/280850-sterling-crispin" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Sterling Crispin</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">,&nbsp;</span><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/468710-bex-ilsley" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Bex Ilsley</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">,&nbsp;</span><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/373164-zzin-jinhee-park" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Jinhee Park</a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2014+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2015:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/16146-theresa-ganz" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Theresa Ganz</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/315939-tina-tahir" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Tina Tahir</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/204298-rachel-garrard" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Rachel Garrard</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/347173-bryan-volta" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Bryan Volta</a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2014+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2014:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/45525-edra-soto" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Edra Soto</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/246553-adam-douglas-thompson" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Adam Douglas Thompson</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/241839-anastasia-samoylova" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Anastasia Samoylova</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/378398-oren-pinhassi" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Oren Pinhassi</a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2013+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2013:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/247077-robin-kang?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Robin Kang</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/238335-maureen-meyer?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Maureen Meyer</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">,&nbsp;&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/334738-alison-pilkington?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Alison Pilkington</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/311414-alexis-courtney?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Alexis Courtney</a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong style="font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2012+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2012:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/135691-veronica-bruce" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Veronica Bruce</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/23907-steven-vasquez-lopez" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Stephen Vasquez Lopez</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/152389-susan-meyer" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Susan Meyer</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/224530-timothy-gaewsky" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Timothy Gaewsky</a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong style="font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2011+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2011:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/233718-holly-murkerson" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Holly Murkerson</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/36482-jason-irwin" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Jason Irwin</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/57515-christine-de-la-garenne" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Christine de la Garenne</a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong style="font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2010+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2010:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/18169-chantel-foretich?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Chantel Foretich</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/29757-robert-minervini?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Robert Minervini</a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><strong style="font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2009+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2009:</a>&nbsp;</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/103857-michael-zelehoski?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Michael Zelehoski</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/46020-yo-fukui?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Yo Fukui</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, </span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/10432-julie-davidow?listtype=showcase" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;" target="_blank">Julie Davidow</a></p> <hr /> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**All participants in the ArtSlant Prize Showcase Series agree to ArtSlant&#39;s&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/5575">Terms &amp; Conditions</a>.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**<em>Fees from the Artslant Juried Showcase competitions will be dedicated to the promotion of our prize winners and the administration of the competition.</em></span></p> Fri, 13 Oct 2017 11:01:21 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Director Mariano Pensotti Talks Radical Theater 100 Years After the Russian Revolution <p>As we approach the 100-year anniversary of the October Revolution next month, we should consider the legacy of this event and its importance in light of&nbsp;our contemporary social ills. The mass majority of the world finds itself living under conditions that have historically led to revolution: generalized injustice and inequality, economic instability, war, and disconnect between those in power and the people.&nbsp;</p> <p>A universal discontent is currently expressed through the politics of resistance: mass protests on the streets and on social media, symbolic gestures like sit-ins and individual actions, collective and grassroots organizing, and attempts to create safe spaces of autonomy. In some regions, movements like these have led to &ldquo;revolutions&rdquo; and their inevitable companion: the bloody, repressive, and conservative counterrevolution, as was also the case with the ascent of Stalin in the Soviet Union in 1924. Marx famously said of the 1848 French Revolution &ldquo;History repeats itself: the first time as a tragedy, the second time as a farce.&rdquo; Today, when we are way past the &ldquo;third time,&rdquo; what awaits the &ldquo;democratic&rdquo; world? Will we continue pushing for reform, through struggle and conflict, in the plastic system that is our democracy, or is yet another revolution in the making? On this backdrop, the perennial question of art&rsquo;s role in social transformation arises once more. How can contemporary art become a form of resistance to injustice and an instrument of change, not only a depiction of it?</p> <p>For me, the work of Argentine author and director&nbsp;<a href="http://www.marianopensotti.com/">Mariano Pensotti</a>&nbsp;offers a promising response. His interdisciplinary practice is heavily influenced by the&nbsp;<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Proletcult_Theatre">Proletkult Theater</a>&nbsp;of the Russian Revolution. His latest project,&nbsp;<em><a href="http://www.marianopensotti.com/ardebrillanteeng.html">Arde brillante en los bosques de la noche (It burns bright in the forests of the night)</a></em>, which debuted earlier this year, chronicles the lives of three contemporary women in Latin America with diffuse connections to the 1917 revolution, and asks us to consider the relevance of its ideologies and principles in contemporary society, specifically Argentina.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171011084301-4e66e475858fdd3eba7b90eb642d7bd9-Pensotti_kfda_2017CTitanne_Bregentzer_RHoK-6.