Articles | ArtSlant https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/show en-us 40 James Bridle’s Self-Driving Car Steers Into Slippery Questions About Automation <p>According to artist, writer, and theorist James Bridle, the autonomous car and the issues it raises stand in for many of the questions facing humanity today: what will ultimately result from our relationship with technology and artificial intelligence? How will we collectively adapt to world where jobs&mdash;like truck driving&mdash;have been automated out of existence? How will we deal with increasingly opaque, complex systems of governance and exchange?</p> <p>Bridle, whose work spans a variety of topics tied to network infrastructure, government transparency, and technological surveillance, looks to the technology behind self-driving cars in his new exhibition, <em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/444019-failing-to-distinguish-between-a-tractor-trailer-and-the-bright-white-sky" target="_blank">Failing to Distinguish Between a Tractor Trailer and the Bright White Sky</a></em>. Its headliner photograph, <em>UNTITLED (AUTONOMOUS TRAP 001)</em>, depicts a self-driving car that has been &ldquo;trapped&rdquo; in a ring of salt resembling road lines. A snow-topped, Mount Parnassus looms above the car&rsquo;s Greek environs. We recently discussed some of the political ramifications of automation, the role of mythology and mysticism, and the artist&rsquo;s strategy of learning-by-doing as a way to understand and deal with complex systems.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170426124044-Gradient_Ascent.jpg" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">James Bridle,&nbsp;<em>Gradient Ascent</em>, 2016, Still from single channel digital video, 12:00. Courtesy of the artist and Nome, Berlin</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Benjamin Busch: Your work deals with increasing complexity brought on by planetary-scale computation. It makes typically unseen information visible. How do you choose what to make visible?</strong></p> <p><strong>James Bridle: </strong>I think the key term there is &ldquo;typically unseen,&rdquo; because none of this stuff is really invisible. It&rsquo;s essentially about a curiosity to go out and look for it. I sort of realized doing this project, well really when I started finally putting the works together for the show, that it was essentially a project about my own curiosity and my own interest and desire to unpick things, to be able to look at complex systems and think that, <em>yeah, I could understand that, I could get into that</em>. So it&rsquo;s really a project of self-education.</p> <p>The things that I pick are the things that I find to be fascinating at the time, and I often don&rsquo;t realize why I&rsquo;m fascinated by them until I&rsquo;ve spent quite a lot of time looking at them. And in fact, it&rsquo;s only just in the last week maybe, after working on this project for months and months, that I really see the connection to previous work. The autonomous vehicle, which is an intensely networked vehicle, being something actually incredibly closely related to all the drone work that I did before on unmanned military aircraft. And every time I try to get away from that subject, I find myself kind of looping back to it, because it seems to be so compelling&mdash;even if I don&rsquo;t realize I&rsquo;m doing it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170426124247-BRIDLE_FAILING-5673.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">James Bridle, Installation view of&nbsp;<em>Failing to Distinguish Between a Tractor Trailer and the Bright White Sky&nbsp;</em>at Nome Gallery, Berlin, 2017.&nbsp;Courtesy of the artist and Nome Gallery, Berlin. Photo: Gianmarco Bresao</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>BB: So maybe in contrast to the drone material, what about autonomous vehicles makes them an especially good example of automation?</strong></p> <p><strong>JB:</strong> The first thing that got me interested, I realized, exactly like the drones, is that I don&rsquo;t see people really talking about them, or really thinking about their implications&mdash;except within maybe very specialized communities of people actually building them. But they&rsquo;re also a thing that&rsquo;s already here; there are autonomous vehicles driving on the highways in the U.S., on highways in Europe, at different levels of autonomy. Most of what&rsquo;s required is already within vehicles that are on the road here. Some of that software hasn&rsquo;t quite been enabled yet, but it&rsquo;s sort of ready to go.</p> <p>So it&rsquo;s a technology that&rsquo;s already here, and yet we&rsquo;ve had no discussion of its consequences. Some of those consequences may be fantastic. In the case of self-driving cars, lower road death seems like a really good thing. We do appear to be essentially trying to rebuild public transport, when maybe we could just do that instead. But one of the biggest effects is how it&rsquo;s going to change both people&rsquo;s working practices and people&rsquo;s social practices. So we&rsquo;re about to lose all of the jobs in driving&mdash;whether that&rsquo;s taxi cabs, whether that&rsquo;s bus drivers, whether that&rsquo;s truckers. That&rsquo;s a huge sector of the workforce that is going to be incredibly deskilled, and has already been deskilled&mdash;through GPS technologies, through taxi apps, all of these things. They&rsquo;re all a process of deskilling and alienating workers until they&rsquo;re just slightly more expensive than the robots, and then they&rsquo;ll get replaced by those as well.</p> <p>And that is a really clear, obvious example of what&rsquo;s happening across labor and working practices in general, so it&rsquo;s a really interesting way to approach automation in labor. But it&rsquo;s also for me a way of asking what it is that we want to automate. I&rsquo;m not a fan of cars, I don&rsquo;t have a car, I think they&rsquo;ve been really bad for cities, for society, for the environment. But I do like driving, and driving is fun, and lots of people like driving. It seems to me that we&rsquo;re rushing towards automating something that people enjoy a lot as well. No one is going to stop people driving, but it seems slightly unreflective, this kind of desire to do away, and to automate, and to replace human pleasures with machinery, essentially.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170426124208-BRIDLE_FAILING-5682.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">James Bridle, Installation view of&nbsp;<em>Failing to Distinguish Between a Tractor Trailer and the Bright White Sky&nbsp;</em>at Nome Gallery, Berlin, 2017.&nbsp;Courtesy of the artist and Nome Gallery, Berlin. Photo: Gianmarco Bresao</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>BB: Questions of automation have been addressed by the Accelerationist Manifesto and by the Xenofeminist Manifesto as well, particularly dealing with alienation in automation. Do you think that your work has a dialogue with accelerationist politics or aesthetics?</strong></p> <p><strong>JB: </strong>Yeah, absolutely. I&rsquo;m a great fan of Nick Srnicek and Alex Williams&rsquo; work. I really approve of using technology to better everything, but I just don&rsquo;t see that happening right now in any way. The acceleration is happening on the right, the acceleration is happening in corporatized and opaque technologies. It&rsquo;s not happening on a social level, which will be needed to balance that.</p> <p>So I fully support that and, in part, my work is absolutely connected to that, in that within this exhibition there&rsquo;s essentially two responses to this question of automation, using self-driving cars as a figure.</p> <p>On the one hand, to do it myself, to learn how to do it, to make that technology accessible to everyone, which I think is a really essentially democratizing move. The only way we&rsquo;ll get some of those social goals that are hoped for from an accelerationist view of technology is also to make these technologies accessible to everybody, so that they&rsquo;re not just the preserve of various elites&mdash;whether that&rsquo;s programming elites, or corporate or financial elites&mdash;everyone needs to be able to do this stuff. And everybody can! And so by doing this, I&rsquo;m hoping to demonstrate that this is possible. You can read the stuff that&rsquo;s on the internet, there&rsquo;s open-source software. I make open-source software myself as part of the project.</p> <p>And the other strand of it is also, actually, straight-up resistance. The traps for autonomous cars, which are somewhat playful, but nevertheless are actual ways of interacting with this technology directly from a non-specialized point of view.</p> <p>Both of those approaches are present, I hope, within the work. Both trying to understand and master it oneself and therefore democratize it and also to resist it where necessary.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170426123533-trap.jpeg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">James Bridle,&nbsp;<em>UNTITLED (AUTONOMOUS TRAP 001)</em>, 2017, Ditone archival pigment print, 150 x 200 cm. Courtesy of the artist and Nome, Berlin</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>BB:</strong> <strong>What&rsquo;s interesting about <em>UNTITLED (AUTONOMOUS TRAP 001)</em> is that it actually makes this technology appear very human again by revealing its flaws. I&rsquo;m interested in the presence of the Greek landscape in the work, which is prominently featured here. Why particularly this connection to the Greek landscape and also the connection to Greek mythology?</strong></p> <p><strong>JB: </strong>The connection to the Greek landscape is simply because that&rsquo;s where I&rsquo;ve been living for the last couple years. I didn&rsquo;t go there to seek that specific inspiration, but it&rsquo;s quite hard not to&mdash;it&rsquo;s a pretty great landscape. And as soon as you find yourself in that landscape, you immediately find yourself in the mythology of that landscape as well, because it&rsquo;s radically present there, and you start to understand and see why. If you&rsquo;re driving around these mountains, you can&rsquo;t help but bump into temples and also ancient caves, and groves of mushrooms, and all these kind of things. So that was really not an intention to go out and seek that, but it felt kind of inevitable.</p> <p>It&rsquo;s a massive clich&eacute; for an English boy to go to Greece and get inspired by Greek mythology, but it&rsquo;s always been present in my work in various forms, and it&rsquo;s rarely been as explicit as it is now. Actually, the effect of doing this there has allowed me to make that more explicit in my work. I&rsquo;ve made a lot of allusions to mythology in the past when I talk about the need for new metaphors for technology, and particularly complex technologies, or new metaphors for the cloud, on which I&rsquo;ve previously drawn from plenty of mystical texts in talking about that.</p> <p>And I&rsquo;ve always had a connection to mythology as a form of storytelling that precedes technological storytelling. So I&rsquo;m really interested in the fact that a de-humanized view of technology denies the power of different mythologies for enacting or talking about those technologies. There&rsquo;s a long, long history of narratives that are capable of dealing with uncertainty, and doubt, and complexity. Humans have been making those narratives for a very, very long time. So for me it feels entirely natural to connect that back with the work that I&rsquo;m doing now.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170426123852-Gradient_Ascent_1.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">James Bridle,&nbsp;<em>Gradient Ascent</em>, 2016, Still from single channel digital video, 12:00. Courtesy of the artist and Nome, Berlin</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>BB: When we think about technology and the people making technology that&rsquo;s part of our everyday life, we also think about an implicit idea of the human that&rsquo;s perhaps brought on by humanism. To what extent does the human as we know it play a role in your work, or are you trying to redefine what&rsquo;s human, actually?</strong></p> <p><strong>JB: </strong>The human plays an absolutely central role in my work, because it&rsquo;s just me trying to figure this stuff out. I don&rsquo;t see these technologies as anti-human, or de-humanizing, or any of those things. But I think they&rsquo;re often used and deployed in that way&mdash;not always consciously by the people who make them, but that is often the effect&mdash;because people don&rsquo;t think through the moral consequences of the work they make. The first people to make taxi apps weren&rsquo;t planning on destroying labor unions and lowering wages and all these kind of things. But to think it through, those are some of the consequences it has. Like with self-driving cars&mdash;the people designing them aren&rsquo;t trying to put people out of work, that&rsquo;s not their intention, but unless you think of the social consequences surrounding the work, then those are often going to be the results.</p> <p>The human impact of these things is important for me, but also on an individual human level. For me, the interest in doing this work is also, as I&rsquo;ve said, what I learn from it. This is not really about building this technology; it&rsquo;s about building an understanding of the world through learning about how these systems work.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170426124928-BRIDLE_FAILING-5702.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">James Bridle, Installation view of&nbsp;<em>Failing to Distinguish Between a Tractor Trailer and the Bright White Sky&nbsp;</em>at Nome Gallery, Berlin, 2017.&nbsp;Courtesy of the artist and Nome Gallery, Berlin. Photo: Gianmarco Bresao</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>BB: Do you think that art, in your process, can be used as a device to overcome alienation, as you&rsquo;ve described it?</strong></p> <p><strong>JB: </strong>It certainly overcomes my alienation. I&rsquo;m always loath to prescribe it as some kind of panacea for everything. But, it is the place in which you can do things with things other than what they were intended for. By which I mean the pressure of, for example, the only reason to go and investigate a self-driving car is so that you can go out and sell cars. Well, not if you choose to do it in other ways. If you choose to see what else that technology is capable of&mdash;or see what you learn by learning that&mdash;that is applicable in other ways. So for me, the art practice is a machine for generating further curiosities and literacies. By doing this work, you spill out a bunch of new ways of thinking through the world, and also new ways for myself to think about other things.</p> <p><em>James Bridle&rsquo;s exhibition </em><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/events/show/444019-failing-to-distinguish-between-a-tractor-trailer-and-the-bright-white-sky" target="_blank">Failing to Distinguish Between a Tractor Trailer and the Bright White Sky</a><em> marks the reopening of NOME at their new location, Glogauer Str. 17, 10999 Berlin. It will be on view April 22&ndash;July 29.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/477171-benjamin-busch?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Benjamin Busch</a></p> <p><em><a href="http://www.benbusch.info/" target="_blank">Benjamin Busch</a></em>&nbsp;<em>is currently researching critical modes of architectural production within the field of spatial practice. Treating architecture as a symptom of abstract processes, his artwork and writing investigate complex fields of relations within the built environment.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;James Bridle, Installation view of&nbsp;<em>Failing to Distinguish Between a Tractor Trailer and the Bright White Sky&nbsp;</em>at Nome Gallery, Berlin, 2017.