Articles | ArtSlant https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/show en-us 40 Occupy Museums Values Statement on #J20 <p><span style="font-size:18px;"><span -webkit-tap-highlight-color:="" font-size:="" letter-spacing:="" new="" style="color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.8); font-family: freight-text-pro, " text-size-adjust:="" times="">January 20th is not a day for business as usual. It is a day of reckoning: a day when we must step back stand together and acknowledge how far we have fallen from the values that we supposedly uphold as individuals, communities, and institutions. At the same time, however, we must recognize that this occasion is&nbsp;</span><em -webkit-tap-highlight-color:="" box-sizing:="" font-size:="" letter-spacing:="" new="" style="color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.8); font-family: freight-text-pro, " text-size-adjust:="" times="">exactly&nbsp;</em><span -webkit-tap-highlight-color:="" font-size:="" letter-spacing:="" new="" style="color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.8); font-family: freight-text-pro, " text-size-adjust:="" times="">business as usual in the United States of America. It would be naive to suggest that the advent of Fascism is representative of one man or one woman or one administration. This moment has finally landed following decades of Reaganomics. It landed after centuries of living in a house with a flawed foundation built on slavery, stolen labor, and bloodshed; maintained through the normalization of systemic injustice. It has landed as the full legitimization of cultural homogenization, techno-militarism and life inside the atomized logic of corporatism. It has landed after the sequestering of money and political agency into fewer and fewer hands. We have become a country of red and blue: a separatist mentality that replays &ldquo;the people&rdquo; as demographics, driving wedges between &ldquo;races,&rdquo; classes, regions, genders, education levels, and worldviews.</span></span></p> <p><span font-size:="" letter-spacing:="" new="" style="color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.8); font-family: freight-text-pro, " times="">Our values&nbsp;&mdash; values fought for tirelessly over the generations, values that we believe to be sacred&nbsp;&mdash; have proven to be as fragile as they are precious.</span></p> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 1em; font-size: 1.2em; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing: 0.01em; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.8); font-family: freight-text-pro, 'Times New Roman', Times, Georgia, serif; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-size-adjust: 100%; margin-right: 0px !important; margin-left: 0px !important;"><span style="font-size:18px;">Facing this reality, we bear much responsibility and seize this moment of national coming-into-consciousness as an opportunity. Occupy Museums calls on our communities&nbsp;&mdash; in this case artists, cultural practitioners, and institutions&nbsp;&mdash; to directly name and confront this truth: we are living in a Fascist State. Fascist propaganda exacerbates the racism and misogyny embedded in our culture for cynical political ends; it is the enemy of art. This can be seen from the new administration&rsquo;s&nbsp;<a href="http://hyperallergic.com/352879/trump-team-plans-to-eliminate-national-endowments-for-the-arts-and-humanities/" style="box-sizing: border-box; color: rgb(51, 51, 51); text-decoration: none; outline: 0px; -webkit-transition: 0.2s; transition: 0.2s; border-bottom-width: 1px; border-bottom-style: solid; border-bottom-color: rgb(145, 215, 248);" target="_blank">plans to eliminate the National Endowment for the Arts</a>&nbsp;&mdash; a last vestige of truly public support of the arts. Their vision of art is reduced to luxury trappings for oligarchs. Although the same financial sphere that has largely brought us to the current precipice stands behind US museums as their primary means of support, this doesn&rsquo;t devalue their potency as public spaces and repositories of collective mythologies. Their civic function depends not on philanthropy but on struggle. Museums require artists, activists, and global citizens to challenge them, demanding that they hold true to their missions to serve the public, not just the 1%. That is why on #J20 we invite our communities to join us inside the museum, which we demand function as public space, to declare our common values, to make undeniable our demands, and to render our truths unmediated and unavailable for contortion, interpretation, or abstraction. Then we head out into the streets.</span></p> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 1em; font-size: 1.2em; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing: 0.01em; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.8); font-family: freight-text-pro, 'Times New Roman', Times, Georgia, serif; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-size-adjust: 100%; margin-right: 0px !important; margin-left: 0px !important;"><span style="font-size:18px;">Occupy Museums reflects on the values behind our mission and in solidarity with all arts workers commits to continuing the struggle for the following:</span></p> <ol style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 1em; font-size: 1.1em; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing: 0.01em; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.8); font-family: freight-text-pro, 'Times New Roman', Times, Georgia, serif; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-size-adjust: 100%; margin-right: 0px !important; margin-left: 0px !important;"> <li style="box-sizing: border-box; font-size: 1.1em; line-height: 1.5em; margin: 0px 0px 1em; letter-spacing: 0.01em;"><span style="font-size:18px;">Racism and xenophobia are real and alive today. Misogyny and homophobia are real and alive today. White nationalism is growing in political, economic, and symbolic power. We value cultural institutions who are able to name the severity of this political zeitgeist and join the fight for dismantling white supremacy.&nbsp;<span style="box-sizing: border-box; font-weight: 700;">We declare that one cannot be neutral on a Fascist train. We commit to joining in efforts to organize an anti-Fascist resistance.&nbsp;</span></span></li> </ol> <ol start="2" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 1em; font-size: 1.1em; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing: 0.01em; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.8); font-family: freight-text-pro, 'Times New Roman', Times, Georgia, serif; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-size-adjust: 100%; margin-right: 0px !important; margin-left: 0px !important;"> <li style="box-sizing: border-box; font-size: 1.1em; line-height: 1.5em; margin: 0px 0px 1em; letter-spacing: 0.01em;"><span style="font-size:18px;">Arts within neoliberal economies have long been stripped of social organizing force and community accountability. We have witnessed a transparent bid to transform art into an asset class for private speculation, upending its political autonomy; art has become a tool of propaganda. As this incoming administration dramatically reduces or eliminates public funding for the arts, museums will be relying solely on compromised private funding.&nbsp;<span style="box-sizing: border-box; font-weight: 700;">We uphold the value of art and cultural production independent from financial and political coercion, free from appropriation and exploitation.</span></span></li> </ol> <ol start="3" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 1em; font-size: 1.1em; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing: 0.01em; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.8); font-family: freight-text-pro, 'Times New Roman', Times, Georgia, serif; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-size-adjust: 100%; margin-right: 0px !important; margin-left: 0px !important;"> <li style="box-sizing: border-box; font-size: 1.1em; line-height: 1.5em; margin: 0px 0px 1em; letter-spacing: 0.01em;"><span style="font-size:18px;">We reject a culture that ignores or celebrates US war and imperialism. We reject a culture that fetishizes, essentializes, and flattens the layers of our shared reality. Such a culture reflects a shallow politics where sycophantic hype replaces public discourse.&nbsp;<span style="box-sizing: border-box; font-weight: 700;">We value art that is authentic, layered, diverse, and unafraid of delving into the complexity of our shared experiences. We commit to a struggle against the reign of hegemonic power brokers in the arts and in support of a more committed art and discourse. Museums must move toward greater social justice to be relevant.</span></span></li> </ol> <ol start="4" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 1em; font-size: 1.1em; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing: 0.01em; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.8); font-family: freight-text-pro, 'Times New Roman', Times, Georgia, serif; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-size-adjust: 100%; margin-right: 0px !important; margin-left: 0px !important;"> <li style="box-sizing: border-box; font-size: 1.1em; line-height: 1.5em; margin: 0px 0px 1em; letter-spacing: 0.01em;"><span style="font-size:18px;">Since their inception centuries ago, the collections of art museums have consisted of objects stolen from indigenous and oppressed peoples whose cultures were appropriated and/or decimated to reify whiteness. Even though museums partially embody the democratization of art, they are also sites embedded with white supremacy and patriarchy. We will not separate our appreciation of museums from the ongoing need to shift the power that is codified into this mode of cultural representation.&nbsp;<span style="box-sizing: border-box; font-weight: 700;">We commit to the ongoing struggle for increased presence of Black and Brown people, immigrants, and women in museum administrations, collections, events, and viewership, and in the return of stolen cultural heritage and objects.</span></span></li> </ol> <ol start="5" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 1em; font-size: 1.1em; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing: 0.01em; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.8); font-family: freight-text-pro, 'Times New Roman', Times, Georgia, serif; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-size-adjust: 100%; margin-right: 0px !important; margin-left: 0px !important;"> <li style="box-sizing: border-box; font-size: 1.1em; line-height: 1.5em; margin: 0px 0px 1em; letter-spacing: 0.01em;"><span style="font-size:18px;">White Nationalist populism thrives from the perceived (and often real) elitism and exclusivity of the &ldquo;art world.&rdquo; Yet it is a right for every human being to partake in and benefit from the cultural wealth and heritage composed from our collective history, regardless of economic or social status.&nbsp;<span style="box-sizing: border-box; font-weight: 700;">We believe that access to cultural institutions should always be free and we commit to a long struggle to take back institutions from the exclusivity of philanthropy and high-ticket-price corporate models.</span></span></li> </ol> <ol start="6" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 1em; font-size: 1.1em; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing: 0.01em; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.8); font-family: freight-text-pro, 'Times New Roman', Times, Georgia, serif; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-size-adjust: 100%; margin-right: 0px !important; margin-left: 0px !important;"> <li style="box-sizing: border-box; font-size: 1.1em; line-height: 1.5em; margin: 0px 0px 1em; letter-spacing: 0.01em;"><span style="font-size:18px;">Economic precarity stemming from the devaluation of labor and increased corporate profits from extractive debts drives a wedge between members of our society, pitting us against each other in ruthless competition.&nbsp;<span style="box-sizing: border-box; font-weight: 700;">We look to democracies across the globe who affirm the right to a living wage and even a basic income and call on our nation&rsquo;s cultural institutions to pay all employees, contractors, and exhibiting artists a living wage for their labor.