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><a href="http://www.kfda.be/en/archive/detail/arde-brillante-en-los-bosques-de-la-noche" target="_blank">Kunsten Festival des Arts, Brussels</a>: Mariano Pensotti &amp; Grupo Marea,&nbsp;<em>Arde brillante en las bosques de la noche</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Like the Proletkult Theater, Pensotti combines a multitude of media in his plays and installations including entire films; he places some of his works in the unsuspecting public space; his plots address today&rsquo;s pressing social issues. This mix of form and content recalls Sergey Eisenstein&rsquo;s &ldquo;theater of attractions&rdquo; style. Like the latter, Pensotti raises the spectator&rsquo;s awareness of their own existence by forcing them to &ldquo;co-produce&rdquo; the meaning of the work, yet ultimately leading them to the conclusion he carefully planned.</p> <p>Beyond formal and stylistic approaches inspired by revolutionary theorists, Pensotti is also keenly attentive to the mode of production of the work. Attempting to put his political ideas into practice, Pensotti founded the collective Grupo Marea with set designer Mariana Tirantte. Without relinquishing the director&rsquo;s authorship, the group collaborates on the development of theater plays, installations, and artworks, splitting funding equally among the members, and crediting contributions collectively. With its roots in the collective theater practices of the 1960s, this more egalitarian model of production can serve as an example for improving human relations in the cultural field. It stimulates us to work more collaboratively and less competitively, to attempt resisting the pitfalls of aspirational capitalism and the &ldquo;politics of envy&rdquo; that govern the art world, to recognize each individual&rsquo;s contribution to the whole, thereby truly making the personal political. These small gestures of resistance, if undertaken by a critical mass, can lead to larger, more durable, social transformations.</p> <p>I spoke with Pensotti recently about&nbsp;<em><a href="http://www.marianopensotti.com/ardebrillanteeng.html">Arde brillante en los bosques de la noche</a></em>, a work whose artistic merit matches its political force, balancing the two without collapsing into neither pure form nor politics, creating the type of artistic work that responds to the needs of our troubled generation.</p> <table align="center" width="600"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;[The play] has to do with the idea of being a spectator or protagonist of History, but also to address the question of whether witnessing somebody else&rsquo;s story might transform your own.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171010153435-csm_PENSOTTI_2_B100_429b333848.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.theaterspektakel.ch/en/program17/production/arde-brillante-en-las-bosques-de-la-noche/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1507736471038000&amp;usg=AFQjCNHpPmpQB9sSShG_ehsXiuEdbCbp9w" href="https://www.theaterspektakel.ch/en/program17/production/arde-brillante-en-las-bosques-de-la-noche/" id="m_1814254033904326852yui_3_16_0_ym19_1_1507117463731_8083" style="font-size: 12px;" target="_blank">Theater Spektakel</a><span style="font-size:12px;">: Mariano Pensotti &amp; Grupo Marea,&nbsp;<em>Arde brillante en las bosques de la noche</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Olga Stefan: <em>Arde brillante en los bosques de la noche</em>, your most recent play, asks us to consider, 100 years after the Russian Revolution, where its principles and ideologies are still needed today. To enter into this inquiry you construct a false premise: the story of the daughter of Alexandra Kollontai (the Soviet revolutionary and feminist who wrote extensively on freedom, the body, sexuality, and how capitalist society shapes female identity), who runs away from Stalinist Russia after her mother&rsquo;s death and takes refuge in Misiones, Argentina. This story becomes the thread uniting all three characters in the play. Why did you come up with this premise and why did you need it?</strong></p> <p><strong>Mariano Pensotti:</strong> From the beginning it was clear for me that I didn&rsquo;t want to work with the Russian Revolution just as an historical event, but rather to see how its ideas and principles are still relevant now. And at the same time, I wanted to trace the implications of the Revolution in my own Argentinian context, to move it out of Europe. The Russian Revolution as a whole is extremely difficult to fictionalize: it has actually been done so many times before that I wanted to go in a different direction. That was when I started to get deeper into the story of Alexandra Kollontai and her writings and actions during the Revolution.</p> <table align="left" width="400"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: #1f1f1f;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;Contemporary feminism, especially in Latin America, is quite closely linked to some of the key ideas of the Russian Revolution.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>At a certain point I started to feel that contemporary feminism, especially in Latin America, is quite closely linked to some of the key ideas of the Russian Revolution, even if it doesn&rsquo;t lay in classical Marxism at all. But of course I&rsquo;m a theater director, not a theoretician, and I work with fiction, with some sort of &ldquo;expanded-fiction&rdquo; if you like. I don&rsquo;t do documentary theater either. So I started to imagine stories related to all these topics and I discovered that there was a small community of Russians living in Misiones more or less at the same time of the Revolution and that was the moment where I imagined a fake Kollontai daughter going to live there, trying to create an utopian socialist commune in the crazy Argentinian jungle in the first decades of the twentieth century.</p> <p><strong>OS: Some of your previous titles come from music or quotes. Where does the title of this play come from? </strong></p> <p><strong>MP:</strong> It&rsquo;s a very free translation of a William Blake verse from his poem &ldquo;The Tyger.&rdquo; The original verse says &ldquo;burning bright in the forest of the night&rdquo; which has been translated into Spanish in many ways. It&rsquo;s a poem that I like a lot and somehow I think the verse is a nice metaphor of the whole idea of the revolution, the utopia that, like a wild animal in a forest, shines even in the darkest moments.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171011083141-5cb9245f8f51fe82c7db6af6a5e5c9a5-Pensotti_kfda_2017CTitanne_Bregentzer_RHoK.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.kfda.be/en/archive/detail/arde-brillante-en-los-bosques-de-la-noche" style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;" target="_blank">Kunsten Festival des Arts, Brussels</a><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">: Mariano Pensotti &amp; Grupo Marea,&nbsp;</span><em style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">Arde brillante en las bosques de la noche</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>OS: The play presents the story of three independent women who nevertheless still suffer from the violence of this male-dominated society, but in different ways. Tell us about the relationship between each character and the type of violence you assign to her.</strong></p> <p><strong>MP:</strong> I think what the main characters experience through the stories is a mixture of violence and frustration. The first one, Estela, is a university professor who teaches the Russian Revolution in contemporary Buenos Aires and she&rsquo;s in conflict with herself because she feels her life is much more conventional and bourgeois than what she teaches. She is at a difficult moment in her relationship with her teenage daughter, who has no qualms to take her place in a male-dominated society and sees no contradiction in becoming a sort of doll-sex-object. And at the same time her husband is leaving her for a younger woman, which eventually alienates Estela and leads her to use violence against herself.</p> <table align="right" width="350"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: right;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;Puppets are struggling all the time to say what they want, to be free while they&rsquo;re being manipulated.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>The second character, Sonja, is a young European middle-class woman who decides to join a revolutionary guerrilla movement in Colombia after watching a violent event against a woman. Then, after some experiences of real violence during combat, she went back to Europe and finds how much her family has changed during her absence. Behind an image of tolerance and support she finds out that her relatives &ldquo;sold&rdquo; her. They try to make money by selling her story and forcing her to work by giving workshops for Apple CEOs who had discovered that studying revolutionary techniques helps them improve sales.