&nbsp;Courtesy of the artist and Nome Gallery, Berlin. Photo: Gianmarco Bresao)</span></p> Wed, 26 Apr 2017 11:23:52 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Announcing the Georgia Fee Artist | Writer Residency Shortlist <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 600px;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;">We are pleased to announce the shortlist for the 2017 Georgia Fee Artist | Writer Residency in Paris. The candidates will be interviewed in the comings weeks and the selected resident will be announced in early May.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">A heartfelt <em>thank you</em> to everyone who applied in this exceptionally competitive year&mdash;we love reading your applications and are genuinely thrilled by the diversity of high-quality applications the residency receives. We&rsquo;ve got a difficult choice ahead of us, and we couldn&rsquo;t be happier.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">All applications were considered and discussed at length amongst our panel and even if you did not make it this time, we encourage you to apply next year.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: large; color: #000000; font-family: helvetica;"><strong>The Georgia Fee Artist | Writer Residency 2017 Shortlist:</strong></span></p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/258532-kayla-anderson" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Kayla Anderson</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/205424-holly-armishaw" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Holly Armishaw</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/430039-shannon-fannin" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Shannon Fannin</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/204298-rachel-garrard" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Rachel Garrard</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/479163-brittany-julious" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Brittany Julious</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/478156-shoshana-kessler" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Shoshana Kessler</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/477577-anna-kim" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Anna Kim</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/415736-dain-mergenthaler" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Dain Mergenthaler</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/155816-caroline-picard" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Caroline Picard</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/214092-krista-svalbonas" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Krista Svalbonas</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/369223-asli-uludag" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Asli Uludag</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/369829-gray-wielebinski" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Gray Wielebinski</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000;">&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/479245-daniel-woody" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Daniel Woody</a></span></td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" style="text-align: center;"> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;"><span style="color: #000000;">The</span>&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/la/foundation/index" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;"><strong>Georgia Fee Artist | Writer Residency</strong></a>&nbsp;<span style="color: #000000;">was established in memory of&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/la/articles/show/32913" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">ArtSlant&rsquo;s Founder who passed away December 8, 2012.</a>&nbsp;<span style="color: #000000;">Georgia was dedicated to supporting and investing in young artists and writers, and she had a deep connection with the city of Paris. This residency, which offers artists and writers the opportunity to create work for two months in Paris, has been created in Georgia&#39;s memory.</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000; line-height: 24px;">The goal of the Georgia Fee Artist | Writer Residency in Paris is to support and invest in emerging artists and writers, to provide an opportunity for them to advance their work and explore and engage with the cultural landscape of Paris, to encourage experimentation, and to increase exposure of their work to an international audience.</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000; line-height: 24px;">The Residency is open to visual artists of all mediums, art writers, and critics, 24 years or older. The selection will be made based on the merit of past work and the potential for future success, the ability to independently develop new work, and the proposed project&#39;s relevance to the city of Paris.</span></p> <p style="text-align: left;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; color: #000000; line-height: 24px;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/foundation" style="font-size: 10px; text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">For more information on the Georgia Fee Artist | Writer Residency</span></a></span></p> <p><span style="color: rgb(0, 207, 166); text-decoration: none; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium;"><a href="mailto:%20residency@artslant.com" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">residency@artslant.com</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #00cfa6;">&nbsp;<span style="font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/la/users/signin" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">Subscribe</a>&nbsp;| <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/6424" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">Contact Us</a></span></span><span style="font-size: small;"> <span style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">|</span> <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ew" style="font-size: small; text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;">Website</span></a></span></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 24 Apr 2017 14:08:15 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Rana Siegel Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/47728-under-the-radar-rana-siegel-antonio-torrez-solis-heui-tae-yoon">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/132944-rana-siegel" target="_blank">Rana Siegel</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work? </strong></p> <p>I don&rsquo;t set out to communicate something in particular&mdash;it&rsquo;s not so intentional or what directs my work; rather, communication/meaning grows out from an intuitive process of making that&rsquo;s tactile and responsive. It emerges from an exchange, like a conversation; it&rsquo;s somatic, being realized through the body, like dance or music. The work is a combination of the process, or the performance as I like to call it, and the &ldquo;thing&rdquo; that&rsquo;s being made. I don&rsquo;t delineate between the two as they have equal value. The process involved is inseparable from the content or the content arrives from the process. The interplay of movements between my hands and that which I am working with stimulate thought processes that lead to questions, urges, and curiosities that are then investigated and answered. Choices in arrangements and material combinations gain significance, even the slightest of acts become substantial.</p> <p>The work is in a constant state of being/becoming; it&rsquo;s not resolute. It is made in the moment and subject to change if made in the next. The sense of touch becomes very important, not only with how I engage with the work, but with how the materials and structures interact with each other. They aren&rsquo;t fixed or bound, instead, they come together by balancing on each other, wrapping, falling, allowing gravity to take hold; they&rsquo;re verbs. They are quite gestural, each having their behavioral qualities. Like characters, they can be precarious and at times vulnerable. They can be seen as visual narratives, where someone can supply their own meaning and connections. They are forever open to different possibilities. I think there is a beauty and realness in that.</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>It may depend on the kind of artwork someone makes, but in general, I don&rsquo;t think an artist has a responsibility.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art or not)? </strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170424133710-Siegel3.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Breadth</em>, 2008, Smoke, paper</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I don&rsquo;t have the &ldquo;greatest,&rdquo; not yet, but this work taught me something of great value. This image is from an ongoing series called <em>Breadth</em>, which I started back in undergrad, in response to a simple request by my professor: make a drawing. I never sketched or did anything two-dimensional; I skipped over that first year of art school, bypassing all those tedious tasks, and jumped right into a Fiber department where I explored the dimensions of materiality and predominately made site-specific installations. Maybe she was curious to see what my type of drawing would look like, how I would approach that question, or maybe she wanted me to see something.</p> <p>I am not sure how the process came to be, but I crafted this elaborate system that included smoke, stools, long planks of wood. I was lying on the ground and by controlling the suction of air, created these linear-type drawings. The process was very physical, and I was intrigued by my recipe of production. Each drawing was unique, a surprise, as I never saw the work until it was made. They were delicate, and over time you could start to see dust particles accumulate on the surface of the soot&mdash;they aged that way. They were very tactile&mdash;the whole process was&mdash;and that seemed very fitting with how I was already making work.</p> <p>In that moment, I became aware of something important, something about how I operate; it was self-reflective. You can understand something about yourself when you leave the familiar and dive into different mediums, creative or not. It is similar to traveling somewhere new, when you leave your familiar backdrops and you&#39;re paired down to your essentials. As a student, this was a very good lesson; it was enlightening, still is.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170424133800-mini_monumental.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em>Mini Monumental</em>, 2016-2017,&nbsp;Stone, misc. ribbon&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>I actually have an idea that I hope could be a reality some day, but it also might be a little far-fetched, so it seems appropriate for this question. I want to compose a symphonic experience made in several movements, written for voice for a huge choir. I think of voices like threads and want them to circulate around a large vast space, the kind that amplifies and lifts sound. The bodies would be stationary and the collective sound would be what travels by way of the orchestration&mdash;alternating notes, volume, reverberation... something like that.</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p>This is hard, only three? So I am going to limit myself to Chicago and list the first three who come to mind, though they don&rsquo;t need my praise, but I do admire them and think they add depth to our creative community: <a href="http://atom-r.com/">Atom-R</a> (Anatomical Theaters of Mixed Realities), <a href="http://www.karolinagnatowski.com/">Karolina Gnatowski</a>, and <a href="http://dfbrl8r.org/">DFBRL8R</a>, which is not a person, though it is run by the ever-talented Joseph Ravens, but a space for performance art.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <div> <hr align="left" noshade="noshade" size="0" width="100%" /></div> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: <em>Ravel</em>, 2016, Slate, misc. fiber material)</span></p> Mon, 24 Apr 2017 10:40:03 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Announcing: ArtSlant Prize IX Round 3 Juried Winners! <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170104153040-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 200px; height: 200px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><b><i>Check out the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/showcases/showcase?listtype=showcase&amp;sublist=59%5Ejuried+winners" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Round 3 Juried Winners</a>! </i></b></font></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><font face="helvetica" size="4">Special thanks to this round&#39;s amazing jurors! &lt;3</font></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><b><i>Round 4 is now open! Apply today for your chance at $5k in prizes! </i></b></font></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><i><strong>To apply</strong>, go to your ArtSlant profile and click <strong>enter contest</strong>.</i></font></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><strong><font face="helvetica" size="4">Round 3 Jurors:</font></strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170404122131-round-3-jurors.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><strong>Miguel Leal Rios</strong> is the director and curator of the <strong><a href="http://www.lealriosfoundation.com/" style="color: #00cfa6; tex-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Leal Rios Foundation | Contemporary Art</a>.</strong></font></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><strong>Junho Lee</strong> is the Director of the <a href="http://www.narsfoundation.org/" style="color: #00cfa6; tex-decoration: none;" target="_blank"><strong>NARS Foundation</strong></a>.</font></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><strong>Kerry Doran</strong> is a writer, editor, and curator based in New York. She is the director at <a href="http://www.postmastersart.com/" style="color: #00cfa6; tex-decoration: none;" target="_blank"><strong>Postmasters Gallery</strong></a>.</font></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase; background-color: #00cfa6; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none;">Round 3 Juried Winners:</span></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1037930"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1037930/u3azr9/20170317091316-1116_Posey_Bless_the_Mess-6434.jpg" width="100%" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">PAINTING:</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/288482-mark-posey" style="color: #000000;">Mark Posey, <i>Standing Table</i>, 2016.</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1027988"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1027988/u3azr9/20170130041816-image.jpeg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">DRAWING:</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/74231-david-rios-ferreira" style="color: #000000;">David Rios Ferreira, <i>Lets Use Them Up Till Every Piece Is Gone 1</i>, 2016.</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1040804"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1040804/u3azr9/20170406045439-3_Hasta_la_Vista__Maybe.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">INSTALLATION:</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/312083-denise-treizman" style="color: #000000;">Denise Treizman, <i>Hasta la Vista, Maybe</i>, 2016.</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1041131"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1041131/u3azr9/20170407174057-Screen_Shot_2017-04-07_at_19.39.45.png" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="font-size: large;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">NEW-MEDIA:</span></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/134050-carrick-bell" style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase; text-align: left; color: rgb(0, 0, 0);">Carrick Bell, <i>If you feel it let it happen</i>, 2016.</a></p> <p style="text-align: left;">&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1040624"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1040624/u3azr9/20170405124855-07.