</span></span></li> </ol> <ol start="7" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 1em; font-size: 1.1em; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing: 0.01em; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.8); font-family: freight-text-pro, 'Times New Roman', Times, Georgia, serif; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-size-adjust: 100%; margin-right: 0px !important; margin-left: 0px !important;"> <li style="box-sizing: border-box; font-size: 1.1em; line-height: 1.5em; margin: 0px 0px 1em; letter-spacing: 0.01em;"><span style="font-size:18px;">The transformation of public spaces and our neighborhoods and homes into speculative instruments increases the already dire state of class anxiety. The economic precarity suffered by artists puts them at risk of being both affected by and a catalyst in the gentrification of poor neighborhoods.&nbsp;<span style="box-sizing: border-box; font-weight: 700;">Cultural institutions play a major role in gentrification that must be addressed; it is imperative that institutions use their cultural and financial capital to support their communities of arts workers and their local publics rather than enable gentrification by participating in development schemes.</span></span></li> </ol> <ol start="8" style="box-sizing: border-box; margin-top: 0px; margin-bottom: 1em; font-size: 1.1em; line-height: 1.5em; letter-spacing: 0.01em; color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0.8); font-family: freight-text-pro, 'Times New Roman', Times, Georgia, serif; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: rgba(0, 0, 0, 0); -webkit-text-size-adjust: 100%; margin-right: 0px !important; margin-left: 0px !important;"> <li style="box-sizing: border-box; font-size: 1.1em; line-height: 1.5em; margin: 0px 0px 1em; letter-spacing: 0.01em;"><span style="font-size:18px;">Intellectualism and cultural experiment are considered as dangerous and unpatriotic to Fascists. Nazi poet laureate Hanns Johst famously wrote: &ldquo;Let &rsquo;em keep their good distance with their whole ideological kettle of fish &hellip; I shoot with live ammunition! When I hear the word culture &hellip;, I release the safety on my Browning!&rdquo;&nbsp;<span style="box-sizing: border-box; font-weight: 700;">Our cultural institutions must fortify themselves against the coming onslaught by deepening and declaring their commitment to and support of artists, critical discourse, freedom of expression, and their immediate communities. We call on all museums and cultural institutions to stand in solidarity with the artists, art critics, art workers, and public who will not stand by in silence as power is handed over to Fascists. Cultural institutions can begin (as some have already begun) by collectively reassessing their institutions&rsquo; statements of ethics, making amendments, addenda, and revisions that specifically address the institution&rsquo;s role and responsibility to treat its workers fairly, to protect them from State repression when threatened, and to support the creation of bold and progressive works of art.</span></span></li> </ol> <p style="box-sizing: border-box; font-size: 1.1em; line-height: 1.5em; margin: 0px 0px 1em; letter-spacing: 0.01em;"><span style="font-size:18px;"><b>Originally published at <a href="http://hyperallergic.com/352991/occupy-museums-j20-art-strike/" target="_blank">Hyperallergic</a></b></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Fri, 20 Jan 2017 10:53:13 -0500 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Round 1 of the ArtSlant Prize IX Accepting Submissions Until Next Week <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">The ArtSlant Prize supports emerging artists working in all media.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">We offer cash prizes and an exhibition to winners, with opportunities to sell and promote your work to our international network throughout the process.</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; text-align: left; line-height: 30px;">Each round of our prize is judged by a panel of three independent art professionals. In the past, these have included gallery owners and curators from some of the top galleries in the world, as well as renowned critics and artists.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;">&nbsp;</p> <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170104153040-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 200px; height: 200px;" /></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><i>We are pleased to announce the opening of the</i></font></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><i>ninth annual ArtSlant Prize!</i></font></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;"><em>&nbsp;</em></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;"><em><strong>To Apply:</strong>&nbsp;click&nbsp;<strong>contest entry</strong> from your ArtSlant Profile<strong>&nbsp;</strong>or enter from your <strong>Contest </strong>tab on your account page.</em></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;"><em><strong>Submissions close</strong>&nbsp;on&nbsp;<strong>January 25th at Midnight ET.</strong></em></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="text-align: center;"><em style="font-size: large;"><strong><span style="font-family: helvetica;">ARTSLANT PRIZE IX</span></strong></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">1st Place: $3000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">2nd Place: $1000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">3rd Place: $1000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">Honorable Mention &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: small;"><span style="color: #00cfa6;">see below for more details</span></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><strong><span style="font-family: helvetica;">HOW IT WORKS:</span></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: helvetica;"><strong><span style="font-size: large;">Step 1: Enter Showcase&nbsp;</span></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: large; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Click <strong>enter Showcase</strong>&nbsp;to the right of your ArtSlant profile. Don&#39;t have one? <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/users/signin">Create your free profile today! </a></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: large; font-family: georgia, palatino;">Just $3 enters one of your works into our site-wide competition.</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: large; font-family: georgia, palatino;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: large; font-family: helvetica;"><strong>Step 2: Win Showcase</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">If your work is selected by our editors, you become a Showcase Winner and enter Premium Placement ($25). This advances you in the ArtSlant Prize competition to the Juried Round where your work receives a ton of exposure and is reviewed by our panel of guest jurors.</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><span style="line-height: 30px;">Premium Placement promotes your work around the ArtSlant website including on the <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/main" target="_blank">homepage</a>,&nbsp;the <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/artshow" target="_blank">artshow</a>, and on our social media accounts.&nbsp;</span><span style="line-height: 21px;">Think of it like a very affordable form of advertising.&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><span style="line-height: 21px;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: large; font-family: helvetica;"><strong><span style="line-height: 30px;">Step 3: Win Juried Round</span></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">A rotating panel of leading gallerists and art professionals reviews the Showcase Winners and select&nbsp;one artist to advance from each of the following categories: painting, photography, mixed-media, abstract, sculpture, drawing, new-media, installation, and student. Juried winners have the option to sell their work through ArtSlant on <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/node/index.html?ie=UTF8&amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true">Amazon.com</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-size: large; font-family: helvetica;"><strong><span style="line-height: 21px;">Step 4: Win the ArtSlant Prize</span></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Four Juried Winners are selected for the ArtSlant Prize at the end of the year. Winners receive cash prizes and are exhibited at the ArtSlant Prize exhibition. Past exhibitions took place at Aqua Art Miami during Art Basel Miami Beach.</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">1st Place: $3000</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">2nd Place: $1000</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">3rd Place: $1000</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><span>Honorable Mention&nbsp;</span><span>&nbsp;</span></span><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px; text-align: center;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Just click <strong>enter Showcase</strong> from your ArtSlant Profile&nbsp;to participate in the international ArtSlant Prize.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Don&#39;t have an ArtSlant Profile?&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/users/signin">Create one for free today.</a></span></p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="3"> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Previous ArtSlant Prize winners have gone on to secure gallery representation and have been purchased by prominent collectors, museum directors and personalities.</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Past winners include:</span></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2016 Winners</strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">To be announced...</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2015+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2015 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/16146-theresa-ganz" target="_blank">Theresa Ganz</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/315939-tina-tahir" target="_blank">Tina Tahir</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/204298-rachel-garrard" target="_blank">Rachel Garrard</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/347173-bryan-volta" target="_blank">Bryan Volta</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2014+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2014 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/45525-edra-soto" target="_blank">Edra Soto</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/246553-adam-douglas-thompson" target="_blank">Adam Douglas Thompson</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/241839-anastasia-samoylova" target="_blank">Anastasia Samoylova</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/378398-oren-pinhassi" target="_blank">Oren Pinhassi</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2013+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2013 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/247077-robin-kang?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Robin Kang</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/238335-maureen-meyer?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Maureen Meyer</a>,&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/334738-alison-pilkington?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Alison Pilkington</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/311414-alexis-courtney?