</p> <p>And the third character is a journalist who works on a political TV show, and to celebrate a promotion decides to do sexual tourism in Misiones with some friends.&nbsp; There, young and poor descendants of Russians sell themselves to middle class ladies from Buenos Aires. At the beginning it looks like a form of violence against the male prostitutes&rsquo; bodies, but when she gets deeper into that world, it is ultimately revealed to be something different, and much more violent.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171010153519-csm_PENSOTTI_1_B100_21030b0bae.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.theaterspektakel.ch/en/program17/production/arde-brillante-en-las-bosques-de-la-noche/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1507736471038000&amp;usg=AFQjCNHpPmpQB9sSShG_ehsXiuEdbCbp9w" href="https://www.theaterspektakel.ch/en/program17/production/arde-brillante-en-las-bosques-de-la-noche/" id="m_1814254033904326852yui_3_16_0_ym19_1_1507117463731_8083" style="font-size: 12px;" target="_blank">Theater Spektakel</a><span style="font-size: 12px;">: Mariano Pensotti &amp; Grupo Marea,&nbsp;<em>Arde brillante en las bosques de la noche</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>OS: <em>Arde brillante en los bosques de la noche</em> is a film within a play within a puppet theater. You call it a <em>marioshka</em> of &ldquo;fictions within fictions.&rdquo; How are these fictions related and how does the form of each story correspond to its representation of reality? Specifically, the first layer of reality was expressed through a puppet play, with the characters manipulating puppets that are exact replicas of themselves. Puppets are usually recognized as less &ldquo;real,&rdquo; while cinema, which we perceive as the most closely connected to reality, is in fact the most removed in this play&mdash;the third layer, the furthest away from reality. So in fact you used the inverse of expectation.</strong></p> <p><strong>MP:</strong> I wanted to use the inverse of expectations in terms of reality and its representations. And I also wanted the puppets to be the main point of view, the one of the audience. As you mention, this is a film within a play within a puppet theater and the beginning and the end are the puppets. There&rsquo;s a lot of theory about the body and its representations inside the piece. I wanted to have the body of the same actors transformed into small puppets that work as doubles, then in the second story, to have them live as people, and then in the third, to appear in a bigger format through the medium of film. It really has to do with the idea of being a spectator or protagonist of History, but also to address the question of whether witnessing somebody else&rsquo;s story might transform your own. And somehow it is also related to the transition from manual labor, the puppets, to a more elaborated form of work, the film.</p> <p>But speaking about theory, I wanted to use a lot of discussions about freedom, the body, social control and biopolitics, which in the mouth of puppets feels less solemn than in a living body&rsquo;s, and also much more contradictory and bittersweet, since they&rsquo;re struggling all the time to say what they want, to be free while they&rsquo;re being manipulated in such a concrete way.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171011083218-b630d96ca52b269814b6a1e8a755f08b-Pensotti_kfda_2017CTitanne_Bregentzer_RHoK-8.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.kfda.be/en/archive/detail/arde-brillante-en-los-bosques-de-la-noche" style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;" target="_blank">Kunsten Festival des Arts, Brussels</a><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">: Mariano Pensotti &amp; Grupo Marea,&nbsp;</span><em style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">Arde brillante en las bosques de la noche</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>OS: Your work, which spans theater, cinema, performance art, and installation, is influenced by Prolekult Theater and Sergei Eisenstein&rsquo;s theories.&nbsp; In <em>Arde brillante en los bosques de la noche</em>, the film is an autonomous work of art but also an inherent part of the play. Similarly, in Eisenstein&rsquo;s 1923 theatrical mise-en-scene of Alexander Ostrovsky&rsquo;s 1868 <em>Enough Stupidity in Every Wise Man</em>, he not only adapts the characters to reflect that day&rsquo;s societal realities, but also makes his first film called <em>Glumov&rsquo;s Diary</em>, which is an inherent part of the play yet also a stand-alone work.</strong></p> <p><strong>MP:</strong> Eisenstein&rsquo;s mise-en-scene of the Ostrovsky&rsquo;s piece, which I have to admit I didn&rsquo;t know about before starting the research for <em>Arde brillante&hellip;</em> was really the starting point and the trigger of the idea of using a film for the third part. I was reading a book about that experience and when I went to bed that night, I had a strange dream where a group of puppets went to see a theater piece&hellip; I&rsquo;ve always been interested in Eisenstein&rsquo;s ideas about montage and his basic notion that two images form a third one in the mind of the audience.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171011083258-bd90e6c68b49e226857bcb6182c59767-Mariano_Pensotti-1.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://www.kfda.be/en/archive/detail/arde-brillante-en-los-bosques-de-la-noche" style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;" target="_blank">Kunsten Festival des Arts, Brussels</a><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">: Mariano Pensotti &amp; Grupo Marea,&nbsp;</span><em style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">Arde brillante en las bosques de la noche</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>OS: You created Grupo Marea, a collective with whom you work on the production of your plays. When we spoke about political theater and how the production of the play is equally important to its content and form, you mentioned that you tried to reflect your politics in the way you relate to your colleagues and co-workers. Please tell us about this further and how you function in Grupo Marea. How do you treat authorship, hierarchy, and collaboration in the group?</strong></p> <p><strong>MP:</strong> We were interested in forming a collective of artists from different backgrounds and disciplines working together in theater to explore the limits of fiction. We discuss ideas together from the beginning of each project, not defining the format that we&rsquo;re going to use, keeping that open as much as possible&mdash;afterward it can become a theater piece, an installation, a collaboration with other artists, etc.</p> <p>After some time of discussion, I&rsquo;m the one who writes the stories and the text but I keep on talking with the other members of the group about the concept, independently of their role in the final piece. Even though it&rsquo;s not exactly a classic example of &ldquo;collective creation,&rdquo; it certainly implies a strong amount of ideas coming from all of us. We try to collaborate as much as possible in the general production of everything, and we form a cooperative where we all earn almost the same amount of money at those moments where there&rsquo;s some money involved, which is not always the case.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/eWaM51KXoUw" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>OS: </strong><strong>What I loved about&nbsp;</strong><strong><em>Arde brillante en los bosques de la noche</em></strong><strong> i</strong><strong>s that you treat revolutionaries and radical ideologies in a very human way&mdash;you show their hypocrisies, duplicities, and absurdities while highlighting the many important positive and relevant contributions.&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>Do you think political theater needs to be propaganda, as Eisenstein and many others since believed?&nbsp;How do you see political theater and art today in the context of the long tradition of radical Argentine thinkers who have written on the topic?