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">SCULPTURE:</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/480451-tadasuke-jinno" style="color: #000000;">Tadasuke Jinno, <i>Black Box</i>, 2016.</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/995529"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/995529/u3azr9/20160623024502-Migrator_8_right_sm.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">PHOTOGRAPHY:</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/214092-krista-svalbonas" style="color: #000000;">Krista Svalbonas, <i>Migrator 8</i>, 2016.</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1021397"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1021397/u3azr9/20161212194431-Road._Yellow__canvas__acrylic__24_x_36_Tatiana_Savchenko.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="400" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">ABSTRACT:</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/317779-tatiana-savchenko" style="color: #000000;">Tatiana Savchenko, <i>Road. Yellow</i>, 2016.</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1040815"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1040815/u3azr9/20170420170413-20170406100112-cityoftheblind.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; text-transform: uppercase; color: #ffffff; padding: 5px; letter-spacing: 2px; text-decoration: none; background-color: #00cfa6;">MIXED-MEDIA:</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; text-transform: uppercase;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/477422-sohyun-han" style="color: #000000;">Sohyun Han, <i>City of the Blind</i>, 2017.</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">The ArtSlant Prize is an annual competition hosted by ArtSlant.com. Up for grabs are exhibition and sales opportunities including inclusion in our&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/node/index.html?ie=UTF8&amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Amazon Art Sales Platform</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, and great exposure&mdash;not to mention cash prizes for selected ArtSlant Prize winners. See below for all the details.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><span style="line-height: 21px;">Check out the latest submissions from the ArtSlant Community on our&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase" style="line-height: 21px;">Art page</a><span style="line-height: 21px;">.&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Previous ArtSlant Prize winners have gone on to secure gallery representation and have been purchased by prominent collectors, museum directors and personalities.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">Past winners include:</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2016+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2016 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/318334-brigitta-varadi" target="_blank">Brigitta Varadi</a>, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/71495-tiffany-smith" target="_blank">Tiffany Smith</a>, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/280850-sterling-crispin" target="_blank">Sterling Crispin</a>, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/468710-bex-ilsley" target="_blank">Bex Ilsley</a>, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/373164-zzin-jinhee-park" target="_blank">Jinhee Park</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2015+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2015 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/16146-theresa-ganz" target="_blank">Theresa Ganz</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/315939-tina-tahir" target="_blank">Tina Tahir</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/204298-rachel-garrard" target="_blank">Rachel Garrard</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/347173-bryan-volta" target="_blank">Bryan Volta</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2014+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2014 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/45525-edra-soto" target="_blank">Edra Soto</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/246553-adam-douglas-thompson" target="_blank">Adam Douglas Thompson</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/241839-anastasia-samoylova" target="_blank">Anastasia Samoylova</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/378398-oren-pinhassi" target="_blank">Oren Pinhassi</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2013+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2013 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/247077-robin-kang?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Robin Kang</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/238335-maureen-meyer?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Maureen Meyer</a>,&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/334738-alison-pilkington?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Alison Pilkington</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/311414-alexis-courtney?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Alexis Courtney</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2012+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2012 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/135691-veronica-bruce">Veronica Bruce</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/23907-steven-vasquez-lopez" target="_blank">Stephen Vasquez Lopez</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/152389-susan-meyer">Susan Meyer</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/224530-timothy-gaewsky" target="_blank">Timothy Gaewsky</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2011+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2011 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/233718-holly-murkerson" target="_blank">Holly Murkerson</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/36482-jason-irwin" target="_blank">Jason Irwin</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/57515-christine-de-la-garenne" target="_blank">Christine de la Garenne</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2010+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2010 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/18169-chantel-foretich?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Chantel Foretich</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/29757-robert-minervini?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Robert Minervini</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2009+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2009 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/103857-michael-zelehoski?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Michael Zelehoski</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/46020-yo-fukui?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Yo Fukui</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/10432-julie-davidow?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Julie Davidow</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <hr /> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**All participants in the ArtSlant Prize Showcase Series agree to ArtSlant&#39;s&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/5575">Terms &amp; Conditions</a>.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**<em>Fees from the Artslant Juried Showcase competitions will be dedicated to the promotion of our prize winners and the administration of the competition.</em></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> Mon, 24 Apr 2017 10:05:32 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Eugene Macki | Krista Svalbonas | Steven Randall <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><em><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></span></em></p> <p><em><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></span></em></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/277007-eugene-macki?utm_source=EugeneMacki&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Eugene Macki &ndash; London</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1042572?utm_source=EugeneMacki&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1042572/u3azr9/20170416145437-2.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1042574?utm_source=EugeneMacki&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1042574/u3azr9/20170416150113-Macke06.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1032891?utm_source=EugeneMacki&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1032891/u3azr9/20170227144026-1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1032898?utm_source=EugeneMacki&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1032898/u3azr9/20170227144317-1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/214092-krista-svalbonas?utm_source=KristaSvalbonas&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Krista Svalbonas &ndash; Chicago</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/chi/works/show/995532?utm_source= KristaSvalbonas&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/995532/u3azr9/20160623024536-Migrator_10_sm.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/chi/works/show/995527?utm_source=KristaSvalbonas&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/995527/mf2ji7/20160623024441-Migrator_3_sm.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/chi/works/show/995535?utm_source=KristaSvalbonas&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/995535/mf2ji7/20160623024604-Migrator_7_Left_sm.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/chi/works/show/995528?utm_source=KristaSvalbonas&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/995528/mf2ji7/20160623024501-Migrator_8_sm.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/160517-steven-randall?utm_source=StevenRandall&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Steven Randall &ndash; New York</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1008813?utm_source=StevenRandall&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1008813/u3azr9/20160925160157-small_whitewalls1.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1008807?utm_source=StevenRandall&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1008807/mf2ji7/20160925160128-small_mound2.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1008808?utm_source=StevenRandall&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1008808/mf2ji7/20160925160129-small_canda3.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1008811?utm_source=StevenRandall&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1008811/mf2ji7/20160925160148-small_700lb_E6.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/s?marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Mon, 24 Apr 2017 09:37:12 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list ArtSlant Prize IX Announcing Round 3 Juried Winners <p style="text-align:center"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170104153040-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="height:200px; width:200px" /></p> <p style="text-align:center"><strong><em>Check out the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/showcases/showcase?listtype=showcase&amp;sublist=59%5Ejuried+winners" style="color: #00cfa6; text-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Round 3 Juried Winners</a>! </em></strong></p> <p style="text-align:center"><em>Special thanks to this round&#39;s amazing jurors! &lt;3</em></p> <p style="text-align:center"><strong><em>Round 4 is now open! Apply today for your chance at $5k in prizes! </em></strong></p> <p style="text-align:center"><em><strong>To apply</strong>, go to your ArtSlant profile and click <strong>enter contest</strong>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align:center"><strong>Round 3 Jurors:</strong></p> <p><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170403160727-Miguel_Leal_Rios_P_B_2014.JPG" /><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170331142334-10151786_10152615189148857_4820608482647715550_n.jpg" /><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170403160741-Doran.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align:center"><strong>Miguel Leal Rios</strong> is the director and curator of the <strong><a href="http://www.lealriosfoundation.com/" style="color: #00cfa6; tex-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Leal Rios Foundation | Contemporary Art</a>.</strong></p> <p style="text-align:center"><strong>Junho Lee</strong> is the Director of the <a href="http://www.narsfoundation.org/" style="color: #00cfa6; tex-decoration: none;" target="_blank"><strong>NARS Foundation</strong></a>.</p> <p style="text-align:center"><strong>Kerry Doran</strong> is a writer, editor, and curator based in New York. She is the director at <a href="http://www.postmastersart.com/" style="color: #00cfa6; tex-decoration: none;" target="_blank"><strong>Postmasters Gallery</strong></a>.</p> <p><span style="background-color:#00cfa6; color:#ffffff; font-family:helvetica; font-size:large">Round 3 Juried Winners:</span></p> <p style="text-align:center"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1037930"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1037930/u3azr9/20170317091316-1116_Posey_Bless_the_Mess-6434.jpg" style="width:100%" /></a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align:left"><span style="font-family:helvetica; font-size:large"><span style="background-color:#00cfa6; color:#ffffff; font-family:helvetica; font-size:large">PAINTING:</span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align:left"><span style="font-family:helvetica; font-size:large"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/288482-mark-posey" style="color: #000000;">Mark Posey, <em>Standing Table</em>, 2016.</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1027988"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1027988/u3azr9/20170130041816-image.jpeg" style="display:block; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; width:100%" /></a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align:left"><span style="font-family:helvetica; font-size:large"><span style="background-color:#00cfa6; color:#ffffff; font-family:helvetica">DRAWING:</span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align:left"><span style="font-family:helvetica; font-size:large"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/74231-david-rios-ferreira" style="color: #000000;">David Rios Ferreira, <em>Lets Use Them Up Till Every Piece Is Gone 1</em>, 2016.</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1040804"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1040804/u3azr9/20170406045439-3_Hasta_la_Vista__Maybe.jpg" style="display:block; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; width:100%" /></a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align:left"><span style="font-family:helvetica; font-size:large"><span style="background-color:#00cfa6; color:#ffffff; font-family:helvetica; font-size:large">INSTALLATION:</span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align:left"><span style="font-family:helvetica; font-size:large"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/312083-denise-treizman" style="color: #000000;">Denise Treizman, <em>Hasta la Vista, Maybe</em>, 2016.</a></span></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1041131"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1041131/u3azr9/20170407174057-Screen_Shot_2017-04-07_at_19.39.45.png" style="display:block; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; width:100%" /></a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align:left"><span style="font-family:helvetica; font-size:large"><span style="font-size:large"><span style="background-color:#00cfa6; color:#ffffff; font-family:helvetica">NEW-MEDIA:</span>&nbsp;</span>&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align:left"><span style="font-family:helvetica; font-size:large"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/134050-carrick-bell" style="color: #000000;">Carrick Bell, <em>If you feel it let it happen</em>, 2016.