Articles | ArtSlant https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/show en-us 40 Under the Radar: Moth Dust | Kate Pincus-Whitney | Joe Sobel <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/486035-moth-dust?utm_source=Moth-Dust&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Moth Dust &ndash; New York City, Berlin, Helsinki</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1051133?utm_source=Moth-Dust&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1051133/u3azr9/20170613231202-moth-dust-portrait-photographer-nyc-international-center-of-photography--18.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1051137?utm_source=Moth-Dust&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1051137/y8wnrh/20170613231204-moth-dust-portrait-photographer-nyc-international-center-of-photography-0630.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1051141?utm_source=Moth-Dust&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1051141/y8wnrh/20170613231207-moth-dust-portrait-photographer-nyc-international-center-of-photography-5499-2.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1051140?utm_source=Moth-Dust&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1051140/y8wnrh/20170613231205-moth-dust-portrait-photographer-nyc-international-center-of-photography-4621.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/482575-kate-pincus-whitney?tab=PROFILE?utm_source=Kate-Pincus-Whitney&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Kate Pincus-Whitney &ndash; Los Angeles, New York</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1046465?utm_source= Kate-Pincus-Whitney&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1046465/u3azr9/20170513194217-Midnight_Snack-_Easy_Cheez_and_Caviar.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1046491?utm_source=Kate-Pincus-Whitney&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1046491/y8wnrh/20170513233455--Good-_Girl_s_Allowence.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1046462?utm_source=Kate-Pincus-Whitney&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1046462/y8wnrh/20170513194155-Mightnight_Snack-_Flamin__Hot_Cheetos.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1046493?utm_source=Kate-Pincus-Whitney&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1046493/y8wnrh/20170513233509-13_PincusWhitney__Kate__4_Open_Closed_Help_Needed_1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/98037-joe-sobel?utm_source=JoeSobel&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Joe Sobel &ndash; Paris</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1051026?utm_source=JoeSobel&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1051026/u3azr9/20170613184139-641A0510.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1051029?utm_source=JoeSobel&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1051029/y8wnrh/20170613184150-641A0517.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1051028?utm_source=JoeSobel&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1051028/y8wnrh/20170613184149-641A0516.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1051031?utm_source=JoeSobel&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1051031/y8wnrh/20170613184158-641A0535.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/s?marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Fri, 23 Jun 2017 01:20:51 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Artist Migrations from SF to LA Are Shaping West Coast Aesthetics and Identity <p>On this particular Saturday in May, it&rsquo;s unusually quiet in the Tenderloin as I walk from BART up Larkin Street. The San Francisco neighborhood is known for its seedy characteristics, its history of vice, homelessness, happy ending massage parlors, strip clubs, dive bars, single occupancy hotels, and social service centers. Today it feels like a level of caring has taken place, with some new businesses now occupying previously vacant storefronts&mdash;the rawness is still there, it just doesn&rsquo;t feel as bedraggled and dangerous.&nbsp;Maybe it&rsquo;s the heat&mdash;a blazing 65 degrees that feels like 80 by our SF standards.</p> <p><em>I left LA in 2011 to escape the heat.</em></p> <p>I am on my way to see the exhibition <em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/events/show/449149-expat">EXPAT</a></em> at R/SF projects. The show interested me because I am myself a Los Angeles transplant, and the show features artists who all moved to LA from SF. In fact, two of the artists, Greg Ito and Matt Lipps, lived in LA, moved to SF, and then returned south in the last couple of years. For <em>EXPAT</em>, R/SF wanted to bring the artists back to San Francisco to establish a cross-pollinated identity for the two cities, and to create a stronger contemporary art presence encompassing the entire West Coast.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170622151650-3._RSFprojects_EXPAT_11.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>EXPAT</em>, installation view at R/SF projects, 2017. Courtesy of the gallery</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Artist and R/SF project co-founder Anička Vr&aacute;na-Godwin briefly moved to Los Angeles to take advantage of the city&rsquo;s opportunities, but returned recently after becoming homesick for the project space she had co-founded. &ldquo;I missed the energy here,&rdquo; she said, and the atmosphere of the Tenderloin.<a href="#_edn1" name="_ednref1" title="">[1]</a> There really isn&rsquo;t anything like the Tenderloin in LA.</p> <p>San Francisco, in comparison to LA, is a very small town, which suits those who welcome a slower pace, the compact &ldquo;big city feel,&rdquo; historical architecture, and cooler weather&mdash;not to mention its reputation as a safe-haven for innovators, intellectuals, the LGBTQ+ community, and anarchists alike. But there&rsquo;s an elephant in the room: the rise in population over the last five years, driven by masses of tech companies, their workers (or those hoping to be), and those taking advantage of this new population in need of culture and living spaces. The resulting real estate greed of almost criminal proportions has out-priced many low-income people, working class families, and artists from their shops, studios, and homes.