</strong></p> <p><strong>MP:</strong> Well, I have to say that I don&rsquo;t consider my theater to be exactly &ldquo;political theater,&rdquo; but more a theater that likes to discuss political ideas inside the context of fictions and the life of some specific characters. In that sense sometimes I feel closer to a certain literary tradition from the nineteenth century, especially novelists such as Tolstoy, Balzac, or Stendhal that&mdash;making a huge reduction of their goals&mdash;were struggling to create art pieces that were bigger than life, including fictions, but also their lived experiences, discussions of political events of their time, and philosophical ideas&hellip;</p> <p>I don&rsquo;t think political theater needs to be propaganda, but I don&rsquo;t like theater that hides its political ideas too much either. I think I prefer works of art where ideas are quite clear and exposed, and then sometimes contradicted within the same piece.</p> <table align="center" width="600"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t think political theater needs to be propaganda, but I don&rsquo;t like theater that hides its political ideas too much either.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>In some way I think political art in Argentina, as politics in general, is quite alienated right now. After 10&ndash;12 years of center-left governments in Latin America, with a rebirth of political involvement in every aspect of life, we&rsquo;re now facing a huge reaction from the right. In just two years most of the Latin American countries had turned right, supported by mass media propaganda, dirty tactics, and a lot of opportunism. What is more striking for us is that now there&rsquo;s no military involved in right wing governments, as was the case in the 70s and 80s, but rather CEOs. A new neoliberal experiment is taking place here again and the future looks extremely uncertain. In the best scenario it might create, as a sort of reaction, a political art movement opposing this at some point, but so far I&rsquo;m seeing more apathy and depression than action. As we&rsquo;re now not facing a dictatorship but a right wing government elected by a surprisingly large number of people, the question of &ldquo;for whom&rdquo; we&rsquo;re making art is also in the air. That creates an atmosphere of isolation and the need to find new ways of organization.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171011084233-42e303caa570c8829120215c89b4841b-Pensotti_kfda_2017CTitanne_Bregentzer_RHoK-2.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="http://www.kfda.be/en/archive/detail/arde-brillante-en-los-bosques-de-la-noche" target="_blank">Kunsten Festival des Arts, Brussels</a>: Mariano Pensotti &amp; Grupo Marea,&nbsp;<em>Arde brillante en las bosques de la noche</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>OS: In most of your work the theme of broken utopias seems to be a constant subtext. Dreams that have not materialized. Missed opportunities. What could have been. Disillusionment. Tell us where this preoccupation comes from.</strong></p> <p><strong>MP:</strong> It probably has to do with the position of my generation in relation to Argentina. We&rsquo;re the sons and daughter of the revolutionaries who, during the 70s and 80s, were trying to transform the country into some sort of Socialism and were exterminated by the dictatorship. We grew up surrounded by the idea of &ldquo;loss.&rdquo; Not just a physical loss of people [murdered and disappeared by the regime] but also of a lost world, more ideal than real. The contrast between the world our parents fought for and the one we were living in was so huge that it left a permanent mark on many of us.</p> <p>But then there&rsquo;s also something that I consider more universal: no matter where you were born or raised, the feeling that we all have is that we could have been better or happier had we done or experienced things differently. The tragedy of being one and not many. The difference between our expectations of life, of ourselves, and our true reality is for me a wonderful source of fiction.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/51287-olga-stefan?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Olga Stefan</a></p> <p><em>Olga Stefan is an arts writer, curator, and researcher based in Z&uuml;rich.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;</span><a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=https://www.theaterspektakel.ch/en/program17/production/arde-brillante-en-las-bosques-de-la-noche/&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1507736471038000&amp;usg=AFQjCNHpPmpQB9sSShG_ehsXiuEdbCbp9w" href="https://www.theaterspektakel.ch/en/program17/production/arde-brillante-en-las-bosques-de-la-noche/" id="m_1814254033904326852yui_3_16_0_ym19_1_1507117463731_8083" style="text-align: center; font-size: 12px;" target="_blank">Theater Spektakel</a><span style="text-align: center; font-size: 12px;">: Mariano Pensotti &amp; Grupo Marea,&nbsp;<em>Arde brillante en las bosques de la noche</em></span><span style="text-align: center;">. </span><span style="text-align: center; font-size: 12px;">All images &copy; Grupo Marea)</span></p> Wed, 11 Oct 2017 10:30:13 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Larry Madrigal Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/articles/show/48339-under-the-radar-andrea-rugarli-troy-schooneman-larry-madrigal" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/475391-larry-madrigal" target="_blank">Larry Madrigal</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>I am definitely not trying to communicate an explicit message per se. But on a subconscious level, there are some elements in my work that are a direct link my worldview. My interests in portraits comes from a fundamental idea of transcendent dignity within individuals. You could say that I&rsquo;m trying to make a statement about our importance as humans, and that we actually universally matter. Capturing the likeness of a person is therefore very important to my process as well as integrating elements of their life and interests within the image. In recent work, I am moving towards broader themes within the human experience. I am currently working on a painting of a music producer, and hope it captures the pleasure of music, music history, organization of elements, while at the same time, exposing the inner complex world of this particular individual.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171009140224-20170120052508-Madrigal_Larry_1.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>From Above and Below</em>, 2016,&nbsp;Oil on canvas, 60 x 48 inches</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>I love hearing how other artists answer this question, as it sheds light on their view of art. It&rsquo;s interesting to hear the language of purpose and responsibility with phrases like, &ldquo;an artist should&rdquo; or &ldquo;should not&rdquo; in these responses, as they imply a universal standard. I would argue that an artist&rsquo;s responsibility is to work hard, and be authentic. Artists have the unique opportunity to expose the internal human experience through visual, poetic, musical, or other avenues. They add an important layer over the mere facts of life.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)? </strong></p> <p>My three-month-old daughter, Marlowe, is by far the most amazing thing my wife and I made thus far:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171009140112-Marlowe.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Photo courtesy of Larry Madrigal</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>I&rsquo;ve always wanted to make an Old Master painting. But, I don&rsquo;t think I&rsquo;ll ever get around to it. There are so many other paintings I want to make before that experiment.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p><a href="https://www.tylergriese.com" target="_blank">Tyler Griese</a> in a fantastic figurative painter exploring the range of human emotions through complex spaces, odd colors, and light.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.deanreynoldsart.com" target="_blank">Dean Reynolds</a> is a brilliant craftsman, pop art rockstar, and incredibly thoughtful artist. His work contains bright colors and wild imagery, yet underneath has a serious and weird vibe.&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="http://jonnicheatwood.com" target="_blank">Jonni Cheatwood</a> is an artist whose number one rule is to have no rules. His abstract work, inspired by Jean-Michel Basquiat, is authentic and raw.