</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1040624"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1040624/u3azr9/20170405124855-07.jpg" style="display:block; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; width:100%" /></a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align:left"><span style="background-color:#00cfa6; color:#ffffff; font-family:helvetica; font-size:large">SCULPTURE:</span>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align:left"><span style="font-family:helvetica; font-size:large"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/480451-tadasuke-jinno" style="color: #000000;">Tadasuke Jinno, <em>Black Box</em>, 2016.</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/995529"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/995529/u3azr9/20160623024502-Migrator_8_right_sm.jpg" style="display:block; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; width:100%" /></a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align:left"><span style="font-family:helvetica; font-size:large"><span style="background-color:#00cfa6; color:#ffffff; font-family:helvetica; font-size:large">PHOTOGRAPHY:</span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align:left"><span style="font-family:helvetica; font-size:large"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/214092-krista-svalbonas" style="color: #000000;">Krista Svalbonas, <em>Migrator 8</em>, 2016.</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1021397"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1021397/u3azr9/20161212194431-Road._Yellow__canvas__acrylic__24_x_36_Tatiana_Savchenko.jpg" style="display:block; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; width:400px" /></a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align:left"><span style="font-family:helvetica; font-size:large"><span style="background-color:#00cfa6; color:#ffffff; font-family:helvetica">ABSTRACT:</span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align:left"><span style="font-family:helvetica; font-size:large"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/317779-tatiana-savchenko" style="color: #000000;">Tatiana Savchenko, <em>Road. Yellow</em>, 2016.</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1040815"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1040815/u3azr9/20170420170413-20170406100112-cityoftheblind.jpg" style="display:block; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; width:100%" /></a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align:left"><span style="font-family:helvetica; font-size:large"><span style="background-color:#00cfa6; color:#ffffff; font-family:helvetica">MIXED-MEDIA:</span>&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align:left"><span style="font-family:helvetica; font-size:large"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/477422-sohyun-han" style="color: #000000;">Sohyun Han, <em>City of the Blind</em>, 2017.</a></span></p> <p style="text-align:center">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align:justify"><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:large">The ArtSlant Prize is an annual competition hosted by ArtSlant.com. Up for grabs are exhibition and sales opportunities including inclusion in our&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/node/index.html?ie=UTF8&amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Amazon Art Sales Platform</a><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:large">, and great exposure&mdash;not to mention cash prizes for selected ArtSlant Prize winners. See below for all the details.</span></p> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:large">Check out the latest submissions from the ArtSlant Community on our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase" style="line-height: 21px;">Art page</a>.&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align:center">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align:center">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:small">Previous ArtSlant Prize winners have gone on to secure gallery representation and have been purchased by prominent collectors, museum directors and personalities.</span></p> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:small">Past winners include:</span></p> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:large"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2016+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2016 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:small"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/318334-brigitta-varadi" target="_blank">Brigitta Varadi</a>, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/71495-tiffany-smith" target="_blank">Tiffany Smith</a>, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/280850-sterling-crispin" target="_blank">Sterling Crispin</a>, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/468710-bex-ilsley" target="_blank">Bex Ilsley</a>, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/373164-zzin-jinhee-park" target="_blank">Jinhee Park</a></span></p> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:large"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2015+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2015 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:small"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/16146-theresa-ganz" target="_blank">Theresa Ganz</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/315939-tina-tahir" target="_blank">Tina Tahir</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/204298-rachel-garrard" target="_blank">Rachel Garrard</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/347173-bryan-volta" target="_blank">Bryan Volta</a></span></p> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:large"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2014+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2014 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:small"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/45525-edra-soto" target="_blank">Edra Soto</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/246553-adam-douglas-thompson" target="_blank">Adam Douglas Thompson</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/241839-anastasia-samoylova" target="_blank">Anastasia Samoylova</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/378398-oren-pinhassi" target="_blank">Oren Pinhassi</a></span></p> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:large"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2013+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2013 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:small"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/247077-robin-kang?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Robin Kang</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/238335-maureen-meyer?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Maureen Meyer</a>,&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/334738-alison-pilkington?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Alison Pilkington</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/311414-alexis-courtney?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Alexis Courtney</a></span></p> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:small"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2012+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2012 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:small"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/135691-veronica-bruce">Veronica Bruce</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/23907-steven-vasquez-lopez" target="_blank">Stephen Vasquez Lopez</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/152389-susan-meyer">Susan Meyer</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/224530-timothy-gaewsky" target="_blank">Timothy Gaewsky</a></span></p> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:small"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2011+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2011 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:small"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/233718-holly-murkerson" target="_blank">Holly Murkerson</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/36482-jason-irwin" target="_blank">Jason Irwin</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/57515-christine-de-la-garenne" target="_blank">Christine de la Garenne</a></span></p> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:small"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2010+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2010 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:small"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/18169-chantel-foretich?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Chantel Foretich</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/29757-robert-minervini?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Robert Minervini</a></span></p> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:small"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2009+Winners" style="text-decoration: none; color: #00cfa6;">ArtSlant Prize 2009 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:small"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/103857-michael-zelehoski?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Michael Zelehoski</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/46020-yo-fukui?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Yo Fukui</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/10432-julie-davidow?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Julie Davidow</a></span></p> <p style="text-align:center"><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:small">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <hr /> <p><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:small">**All participants in the ArtSlant Prize Showcase Series agree to ArtSlant&#39;s&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/5575">Terms &amp; Conditions</a>.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:small">**<em>Fees from the Artslant Juried Showcase competitions will be dedicated to the promotion of our prize winners and the administration of the competition.</em></span></p> <p style="text-align:center">&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> Sun, 23 Apr 2017 13:19:41 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Anicka Yi: Life is Cheap <p>Anicka Yi, the recipient of the 2016 Hugo Boss Prize, opened&nbsp;<em>Life is Cheap,&nbsp;</em>consisting of three works,&nbsp;<em>Lifestyle Wars</em>,<em> Immigrant Caucus,</em>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<em>Force Majeure,</em>&nbsp;at the Guggenheim on April 21, 2017. The exhibition title is one part indictment, one part plea.</p> <p>&ldquo;Life is cheap&rdquo; is usually said with a quiet lilt; eyes down, a slight shake of the head. The disgust is projected both outward and inward. It&rsquo;s a gesture of shame. But Yi hints at perhaps another invocation of the saying&mdash;that life is in fact <em>cheap&nbsp;</em>and easy to come by. It is all around you, waiting for you to recognize its glorious complexity. And sure, this interpretation is navel-gazey, but in times like these, where minutiae are almost always irksome, it&rsquo;s nice to lose oneself in marvel for a few minutes and remember that we are a complex part of a complex part of a complex part... of something called a &ldquo;whole.&rdquo;</p> <p><em>H. sapiens, Homo, Hominidae, Haplorhini, Primates, Mammalia, Chordata, Animalia.</em> Our distinction is a denial of our dependence and a dismissal of our similarity. With her latest exhibition, Yi breaks down the notion of humanity&rsquo;s individualities and ethnic preoccupations by applying a scientific approach to sculptures consisting of carpenter ants, bacterial colonies taken from Chinatown and Koreatown in New York, manufactured scents, and a lot of agar-agar.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170421161128-Anicka_Yi_Portrait.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><span style="font-family: Verlag;">Anicka Yi. Photo: David Heald&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Joel Kuennen:&nbsp;<em>Life is Cheap</em>&nbsp;has two large dioramas,&nbsp;<em>Lifestyle Wars</em>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<em>Force Majeure...</em></strong></p> <p><strong>Anicka Yi:&nbsp;</strong><em>Force Majeure</em>&nbsp;is a staging of violence, proliferation, unregulated life. It&rsquo;s a staging of the genesis of life and also throws back at us a physical manifestation of our anxieties around life, disease, bacteria, around that which we consider as harmful when it&rsquo;s actually not. Not in every case at least, but that there is harm and maybe that&rsquo;s something that we can coexist with and be tolerant of and maybe do a dance with.</p> <p>The ants in&nbsp;<em>Lifestyle Wars</em>&nbsp;are in this ceaseless motion and this transition of information, this data network. The power of ants is in their numbers; they don&rsquo;t really have individuality and they need, like our human society, social structures. They are the only other species, other than our own, that practices slavery. They are also highly guided by their sense of smell so they have a very refined, sophisticated olfaction.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170421161255-Hugo_Boss_Prize_2016-exh_ph-8.jpg" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><span style="font-family: Verlag;">Anicka Yi,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Verlag; font-style: italic;">Lifestyle Wars</span><span style="font-family: Verlag;">, 2017 (detail), Ants, mirrored Plexiglas, Plexiglas, two-way mirrored glass, LED lights, epoxy resin, glitter, aluminum racks with rackmount server cases and Ethernet cables, metal wire, foam, acrylic, aquarium gravel, and imitation pearls. Courtesy the artist and 47 Canal, New York. Photo: David Heald &copy; Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JK: You are presenting a new scent in <em>Lifestyle Wars..</em>.</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong><span>We have a scent, it&rsquo;s kind of a hybrid of species and forms. It&rsquo;s a scent that is based on an Asian-American female and a carpenter ant&mdash;it&rsquo;s a hybrid scent.</span></p> <p><strong>JK: What constitutes the gesture towards the Asian-American female?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong><span>I wanted to talk about ethnicity through smell. I wanted to talk about smell as being a conditioned form of perception culturally, socially, politically. Ethnicity is a very gray area, scientifically speaking, in terms of how we can designate certain ethnic groups by smell. There&rsquo;s no definitive real answer scientifically. You can&rsquo;t say all Asian people smell like this and all Black people smell like that or all Caucasian people smell like this or all Latino people smell like that.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table align="center"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/kQ4ky7CgdGI" width="560"></iframe></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JK: What is the marker in this case?