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Alexis Courtney</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2012+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2012 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/135691-veronica-bruce">Veronica Bruce</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/23907-steven-vasquez-lopez" target="_blank">Stephen Vasquez Lopez</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/152389-susan-meyer">Susan Meyer</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/224530-timothy-gaewsky" target="_blank">Timothy Gaewsky</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2011+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2011 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/233718-holly-murkerson" target="_blank">Holly Murkerson</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/36482-jason-irwin" target="_blank">Jason Irwin</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/57515-christine-de-la-garenne" target="_blank">Christine de la Garenne</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2010+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2010 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/18169-chantel-foretich?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Chantel Foretich</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/29757-robert-minervini?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Robert Minervini</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2009+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2009 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/103857-michael-zelehoski?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Michael Zelehoski</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/46020-yo-fukui?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Yo Fukui</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/10432-julie-davidow?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Julie Davidow</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;</span></p> <hr /> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**All participants in the ArtSlant Prize Showcase Series agree to ArtSlant&#39;s&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/5575">Terms &amp; Conditions</a>.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**<em>Fees from the Artslant Juried Showcase competitions will be dedicated to the promotion of our prize winners and the administration of the competition.</em></span></p> <div class="row section" style="font-size: 16px; box-sizing: border-box; margin-left: -15px; margin-right: -15px; margin-bottom: 20px; font-family: Helvetica, sans-serif; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255);"> <div class="span9" style="box-sizing: border-box; position: relative; min-height: 1px; padding-left: 15px; padding-right: 15px; float: left; width: 618.75px;"><span style="font-size: 10px;">Round 1 submission above:&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/474952-anastasiarussa" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration: none; cursor: pointer; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;">AnastasiaRussa</a>,&nbsp;<em>Internet Girl. Portrait of Katya</em>, December 2016.</span></div> <div>&nbsp;</div> </div> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Thu, 19 Jan 2017 09:57:47 -0500 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Heather Dewey-Hagborg and Chelsea Manning Publish Comic in Last Push for Obama Clemency <p>Heather Dewey-Hagborg is perhaps best known for her project&nbsp;<em>Stranger Visions</em>, a dystopian romp into the world of cheap genetics technology and surveillance culture where she was able to create facial masks of New Yorkers from bits of gum and hair left by individuals on the streets.</p> <p>Unfamiliar? Read <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/46776-heather-dewey-hagborg-questions-dna-as-big-data" target="_blank">our interview with her</a> from last year to catch up.</p> <p>Today, she released a comic, <em>Suppressed Images</em>, in collaboration with Army whistle-blower Chelsea Manning and illustrator Shoili Kanungo as one final push to gain clemency from out-going President Barack Obama. Manning has been <a href="http://news.vice.com/story/chelsea-manning-is-on-obamas-short-list-for-his-final-acts-of-clemency" target="_blank">reported</a> to be on his clemency&nbsp;shortlist.</p> <p>The comic tells the story of how Dewey-Hagborg came to work with Manning on&nbsp;<i background-color:="" font-size:="" new="" style="box-sizing: border-box; font-family: Georgia, Times, " times="">Radical Love: Chelsea Manning</i>, a project initiated by Paper Magazine to create a DNA portrait of Manning, since the Army would not allow any portraits of her to be taken.</p> <p>When asked about the significance of this act of visual representation, Dewey-Hagborg said, &ldquo;As Chelsea has described elsewhere, our current society depends a lot on visibility. To be&nbsp;invisible&nbsp;is, in a sense, to cease to exist. This is the power of a person&rsquo;s image which the prison strips her of. The idea behind the piece was to give her back some of the visibility and power she was stripped of.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;Chelsea is such an inspiration to me personally,&rdquo; Dewey-Hagborg continued. &ldquo;I really wanted this comic book to show her incredible spirit and resilience and sense of humor. The media really doesn&rsquo;t capture this. I want people to see her humanity, in addition to her brave act.&rdquo;</p> <p><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170117164916-explanation-large-1.jpg" /></p> <p><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170117164927-2.jpg" /></p> <p><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170117170628-2__1_.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The comic is another vector in a <a href="https://www.freechelsea.com/" target="_blank">wider campaign</a> urging Obama to grant Manning clemency. Here&rsquo;s hoping this goal will come to fruition.</p> <p><em>Read the entire comic&nbsp;<a href="https://suppressedimages.net/" target="_blank">here</a>.</em></p> <p><strong>UPDATE</strong>: President Obama has&nbsp;<a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/17/us/politics/obama-commutes-bulk-of-chelsea-mannings-sentence.html?hp&amp;action=click&amp;pgtype=Homepage&amp;clickSource=story-heading&amp;module=a-lede-package-region&amp;region=top-news&amp;WT.nav=top-news" target="_blank">commuted Chelsea Manning&#39;s prison sentence</a>, she will be released on May 17th.</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/153044-joel-kuennen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Joel Kuennen</a></p> <p><em>Joel Kuennen&nbsp;is the Chief Operations Officer and a Senior Editor at ArtSlant.</em>&nbsp;</p> Tue, 17 Jan 2017 17:22:11 -0500 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Ella Goerner | Matthew Penkala | Ben Pederson <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/474870-ella-goerner?utm_source=EllaGoerner&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Ella Goerner &ndash; Berlin</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ber/works/show/1024137?utm_source=EllaGoerner&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1024137/u3azr9/20170110165145-Ella_Goerner_room_shave_Fotografie_Robert_Vanis_sis.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ber/works/show/1024147?utm_source=EllaGoerner&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1024147/mf2ji7/20170110180835-Ella_Goerner_room_dialogue_metals_Fotografie_Robert_Vanis_sis_more.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ber/works/show/1024148?utm_source=EllaGoerner&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1024148/u3azr9/20170110180933-Ella_Goerner_Nugget_sis_2_8_Fotografie_Robert_Vanis_.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ber/works/show/1024146?utm_source=EllaGoerner&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1024146/mf2ji7/20170110180632-Ella_Goerner_Better_Than_Fotografie_Robert_Vanis_1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/337-matthew-penkala?utm_source=MatthewPenkala&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Matthew Penkala &ndash; Los Angeles</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/869568?utm_source= MatthewPenkala&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/869568/u3azr9/20141130185408-dont_put_me_in_a_box_cosmonaut_web.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/869573?utm_source= MatthewPenkala&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/869573/mf2ji7/20141130185752-waiting_for_the_shipwreck_high.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/869577?utm_source= MatthewPenkala&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/869577/mf2ji7/20141130191322-crime_i_did_content.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/869574?utm_source= MatthewPenkala&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/869574/mf2ji7/20141130185801-the_universal_will_sigh_high.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/397930-benjamin-pederson?utm_source=BenPederson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Ben Pederson &ndash; Brooklyn, NY</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/840032?utm_source= BenPederson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="http://68.media.tumblr.com/370f5af81138ccebb73b275188d07c72/tumblr_nkx1ioNA781u07vo6o1_1280.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/840035?utm_source= BenPederson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/840035/mf2ji7/20140812191537-BP11.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/840040?utm_source= BenPederson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/840040/mf2ji7/20140812191609-BP14.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/840027?utm_source= BenPederson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/840027/mf2ji7/20140812191506-BP2.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20160210150305-prize-radar-logo-2016.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/s?marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Tue, 17 Jan 2017 12:30:28 -0500 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list UNDER THE RADAR: ELLA GOERNER | MATTHEW PENKALA | BEN PEDERSON <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-family:serif"><span style="font-size:18px">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar.</span></span></p> <hr /> <p><span style="font-family:serif"><span style="font-size:18px"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/474870-ella-goerner?utm_source=EllaGoerner&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar">Ella Goerner &ndash; Berlin</a></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:serif"><span style="font-size:18px"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ber/works/show/1024137?utm_source=EllaGoerner&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1024137/u3azr9/20170110165145-Ella_Goerner_room_shave_Fotografie_Robert_Vanis_sis.jpg" /></a></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:serif"><span style="font-size:18px"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ber/works/show/1024147?utm_source=EllaGoerner&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1024147/mf2ji7/20170110180835-Ella_Goerner_room_dialogue_metals_Fotografie_Robert_Vanis_sis_more.jpg" /></a></span></span><span style="font-family:serif"><span style="font-size:18px"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ber/works/show/1024148?utm_source=EllaGoerner&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1024148/u3azr9/20170110180933-Ella_Goerner_Nugget_sis_2_8_Fotografie_Robert_Vanis_.jpg" /></a></span></span><span style="font-family:serif"><span style="font-size:18px"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ber/works/show/1024146?utm_source=EllaGoerner&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1024146/mf2ji7/20170110180632-Ella_Goerner_Better_Than_Fotografie_Robert_Vanis_1.jpg" /></a></span></span></p> <hr /> <p><span style="font-family:serif"><span style="font-size:18px"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/337-matthew-penkala?utm_source=MatthewPenkala&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar">Matthew Penkala &ndash; Los Angeles</a></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:serif"><span style="font-size:18px"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/869568?utm_source=%20MatthewPenkala&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/869568/u3azr9/20141130185408-dont_put_me_in_a_box_cosmonaut_web.jpg" /></a></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:serif"><span