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: <em>Melancholia</em> (Self Portrait), 2017, oil on canvas, 30 x 24 inches. All images: Courtesy of the artist)</span></p> Mon, 09 Oct 2017 11:08:31 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list “It’s Just Art”: Adrian Piper and Rosemarie Trockel Question Art’s Ability to Affect Change <p>A New York City native, Adrian Piper now lives in Berlin after her refusal to return to the States following her inclusion on a TSA &ldquo;suspicious traveler&rdquo; watch list in 2008; Rosemarie Trockel has lived in Germany her entire life. Cursory research suggests the artists&rsquo; affiliation goes little beyond a handful of group exhibitions they were featured in together. Despite the ostensive differences in their backgrounds and artistic practices, their current New York solo exhibitions, located a few blocks from one another on the Upper East Side, share a critical outlook. Enlisting vastly different pictorial languages and artistic strategies&mdash;personal introspection and detached minimalism&mdash;Piper and Trockel question the subversive capacity of art today: <em>Is art enough?</em> they seem to ask.</p> <p><em>Art is Depression</em> is among the most striking works in Trockel&rsquo;s haunting Gladstone Gallery exhibition, <em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/452419-plus-quam-perfekt" target="_blank">Plus Quam Perfekt</a></em>. The sculpture, a Plexiglas box encapsulating a pile of &ldquo;wooden&rdquo; ceramic logs, is positioned a few steps away from an actual fireplace&mdash;a romantic remnant from the gallery&rsquo;s previous life as a townhouse. The sculpture plays on notions of convenience and futility. The inoperative fireplace both suffers from and yearns for the artwork containing kindling that will never burn. The impossibility of flames for the fireplace sets the exhibition&rsquo;s tone: the wood is faux, the fire is inconceivable.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171009100020-BGG_RT2017_install_02_e.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Rosemarie Trockel, <em>
Plus Quam Perfekt
</em>, September 13&ndash;October 28, 2017, 
Installation view: Gladstone 64
. Copyright Rosemarie Trockel
. Courtesy the artist and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels. Photo: David Regen</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Throughout the exhibition, the famously reticent artist maneuvers around mediums and themes in resistance to a conclusion, questioning the logic of even striving for such resolution. Nihilism is commonplace in Trockel&rsquo;s titles: <em>Prisoner of Yourself</em> (2016) hangs like a mirror, yet its glazed ceramic fa&ccedil;ade hinders any reflection; <em>Yes where others say no</em> (2017) conveys the artist&rsquo;s longstanding interest in utilizing archival material with vague connotations. Here, the outsized image of a beautiful blond figure blurs into hazy shades of blue.</p> <p>In her <em>New York Times</em> review of Trockel&rsquo;s 2012 New Museum survey, <em>A Cosmos</em>, Roberta Smith describes the artist&rsquo;s &ldquo;mind-expanding refusal of the standard big-game retrospective&rdquo; and her disinterest in complying with sharply drawn theoretical and philosophical observations. Five years later, Trockel is equally invested in equivocation, if not more so, given her distance from speculative commentary and hesitance to discuss the creative process. In this exhibition, her avoidance of conforming to theoretical frameworks echoes her disbelief in the transformative capacity of art making. Whether the aggravated sociopolitical climate or existentialist reflections hasten this conclusion remains unclear.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171009095954-BGG_RT2017_install_09.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Rosemarie Trockel, <em>
Plus Quam Perfekt
</em>, September 13&ndash;October 28, 2017, 
Installation view: Gladstone 64
. Copyright Rosemarie Trockel
. Courtesy the artist and Gladstone Gallery, New York and Brussels. Photo: David Regen</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>A growing number of artists today are overtly scrutinizing the conviction that art has the potential to help regeneration in society. Kara Walker&rsquo;s <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/450966-solo-exhibition" target="_blank">ongoing exhibition</a> at Sikkema &amp; Jenkins Co. kicked off a well-publicized discussion in this vein with its <a href="http://www.sikkemajenkinsco.com/?v=exhibition&amp;exhibition=5970cdfe8fd13" target="_blank">lengthy title and press release</a> penned by the artist. Walker asserted fatigue at the expectations of her, as a Black woman, to make art for social improvement, &ldquo;It&rsquo;s not exhaustive, activist or comprehensive in any way,&rdquo; she defined her exhibition in the press release. Along these lines, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/456142-solo-exhibition" target="_blank">at L&eacute;vy Gorvy</a>, a reinterpretation of Adrian Piper&rsquo;s 1980 performance <em>It&rsquo;s Just Art</em>, exhibited in the form of mixed-media documentation, constitutes a large portion of the artist&rsquo;s solo presentation.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171009095917-Piper_Mythic_Being__I_Embody_Everything_You_Most_Hate_and_Fear__1975_cropped.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Adrian Piper, <em>The Mythic Being: I Embody Everything You Most Hate and Fear</em>, 1975, Silver print, oil crayon. 8 x 10 inches. Private Collection. &copy; Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Disguised in an exaggerated characterization of a hyper-macho figure in an Afro wig, mustache, and aviator sunglasses, Piper roamed city streets to analyze social discomfort towards Black people in America. &ldquo;I Embody Everything You Most Hate and Fear,&rdquo; reads one of Piper&rsquo;s related forthright drawings. This absorbing multimedia work additionally includes collages created from photographic documentation, diary entries, and speech bubbles. Performing as another character in <em>It&rsquo;s Just Art</em>, this time a female surrogate to the aforementioned masculine character, Piper stares at the camera with a deadpan expression. Her face is painted white and projected onto it are images from the Cambodian genocide, executed by the Khmer Rouge during the mid-1970s. The projection includes thought bubbles conveying thoughts that target and implicate viewers&rsquo; most subdued social phobias and their numbness towards other&rsquo;s agony. &ldquo;But They Establish a Certain Physical Intimacy Between Us Nevertheless (Hesitantly You Agree, Wondering What This Commits You To),&rdquo; one thought reads, protesting the comfort claimed by the powerful. Throughout the performance, Piper addresses her Western audience about the war in the Far East, while speech bubbles deliver uncomfortable assumptions about her spectators. One particularly damning text, &ldquo;Our Confirmation is Gentle and Respectful to The Distance Between Us (You Glance at The News Photos of Cambodian Refugees),&rdquo; could hardly feel more timely. History repeats itself; apathy eclipses militancy.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171009100407-LGG_PiperInstall_082817_1988.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Adrian Piper,&nbsp;<em>It&rsquo;s Just Art</em>, 1980, Documentation of the performance Wednesday, April 23, 1980 at the Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio: performance poster, black and white print on paper; performance diagram; video of the reconstruction of the performance, DVD, 00:24:42. Photo: Tom Powell. Collection of the Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. &copy; Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The press release published on the occasion of Piper&rsquo;s performance of the piece at Artists Space in 1981 emphasizes her &ldquo;use of aesthetics as a distancing mechanism from the political realities of the world&rdquo;&mdash;a strategy that persists today in more recent work like&nbsp;<em>Here</em>&nbsp;(2008&ndash;2015), a set of engraved wall texts in English, Arabic, and Hebrew, reading &ldquo;I was here / We were here / We are here.&rdquo; The incriminating speech bubbles in&nbsp;<em>It&rsquo;s Just Art</em>&nbsp;chime in tune with Trockel&rsquo;s skepticism about what art and activism can achieve. However, Piper&rsquo;s path is loud, vocal&mdash;her work is personal and urgent by necessity. Try as she may to shrug off the pressure of making politically effective art, the stakes are too high for inconclusive, subtle visual narratives like Trockel&rsquo;s.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171009095843-LGG_PiperInstall_082817_1824_EDIT.