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong><span>It&rsquo;s contingent on a number of factors, primarily your diet followed by genetic make up. A lot of what you smell like is being produced through the bacteria in your gut. There is also the tertiary: the type of deodorant that you wear, the soap that you use, your shampoo... those are the main sort of components for how an individual human being smells. An Asian-American with a certain diet that is very similar to an African-American diet could end up smelling more similar than two Asian-Americans with vastly different diets. I was interested in that aspect of how it is very complex and inconclusive in terms of how you can designate a certain ethnicity smelling a certain way, and yet those types of prejudices still linger. </span></p> <p><span>Everybody has these types of misinformed ideas about how Indian people smell like curry; well, guess what, if anyone ate a lot of curry, the turmeric would sweat through your pores and you would smell like curry! There&rsquo;s certain foods that have that ability to become part of you but also announce itself to the rest of the world through our pores. For me it&rsquo;s a rich area to think about in terms of these kinds of stereotypes and prejudices and how even historically different classes were associated with how they smelled. A lot of &ldquo;improvements&rdquo; and radical social changes have been made based on how these different classes smelled, especially the working classes. </span></p> <p><span>How do you improve on something where it&rsquo;s a matter of just prejudice or intolerance about certain ethnicities? Because it&rsquo;s not a question of hygiene and it&rsquo;s not a question about health risks&mdash;it&rsquo;s a question of certain preferences for diet, a certain predilection for body ointments in the tertiary route, and genetics. It&rsquo;s very complicated and it&rsquo;s not something that has been resolved through science. That&rsquo;s what I&rsquo;m interested in: that science can&rsquo;t help us get past this. We also can&rsquo;t seem to come to terms with it intellectually or psychologically.</span></p> <p><strong>JK: &ldquo;Tertiary,&rdquo; for example, refers to a lotion you put on and external variance to the personal biome, correct?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong>Yes, it is part of the constellation of my material choices.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em style="color: rgb(31, 31, 31); font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-large;">&ldquo;There&rsquo;s a consciousness there that&rsquo;s been assembled.&rdquo;</em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JK: In that sense, are you then constructing objects out of tertiary and secondary realities where the primary becomes the participant?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong>If we follow that to the logical conclusion, then does that mean that my work needs a viewer?</p> <p><strong>JK: Then it&rsquo;s just biology?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong>No, there&rsquo;s a consciousness there that&rsquo;s been assembled. With ants, there&rsquo;s a consciousness that&rsquo;s been assembled, so is that art as well?&nbsp;Ants are matriarchal; they only have males as drones and they die immediately after. They inseminate the eggs, which as far as I&rsquo;m concerned, is pretty good for me. Especially recently, I&rsquo;ve been telling my straight male friends,&nbsp;<em>just sit out a few</em>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170421161410-Hugo_Boss_Prize_2016-exh_ph-13.jpg" /></span></p> <div class="page" title="Page 1"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><span style="font-family: Verlag;">Anicka Yi,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Verlag; font-style: italic;">Force Majeure</span><span style="font-family: Verlag;">, 2017, Plexiglas, aluminum, agar, bacteria, refrigeration system, LED lights, glass, epoxy resin, powder coated stainless steel, light bulbs, digital clocks, silicone, and silk flowers. Courtesy the artist and 47 Canal, New York. Photo: David Heald &copy; Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><strong>JK: Your material vocabulary can be kind of cacophonous, a grab bag of consumer items and organisms. Can you speak to the importance of combining these different technical materials?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong><span>It&rsquo;s through the filter, the lens of the lived life. In that sense, it&rsquo;s probably somewhat autobiographical. That&rsquo;s something I&rsquo;ve never really articulated to anyone. What is the binding agent of all of these materials? What is the reach of a length of a human arm or what is in this cosmology of the person who is trying to assemble the combinations? In that regard, there&rsquo;s something, probably a shattered narrative by a person who is living through these materials through a desiring body or a slightly repulsed body, a body that&rsquo;s not entirely pleased but not displeased. I don&rsquo;t know how to unravel that narrative logic until the very end and that&rsquo;s probably when I&rsquo;m dead. I can&rsquo;t really say and I don&rsquo;t even know if I&rsquo;m capable of doing that for you. I think that every person, especially creative people, they have a kind of wiring, a sensibility that overlaps with a certain zeitgeist and personal history much in the way we&rsquo;re describing how an individual smells in their own unique sense. There are these contributing factors: diet, genetic, and tertiary influences. Tertiary is separate from the zeitgeist. It&rsquo;s not necessarily something someone else picks up on that is in the air.</span></p> <p><strong>JK: One other thing about materiality in your work: when you use organisms you leave the names general, like &ldquo;bacteria,&rdquo; &ldquo;dough,&rdquo; &ldquo;fungi.&rdquo; Is there a particular reason for this?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong>It does tend to be a catch-all because it would be very difficult for me to clarify what kind of bacteria will be grown in the Guggenheim diorama. There are specific certain kinds that we are introducing but we cannot be exclusive to that. For me to be able to categorize, I would have to go back throughout the course of the exhibition and start to analyze what type of bacteria is actually growing there. Once I put up an installation, it&rsquo;s difficult to do the reading after the fact because things are changing so rapidly. &nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JK: Colonies can emerge and collapse in a number of hours&hellip;</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong>There&rsquo;s a fair amount of what can we call a &ldquo;microbial eugenics&rdquo; that does take place in my installations. I do have aesthetic considerations: certain bacterial growth yields better colors; certain bacterial growth yields better shapes.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170421170540-AY_2666.jpg" /></span></p> <div class="page" title="Page 1"> <div class="layoutArea"> <div class="column"> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><span style="font-family: Verlag;">Anicka Yi,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Verlag; font-style: italic;">2666, 2015,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Verlag;">Bacteria, nutrient agar, Plexiglas, 24 x 20 x 4 inches (60.96 x 50.80 x 10.16 cm). Courtesy of 47 Canal, New York and Kunsthalle Basel.&nbsp;Photo: Philipp Hänger&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> </div> </div> </div> <p><strong>JK: Your work often begins with an essence and then the work is allowed to live from there and go where it may. How do you consider this relationship between refinement and growth?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong><span>Refinement is an area that I think, as far as my participation and intervention, requires a tremendous amount of research and backstory. I have to learn a lot about a certain subject matter in order to set the conditions for the type of refinement that I would qualify as my version of refinement. Then there is an entire cosmology of chaos around that. It&rsquo;s always in flux, paradoxically different speeds, gears, logic. I think that&rsquo;s something that is maybe a leitmotif that doesn&rsquo;t get spoken about very often in relation to my work. </span></p> <p><span>There&rsquo;s a lot of counter-intuitive logic going on with the material choices, arrangement, juxtaposition, and the timing. We&rsquo;re talking about metabolic timing, physical time, geological time and there&rsquo;s a lot of counter-intuitive time and rationale that&rsquo;s embedded into the work and that&rsquo;s what I&rsquo;m working against. That&rsquo;s what happens when these collisions take place where they&rsquo;re not supposed to. Where a flower rejects the resin that is supposed to encase it and then you have this leaking&hellip;a lot of that&hellip;and so there are a lot of alchemical kinds of contradictions. We&rsquo;re in a universe that&rsquo;s populated with very sinister elements that don&rsquo;t really intend for anything to survive.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><em style="color: rgb(31, 31, 31); font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: x-large;">&ldquo;I want my work to perish.&rdquo;</em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JK: When I was a kid I would make ant castles, blocks of wood that I would fashion into a castle structure and then I would entice ants with sugar water. The whole structure became this moving breathing thing but after a while, I realized they would all just go to the sugar water and drown. Then I realized, this isn&rsquo;t that cool and I&rsquo;m basically just killing a bunch of ants.</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong>It&rsquo;s a very fine line and death is all around us. Life is death. With ants I have to stress that they are not really that great at individualistic thinking&hellip;and if they are, they are bullied and sequestered and extinguished. When we do these experiments with ants we&rsquo;ve found that an ant that smells a little different will be sequestered in a corner. They are put under a kind of trial. Other ants are there for hours questioning this ant that&rsquo;s different, this&nbsp;<em>rogue</em>&nbsp;ant. They don&#39;t go immediately into action. They just put it under this Kafka-esque trial. There are levels of security and authority at play.</p> <p><strong>JK: You&rsquo;ve said before that perishability is essential to your sculptural vocabulary. How do you think about your works as they move through time?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong><span>Time is probably the dominant material. It&rsquo;s the unspoken, un-cited. A lot of my work is time-based and I&rsquo;m intentionally foregrounding that time. The motivation for that was trying to get at a present-ness, to be here. Don&rsquo;t worry about a hundred years from now&mdash;that also seemed like a very masculine type of aspiration: that the art should outlive us all and that signifies my proximity to the gods, immortality, legacy, all that nonsense. I personally don&rsquo;t care if you don&rsquo;t talk about me after I&rsquo;m dead. That&rsquo;s not a motivation for me. My motivation is the living, the suffering. That&rsquo;s what I care about.</span></p> <p><strong>JK: Is it more about creating a situation where that suffering comes into focus?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong><span>Absolutely. I want to diminish and eliminate the suffering. In order to do that, you have to reveal the suffering and foreground the suffering to give that a voice. It&rsquo;s not about ignoring it or eliminating it but asking <em>what can we influence?</em> If we are even here to influence at all. Time is greater than I am and yet time is also non-linear when you think about it in a quantum way. I want my work to perish.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170421171511-HBP16AnickaYi_Sister.jpg" style="width: 400px;" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><span style="font-family: Verlag;">Anicka Yi,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Verlag; font-style: italic;">Sister</span><span style="font-family: Verlag;">, 2011, Tempura fried flowers, cotton turtleneck, approximately 41 x 19 x 7 in Courtesy of 47 Canal, New York. Photo: Joerg Lohse&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JK: At the<a href="http://arts.mit.edu/artists/anicka-yi/#about-the-residency" target="_blank"> MIT Residency </a>you did, you worked on stabilizing things. How has stabilization entered your practice, specifically in regards to the reactive and active nature of your work?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong><span>It&rsquo;s a framework. Without agar it&rsquo;s really hard for us to grow bacteria. Agar is a relatively known substrate, so in terms of that kind of &ldquo;stabilization&rdquo; that&rsquo;s how I point to it. In order to render tangible or visible.</span></p> <p><strong>JK: Is it more about producing a predictability?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong><span>Let&rsquo;s just say it something that&rsquo;s more of a neutral value in order to support some principles, ideas, characters, voices. All equally important and necessary in the balance. I respect that kind of stability because I wouldn&rsquo;t be able to do what we&rsquo;re doing here without a giant cooling refrigerator system to get the bacteria to grow at the right temperature. Without the right temperature you have lots of problems: no growth or conversely over growth, where the bacteria just takes over. The bacteria I work with loves 72-75 degrees. That&rsquo;s the sweet spot when you&rsquo;ll have really nice, steady, consistent growth but you won&rsquo;t have an insane proliferation or, conversely, a completely empty, visual space.&nbsp;</span></p> <table align="right" width="400"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: #1f1f1f;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;If you&rsquo;re going to work with bacteria you have to work with the laws of bacteria.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><strong>JK: So it&rsquo;s not necessarily about preservation but rather facilitation.</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong><span>Yes, it&rsquo;s about these kinds of dichotomies, these shifts in the balance and learning temperatures. Understanding basics around physics. When you have humidity that the bacteria really thrives on, you&rsquo;re going to get condensation. I don&rsquo;t want a drippy piece of glass, for example, so how do we deal with that? The more I&rsquo;ve been using a conventional science laboratory as a tool for my work, the more I&rsquo;m having to understand all matters of stability because in order to create these experiments you have to offset it, to run it through something that is under your control. If you&rsquo;re going to work with bacteria you have to work with the laws of bacteria. It teaches me a great deal of physics and chemistry. &nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <p><strong>JK: Art is, almost by definition, historically stable. Performance art may have done the most to change this assumption, as far as art history goes. Do you consider your sculptural work as performative objects? How do you think about that relationship to performance?</strong></p> <p><strong>AY:&nbsp;</strong><span>It&rsquo;s a good connection. Performance implies there&rsquo;s a certain kind of transience, ephemerality, and so it makes sense that some of my less permanent works would be in that performative state. I don&rsquo;t have the kind of art education or conditioning for that kind of language to act as the fencing around my actions and my thoughts, but I often think in terms of farming and agriculture with certain forms of organisms. You can consider that performative. I think that my use of &ldquo;science&rdquo; is performative: I am performing a science. Is it science? Yeah, but it&rsquo;s more of performing <em>as science</em>. Performing an act of control and chaos. So yes, I think performativity is running rampant throughout my work. One could even say I&rsquo;m performing as an artist. I didn&rsquo;t study art at all, I studied film theory.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div>&mdash; <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/153044-joel-kuennen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Joel Kuennen</a></div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div>&nbsp;</div> <div><span style="font-size:10px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;<span style="font-family: Verlag;">Anicka Yi,&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Verlag; font-style: italic;">Force Majeure</span><span style="font-family: Verlag;">, 2017 (detail),&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Verlag;">Plexiglas, aluminum, agar, bacteria, refrigeration system, LED lights, glass, epoxy resin, powder coated stainless steel, light bulbs, digital clocks, silicone, and silk flowers.