style="font-size:18px"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/869573?utm_source=%20MatthewPenkala&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/869573/mf2ji7/20141130185752-waiting_for_the_shipwreck_high.jpg" /></a></span></span><span style="font-family:serif"><span style="font-size:18px"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/869577?utm_source=%20MatthewPenkala&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/869577/mf2ji7/20141130191322-crime_i_did_content.jpg" /></a></span></span><span style="font-family:serif"><span style="font-size:18px"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/869574?utm_source=%20MatthewPenkala&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/869574/mf2ji7/20141130185801-the_universal_will_sigh_high.jpg" /></a></span></span></p> <hr /> <p><span style="font-family:serif"><span style="font-size:18px"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/397930-benjamin-pederson?utm_source=BenPederson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar">Ben Pederson &ndash; Brooklyn, NY</a></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:serif"><span style="font-size:18px"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/840032?utm_source=%20BenPederson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="http://68.media.tumblr.com/370f5af81138ccebb73b275188d07c72/tumblr_nkx1ioNA781u07vo6o1_1280.jpg" /></a></span></span></p> <p><span style="font-family:serif"><span style="font-size:18px"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/840035?utm_source=%20BenPederson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/840035/mf2ji7/20140812191537-BP11.jpg" /></a></span></span><span style="font-family:serif"><span style="font-size:18px"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/840040?utm_source=%20BenPederson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/840040/mf2ji7/20140812191609-BP14.jpg" /></a></span></span><span style="font-family:serif"><span style="font-size:18px"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/840027?utm_source=%20BenPederson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/840027/mf2ji7/20140812191506-BP2.jpg" /></a></span></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p><span style="font-family:serif"><span style="font-size:18px">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></span></p> <p style="text-align:center">&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="box-sizing: border-box; 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width:100%" /></a><a href="https://www.amazon.com/s?marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration: none; cursor: pointer; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent; font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration: none; cursor: pointer; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></span></a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Fri, 13 Jan 2017 14:17:09 -0500 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Rise Up, Nasty Women: Artists Respond to Trump <p>&ldquo;Literally the day the election results were announced I started working on the exhibit,&rdquo; says artist and curator Indira Cesarine. Next week, her Tribeca gallery,<a href="http://untitled-space.com/uprise-angry-women-group-show/"> The Untitled Space</a>, opens the exhibition <em>UPRISE / ANGRY WOMEN</em>, featuring work by 80 women-identifying artists addressing the social and political climate in America today.</p> <p>Cesarine wasn&rsquo;t the only one sparked into immediate action.</p> <p>&ldquo;Hello female artists/curators! Lets organize a NASTY WOMEN group show!!! Who&#39;s interested???&rdquo; artist<a href="http://www.roxannejackson.com/"> Roxanne Jackson</a> posted on Facebook a few days later. She had no idea just how overwhelming the interest would be: within an hour she had 300 responses. Jackson and curator<a href="http://jessamynfiore.com/"> Jessamyn Fiore</a> got to work on the <a href="http://nastywomenexhibition.org/"><em>NASTY WOMEN Exhibition</em></a>, which opened at the Knockdown Center in Queens on Thursday and runs through the weekend.</p> <p>Some exhibitions take months, if not years to plan. But these two shows, both timed to lead up to Donald Trump&rsquo;s inauguration on January 20, tapped into something that we&rsquo;ll likely see a lot more of over the next four years: a pressing need to respond. These exhibitions are remarkable, not for their curatorial research and selectivity, but in their urgency and passion. In each case, organizers came up with an idea and mobilized hundreds of artists and collaborators with barely a month&rsquo;s notice.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong class="h3">&ldquo;We included them all.&rdquo;</strong></p> <p>Both exhibitions began with open calls shared widely in social media. Cesarine says <em>UPRISE </em>&nbsp;is the first open-call show her gallery has organized: &ldquo;I felt it was important for the <em>UPRISE / ANGRY WOMEN</em> exhibit to reflect how women in America are feeling right now, and to have artists from all over the country from diverse backgrounds represented in the exhibit.&rdquo; She ultimately received more than 1,800 submissions from some 400 woman-identifying artists. Due to the space limitations of the Lispenard Street gallery, she curated the submissions down to 80 artworks by as many artists.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170113184746-__JORDIE_OETKEN_-__In_Solidarity__-_The_Untitled_Space_UPRISE_-_ANGRY_WOMEN_EXHIBIT.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Jordie Oetken,&nbsp;<em>In Solidarity</em>. Exhibited in <i>UPRISE / ANGRY WOMEN</i></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><em>NASTY WOMEN</em> took a different curatorial approach. &ldquo;This is not a traditional show,&rdquo; says Fiore. &ldquo;I&rsquo;ve never worked on an exhibition where I said &lsquo;Everyone is included.&rsquo;&rdquo; But when she began the project, she knew her role was not about making selections. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s more about inclusivity. It&rsquo;s about bringing all these diverse voices together&mdash;and I do look at these works <em>as voices</em>. The art is an action that these women have made. So we included them all.&rdquo; But Jackson and Fiore could not anticipate how widely their call to action would resonate: they had to close the submission period early after receiving some 1,000 artworks by nearly 700 artists.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong class="h3">&ldquo;There is no better point in time to enact change than during a cultural rupture.&rdquo;</strong></p> <p>&ldquo;As I watched Roxanne&rsquo;s Facebook post blow up, I saw that other people are feeling this too&mdash;that we have to <em>do something</em>. And do it now,&rdquo; Fiore recalls. These exhibitions tap into an enormous and growing sentiment: how can we respond?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170113185314-05.Jen-Schwarting.jpg" style="text-align: center;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Jen Schwarting,&nbsp;<em>WAKE UP</em>, 2016. Exhibited in <i>NASTY WOMEN</i></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>In mass actions, be they group exhibitions or the imminent<a href="https://www.womensmarch.com/"> Women&rsquo;s March on Washington</a>, it&rsquo;s clear that diverse congregations of women are looking for ways to register discontent, to be seen and heard, to be held to account. There is also a search for commonality, solidarity, and belonging in these undertakings. &ldquo;Art can challenge the status quo and shed light on the issues our society is facing today,&rdquo; says Cesarine. &ldquo;It is an important time in history for women to join together to fight for our rights and ensure that they continue to progress. It is important for Trump&rsquo;s sexist, racist behavior to not become normalized.&rdquo;</p> <p>These are not the first exhibitions of their kind. In 2014 and 2015, eighteen Missouri galleries staged<a href="http://api.ning.com/files/ahs5JtVtSPUbjA1yyiGCZ1FAHRVtv9tMVMidC2NJbrkVNvCCtuuAcO3V-vwA8v0X-aZRsuPA0B3lUGlabDaBps42bUbvC*TT/HUDSMediaPoints.pdf"> <em>Hands Up, Don&#39;t Shoot: Artists Respond</em></a>, in which more than 100 artists considered the killing of Michael Brown. That December, immediately following the non-indictment of Daniel Pantaleo, the police officer who killed Eric Garner, the Brooklyn non-profit Smack Mellon rearranged their exhibition schedule and put out a call for work responding to police brutality, racism, and social justice. The resulting show, <em>Respond</em>, featured 200 artworks from over 600 proposals.</p> <p>Urgency and scale are essential to these actions. &ldquo;There is no better point in time to enact change than during a cultural rupture,&rdquo;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/41814"> wrote Joel Kuennen about <em>Respond</em></a> for ArtSlant at the time. He continued, &ldquo;This is part of the mandate of contemporary culture: to express with as many images and words as experienced time will allow.&rdquo; In the <a href="https://www.nytimes.com/2015/01/23/arts/smack-mellon-and-grey-art-display-art-sparked-by-politics.html" target="_blank"><em>New York Times</em></a> Holland Cotter concluded that &ldquo;it&rsquo;s the show as a whole, its massed voice, that is so impressive, and heartening.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170113182207-IMG_9220.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>NASTY WOMEN Exhibition</em>, Installation in Progress at Knockdown Center, 2017. Photo: Jessamyn Fiore&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>UPRISE</em> and <em>NASTY WOMEN </em>are, indeed, each greater than the sum of their parts. The very gesture of amassing so many voices is a protest, a rising up to be heard. Like <em>Respond</em>, <em>UPRISE </em>will be hung salon-style, a cacophony of mediums, positions, and voices. <em>NASTY WOMEN</em>, on the other hand, aimed for an even more unified, monumental experience. Ten twelve-foot-high letters spelling <em>N-A-S-T-Y W-O-M-E-N</em> span the vast hall of the Knockdown Center. This scaffolding-like installation provides walls and shelves for more than 700 artworks, each no larger than a foot in any dimension.</p> <p>The project&rsquo;s dimensions are, in fact, even more expansive than that: There are currently 27<a href="http://nastywomenexhibition.org/other-nasty-venues/">&nbsp;confirmed venues</a>&nbsp;(and counting) organizing related &ldquo;nasty&rdquo; shows across the United States and abroad. Most exhibitions will take place this month, but a number are scheduled throughout the Spring.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong class="h3">&ldquo;Wherever you are is the place to start.&rdquo;</strong></p> <p>Following the election, clients began asking<a href="http://www.bethpickens.com/"> Beth Pickens</a>, an LA consultant to artists and cultural non-profits, whether making art was enough. Should they quit art making and, say, go to law school or run for office? In response, Pickens put together the pamphlet &ldquo;Making Art During Fascism,&rdquo; which concludes: &ldquo;Your work will be more important than ever. You have no idea who needs to see/hear/feel what you are making.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170113185352-11.johanna-braun_slumberparty.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Johanna Braun,&nbsp;<em>Slumber Party</em>, 2016. Exhibited in <i>NASTY WOMEN</i></span></p> <p><br /> &ldquo;Wherever you are is the place to start. Art is going to help people through this time,&rdquo; Pickens said in a<a href="http://www.callyourgirlfriend.com/episode-74-pump-up-2017"> recent interview</a>. &ldquo;The things we&rsquo;re called to do&mdash;we have to continue doing them no matter the political reality because that will help us add new actions into our lives.&rdquo; She encouraged people to take stock of what they have to offer: &ldquo;Is it time? Is it money? Is it a particular skill or tools or physical space? Is it previous experience in activism or leadership or organizing?