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Adrian Piper, <em>Here</em>, 2008&ndash;2015, Engraved wall text, Site-specific installation comprised of three components, Dimensions variable. Collection of the Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. &copy; APRA Foundation Berlin. Photography by Tom Powel</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The irony is that these artists&rsquo; apparent misgivings about art may actually be suspicion about us, its onlookers: they seem to dare their viewers to take action, but they aren&rsquo;t getting their hopes up. Whether speaking in an outspoken or reticent voice, both artists remain in doubt about the audience&rsquo;s ability and enthusiasm for transformation. Trockel&rsquo;s non-reflective mirror, challenging the viewer with its lifeless surface, and Piper&rsquo;s unabashed textual confrontation of her audience ultimately manifest <em>our</em> failure to heed the message of the art we observe.</p> <p><em>Adrian Piper&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/456142-solo-exhibition" target="_blank">solo exhibition</a> at L&eacute;vy Gorvy continues through October 21.</em></p> <p><em>Rosemarie Trockel&rsquo;s&nbsp;</em><em><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/452419-plus-quam-perfekt" target="_blank">Plus Quam Perfekt</a> runs through October 28 at Gladstone Gallery, 64th Street.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/216750-osman-can-yerebakan?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Osman Can Yerebakan</a></p> <p><em>Osman Can Yerebakan is a writer and curator based in New York.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Adrian Piper,&nbsp;<em>It&rsquo;s Just Art</em>, 1980, Documentation of the performance Wednesday, April 23, 1980 at the Allen Memorial Art Museum, Oberlin College, Oberlin, Ohio: performance poster, black and white print on paper; performance diagram; 15 black and white photographs, silver gelatin prints on baryte paper, marker; 3 paper-text collages, marker on paper; video of the reconstruction of the performance, DVD, 00:24:42. Photo credit for the black and white photographs: Ralph Neri. Photo credit for the installation view: Tom Powell. Collection of the Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin. &copy; Adrian Piper Research Archive Foundation Berlin.)</span></p> Mon, 09 Oct 2017 09:55:56 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Our Paris Residency Now Accepting Applications for Winter 2018 Term <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px;">We are now accepting applications for the February&ndash;March 2018 Paris residency. The <strong>a</strong></span><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px;">pplication deadline is October 31</strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px;">, </span><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px;">2017</strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px;">.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px;">The&nbsp;Georgia Fee Artist | Writer Residency&nbsp;was established in memory of&nbsp;</span><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/32913">ArtSlant&#39;s Founder who passed away December 8th, 2012.</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px;"> Georgia was dedicated to supporting and investing in artists and writers, and had a deep connection with the city of Paris.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px; line-height: 28px;">The Residency selects artists and writers who critically engage with the city of Paris, its history and its potential. It provides an opportunity for awardees to explore the cultural landscape of Paris; to deepen their practice through experimention and research; and to increase exposure of their work to an international audience.</p> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px; line-height: 28px;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20171005162505-georgia-fee-studio.png" width="600" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 10px; font-family: georgia, palatino;">The Georgia Fee Artist | Writer apartment and studio.</span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px; line-height: 28px;">Visual artists of all mediums, art writers, and critics, 24 years or older are welcome to apply. Selection is made based on the merit of past work, the potential for future success, the ability to independently develop new work, and the proposed project&rsquo;s relevance to the city of Paris. Recipients will be required to produce a serial, web-based component (blog, visual essay, hypertextual experiment, etc.) which will be hosted on ArtSlant.com.</p> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px; line-height: 28px;">The Georgia Fee Artist | Writer Residency in Paris provides the recipient with lodging for <strong>2 months in an</strong> <strong>apartment/studio</strong> in the 15th arrondissement, <strong>travel</strong> to and from Paris, and a <strong>$1000/month stipend</strong>. Residents are expected to secure their own travel documents and visas. Requirements depend on country of origin.&nbsp;</p> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px; line-height: 28px;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/foundation"><strong><span style="background-color:#FFFF00;">Apply here.</span></strong></a></p> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: 18px; line-height: 28px;"><span style="font-size:10px;">Image at top:&nbsp;<span style="text-align: center;">Georgia Fee,&nbsp;</span><em style="font-size: 10px; text-align: center;">50 Kisses</em><span style="text-align: center;">, 2001</span></span></p> Mon, 09 Oct 2017 06:46:16 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Julia San Martin | Zena Blackwell | Mary Jones <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/491273-julia-san-martin?utm_source=JuliaSanMartin&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Julia San Martin &ndash; New York</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1063402?utm_source=JuliaSanMartin&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1063402/u3azr9/20170913142905-IMG_2896.JPG" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1063398?utm_source=JuliaSanMartin&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1063398/mf2ji7/20170913142807-IMG_6149_res_normal.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1063407?utm_source=JuliaSanMartin&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1063407/mf2ji7/20170913143141-IMG_6305.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1063401?utm_source=JuliaSanMartin&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1063401/mf2ji7/20170913142826-IMG_6068_res_normal.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/489645-zena-blackwell?utm_source=ZenaBlackwell&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Zena Blackwell &ndash; Cardiff</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1059088?utm_source= ZenaBlackwell&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1059088/u3azr9/20170811065727-IMG_0023.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1059096?utm_source=ZenaBlackwell&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1059096/mf2ji7/20170811065943-IMG_0234.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1059091?utm_source=ZenaBlackwell&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1059091/mf2ji7/20170811065831-Zena_Blackwell_1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1059090?utm_source=ZenaBlackwell&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1059090/mf2ji7/20170811065809-IMG_0229.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/488556-mary-jones-art?utm_source=MaryJones&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Mary Jones &ndash; Iowa</span></a></p> <p><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1056678/u3azr9/20170726022347-jones_14thday1_web.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto; width: 100%;" /></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1056669?utm_source=MaryJones&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1056669/mf2ji7/20170726021438-jones_notes.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1056696?utm_source=MaryJones&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1056696/u3azr9/20170726024721-jones_m_thataways_copy.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1056670?utm_source=MaryJones&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1056670/mf2ji7/20170726021502-jones_unawares.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/sp?