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Verlag;">Courtesy the artist and 47 Canal, New York.&nbsp;</span><span style="font-family: Verlag;">Photo: David Heald &copy; Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation)</span></span></div> Tue, 25 Apr 2017 16:33:35 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: SPAMM <p><a href="http://spamm.fr/" target="_blank">Spamm</a> is an ambitious annual exhibition that gathers together a dizzying array of video work by net artists. Spamm was formed in France in 2011 by Micha&euml;l Borras a.k.a SYSTAIME, who invited Ellectra Radikal to start co-curating in 2013.&nbsp;</p> <p>The show freely unites undiscovered new talent with some of the most highly regarded artists now working in new media. This year&rsquo;s edition, <strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ▁ℙ<strong>ϴШ&euro;</strong>&real;, features 142 artists and functions as a fascinating overview of the wild world contemporary net art.</p> <p><strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ▁ℙ<strong>ϴШ&euro;</strong>&real; was also recently a physical exhibition at the <a href="http://www.newschool.edu/parsons-paris/gallery/" target="_blank">Parsons Paris Gallery</a>. I spoke to the curators about the significance of moving digital art into the physical space as well as the history and thinking behind the Spamm project as a whole. Though they won&rsquo;t pick favorites&mdash;they prefer to view the Spamm curatorial project in its entirety&mdash;we also share some of the video work from this year&rsquo;s exhibition (click on the link below each video to watch it in the Spamm platform). You can find the full exhibition <a href="http://spamm.fr/" target="_blank">here</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170419140227-Screen_Shot_2017-04-19_at_16.01.56.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Screen capture of&nbsp;<a href="http://spamm.fr/" target="_blank"><strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ▁ℙ<strong>ϴШ&euro;</strong>&real;</a>, the online exhibition.</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: What is the philosophy of Spamm?</strong></p> <p>OPEN YOUR minds, be free, love art!!!!</p> <p><strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ lives on the web well before thinking.<br /> <strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ is an open space that does not contain its boundary.<br /> <strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ is NO BORDER.<br /> <strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ is the quantity not the scarcity.<br /> <strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ is the horizontal space of digital creation.<br /> <strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ is an irreducible complexity that escapes the domain of words.<br /> <strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ is the multi-faceted core of being in the world.<br /> We_Are_The_Power, We_Are_Internet!<br /> We_Are_Now, We_Are_Here!<br /> We_Are_<strong>ϟ</strong><strong>ℙ</strong>&forall;ℳℳ!<br /> We_Are_Happy!<br /> We_Are_TAAZ*!<br /> We_Are_Art!</p> <p><strong>SPAMM</strong> is constantly evolving. In this sense <strong>SPAMM</strong> is not based on a philosophy and does not define any.</p> <p><strong>SPAMM </strong>exists, it&rsquo;s a multiple entity as an image of the network.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="videoWrapper" style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/156049025" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="100%"></iframe></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Paula Pinho Martins Nacif,&nbsp;</span><em><a href="http://spamm.fr/stream/?g=3" style="font-size: 12px;" target="_blank">&lt;3 take care of you &lt;3</a></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How do you choose the artists that you want to be part of Spamm?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>SPAMM</strong> gathers a community of artists and curators from the internet around several art projects shared via the social media Facebook.&nbsp;For <strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ▁ℙ<strong>ϴШ&euro;</strong>&real;, we shared an open call via our Facebook accounts and drove the whole curation directly through contact with the artists in a Facebook group for <strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ▁ℙ<strong>ϴШ&euro;</strong>&real;. The artists posted their artworks, links, and websites, YouTube and Vimeo channels and we made a final selection from there.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="videoWrapper" style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/59651562" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="100%"></iframe></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Emilio Gomariz,&nbsp;<em><a href="http://spamm.fr/stream/?g=8" target="_blank">Finder Fantasy</a></em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Do you think there is a difference between curating net art and more traditional art forms?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ellectra Radikal:</strong> Our challenge as curators for <strong>SPAMM</strong> is to create a no-restrictions area for the artists and the public coming from all horizons, for an online or physical exhibition.&nbsp;To contextualize net art means being online &ldquo;a lot,&rdquo; to link web artists around the world via social networks, to open participatory spaces, groups online, to create websites, to develop a comprehensive and global digital strategy partnering with fb friends, artists, galleries, curators, museums, and art fairs around the world.</p> <p><strong>Micha&euml;l Borras a.k.a SYSTAIME:</strong> There are no recipes. We are self-taught as curators. We are not here to theorize on <em>what is curation</em>&mdash;there are good schools for that. We complete this work.&nbsp;I make something before knowing how to make it; if I know before I do it, it will not leave room for accidents, glitches, and discovery out of all traditional circuits. No, I do not think about all these terms: post internet, net art.</p> <p><strong>SPAMM</strong> shows contemporary artists who work with the tools of our time and who restore this time through their prism. It happens that we live in the digital time, maybe post-digital.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="videoWrapper" style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/120861217" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="100%"></iframe></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ei Jane Janet Lin,&nbsp;<a href="http://spamm.fr/stream/?g=133" target="_blank"><em>Selfie #1</em></a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How would you define net art?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>Ellectra Radikal:</strong> Digital creations that use digital technologies and media in relation to the internet; designed by, for, and with the internet; which interact with the Internet&mdash;these are net art. I also use Wikipedia. Net art is found less in what we can see and more in the device that makes it exist in cyberspace.</p> <p><a href="http://spamm.fr/" target="_blank"><strong>Spamm.fr</strong></a> is one creation of net art.</p> <p><strong>Micha&euml;l Borras a.k.a SYSTAIME: </strong>Stop. I won&rsquo;t say anything about net art or post internet art. It is contemporary art. There is no difference.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="videoWrapper" style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/116033798" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="100%"></iframe></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Eileen Isagon Skyers,&nbsp;<em><a href="http://spamm.fr/stream/?g=73" target="_blank">Chitta</a></em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What was the art you saw that you understood was net art?</strong></p> <p><a href="http://wwwwwwwww.jodi.org/" target="_blank">Jodi</a>, <a href="http://larrycarlson.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">Larry Carlson</a>, <a href="http://www.jimpunk.com/" target="_blank">Jimpunk</a>, <a href="http://www.fredforest.org/" target="_blank">Fred Forest</a>, <a href="http://www.newrafael.com/" target="_blank">Rozendaal</a>, <a href="http://paddleson.tumblr.com/about" target="_blank">PADDLES ON!</a> at Phillips&hellip;</p> <p><strong>CP: You are both artists. What would you define as your first experiments in net art?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ellectra Radikal: </strong>Ellectra Radikal is my avatar, who was born in 2005 in Second Life&mdash;a product of a form of life on the internet.</p> <p><strong>Micha&euml;l Borras a.k.a SYSTAIME: </strong>I don&rsquo;t remember. Ask Google.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="videoWrapper" style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/146460515" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="100%"></iframe></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">J&aacute;nos Br&uuml;ckner, <a href="http://spamm.fr/stream/?g=88" target="_blank"><em>Adult Material</em></a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What were you first experiences of curating net art?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ellectra Radikal: <a href="http://spamm.fr/" target="_blank">SPAMM.fr</a>,</strong> 2013.</p> <p><strong>Micha&euml;l Borras a.k.a SYSTAIME: <a href="http://spamm.fr/" target="_blank">SPAMM.fr</a>, </strong>2011<strong>, </strong>but I did curate online before that.</p> <p><strong>CP: How did you two meet?</strong></p> <p>On Facebook.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <div class="videoWrapper" style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/R5wx3m_g8t0" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="100%"></iframe></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Oblinof Kohara, <a href="http://spamm.fr/stream/?g=63" target="_blank"><em>WTFile Payaso Cagar Trompada</em></a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Why did you decide to work together?</strong></p> <p><strong>Micha&euml;l Borras a.k.a SYSTAIME: </strong>A lot of my fb contacts asked me: &ldquo;are you Ellectra Radikal?&rdquo;</p> <p>Because I have many avatars on Facebook&hellip; I answered no and took a look at this avatar&hellip;</p> <p><strong>Ellectra Radikal: </strong>We are coming from the painting practice, we came across alternative art scenes, punk, techno&hellip; We talked about our artistic backgrounds, experiences being an artist, being filmmakers, etc. We found each other.</p> <p><strong>Micha&euml;l Borras a.k.a SYSTAIME:</strong>&nbsp;The internet makes it possible to put the artwork before the person.&nbsp;Another art is possible.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="videoWrapper" style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/176262051" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="100%"></iframe></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Rapha&euml;l Moreira Gon&ccedil;alves,&nbsp;<em><a href="http://spamm.fr/stream/?g=11" target="_blank">Versus Fant&ocirc;mes</a></em></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What inspired your interest in net art?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ellectra Radikal: </strong>Living my life as an avatar online, performing, riding with the wind, digging the deep seas of Facebook accounts, searching for artists actively present on the social stream&mdash;YouTube, Vimeo, their websites&mdash;reading blogs, web medias, climbing the rainbows of glamorous profiles, looking for cats and unicorns, dogs and parrots, octopi and dolphins, piranhas and other creatures, reading, liking, sharing, posting, creating on line.</p> <p>When Micha&euml;l Borras offered me the chance to co-curate my first exhibition, <a href="http://cupcake.spamm.fr/" target="_blank">Cupcake</a>, for <a href="http://spamm.fr/" target="_blank">SPAMM.fr</a> in 2013, I was more than interested! It was a great chance for me to discover and meet more of the artists from this gorgeous art scene. Net art is a paradigm, and I love to be part of improving collaborative work online and to show this new art.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="videoWrapper" style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/146020817" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="100%"></iframe></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Benjamin Berg,&nbsp;<em><a href="http://spamm.fr/stream/?g=40" target="_blank">Black Ice</a></em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Why did you decide to create Spamm?</strong></p> <p><strong>Micha&euml;l Borras a.k.a SYSTAIME: </strong>To see all these artists existing, but ignored by institutions brought me to this observation of one artist: &ldquo;People do not seem to realize what is going on. We are going to show them.&rdquo; In short, it is the aim of all curation: to relay, to unite, to enlighten, to develop.</p> <p><strong>CP: You also had a physical show in a gallery for the launch of this year&rsquo;s </strong><strong>ϟ</strong><strong>ℙ</strong><strong>&forall;ℳℳ▁</strong><strong>ℙϴШ&euro;</strong><strong>&real;</strong><strong>.</strong><strong> Why do you think it&rsquo;s important to show this work away from the internet?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ellectra Radikal: </strong>&ldquo;Actualization consists in bringing a thing in time to realize it. Potentiating involves subtracting something from time to keep it in a virtual state.&rdquo;&nbsp;We go from one to the other in the movement of breaths.</p> <p>I am not a digital native. I like to arrange the manifestations of art in the physical reality,&nbsp;to meet and to see my friends having good time together, dancing, making music, singing, jumping, drinking, playing, sharing, talking about art, non art, fake art, fruit juice recipes&hellip; Seriously?: The internet is COOL online, the internet is cool away from internet :)</p> <p><strong>Micha&euml;l Borras a.k.a SYSTAIME:&nbsp; </strong>To show that this is art and its destination is not only online. Whatever we are doing online, our aim is to meet in the real. We are talking about <em>the incarnation of the avatar</em>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170419141314-Spamm2.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">IRL ϟℙ&forall;ℳℳ▁ℙϴШ&euro;&real; EXHIBITION X R3FRAG</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What are your thought on the monetization of net art? It is traditionally very hard to make money being a net&nbsp;artist.&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>Ellectra Radikal: </strong>It is traditionally very hard to make money being an artist.&nbsp;Traditionally because of the traditional art market rules. But we are &ldquo;light&rdquo; and free of many certainties and presuppositions, and we are likely to rapidly evaluate and change the patterns of the market art world.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Spamm is free and the art is not for sale. Is that practical or philosophical?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ellectra Radikal: </strong>Practical&mdash;under construction. My philosophy of the internet is: Open Source. That does not mean not for sale.</p> <p><strong>Micha&euml;l Borras a.k.a SYSTAIME: </strong>One of the problems of network art is to be not exhibited much because very few collectors have chosen to collect non-physical objects. Very few galleries encourage them in this direction. For example, my gallery owner asked me for my solo exhibition to show digital prints of screenshots from my videos. The post-internet movement could have been born to monetize this practice by dragging it towards the production of physical objects.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="videoWrapper" style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/197782188" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="100%"></iframe></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Manuel Ro&szlig;ner,&nbsp;<em><a href="http://spamm.fr/stream/?g=70" target="_blank">1822 vid05 .RGB color 5</a></em></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How would you describe your relationship with the internet?