&rdquo;</p> <p><em>NASTY WOMEN</em> and <em>UPRISE</em> are triumphs in this sort of thinking. &ldquo;It&rsquo;s been pretty phenomenal how it&rsquo;s come together,&rdquo; says Fiore, who normally works on shows with a much longer lead in time. Due to the incredible generosity of artists, woodworkers, technicians, venues, and others donating their skills and resources, the <em>NASTY WOMEN</em> team was able to achieve things that would have been challenging even under normal circumstances. This generosity, she says, speaks to how &ldquo;things are different right now, and how this is a different type of exhibition.&rdquo;</p> <p>Does Fiore get the sense that the open call, or the political climate in the States, has mobilized women artists who do not normally make political work?</p> <p>&ldquo;Absolutely,&rdquo; says Fiore. Many artists wrote that they made work after the election, or especially for the exhibition. Some divulged, &ldquo;I&rsquo;ve only ever made work, but I never wanted to show it until now.&rdquo; Others, like a writer, said they don&rsquo;t normally make visual art at all. &ldquo;To me that&rsquo;s a very powerful statement.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong class="h3">&ldquo;We&rsquo;ve been describing it as a visual art protest.&rdquo;</strong></p> <p>These exhibitions are not, however, just cries into a dark night. There are tangible benefits, like cold, hard, cash in the hands of worthy organizations. 100 percent of <em>NASTY WOMEN</em>&rsquo;s proceeds will go to Planned Parenthood, and a portion of <em>UPRISE</em>&rsquo;s earnings will benefit <a href="http://www.eracoalition.org/">ERA Coalition</a>&rsquo;s Fund for Women&rsquo;s Equality. The Coalition continues to push for passage and ratification of the<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equal_Rights_Amendment"> Equal Rights Amendment</a>, which would prohibit discrimination on the basis of sex.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170113185411-09.Priscilla-Stadler_ungrabbale.jpg" style="text-align: center;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Priscilla Stadler,&nbsp;<em>Ungrabbale</em>, 2016. Exhibited in <i>NASTY WOMEN</i></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&ldquo;People said we should get famous artists so we could raise more money,&rdquo; Fiore recalls. But the <em>NASTY WOMEN </em>organizers wanted the spirit of inclusivity and equality to extend to the show&rsquo;s audience. Priced from $10, all works cost $100 or less. &ldquo;I wanted everyone to be able to participate through the <em>buying </em>of the works as well. We&rsquo;ve been describing it as a visual art protest.&rdquo;</p> <p>Open call, rapid, inclusive, non-profit, cash-and-carry&mdash;these attributes do not reflect typical art world systems. Museums&mdash;accountable to trustees and reliant on the allocation of exhibition budgets years in advance&mdash;cannot respond nearly as deftly to pressing contemporary issues. Political art may be <a href="https://www.artsy.net/article/artsy-editorial-at-art-basel-in-miami-beach-dealers-test-whether-art-market-can-take-a-more-political-turn">trending in the market</a> post-election, but we can hardly count on commercial galleries with seasonal schedules, demanding collectors, and obligations to represented artists to switch up their model. Can we?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong class="h3">Artists Respond:</strong></p> <p>Prominent themes in both the submissions and final exhibition, says Cesarine, include &ldquo;works on subjects of rage, rape culture, protest, equality, reproductive rights, subjects addressing stereotypes of women and gender roles, as well as of course anti-Trump art.&rdquo; Fiore echoes this sentiment (down to the &ldquo;very funny&rdquo; selection of anti-Trump work). In particular, she says <em>NASTY WOMEN</em> includes many works &ldquo;exploring female identity and our position in society in one way or another, often considering the history of the oppression of women.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170113181857-__Mila_Rochenner__Wrong_Side_Feelings__-_THE_UNTITLED_SPACE_-_UPRISE_-_ANGRY_WOMEN_EXHIBIT.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Mila Rochenner,&nbsp;<em>Wrong Side Feelings</em>, 2015. Exhibited in <i>UPRISE / ANGRY WOMEN</i></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Sculptor <a href="http://www.milarochenner.com/" target="_blank"><strong>Mila Rochenner</strong></a> was born in Brazil and says she identifies with her German Jewish and Indian heritage. She submitted her sculpture <em>Wrong Side Feelings</em> (2015) to <em>UPRISE </em>in response to her experiences of sexism, racism, and xenophobia. &ldquo;This senseless violence forces you to revise your identity. If I know about others&rsquo; suffering, I know I am not alone.&rdquo; Her sculpture reflects a period of pain when she was sexually harassed by an influential teacher during her master&rsquo;s program.</p> <p>She says she doesn&rsquo;t believe art can single-handedly affect political or social change, but that it&rsquo;s &ldquo;one tool we have to open a door for discussion. Art affects civil discourse by directing and propositioning ideas that haven&rsquo;t yet found their way into mass conscious, mainstream thinking.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170113175933-11.Katya-Grokhovsky.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Katya Grokhovsky, <em>Hotness (Approval Pending)</em>, 2016. Video still. Exhibited in <em>NASTY WOMEN</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="http://www.katyagrokhovsky.net/" target="_blank"><strong>Katya Grokhovsky</strong></a>&rsquo;s video <em>Hotness (Approval Pending)</em> (2016), featuring a faceless female torso, trapped in a glitchy loop, expresses her frustration with a lifetime of objectification and &ldquo;the patriarchal regime constantly violating the freedom of the woman&rsquo;s body, health, and life choices.&rdquo;</p> <p>She wholeheartedly believes art can affect social issues. &ldquo;Artists have a responsibility to engage through their work, to not give in to apathy, to ignite, to shed a beam of light into the darkest corners of our world,&rdquo; she says. &ldquo;Art can heal, can energize, can lead to revolutions, can challenge the status quo, in diverse, beautifully humane ways, which do not involve any violence or violation of anyone&rsquo;s rights. A simple positive change of energy in the room created by an artwork, can lead to the most beautiful change of a heart and life.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170114074833-SarupaSidaarth_DarkMatter.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Sarupa Sidaarth,&nbsp;<em>Dark Matter.</em> Exhibited in&nbsp;<em>UPRISE / NASTY WOMEN</em></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>For <a href="http://www.sarupasidaarth.com/" target="_blank"><strong>Sarupa Sidaarth</strong></a>, whose portrait <em>Dark Matter</em> takes on themes of racism, colorism, and xenophobia, forcing these issues into the light is not a new preoccupation. &ldquo;It is important to find creative ways to coexist,&rdquo; she explains. &ldquo;We don&rsquo;t live in an egalitarian society. By participating I am sharing my way of seeing.&rdquo;</p> <p>Can her work affect change? &ldquo;I think of art as storytelling. When the viewer confronts a work of art, at the very least there is a dialogue between an idea, artist and the viewer.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170113180949-__Parker_Day_God_Bless_America_-_THE_UNTITLED_SPACE_-_UPRISE_-_ANGRY_WOMEN_EXHIBIT_lowres.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Parker Day,&nbsp;<em>God Bless America</em>. Exhibited in&nbsp;<em>UPRISE / ANGRY WOMEN</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Los Angeles-based photographer <a href="http://www.parkerdayphotography.com/" target="_blank"><strong>Parker Day</strong></a> says she&rsquo;s glad to be a part of an all-women show &ldquo;that goes beyond the baseline fact that we all identify as female.&rdquo; She went on: &ldquo;There are lots of click-baity articles and reductive shows that are &lsquo;all women&rsquo; but&hellip; <em>UPRISE / ANGRY WOMEN </em>has teeth to it and a strong point of view.&rdquo;</p> <p>Her photograph <em>God Bless America</em> is part of <em>ICONS</em>, a series of 100 portraits of misfit characters, who &ldquo;demand attention and will not be denied.&rdquo; &ldquo;My work is fueled by a gentle undercurrent of rage,&rdquo; she says. &ldquo;It&#39;s about saying fuck you to the &lsquo;real world&rsquo; and how things have been and forging your own world.&rdquo;</p> <p>&ldquo;Art is power. Art is strength,&rdquo; Day asserts. &ldquo;It can shift how people see themselves and the world around them. When we feel differently, we act differently.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170113180551-__ALYSON-PROVAX-_I_thought_It_would_be_different_by_now_-_THE_UNTITLED_SPACE_-_UPRISE_-_ANGRY_WOMEN_EXHIBIT-_lowres.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Alyson Provax,&nbsp;<em>I thought it would be different by now</em>, 2016. Exhibited in&nbsp;<em>UPRISE / ANGRY WOMEN</em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="http://alysonprovax.com/" target="_blank"><strong>Alyson Provax</strong></a> submitted <em>I thought it would be different by now</em>, which she made within a week of the election results, because she felt &ldquo;a sense of community from being part of a show focused on women&rsquo;s anger.&rdquo; The work reflects on her sadness and feeling of culpability following the election. Provax says she was surprised by how hard Clinton&rsquo;s loss hit her. &ldquo;I realized that I had been blindly expecting history to simply move in the direction that I believed that it should. Donald Trump&rsquo;s victory felt a bit like falling into another world. But alongside those feelings of course I also realized the fallacy of trusting history to move in the direction I want it to. Actions are important.&rdquo;</p> <p>She cites way the film <em>The Day After</em> reportedly affected President Ronald Reagan&rsquo;s feelings about nuclear war. &ldquo;Art can change our perception and understanding of things on a personal level, and this can have great repercussions.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong class="h3">&ldquo;And angry.&rdquo;</strong></p> <p>Fiore ended our conversation saying, &ldquo;there are a lot of women who are <em>scared</em>. They&rsquo;re scared. And angry. They feel disconnected. And this show for them is a way to make that connection, to show solidarity, to represent themselves with other women.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>The</em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/436964-nasty-women-nyc-art-exhibition"> <em>NASTY WOMEN Exhibition</em></a><em> runs at The Knockdown Center in Queens from January 12&ndash;15.</em></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/436831-uprise-angry-women"><em>UPRISE / ANGRY WOMEN</em></a><em> runs at The Untitled Space from January 17&ndash;28.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/95201-andrea-alessi?tab=REVIEWS">Andrea Alessi</a></p> <p><em>Andrea Alessi is Managing Editor of ArtSlant.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Sat, 14 Jan 2017 06:56:05 -0500 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list In Commanding Prints, Afro-Cuban Artist Belkis Ayón Unites Mythology and Cultural Critique <p><em>Nkame</em>, a salutation that translates to &ldquo;<a href="http://www.fowler.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Nkame-Press-Release_long-FINAL.2.pdf" target="_blank">greeting</a>&rdquo; in the Abaku&aacute;n language, welcomes Belkis Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s first solo show in the United States to the Fowler museum. After Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s death in 1999, the Afro-Cuban artist&rsquo;s body of work was declared a&nbsp;<a href="https://web.archive.org/web/20081205054721/http://www.csupomona.edu/~kellogg_gallery/critics/ayon.html" target="_blank">patrimony</a>&nbsp;by the Cuban government and was not allowed out of the country until recently. Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s mysterious black-and-white prints appear as an obscure treasure that has just been uncovered, so it is fitting that her work be centered on the mythology of the Abaku&aacute;, an Afro-Cuban all-male secret society similar to the Masons.