_encoding=UTF8&amp;asin=&amp;isAmazonFulfilled=&amp;isCBA=&amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;orderID=&amp;seller=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;tab=products&amp;vasStoreID=#" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 09 Oct 2017 06:44:50 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: Katie Torn <p>New York-based new media artist <a href="http://katietorn.com/index.html" target="_blank">Katie Torn</a> makes work suspended in limbo somewhere between our physical and digital realities, as she seamlessly synthesizes filmed or photographed sculptural objects with digitally generated forms. There is strange alchemy at work in Torn&rsquo;s aesthetic, which fuses disposable cultural touchstones of the 80s and 90s with complex, surrealist compositions and ideas. Her work is simultaneously joyful and solemn, perfectly reflecting her love/hate relationship with the modern capitalist world, including her most frequent subject matter: consumer culture and its unstoppable impact on every aspect of our existence.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171004121256-KTorn_07.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Breathe Deep, </em>2014, Still from single channel video. Commissioned by the Denver Theater District / Denver Digerati 2014</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: What toys inspired you as a kid?</strong></p> <p><strong>Katie Torn:</strong> Growing up in the 1980s I was really into the original My Little Pony, The Care Bears, and Glo Worms. I remember watching the shows on television and then making up my own narratives with the toys. There was an active back and forth interplay between my imagination and watching merchandise-driven cartoons. This is why I&rsquo;m so drawn to this type of imagery in my work. I was bombarded by these images when I was first developing my imagination and creativity as a child.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171004121230-KTorn_10.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Gremlin</em>, 2017, Still from <em>Low Tide</em>, 3-channel video installation</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What are your strongest memories of when you started using the internet?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> My grandfather bought me first computer when I was 12 years old, around 1993. Shortly after I started using the internet and AOL. I would spend hours in chat rooms messaging with strangers with no parental control. I don&rsquo;t think my parents even understood what I was doing. I remember having a sleepover with a bunch of friends and writing provocative things to strange men online in the middle of the night. It was an interesting time to come of age. I imagine many people in my generation experienced sexuality virtually before having physical experiences.</p> <p><strong>CP: How would you describe your current relationship with the internet?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> It&rsquo;s a love/hate relationship. Although I really enjoy being connected to a community of digital artists and being witness to their art-making processes, I am often bored while using the internet. It&rsquo;s a lot less exciting than it used to be when it was new and lawless. Now it&rsquo;s so much part of the everyday humdrum of life.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171004121201-KTorn_12.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Squid</em>, 2017, Still from <em>Low Tide</em>, 3-channel video installation</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first discover the creative possibilities of computers?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> Playing around with editing software in high school. I originally wanted to be a narrative filmmaker, but found myself focusing more on the post-production process. I started by making simple motion graphic animations and mixing that with overly color-corrected video footage. Later in college I realized what I was doing was more inline with video art than filmmaking, so I took off in that direction.</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first become aware of the medium of digital art?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> I discovered net art through the website gUrl in the mid 90s. I really loved that site; it provided teenage girls with an alternative to mainstream teenage culture and was also a great database of weird, random net art projects. I wasn&rsquo;t even really aware that I was experiencing digital art at the time, but looking back that was my first experience of it.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171004121129-KTorn_04.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>#BeachSelfie</em>, 2016, Still from video series @RealSelfCindy. Courtesy of daata-editions.com and the Artist</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Was there a particular &ldquo;eureka&rdquo; moment for you what you started using programs for 3D animation?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> Definitely! I discovered the potential for 3D animation as a grad student at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. <a href="http://www.claudiahart.com/">Claudia Hart</a>&rsquo;s experimental 3D class was producing some pretty interesting stuff and using 3D in a way that I had never seen before. I was making videos of physical sculptures and collaging those together with After Effects. Once I figured out how to bring 3D into my videos in a convincing way it opened up a whole new world of making that was life changing for my practice.</p> <p><strong>CP: How you describe you art school experience?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> Art school can be confusing. There are so many methodologies, and unfortunately many art professors are trying to convince you that their way of making and thinking is the best and only way. My practice went through a lot of changes and I made a lot of really bad stuff as a student. I think you just have to make a lot of work and get as diverse an education as you can. I was lucky enough to have the time and resources to figure it out and I eventually was able to cultivate multiple techniques into a practice that felt right for what I wanted to say.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="533" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/230171738" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="300"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/230171738" target="_blank">On the Beach, Single Channel Video Installation, 2017</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Your work often features physical elements that you have filmed and manipulated. What differentiates these pieces from your purely digital work?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> As an undergraduate student at Hunter College, I was a painting major at the time but still was interested in moving image. I took a video art class with the artist and writer <a href="http://constancedejong.net/" target="_blank">Constance DeJong</a> and started making videos of my paintings and manipulating them in the computer with editing software. This was also the first time I experimented with sculpture. I began to paint objects and TVs that I included in my videos and made TV sculptures to show those videos on. As I have developed as an artist I find myself being drawn more and more to working with physical elements and I am less interested in purely 3D-rendered works. My true voice is in the mix of the two.</p> <p><strong>CP: Have your considered presenting physical sculptures as the final form of your work? </strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> I&rsquo;ve thought about it, but it never really made sense with my concept. I reuse and recycle many of my sculptures to generate my work. My sculptures are modular and I like working with materials that are ephemeral. If they were made permanent I would have to let go of an element of freedom that I relish in while making the work.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171004121053-KTorn_09.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Installation shot from the solo exhibition <em>Low Tide</em>, Upfor Gallery, Portland, OR, 2017</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How would you describe your aesthetic?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> My ideas emerge from a physical handmade place. There is a rawness and expressionism there that is visceral, but I also incorporate slick computer-generated imagery. I work with found physical objects and imagery scavenged from online so there is a kind of thrift store digital detritus element to the work. The visual choices that I make are also influenced by a girly aesthetic that was ingrained in me as a child. I am drawn to &ldquo;feminine&rdquo; colors and childlike shapes, yet I mix this with a somewhat cynical vision of the future.</p> <p><strong>CP: Do you think the internet has been generally good for humanity?