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ellectra Radikal: </strong>There are no strangers on the internet, there are Internauts. I love that. It is the Internauts who create the dimension of the navigation online. And it is infinite.</p> <p>*** In matters of style, I swim with the current ***</p> <p>When I was connected to curate in the digital art scene, I subscribed to it in an almost abstract way, measuring the artistic practices that Internauts are investigating. I seek, in the first place, the traces, the voices, the sounds, the images of this machine-baby-talk with an imaginary look. I&rsquo;m looking for everything that allows us to overcome our isolation, the barriers of language and where <em>de-centration</em> confronts us with the foundations of our identity constructions.</p> <p><strong>Micha&euml;l Borras a.k.a SYSTAIME: </strong>Internet is my brother.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="videoWrapper" style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/DNYBbO7-uQU" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="100%"></iframe></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Elena Romenkova,&nbsp;<a href="http://spamm.fr/stream/?g=99" target="_blank"><em>Walk Through</em></a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Are there any submissions to Spamm that you have been particularly impressed by?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ellectra Radikal: </strong>One-hundred-and-forty-two exactly : )</p> <p><strong>Micha&euml;l Borras a.k.a SYSTAIME: </strong>A curation is a choice. I will not make a choice in my choices. A curation tells a story. This story is about diversity. Once the curation is closed, the question of one work rather than another is no longer justified. It is a whole dynamic. Each work reinforces the previous one and the following. The idea is also to give the public the space to make its own choice, its own narrative.</p> <p><strong>CP: What does post-internet mean to you?</strong></p> <p><strong>Ellectra Radikal: </strong>The expression of the reincarnation of the desire;&nbsp;the expression of the need to leave the web, devices, connections, machines, screens; the temptation of the geek&hellip; One more utopia of the &ldquo;technological counter-culture.&rdquo;&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What does the future hold for Spamm?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>More exhibitions, more Spammerz, more Art!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <div class="videoWrapper" style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="300" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/v8yAiWs5EfI" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="100%"></iframe></div> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Paulin Paulin,&nbsp;<a href="http://spamm.fr/stream/?g=60" target="_blank"><em>When you pretend to be a glitch artist but no one cares</em></a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&#39;re interested in what&#39;s happening with art on the web. We invited online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, to write a bi-monthly column for us. Every other Wednesday he selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(All images: Courtesy of the artists and <strong>ϟ</strong>ℙ&forall;ℳℳ▁ℙ<strong>ϴШ&euro;</strong>&real;)</span></p> Wed, 19 Apr 2017 13:01:47 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Let Them Eat Art! Dissent on Documenta 14’s Periphery <p>For Athenians, the presence of Documenta in Athens has raised a number of questions, including most importantly: how will this German-funded meta-exhibition transform the city, and what will happen after it has run its course? Yet for most Athenians, Documenta 14, whose tagline is &ldquo;Learning from Athens,&rdquo; will likely go unnoticed or even appear superfluous against the burdens of everyday life in the Greek capital. To be clear, while the exhibition does include Athenian and Greek artists, and while the public programs open their important discussions to a wider public audience, <a href="http://www.holobiont.net/blog/preconceptions-and-illusions-documenta-art-and-athens" target="_blank">recognizing and incorporating its criticism</a>, its visibility and attendance is likely to remain restricted to international visitors and the city&rsquo;s growing art scene. In a city reeling from <a href="https://littlegrapeguy.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">six years of politico-economic distress</a> and <a href="http://www.unhcr.org/news/press/2017/3/58d8f15a4/stronger-cooperation-crucial-ensure-sustainable-refugee-response-greece.html" target="_blank">an unresolved lack</a> of dignified housing and basic services for refugees, Documenta 14 could amount to a spectacle where &ldquo;the Germans,&rdquo; who have been vilified in the Greek media, proclaim, &ldquo;Let them eat art!&rdquo;</p> <p>This critique is not intended to devalue individual artists or artworks in Documenta 14&mdash;several of them ably contribute to ongoing and important discourses surrounding the current political situation in Athens and abroad&mdash;but rather to consider the exhibition&rsquo;s symbolic gesture of relocating from Kassel to Athens <em>and </em>Kassel at a traumatic nexus in Greece&rsquo;s history. At the inauguration of Ross Birrell&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.tornosnews.gr/en/greek-news/culture/22897-documenta-14-horseback-event-to-recreating-parthenon-frieze-scenes.html" target="_blank">controversial artwork</a> <a href="http://www.documenta14.de/en/notes-and-works/12798/the-transit-of-hermes" target="_blank"><em>The Transit of Hermes</em></a>, a 100-day transnational horse ride from Athens to Kassel, Artistic Director Adam Szymczyk stated that &ldquo;it&rsquo;s a physical act before it becomes a metaphor or allegory.&rdquo; Yet the artwork, which invokes not only Greek mythology but also the modern Greek nationalist avatar Alexander the Great with his horse Bucephalus, is an obvious provocation in an exhausted political climate. Birrell&rsquo;s work caricatures the ultimate inability to extricate an artwork from its exhibited context, even despite expressed intentionality.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170418135446-IMG_6095.jpeg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Athens departure of Ross Birrell&rsquo;s <em>The Transit of Hermes</em>. Photo: the author</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>But provoking Athenians is nothing new for the team of Documenta 14. In the two years leading up to the Athens opening, following its announcement in 2015, specific information about the exhibition, such as participating artists and venues, was actively withheld from the public until the last possible moment. This intentional obscurity conjured an environment of heightened anticipation with an added dose of skepticism, evoking reactions from Athenian artists and researchers. Before Documenta 14 opened on April 8, triggering an avalanche of performances, events, and exhibitions, a handful of formally unaffiliated initiatives emerged with one thing in common: some kind of orientation toward Documenta 14. These initiatives range in approach from objective study to artistic reflection/reaction, embodying a fashionable, if understandable negativity.</p> <p>One such initiative, <a href="http://learningfromdocumenta.org/" target="_blank">Learning from Documenta</a>, identifies itself as a research project situated between anthropology,&nbsp;art, and the media, and was established to critically observe and discuss multiple aspects of Documenta 14&rsquo;s presence in Athens. Coordinated by Greek anthropologists Eleana Yalouri and Elpida Rikou, Learning from Documenta <a href="https://hyperallergic.com/371252/the-messy-politics-of-documentas-arrival-in-athens/" target="_blank">examines the gaze of Documenta 14</a>, how this impacts what the institution &ldquo;learns&rdquo; from Athens, and the dynamic its presence creates in the city. The research project held its first public event in June 2016, sharing its mission alongside a presentation by Szymczyk himself.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170418135346-20161026110559-01_Marta_Minujin_El_Partenon_de_libros_A___Marta_Minujin_Archive.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Marta Minuj&iacute;n,&nbsp;<em>El Parten&oacute;n de libros</em>&nbsp;(<em>The Parthenon of Books</em>, 1983), installation, Avenida 9 de Julio, Buenos Aires. Photo: Marta Minuj&iacute;n Archive</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Since then, it has held four roundtable events, including one in January on the politics of curating with Documenta 14&rsquo;s Curator of Public Programs, writer and philosopher Paul B. Preciado. Having invoked the concept of &ldquo;<a href="http://www.thirdtext.org/exercises-freedom-documenta14" target="_blank">the indigenous</a>&rdquo; in Documenta 14&rsquo;s already ongoing public program &ldquo;<a href="http://www.documenta14.de/en/public-programs/927/the-parliament-of-bodies" target="_blank">The Parliament of Bodies</a>&rdquo; (which was used to discuss the situation of those born in Greece but permanently excluded from citizens&rsquo; rights), Documenta was accused at the roundtable of embodying an orientalist approach toward Greece. In response, Preciado contested the accusation. &ldquo;What is the position of being Documenta?&rdquo;, he countered, pointing to the ambiguity of the institution, its multiple layers and reference points, as an institution &ldquo;in the making.&rdquo; However the accusation of orientalism points to a latent, problematic tendency among some international participants of the exhibition&mdash;visible in <em>The Transit of Hermes</em> as well as Marta Minujin&rsquo;s <em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/show/46744-this-artist-is-making-a-life-sized-replica-of-the-parthenon-out-of-banned-books" target="_blank">Parthenon of Books</a></em>, planned for Kassel&mdash;to ambiguously refer to Greek natives, Ancient Greece, and the modern Greek nation state almost indiscriminately as &ldquo;Greek&rdquo;&mdash;a tactic that is also used by the far right Golden Dawn to bolster an &ldquo;antique&rdquo; notion of democratic sovereignty based on blood right. The existence of conflicting viewpoints&mdash;from inside Documenta 14 (which was until recently shrouded in secrecy) and from outside it (a position dealing with different power structures and spheres of influence)&mdash;highlights the importance of observing Documenta&rsquo;s activities from the outside. Looking forward, Learning from Documenta will present its research findings at a workshop in Athens in October.</p> <p>Several other initiatives deploy a common strategy of <a href="https://www.academia.edu/31675842/A_Politics_of_Lies_Nationalization_Subversion_and_Semblance_in_Recent_Artistic_Activism_from_Greece" target="_blank">overidentification</a>, whereby they convincingly mimic existing power structures in society to expose the success of full-scale ideological self-identification, i.e. &ldquo;woke trolling.&rdquo; Examples include the <a href="https://idammathens.wordpress.com/" target="_blank">Institute for the Management of the Athenian Post-documenta Melancholy (IDAMM)</a> and <a href="http://documena.weebly.com/" target="_blank">Documena</a>, whose name borrows the Ancient Greek word for &ldquo;the perceptions that function as a given; those things believed in or hoped for.&rdquo; Perhaps most visible among them is the <a href="http://athensbiennale.org/" target="_blank">Athens Biennale</a>, whose early &ldquo;press conference&rdquo; at the derelict Hotel Bageion on the evening of April 5 was laced with overidentification. Titled &ldquo;Waiting for the Barbarians,&rdquo; the Biennale&rsquo;s 6th iteration for 2018 was announced one year early together with an anticipatory public program running throughout April. The curators ask, &ldquo;Will there ever be any &lsquo;Learning from Athens&rsquo;? &hellip; Are we witnessing the coming of the Barbarians, or the taming of the Barbarian?&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170418135210-09._The_Domestic_Godless__Mick_O_Shea.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">The Domestic Godless, <em>Invasive Pests</em>,&nbsp;Photo of Mick O&#39; Shea. Courtesy 6th&nbsp;Athens Biennale 2017-2018 Waiting For The Barbarians. Photo: &copy; Nyssos Vasilopoulos</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The Biennale&rsquo;s press conference, which took place one day before Documenta 14&rsquo;s, played out like participatory surrealist theater. A speech from the curators, who appeared to be in character, was preceded by the sound intervention <em>Europa Clock</em> by Dimitris Desyllas, which was performed from the fa&ccedil;ade out onto Omonoia Square, and was followed by <em>Invasive Pests</em>, a culinary action by The Domestic Godless in which strange, unexpectedly palatable food&mdash;like moss brownies and crispy fried fish bones&mdash;and equally unusual drink were offered to visitors on striking visual displays. The doors of the apparently abandoned hotel were opened up, inviting visitors to wander through two stories of empty rooms. On the third floor of the hotel, at the end of its main corridor, a solitary pianist, Nikos Laaris, played a single phrase of &ldquo;Ode to Joy&rdquo; (upon which the Anthem of Europe is based) durationally on repeat. One of the curators revealed in conversation that Documenta had originally approached the Biennale to collaborate, but in the end fruitful communication could not be established. Rather than curating a traditional exhibition in response to Documenta 14, the curators chose to focus attention on performative actions (including an ironic bus tour through the suburbs, <em>Klassenfahrt, </em>offered under the guise of an artificial tourist agency), leaving the Hotel Bageion mostly empty (though accessible) throughout the opening week of Documenta: &ldquo;Sometimes the best statement is no statement.&rdquo;</p> <p>Yet do such independent initiatives as Learning from Documenta and the Athens Biennale unavoidably get rolled up into the grand narrative of Documenta 14 itself, inevitably reinforcing the institution by proxy? In their various forms of critique have the institution&rsquo;s critics and &ldquo;<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hy5XKRWmXf8" target="_blank">trolls</a>&rdquo; arguably made Documenta 14 more visible than it would have been without them? They indeed contributed to the &ldquo;Documenta meme,&rdquo; especially by creating information about it before none had been released by the institution. But to criticize them on this basis ignores the fact that they could not have been unaware of their role in the grand scheme of things: the essence of trolling, perhaps also of overidentification, is to provoke overreaction&mdash;and in some cases disidentification.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170418134642-IMG_6100.jpeg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Photo: the author</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Now that the Documenta 14 exhibition has opened, it looks as though the works and locations selected do indeed oscillate between symbolic and literal readings of &ldquo;Learning from Athens.&rdquo; In the cacophony of highly differentiated artworks spread throughout the city, contradictions abound, which seems to be welcomed by Szymczyk, himself eluding critique by transferring it onto commissioned artists. Returning once more to the inauguration of the <em>Transit of Hermes</em>, it is finally worth noting that while Szymczyk, Birrell, and others introduced the artwork to the public, leaflets were distributed among the crowd of onlookers. One side read, &ldquo;Who is learning from Athens and what?&rdquo; and the other, &ldquo;European states are learning from the refugee crisis how to control and manage populations.&rdquo; Several walls bordering the public space of the inauguration displayed graffiti, one reading: &ldquo;The crisis of a commodity or the commodity of crisis?