</p> <p>Ay&oacute;n used Abaku&aacute;n myths as the scaffolding for her striking visual universe. The fact that the religious society&rsquo;s stories and rituals were hidden and repressed under communist rule paralleled the overlooked social, gender, and racial inequalities Ay&oacute;n and others like her experienced.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170112124046-Belkis.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ay&oacute;n at Havana Galerie, Zurich, August 23, 1999. Photo: Werner Gadliger</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>The exhibition plays a video of&nbsp;Ay&oacute;n filmed one year before her tragic death by suicide at the age of 32. She is meticulously crafting a print in a process singular to her, brought on by socioeconomic restraints and her own perfectionism. Because art materials were not readily available to Ay&oacute;n at the height of Cuba&rsquo;s economic crisis, she had to create new methods of printmaking. Her collographs are a mixture of collage and lithography, pastiched from little bits of paper and glue that form the varied textures in her work. She also preferred to combine multiple prints together so she could gain more control over her intricate large-scale works. Contrasting patterns of fish scales, flora, and animal prints create vibrant textures that enrich her dramatic imagery and masterful technique. The work&rsquo;s esoteric subject matter adds another layer to her work.</p> <p>Ay&oacute;n used the mythology of the Abaku&aacute; as the aesthetic language of her work after learning about them in high school. According to her sister, the artist did extensive research into the Abaku&aacute;, but did not adhere to or mean to accurately represent their ideology. Instead, she created her own imagery from the stories of the Abaku&aacute; and combined them with the symbols and structures of Christianity and Catholicism. She also included women in her depictions, subtly making larger social criticisms. &ldquo;The intolerance, sacrifice, impotence, dogmatism, censorship and fear that Belkis portrayed through the Abaku&aacute; myth, however, clearly referenced what she herself experienced, as did those who shared her social, political, and cultural circumstances,&rdquo; Cristina Vives, Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s friend and the guest curator of this show, writes in the catalogue.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170112125230-93.14.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Belkis Ay&oacute;n, <em>Sin t&iacute;tulo (Sik&aacute;n con chivo) (Untitled (Sik&aacute;n with Goat))</em>, 1993, Collograph.&nbsp;Courtesy: Collection of the Belkis Ay&oacute;n Estate</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>Many critics of her time mistakenly interpreted&nbsp;Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s work as folkloric illustrations of Abaku&aacute;n myths, but Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s choice of subject matter had nothing to do with her own religious ideology. No other known artist at the time had focused on the secret society, which allowed Ay&oacute;n to freely interpret its stories. Through the language of a society rife with hidden meanings, she was able to meditate on larger issues of sexism and racism.</p> <p>Ay&oacute;n&nbsp;did this by focusing on the female figure of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.fowler.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Nkame-Press-Release_long-FINAL.2.pdf">Sik&aacute;n</a>, whom Ayon saw as an alter-ego. Sik&aacute;n, like all of the figures in Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s world, is mouthless, reflecting both the actual myth of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.fowler.ucla.edu/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Nkame-Press-Release_long-FINAL.2.pdf">Sik&aacute;n</a>&nbsp;and the silencing of Black women in society. Sik&aacute;n was a princess who accidentally captured a fish while drawing water from the river. She heard the fish&rsquo;s loud bellow, an utterance that turned out to be the mystical voice of the deity Abaku&aacute;. Because women were not permitted to hear this sound, Sik&aacute;n was sworn to secrecy. When she told her fianc&eacute; the sacred knowledge, she was condemned to death.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170112125000-91.08.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Belkis Ay&oacute;n, <em>La cena (The Supper)</em>, 1991 Collograph. Courtesy:&nbsp;Collection of the Belkis Ay&oacute;n Estate</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Sik&aacute;n is represented throughout&nbsp;Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s work as a Christlike figure, most notably in <em>La Cena (The Last Supper) </em>(1991) which seats Sik&aacute;n in the center of a long table surrounded by male and female apostles. Other triptychs such as <em>Perfidia (Perfidy)</em> (1998) illustrate her mouthless figures participating in Abaku&aacute;n consecration ceremonies which prepare for but do not depict the sacrifice of Sik&aacute;n.</p> <p>While in Abaku&aacute;n mythology Sik&aacute;n violates a secret of the brotherhood, in Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s world she is a martyr. She allows her heroine to live, albeit trapped in the patriarchal society&rsquo;s rituals. In later works, Sik&aacute;n becomes increasingly fearful of her place in this society, such as the not-so-subtly named <em>Dejame Salir (Let me out!)</em>&nbsp;(1997), a circular print of Sikan being consumed by flames. A goat, a symbol of sacrifice, lurks closely behind. The dread that pervades Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s later works also coincides with the artist transitioning from large to smaller circular prints. &ldquo;The action took place within a structure she had never used before. What was really happening, however, was much deeper: space was closing in on her,&rdquo; writes Cristina Vives.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170112125409-97.04.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Belkis Ay&oacute;n, <em>Dejame salir (Let me Out!)</em>, 1998, Collograph. Courtesy: Collection of the Belkis Ay&oacute;n Estate</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>There is some speculation that Ayon, like Sik&aacute;n, put herself at risk by exposing the secrets of the&nbsp;Abaku&aacute;, though with only 21,000 members, the society did not hold very much religious or political power, especially under the communist leadership of the time. Yet, a woman betraying a patriarchal network does convey something universally fearful. Sik&aacute;n infiltrating the Abaku&aacute; could also be a metaphor for the struggle of an Afro-Cuban woman trying to exist in an art world that excluded and misunderstood her for decades.</p> <p>It is possible to read Sik&aacute;n&rsquo;s tragic journey as parallel to&nbsp;Ay&oacute;n&rsquo;s encroaching depression, which she kept secret even to those closest to her, though her life and work still leave many mysteries that are just now beginning to be uncovered. With changing US-Cuba relations, <em>Nkame</em> will hopefully mark the beginning of her work being more widely researched and exhibited.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170112125822-91.10.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Belkis Ay&oacute;n, <em>Nlloro (Weeping)</em>, 1991, Collograph.&nbsp;Courtesy: Collection of the Belkis Ay&oacute;n Estate</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/452094-sola-agustsson?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Sola Agustsson</a></p> <p><em>Sola Agustsson is a writer based in Los Angeles. She studied at UC Berkeley and has contributed to Bullett, Flaunt, The Huffington Post, Alternet, Artlog, Konch, and Whitewall Magazine.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Installation view, <em>Nkame: A Retrospective of Cuban Printmaker Belkis Ayón</em>, Fowler Museum at UCLA, 2016. Courtesy the Estate of Belkis Ayón. Photo: Reed Hutchinson)</span></p> Thu, 12 Jan 2017 10:07:34 -0500 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Jenyu Wang Answers 5 Questions <div class="article-text section"><em>Welcome to <strong>5 Questions</strong>. Each week, we&rsquo;re sending five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/mia/articles/show/47134-under-the-radar-danielle-williamson-jenyu-wang-anna-fafaliou" target="_blank"><strong>Under the Radar</strong></a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from&nbsp;<strong><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/211043-jenyu-wang?tab=PROFILE" target="_blank">Jenyu Wang</a></strong>.</em> <p>&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>In retrospect, it feels as if I&rsquo;ve been pushing EPs out there for years, all of them love songs. So far my message has been about sharing intense desires and their loss.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>Hmm. Always wondered if art and responsibility were compatible, or mutually exclusive. The supremely difficult challenge for me has been to stay passionate, stay argumentative, yet stay tender (big Jenny Holzer fan). Those eventually become my responsibilities to my practice.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art or not)?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>Is... this a trick question? In response, I made this (see image) just now. Let me tell you if it&rsquo;s the greatest in one second&mdash;</p> <p><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170111192400-IMG_1070.JPG" style="width: 500px;" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>I&rsquo;ve wanted a tattoo for years. It is really not happening.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.pythagorasfilm.com/" target="_blank">Deborah Stratman</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rumiko_Takahashi" target="_blank">Rumiko Takahashi</a> (manga artist), <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sasha_Grey" target="_blank">Sasha Grey</a> (everyone knows her, though).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <hr /> <p><em background-color:="" box-sizing:="" new="" times=""><span style="box-sizing: border-box; font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source%3DRadar%26utm_medium%3Dimage%26utm_campaign%3DSubs&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1484665060014000&amp;usg=AFQjCNGQrSnozFywPOm-8TIqV7SKfodpnw" href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="box-sizing: border-box; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source%3DRadar%26utm_medium%3Dimage%26utm_campaign%3DMag&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1484665060014000&amp;usg=AFQjCNEu4lj90Y5zLpf4-B1klk2PWIVyBQ" href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="box-sizing: border-box; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1484665060014000&amp;usg=AFQjCNGeuhfQu-BjGZ9fTVnpKDeykvKPRA" href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="box-sizing: border-box; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source%3DRadar%26utm_medium%3Dimage%26utm_campaign%3DPrize&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1484665060014000&amp;usg=AFQjCNFWkXtTroFkNof3USoOSw-HbCD4Aw" href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="box-sizing: border-box; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;</span></em><em background-color:="" box-sizing:="" new="" times=""><span style="box-sizing: border-box; font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a data-saferedirecturl="https://www.google.com/url?hl=en&amp;q=http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143&amp;source=gmail&amp;ust=1484665060014000&amp;usg=AFQjCNG49mVRcOxfgL5BoPGLeb_QWCjVxQ" href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="box-sizing: border-box; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></span></em></p> </div> Mon, 16 Jan 2017 11:38:56 -0500 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: Martina Menegon <p><a href="http://martinamenegon.tumblr.com/">Martina Menegon</a> is an Italian new media artist and educator currently based in Vienna, Austria. <a href="http://martinamenegon.tumblr.com/bio">Her art explores</a> &ldquo;the instability and ephemerality of the human body as well as the alienation from physicality in today&rsquo;s digital age, questioning the gap between real and virtual, flesh and data.