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> I&rsquo;m ambivalent. The internet has really helped people who are isolated and oppressed. It has given them a voice and a community. But on the other hand it has brought together people whose ideas are detrimental to society and it has been used to organize hate groups and spread propaganda on a massive level. Only time will tell if the overall effect has been negative or positive.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="294" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/108084571?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/108084571" target="_blank">BREATHE DEEP</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Your work seems to simultaneously suggest a fascination and repulsion of consumerist/capitalist culture. Do you struggle with that duality?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> Very much. I love the cartoons and toys I grew up with, while at the same time I am aware I was being manipulated to consume junk that was commercially constructed for &ldquo;females.&rdquo; I also see beauty in the decay and destruction that is caused by capitalism while simultaneously feeling disturbed and saddened. It&rsquo;s a kind of tragic romanticism.</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first become aware of these concepts?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> In college I used to make paintings of female figures in dirty snow that was filled with garbage. From the time I started making work that had any meaning it had some element of decay brought on by consumer culture mixed with stereotypical female beauty.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="533" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/172786178" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="300"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><a href="https://vimeo.com/172786178" target="_blank">Mermaid</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Would you describe yourself as a political person?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> My work has had political undertones for quite a while, but it wasn&#39;t until the People&rsquo;s Climate March in 2014 that I began to be politically active other than voting. I heard environmental activists Naomi Klein and Bill McKibben speak at an event and it scared the crap out of me. Their words brought a realness to what I already felt was happening with our planet, but was not ready to face up to.</p> <p><strong>CP: How autobiographical is your work?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> My work stems from my own experience and feeling about being a physical body navigating through a toxic landscape caused by capitalism. From a young age, capitalism has promoted behavior in me that is detrimental to me and my environment. My work is autobiographical in that it reflects that I am a female that came of age in the 1990s who is living through the Anthropocene extinction.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171004121013-KTorn_05.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>#DuckFace</em>, 2016, Still from video series @RealSelfCindy. Courtesy of daata-editions.com and the artist</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Why do you think new media art has become a natural home for feminist thinking?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> Throughout history male artists have used art to objectify and commodify women&rsquo;s bodies. Right now you see a wave of young female artists and entrepreneurs using new media, in particular the internet, to reclaim ownership and control over their own images of their bodies. Because the internet cuts out the middle man to reach a wider audience, it has the potential to supersede the traditional patriarchal power structures.</p> <p><strong>CP: Your recent collages feature directly painted elements on canvas. What inspired you to explore the most traditional of art mediums?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong>&nbsp;I studied classical figurative painting and drawing starting from the age of 13, and it&rsquo;s something that I have wanted to incorporate back into my work for a while. For me, 3D animation has a connection to traditional painting. With painting the artist is manually rendering light and form; in 3D animation the computer is doing it for you. Both are attempting to replicate nature and reality and can be used to create worlds that are viewed through a picture plane. With the collage work, I was experimenting with transforming my digital collage technique of video and 3D renders into a physical process on paper. For both I am combining elements from multiple sources: painted imagery, 3D renders, photographs, and found images. These elements are brought together to exist in the same space through the use of light and shadow.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171004120754-KTorn_14.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Trikonasana (Pose 5)</em>, 2017, Photo collage, paint, canvas paper, 22 x 28 inches</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How influenced are you by Surrealism?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong>&nbsp;Surrealism employs the rules of reality, like how light and shadow give objects depth, to create imagined worlds that reflect certain truths about the world that cannot be expressed in a literal way. I&rsquo;m interested in how surrealism uses the familiar, but makes it appear unsettling to get at something about human nature. You see this in a lot of super realistic 3D-rendered work, animation that falls into the uncanny valley. Coming from a painting background, I am influenced by 20th century art that makes a connection between the human figure and technology. For example, the Surrealist Yves Tanguy, Cubism, and the Italian Futurist Umberto Boccioni.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171004120725-KTorn_13.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Lotus (Pose 7)</em>, 2017, Photo collage, paint, canvas paper, 22 x 28 inches</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How do you think the wider art world views new media art?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> I&rsquo;m always shocked when I go to art fairs because there are usually very few digital art pieces. I think the art world is interested in the ideas that new media brings to the table, but there is still a push to turn those ideas into saleable objects. For instance, the term &ldquo;Post-Internet&rdquo; was hot topic for a while&mdash;it described works that are about the internet or use digital methods but whose output fits into traditional categories like painting and sculpture.</p> <p><strong>CP: How would you describe you personal experiences in the &ldquo;art world&rdquo;?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong> I have had some very positive experiences working with curators, galleries, and other artists. However, if you look at gallery rosters, most have one or two young new media artists, and usually that artist is white and male. This isn&rsquo;t true for all galleries, but you still see it a lot. I had a gallery once tell me that they were interested in representing me because they were looking to represent more women, yet they wanted my work to be less &ldquo;girly.&rdquo; They wanted to know if I was willing to make my work less feminine in order to work with them. It&rsquo;s pretty absurd how superficial the art world can be sometimes, ha.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171004120651-KTorn_20.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Half Moon (Pose 1)</em>, 2017, Photo collage, paint, canvas paper, 16 x 20 inches</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What do you have coming up?</strong></p> <p><strong>KT:</strong>&nbsp;I&rsquo;m working on a longer format animation that has an experimental narrative structure. It&rsquo;s about a female character who attends a yoga retreat in order to cope with her body deconstructing in a decaying environment. This is the first time in a while that I&rsquo;ve been able to work on something without a deadline and it has allowed me more freedom to experiment.</p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&#39;re interested in what&#39;s happening with art on the web. We invited online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, to write a bi-monthly column for us. Every other Wednesday he selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: 3 Katie Torn, <em>#BathroomSelfie</em>, 2016, Still from video series @RealSelfCindy. Courtesy of daata-editions.com and the Artist. All images courtesy of the artist)</span></p> Wed, 04 Oct 2017 09:59:20 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list