&rdquo; These are probably not the last interventions that will occur in the 100 days of Documenta in Athens.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170418134541-IMG_6093.jpeg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Photo: the author</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Should Documenta, as a contemporary art institution, be held responsible for nourishing citizens with food for thought instead of real food, which for some Athenians is indeed scarce? What kinds of subjectivities will Documenta 14 produce, as asked by Learning from Documenta? On the day of the opening, <a href="http://conversations.e-flux.com/t/open-letter-to-the-viewers-participants-and-cultural-workers-of-documenta-14/6393" target="_blank">an anonymous online statement</a> emerged directed toward viewers, participants, and cultural workers of Documenta 14. While it makes some generalizations and employs an alienating tone, the statement does importantly address the increasing precarity of autonomous housing in Athens, squats populated in no small part by refugees with nowhere else to turn. The statement challenges visitors to Documenta 14 hoping to learn from Athens to &ldquo;first open your eyes to the city and listen to the streets.&rdquo; As these squats are increasingly evicted, the statement makes clear that what Athenians need now, more than art consumerism, is solidarity. Time will tell if the surplus attention brought by Documenta 14 will in fact establish greater solidarity, reflected eventually in legislation, or, on the contrary, polarize and alienate further Athenian artists, activists, and refugees, pushing them farther into the periphery.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/477171-benjamin-busch?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Benjamin Busch</a></p> <p><em><a href="http://www.benbusch.info/" target="_blank">Benjamin Busch</a></em>&nbsp;<em>is currently researching critical modes of architectural production within the field of spatial practice. Treating architecture as a symptom of abstract processes, his artwork and writing investigate complex fields of relations within the built environment.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: The Heart &amp; Sword Division during the Press Conference. Courtesy 6th&nbsp;Athens Biennale 2017-2018 Waiting For The Barbarians. Photo: &copy; Nyssos Vasilopoulos)</span></p> Tue, 25 Apr 2017 04:53:02 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Bodies Off the Street: In Turkey, Artists Face Politics by Looking Inward <p>On Sunday, Turkey will vote on a constitutional referendum, which threatens to expand the reach of the presidency. A &ldquo;yes&rdquo; (<em>evet</em>) vote will bring more control into the hands of the current president, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, and his Justice and Development Party (AKP), strengthening the executive government and reducing remaining parliamentary powers. A &ldquo;no&rdquo; (<em>hayir</em>) vote rejects this expansion, but carries with it fears of governmental push-back, including the likely continuation of the current &ldquo;state of emergency&rdquo; restrictions imposed after the <a href="http://www.aljazeera.com/news/2016/12/turkey-failed-coup-attempt-161217032345594.html" target="_blank">failed coup attempt</a> in the summer of 2016.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170416131857-IMG_1009.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Taksim Square in March. Photo: Danyel Ferrari</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Despite the significance of this momentous vote, the streets of Istanbul are strangely quiet. For a city known for the political outspokenness of its citizens, and particularly its artists, there is little public commentary. The difference between the seeming silence of those who would resist today and the historic resistance of the 2013 <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gezi_Park_protests" target="_blank">Gezi Park protests</a> and actions is stark, and undoubtedly owes to the very real threats of arrest, detainment, and violence from the police as seen in Gezi and in demonstrations since.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170415120519-IMG_1421.PNG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Taksim Hold&rsquo;em</em>.&nbsp;Courtesy of Bluff Films. Photo: Ersin Gok</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The soon-to-be-released film, <em>Taksim Hold&rsquo;em</em>, which takes place during the first explosive night in 2013 when Gezi Park occupiers were attacked by Istanbul police, takes its name from the park&rsquo;s surrounding square, Taksim. The feature film follows the events of one evening in one room&mdash;a living room over looking the square&mdash;where the three main protagonists, young middleclass men, who are old high school friends, meet for a weekly poker game.</p> <p>Typically, Gezi, the occupation protests, and the ensuing police attacks are largely represented in the popular imagination with images of the public square, through bodies in the street, under threat: we envision artist and performative interventions, and often police attacking, and even killing, protestors with tear gas, water canons, and rubber bullets. <em>Taksim Hold&rsquo;em</em>, however, forgoes these images so that the &ldquo;public&rdquo; space of the square is never pictured and only imagined through temporary intrusions. Despite the host&rsquo;s intentions to ignore the protest outside, the night&rsquo;s events intermittently penetrate the four walls&mdash;through the news on television, social media posts read aloud, through shouts outside, and two young female protestors admitted to take shelter from the gas and the police who are chasing them.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170415120627-memory_of_a_square.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">G&uuml;ls&uuml;n Karamustafa, <em>Memory of a Square</em>, 2005, Video, 2 projections, black and white and sound, 17 min.<br /> Installation view at Tate Modern. Courtesy of the artist</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The new film is a kind of echo in reverse of G&uuml;ls&uuml;n Karamustafa&rsquo;s film <em>Memory of a Square </em>(2005). On view in the Istanbul Modern&rsquo;s long-running permanent collection exhibition, <a href="http://www.istanbulmodern.org/en/exhibitions/current-exhibitions/artists-in-their-time_1663.html" target="_blank"><em>Artists in Their Time</em></a>, the prescient work offers a series of domestic vignettes. A two-channel installation reveals intimate moments juxtaposed beside existing historical footage from periods of political upheaval in the square. The street images begin with a balloon launch in the late Ottoman period, followed by the erection of the square&rsquo;s statue in the 30s, in the early days of Gezi Park. Several scenes of demonstrations and political turbulence in the 70s follow, ending finally with the demolition of houses around Taksim for the construction of the Tarlabaşı road. Reading these vignettes today, it&rsquo;s hard not to conjure the pedestrianization project and promised destructions that threatened Gezi Park and spurred the 2013 protests&mdash;eight years after the piece was produced. Alongside these historical images we watch meals interrupted, wounds bandaged by careful hands, suitcases packed: the everyday lives of individuals affected by the bodies on the streets.</p> <p>The claustrophobia of <em>Taksim Hold&rsquo;em</em> and the spotlight on the interior lives of its protagonists seem to carry particular weight now in Istanbul. Recent years of arrests, detainments, and dismissals of large numbers of judges, writers, professors, lawyers, and artists have left the streets quiet. As much of the world seems to be reawakening to the possibility of bodies in the streets&mdash;with protests in the tens and hundreds of thousands criticizing their own governments becoming daily events&mdash;it seems like representation in the street is more and more the measure of political engagement. Yet it must be remembered that this is not an option for every<em>body</em>, or everywhere.</p> <p>In her <a href="http://www.maskmagazine.com/not-again/struggle/sick-woman-theory" target="_blank">Sick Woman Theory</a>, writer and performer Johanna Hedva suggests that the dominant discourse on political action, drawing largely as it does from Hannah Arendt&rsquo;s faith in the political effect of bodies in the street, is too narrow a definition of how we engage the political. Arendt&rsquo;s conception suggests that only bodies that are <em>able</em> to enter the street are acting politically. It privileges those for whom this is a possibility and reduces other actions to the nonpolitical. Hedva asks us to consider the politics of intimacy, of interdependence, of bodies that <em>need, </em>that engage in relationships and in so doing reshape the social (political) fabrics around them.</p> <p>Two recent Istanbul performances, staged as part of <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/PeraMuzesi.Museum/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10154991013937597" target="_blank"><em>Look Again</em> </a>at the Pera Museum, addressed the body, bound and in relationship to a fixed surrounding. A museum collaboration curated by dance critic and founding director of <a href="http://performistanbul.org/index.php/home/" target="_blank">PerformIstanbul</a>, Simge Burhanoğlu, <em>Look Again</em> offers &ldquo;an opportunity for artists to engage the permanent collection.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170415120410-IMG_1314.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ekin Bernay, <a href="http://performistanbul.org/index.php/9stone/"><em>9 Stone</em></a>, 2017. Photo: Danyel Ferrari</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Set in the <a href="http://www.peramuseum.org/Exhibition/Anatolian-Weights-and-Measures/133" target="_blank">Anatolian Weights and Measures collection</a>, surrounded by scales&mdash;from delicate and ornate ones designed to weigh jewels and flower seeds, to large and perfunctory ones for measuring flour&mdash;Ekin Bernay&#39;s <a href="http://performistanbul.org/index.php/9stone/" target="_blank"><em>9 Stone</em></a> plays at a kind of new-age healing of what she calls &ldquo;the relation between body and soul, the freedom of the body.&rdquo; Viewers are admitted in groups of fewer than five and given headphones connected to a microphone transmitter worn by the artist. A series of rocks sit in a line, with two larger ones on either side as seats. Bernay invites one audience member to join her. As they sit across from one another, we hear her whisper in our ears a message for this viewer&mdash;&ldquo;where are you heavy?&rdquo;&mdash;as she hands them a rock to hold against a knee, or shoulder, or heart. The piece moves in this strangely shared yet private way, from one participant to the next, like a game of telephone. An unnamed &ldquo;heaviness&rdquo; calls to mind not only hearts broken by lovers, and family traumas, but also the heavy anxious anticipation that hangs in the air of the city today.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170415115027-IMG_1318.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">İ. Ata Doğruel, <em>Ambassador</em>, 2017. Photo: Danyel Ferrari</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Also part of <em>Look Again</em>, İ. Ata Doğruel&rsquo;s performance <a href="http://performistanbul.org/index.php/ambassador/" target="_blank"><em>Ambassador</em></a>, is set in the exhibition <a href="http://www.peramuseum.org/Exhibition/Intersecting-Worlds/132" target="_blank"><em>Intersecting Worlds: Ambassadors and Painters</em></a> and is based on the museum&rsquo;s Orientalist Painting Collection. As we enter the gallery we see Doğruel in profile. He is bisected by a scrim, which extends from his clothing and tightly traces the edges of his face, head, and the chair on which he sits. Because the scrim curves in an S, one can never see both sides of Doğruel&rsquo;s face or body at once, but rather has to walk from side to side, jarred by the discrepancy of his appearance: on the one side of the screen the artist is fully shaved of all hair, including his eyebrows; on the other, he sports a beard, his hair grown long and dense. The performance, like much of Doğruel&rsquo;s work is durational, internally focused&mdash;he sits for six hours in the same position with no break, his head glued into the installation, which tugs visibly on his skin whenever he shifts even slightly. While the artist and official press release suggests the piece addresses the divided lives of historical figures, painters, and diplomats, the audience engages Doğruel as an immobilized body, as a body bound. The curator, Burhanoğlu, who was present in the gallery during my visit, instructed viewers to engage the artist. Viewers talked to him, although he could not answer; they lifted his feet for a moment&rsquo;s relief and rubbed his shoulders.</p> <p><em>Look Again</em> was <a href="https://www.dailysabah.com/arts-culture/2017/04/01/with-performance-program-visitors-look-again-into-pera-museum" target="_blank">recently reviewed</a> by the largely pro-government <em>Daily Sabah</em>. The review praised these performances as revealing new aspects of the museum&rsquo;s collection, Turkey&rsquo;s Ottoman history, and, by extension, the nation&rsquo;s current cultural life. Recent moves by the government in the current post-coup-attempt &ldquo;state of emergency&rdquo; have suspended Turkish cultural institutions from participating in certain funding programs, including <a href="https://ec.europa.eu/programmes/creative-europe/" target="_blank">Creative Europe</a>. As a result Turkey will no longer be able to receive financial support from the program, and any of the country&rsquo;s partnerships with European institutions will be invalidated. Thus, experimental artists in the country are finding new homes within Turkish institutions and are producing works that read on multiple levels.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170415121125-17635541_10154991017382597_8803137853202222192_o.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ekin Bernay,&nbsp;<em>9 Stone</em>, 2017. Via <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/PeraMuzesi.Museum/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10154991013937597" target="_blank">Pera Museum</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I would be talking out of turn to suggest that these works are in any way a direct response to the upcoming referendum vote, or even that the artists have intended them as political pieces, explicitly or at all. However, they nonetheless speak to a growing consideration, in Turkey and beyond, of the politics of the most personal of interactions: those that surround bodies, and vulnerable bodies in particular. Whereas Karamustafa&rsquo;s <em>Memory of a Square</em>, and to some extent <em>Taksim Hold&rsquo;em</em>, oppose interiority with images of the street&mdash; public and political against private and personal, history against memory&mdash;many artists&rsquo; works now seem to muddy the distinctions.</p> <p>Artists are finding once again that, as always, the personal is political, but also that the intimate encounter, the whisper, may be the hidden script that keeps the possibility of resistance alive. As Gezi and the many development projects across the city indicate, the domestic, the intimate, is not the opposite of the public square. But, like the body itself, our interior lives are central to the stakes that call us out to the streets.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/200738-danyel-ferrari?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Danyel Ferrari</a></p> <p><em>Danyel M. Ferrari is an artist and independent researcher currently based in Istanbul, Turkey.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: İ. Ata Doğruel, <em>Ambassador</em>, 2017. Via <a href="https://www.facebook.com/pg/PeraMuzesi.Museum/photos/?tab=album&amp;album_id=10154991013937597" target="_blank">Pera Museum</a>)</span></p> Sun, 16 Apr 2017 10:19:25 -0300 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list