&rdquo; Menegon&rsquo;s expression of these ideas range from uncanny scenes of endless, undulating fleshy figures to far more personal depictions of her own digitally distorted physical form. Her work reveals the ever-evolving relationship between all of us and the inescapable digital world, as well as a complex, autobiographical representation of one artist&rsquo;s journey through it.</p> <p>I asked Menegon about her history of using computers to make art, the origins of her fascination with the human body, and the difference between selfies and self-portraits.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111132734-2.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>Virtual Narcissism</em>, 2016&ndash;ongoing, Various multimedia installations</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: What were your earliest memories of computers?</strong></p> <p><strong>Martina Menegon:</strong> Some years ago my mother was a graphic designer, often freelancing, so as far as I can remember, we always had a computer at home for her to work. Me and my brother were allowed to use it when she didn&rsquo;t need it for work. I remember once I wanted to clean up the desktop and somehow I trashed everything (including the Macintosh HD icon) and the computer never started up again. It was terrifying and I must admit, back then I blamed my little brother (shame on me!).</p> <p><strong>CP: When and why did you first go online?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I honestly cannot remember. It must have been early and probably just because it was finally possible to go online at home. My earliest memory of going online is during my first year of high school, when I opened my first blog where I was writing and posting pictures everyday (back then I was very much into writing little poems or short texts). But I already knew how to use the internet so I must have been online way before this memory.</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><br /> <img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111131135-3.I_ll_Keep_You_Warm_and_Safe_in_My_People_Zoo__3.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111131024-5.I_LL-KEEP-YOU-WARM-AND-SAFE-IN-MY-PEOPLE-ZOO-x-Paper-Thin-V2.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon, <em>I&rsquo;ll Keep You Warm and Safe in My People Zoo</em>, 2016, VR installation Sounds by&nbsp;Stefano D&rsquo;Alessio</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first think about computers as a creative tool?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I guess it always was for me. My mother&rsquo;s computer only had software she needed for work (Illustrator, Photoshop, etc.) and she also installed for me and my brother the amazing &ldquo;<a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kid_Pix">Kid-Pix</a>.&rdquo; I was always playing and drawing and creating with it since I can remember. I always treated computers as creative tools somehow.</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you start to experiment with 3D?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> It was in 2008 during my study in Visual and Performing Arts at the IUAV University in Venice. I followed a 3D animation class where I learned how to model and animate and render in Cinema4D. It was such a fun experience, and I never stopped working with 3D since then. I think I even repeated the class just for the fun of it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111132915-7.SPLITS-ARE-PARTED.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>Splits Are Parted</em>, 2016, Interactive installation,&nbsp;sounds by&nbsp;Stefano D&#39;Alessio</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How and why did the human body, and your own body, become such a constant theme in your work? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I think it always was. I can&rsquo;t say why. I think many different aspects and events of my life brought me to focus a lot on the human body: growing up as a synchronized swimmer, going to art school, experimenting with some performance art, studying performance and interactive art in Venice, being in Second Life, etc.</p> <p>In general I am quite a shy person, always scared of exposing myself publically. This is way I rarely ended up performing in real life. But for some reason, exposing myself in a digital realm does not bother me much. Maybe the only challenge for me is at openings, where people watch or interact with my 3D-scanned body and I am next to it. I sometimes try to blend in with the gallery walls :-P</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170111131341-1.Virtual_Narcissism_-_making_of.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>Virtual Narcissism</em>&nbsp;(making of), 2016&ndash;ongoing, Various multimedia installations</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How has the digital age changed our relationship with the human body? How do you think the digital age has changed your relationship with your own body?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I will not speak for others, but for me, the digital age gave me the possibility of exploring my body in many different ways: through audio, photo, videos, slow-mo, 3D, etc. It made it possible for me to augment and expand the relationship I had with my body. Sometimes I think it&rsquo;s my body that changed my relationship with the digital age: as I am more and more anxious in memorizing its changes and visualizing its data, I feel the urge to explore different techniques and tools.</p> <p><strong>CP: Do you think Virtual Reality will distort this relationship even further? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I think VR is going to create another way for us to relate to our body and it is not going to be necessarily a distortion, just another form. And I am definitely interested in exploring this.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Pzd2UI9_pHg?rel=0&amp;controls=0" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Your project <em><a href="http://martinamenegon.tumblr.com/post/144465199907/virtual-narcissism-various-multimedia" target="_blank">Virtual Narcissism</a></em> feels very autobiographical.</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> <em>Virtual Narcissism</em> is definitely autobiographical. It started as an experiment and ended up being an ongoing project, based on my digital archive of 3D-scanned selfies. In real life, I am generally a very shy person: I feel very uncomfortable being photographed or filmed. When I am alone I am of course less self-conscious, and it&rsquo;s virtually sculpting those moments that interests me the most at the moment.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" class="giphy-embed" frameborder="0" height="360" src="//giphy.com/embed/3o6ZtnBPZyoiR2c9tS" width="480"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>Virtual Narcissism</em>&nbsp;(making of), 2016&ndash;ongoing, Various multimedia installations</span></p> <div>&nbsp;</div> <p><strong>CP: What do you think is the difference between a self-portrait and a selfie? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> When I 3D scan myself, I never really think ahead about what kind of pose or where to sit. I usually plug in my Kinect, open the software, and it gives me 10 seconds to find a pose before the scan starts. I want to be as spontaneous as I can, given that a scan takes a bit longer than a photograph to be done. The results are untouched; all my <em>Virtual Narcissism</em> scans are uploaded as the software puts them out. There is no selection. All my scans are going to be uploaded in my Sketchfab account. So if we stick with the common distinction that sees self-portraiture as a representation of a person and a selfie as an insight into a person&rsquo;s life, then I should consider my work as selfies. But I am not sure this distinction is valid anymore.</p> <p><strong>CP: You regularly collaborate with certain artists. Why is collaboration important to you and your work? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I always loved collaborating with other artists, I think it is a great way to grow artistically as well as share knowledge. I am very fond of this. I never hide my process in art making&mdash;I believe in sharing. I guess this is also why I love teaching. Of the many collaborations I do with artists, two are regular and very important to me and my art. One is with <a href="http://cargocollective.com/stefanodalessio/" target="_blank">Stefano D&rsquo;Alessio</a>, with whom I create interactive installations and some performances. Even when we work separately, I regularly ask him for support in programming or audio design. My collaboration with <a href="http://www.exile.at/ko/" target="_blank">Klaus Obermaier</a> started back in 2010, after I took his <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_(software)" target="_blank">Max/MSP</a> workshop in Venice, where I learned how to create interactive tools for art practice. It was an important event in my artistic career, a major turning point. His works have been influencing me since then.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/KzDifurF9wQ?rel=0&amp;controls=0" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Klaus Obermaier, Stefano D&rsquo;Alessio, and Martina Menegon, <em>EGO</em>, Interactive installation, 2015</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Tell us about your experience playing Second Life? </strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> Second Life has been and still is a big and important experience and influence for my art. It was the first place where I experienced tridimensional glitches, the frustration of being stuck in a wall, having an arm passing through my body, etc. It was also the place where I started socializing, as I had a little shop where I was selling clothes and furniture. I was part of a design community that created amazing artistic events, and I was always trying to go to art performances and installations there as well.</p> <p>I was a Second Life resident for almost 10 years, and the only reason I am using the past tense is because I somehow destroyed my poor virtual me for an art project: I wanted to record the result of me attaching everything I owned in Second Life to my avatar (thousands of different hair styles and colors, clothes, shoes, animations, furniture, houses, etc.). I somehow overloaded the system and my avatar started changing, then transformed into a white cloud, and then the software crashed. Since then, whenever I try to open Second Life, the app crashes. I tried some solutions I found online but nothing worked. I will try to contact the Linden Lab soon, because I have to admit, I miss being in Second Life.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/-ibWVK9QBco?rel=0&amp;controls=0" width="700"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Martina Menegon, <em>Ouch!</em>, 2014</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How is the new media art scene in Vienna ?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> I have to admit most new media works I see here in Vienna are mainly in university exhibitions or small art spaces. In general I have the feeling there is not really a community here for new media, yet. But I guess it&rsquo;s just a matter of time. Just before Christmas, for example, at the Angewandte Innovation Lab (AIL) there was a very nice exhibition, <em><a href="http://www.ailab.at/archive/the-age-of-experience/" target="_blank">The Age of Experience</a></em>, featuring among others <em>The Legible City</em> by Jeffrey Shaw and a great work by Ip Yuk-Yiu, <em>S for Sisyphus</em>. I have to say I felt almost &ldquo;at home&rdquo; while visiting.</p> <p><strong>CP: What do you have coming up in 2017?</strong></p> <p><strong>MM:</strong> Apart from exhibitions and teaching, I will definitely keep working on new developments in&nbsp;<em>Virtual Narcissism</em>. I am currently working on a VR version of it, struggling around with some intricate scripting in Unity3D. I plan to play around with some augmented reality projects as well, as soon as the VR one is done. In general, I will keep working.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&#39;re interested in what&#39;s happening with art on the web. We invited online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, to write a bi-monthly column for us. Every other Wednesday he selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Martina Menegon,&nbsp;<em>I&#39;ll Keep You Warm and Safe in My People Zoo #2</em>, 2016, Video loop. All images: Courtesy of the artist)</span></p> Wed, 11 Jan 2017 11:01:05 -0500 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list In a Gentrifying London Neighborhood, Artists Connect Personal and Global Displacement <p>It&rsquo;s a decidedly vulnerable act many of us have experienced: the frantic search for something in your bag, bent over or on your knees in airport or a train station, personal articles spread out around you as you hunt for missing keys or passport, maybe trying to keep certain items hidden&mdash;tampons, condoms, echoes of bodies and sexuality deemed too personal for public exposure.</p> <p>Berlin-based artist Tanja Ostojić&rsquo;s ongoing project <em>Misplaced Women?</em>, first performed in Zagreb in 2009,&nbsp;centers on a simple but familiar choreography Ostojić both undertakes herself and delegates to other performers: the careful unpacking and repacking of a bag, the turning inside-out of things, in public spaces. Often performed by Ostojić or her delegates in sites of transit&mdash;airports, train terminals, bus stops&mdash;the performances sometimes take place without audiences, though just as often as not, they occur under the suspicious gaze of security personnel. <a href="https://misplacedwomen.wordpress.com/" target="_blank"><em>Misplaced Women?</em></a> evokes not only the physical borders suggested by her chosen sites, but the borders between the personal and the public these moments expose.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170110122424-IMG_4516.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Hilary Williams. Photo: Teresa Albor</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Anyone who re-performs the project can submit to&nbsp;an&nbsp;<a href="https://misplacedwomen.wordpress.com/category/stories/" target="_blank">archive of stories</a>&nbsp;and images. Additionally, Ostojić holds workshops and invites individual artists to perform the piece or to expand on its score. Its <a href="http://www.thisisliveart.co.uk/whats-on/misplaced-women/" target="_blank">most recent iteration</a> took place last month, not in a liminal site of transit, but in a neighborhood in the throes of transformation. Invited by artist <a href="http://elenamarcevska.com/" target="_blank">Elena Marchevska</a>, Ostojić hosted a two-day workshop at the current home of <a href="http://www.thisisliveart.co.uk/" target="_blank">Live Art Development Agency</a> (LADA), in the East London neighborhood of Hackney Wick. Marchevska was undertaking a residency with LADA&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.thisisliveart.co.uk/projects/restock-rethink-reflect" target="_blank"><em>Restock, Rethink, Reflect</em></a> (RRR) project, an ongoing initiative to support artists engaging with issues of identity politics and cultural diversity. Over the last decade residency themes have included race, disability, and feminism; RRR&rsquo;s fourth iteration, which runs through 2018, is specifically focused on questions of privilege.</p> <p>As an academic researcher and artist, Marchevska focuses on questions of displacement, considering feminist and artistic interventions as strategies of &ldquo;hospitality.&rdquo; She had invited Ostojić and fifteen participants of the Misplaced Women Workshop to the once &ldquo;edgy&rdquo; Hackney Wick for two days to take on the surrounding neighborhood as a laboratory in which to research and perform. Until the 2012 Olympic Games in London, Hackney Wick was a former industrial neighborhood of food packers and factories, increasingly populated by affordable art studios, venues, and fabrication labs. Preparation for the 2012 Games saw the construction of massive stadiums and parks in the area, followed by the sudden explosion of condo complexes, the enormous Stratford Westfield shopping mall, and awkward landscaping attempts to turn the Olympic site into &ldquo;useable&rdquo; parks. Along with physical changes came increased rents and the inevitable loss of arts spaces, including the important venue <a href="http://www.performancespace.org/" target="_blank">]performance s p a c e [</a>, which moved to Folkestone following complaints from residents of newly built condominium complexes.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170110122327-Photo_14-12-2016_12_47_22.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Dagmara Bilon. Photo: Jasmine Lee</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>As workshop participants unpacked and repacked their bags throughout this transformed, and transform<em>ing</em>, neighborhood, their actions engaged and pointed to the all too common predicament of <a href="http://www.citymetric.com/horizons/olympic-legacy-killing-londons-creative-culture-2369" target="_blank">Olympic legacy neighborhoods</a> and gentrification in general. They enacted Ostojić&rsquo;s basic score in posh shopping malls full of fake snow and foliage for the holiday season; they performed in children&rsquo;s playgrounds surrounded by unfinished development projects and the sounds of construction&mdash;and, notably, no actual children, despite the oddly temperate December weather.</p> <p>These generic pseudo-public spaces and the vestiges of old Hackney Wick became the backdrops and contexts for reiterations of Ostojić&rsquo;s performance encompassing both personal and more pointedly geo-political critiques. Among the fifteen participants selected by Ostojić and Marchevska from an open call were practicing artists, architects, journalists, activists, and volunteers concerned with displacement.</p> <p>In one performance, UK-based, Polish-born artist <a href="https://dagmarabilon.com/" target="_blank">Dagmara Bilon</a>, whose practice draws on her own experiences of migration, motherhood, and art-making, unpacked a red vintage suitcase and distributed the artifacts of her own past performances&mdash;costumes, personal objects, and large papier-m&acirc;ch&eacute; &ldquo;pussy&rdquo;&mdash;to participants and audience members to carry. She then stepped into two leg holes cut into the suitcase, zipped herself inside and, blinded and in high-healed shoes, tentatively crossed the bridge to the entrance of the Westfield shopping center. A procession of objects and onlookers followed in her wake. The piece was met with varied responses of delight and bemusement by shoppers (and suspicion by a golf-cart-driving security guard).</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170110122125-IMG_0025.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Nick Harris. Photo: Danyel Ferrari</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>Nick Harris&rsquo; performance, a mimed unpacking, recreated the work he does with children as a clown in refugee camps in Europe, including the former &ldquo;Jungle&rdquo; in Calais. His performance, which is initiated by a loud call of &ldquo;<em>Dayira!</em>&rdquo; or &ldquo;circle&rdquo; in Arabic, used to create an impromptu space in the camps, drew the attention of some workers in a food shipping business opposite the former home of ]performance s p a c e [, who came from behind a refrigerator curtain to watch.</p> <p><a href="http://www.teresaalbor.moonfruit.com/" target="_blank">Teresa Albor</a>, an American artist and journalist based in London, carried with her a selection of personal effects from&nbsp;<em>The Things We Leave Behind</em>, a collaborative project&nbsp;with photographer Lais Pontes. The project creates photographic archives of lost or abandoned objects collected through their work with <a href="https://www.facebook.com/dirtygirlslesvos/" target="_blank">The Dirty Girls of Lesvos Island</a>, an organization which collects, washes, and redistributes discarded clothing from asylum seekers arriving on the beaches of Lesbos, Greece. These items, including now-useless money from people&rsquo;s departure countries, family photographs, and once valued religious objects, lost or left in transit, were unpacked and carefully repacked under the watchful eyes of security guards and holiday shoppers in a temporary Christmas village in the mall, and again in the old Hackney Wick packing yards.</p> <p>These varied interpretations of and engagements with the notion of &ldquo;dis/misplacement&rdquo; arise from both Ostojić&rsquo;s commitment to <em>Misplaced Women?</em>&nbsp;as a locus for discussion and experience, as well as from Elena Marchevska&rsquo;s investment in the feminist politics of the notion of &ldquo;hospitality.&rdquo; In a truly collaborative turn, both artists left the determinations of each performance to its participants. The workshop was, thus, a kind of nesting doll of various iterations of sharing space and stories; each participant&rsquo;s work was forged within Ostojić&rsquo;s archive, within Marchevska&rsquo;s residency, harkening as much to histories of activist consciousness-raising circles as to an arts workshop. LADA, which is itself currently threatened with relocation from Hackney Wick, also acts more as a hosting institution than a traditional gallery or performance venue, helping to support and foster new works and building archives of underrepresented projects and artists who work in live arts.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170110122106-IMG_0024.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Teresa Albor. Photo: Danyel Ferrari</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>Large-scale geopolitical displacements have been the subject for many artworks in the past year, some of them extraordinarily visible and well funded. High-profile artworks, like Ai Weiwei&rsquo;s life jacket installations in Berlin and Vienna, often attempt to represent the issue though monumental scale. But the <em>Misplaced Women?</em> project and its participants engage with mis- and displacement on an intimate level. Their performances draw from individual migration stories, as well as embodied experiences such as ageing, motherhood, and illness. The performers&rsquo; unpackings thus resonate on a personal scale as much as they reflect the local site of a gentrifying neighborhood and open onto urgent, broader themes of geopolitical mass displacements.&nbsp;Collectively, these projects work to connect separately understood questions of borders and their crossings. Through a seemingly small, quotidian gesture&mdash;the opening up of a tiny, personal space in public&mdash;<em>Misplaced Women?</em> grapples with how, in turn, borders redrawn by economic and geopolitical forces themselves traverse our bodies and spaces.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170110144405-misplaced_women.png" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Tanja&nbsp;Ostojić. Photo: Danyel Ferarri</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><em>As part of her ongoing research residency at LADA, Elena Marchevska is </em><a href="http://www.thisisliveart.co.uk/opportunities/invitation-for-contributions-to-elena-marchevskas-study-room-guide-on-displ-1/" target="_blank"><em>inviting artist contributions</em></a><em> on the subject of displacement through January 20, 2017.</em></p> <p><em>Tanja Ostojić accepts submissions to her <a href="https://misplacedwomen.wordpress.com/" target="_blank">Misplaced Women? website</a>,&nbsp;an ongoing archive of personal experiences with recreations of the project.&nbsp;</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/200738-danyel-ferrari?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Danyel Ferrari</a></p> <div id="m_-6646011613517832592AppleMailSignature"><em>Danyel M. Ferrari is an artist and independent researcher currently based in Istanbul, Turkey.</em></div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Shannon Marie Mulvey.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-size:12px;">Photo: Hilary Williams)</span></p> Tue, 10 Jan 2017 11:36:48 -0500 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list