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170622151612-4._PeterWu_Helene_XII_2017.jpg" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Peter Wu, <em>Helene XII</em>, 2017, Archival pigment transfer on perforated projection screen, 25 x 18 inches. Courtesy of the artist</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>For many artists in <em>EXPAT</em>, the move to Los Angeles was a practical one: it&rsquo;s cheaper to live there, there is more available studio space, and there are more galleries, artists, and opportunities.<a href="#_edn2" name="_ednref2" title="">[2]</a> For others, it&rsquo;s the city&rsquo;s energy. Peter Wu shared a story via email:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;"><span style="font-size:16px;">After graduating from SFAI, me and two classmates (Aaron Garber-Maikovska and Jason Hwang) moved out to LA. We were some of the first which turned into a mass exodus to this city. We realized that the rent was too high in SF but we also wanted to be near our art school heroes like Mike Kelley, Paul McCarthy, and Jim Shaw.</span></p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;"><span style="font-size:16px;">Upon moving here to LA, I started working at Patrick Painter Inc. This was a crazy moment for me. I had so many romantic ideas of the art world which were quickly crushed by being exposed to its inner workings (good and bad). I chose to work there as this is where our heroes were showing. Later on I was fortunate to have the opportunity to show with the gallery&mdash;a momentary dream come true.</span></p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;"><span style="font-size:16px;">Los Angeles has an energy to it where you feel like you have to get things done. Maybe it was just me, but in SF I felt content with just getting by. Maybe we were afraid of the saturation of artists in New York but there is a slow burning fire here. Not aggressive but, at the [same] time, the potential to become a real threat. We like that space, it&rsquo;s just our pace.</span></p> <p>Many of the artists in<em> EXPAT</em> were able to find work spaces up to five times the size for the same price they were paying in SF. They found more freedom to explore scale and materials, to make messes and to step back from the work and see it clearly, without the walls &ldquo;caving in.&rdquo; In addition, some artists described the psychological relief of not having to worry about the cost of living, which allowed for more mental creative space.</p> <table align="right" width="400"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: #1f1f1f;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;There is a slow burning fire here...We like that space, it&rsquo;s just our pace.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>Furthermore, some described how the sheer volume of galleries&nbsp;expands opportunities&nbsp;for building relationships and becoming part of an ambitious and globally recognized contemporary art circuit. <em>EXPAT </em>artist Jake Ziemann participated in a group show at LA-based Shulamit Nazarian in 2016. In an email he described the decision to move south&nbsp;after that show: &ldquo;[It] felt like the logical next step in my career to extend my community, expand my practice, and to be in more immediate contact geographically with an art scene that both felt foreign to me and in which I had already begun to participate.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170622151339-5._MattLipps_Curtain.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Matt Lipps, <em>Untitled (Curtain)</em>, 2010, C-print, ed. 5/5, 44 x 33 inches. &copy; Matt Lipps. Courtesy of the artist and Jessica Silverman Gallery</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>Photo-based artist Matt Lipps moved from LA to the Bay Area a few years ago to take a full-time academic appointment. Lipps exhibits his work regularly at Jessica Silverman Gallery in SF and at Marc Selwyn in LA. He recently moved back to LA; he realized that his 17 years&rsquo; worth of relationships with colleagues and peers there was &ldquo;home.&rdquo; He described via email how, upon returning, he was able to find a space &ldquo;I can&nbsp;<em>grow into,&rdquo;</em>&nbsp;rather than a space to merely &ldquo;fit&rdquo; into. Thematically his work changed, too.</p> <table align="center" width="650"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;Not only did I have space and time to slow down and breathe, but I think that feeling is reflected in the work.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&ldquo;The first show I completed back in LA, <a href="http://www.mattlipps.com/Looking-Through-Pictures-2016" target="_blank"><em>Looking Through Pictures</em></a>, was much more contemplative&mdash;not only did I have space and time to slow down and breathe, but I think that feeling is reflected in the work as well.&rdquo; The piece he showed in <em>EXPAT</em>, <em>Untitled (Curtain)</em>, is from 2010, and was created while he was still in SF. It&rsquo;s part of a series titled <em>Horizon/s</em>, after the 1950s magazine of the same title. The series, as had a majority of his work since 2004, used cut-out and propped up &ldquo;paper dolls&rdquo; arranged in theatrical dioramas. The new work is more self-reflexive, using the negative space that remained from previous cut-out works such as <em>Untitled (Curtain).</em></p> <p>A week after visiting R/SF projects, I took a trip to LA. While there, I stopped by <a href="http://www.hilde.co/" target="_blank">HILDE</a>, whose Director Hilde Helphenstein recently relocated from SF to open her gallery on Washington Blvd., a quick jaunt east of the gallery cluster in Culver City. On view through July 17 is <em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/events/show/449150-hydrogenesis" target="_blank">HYDROGENESIS</a></em>, an exhibition by artist duo <a href="http://ohl-dc.com/" target="_blank">Ohlsson/Dit-Cilinn</a>, who were my classmates at California College of the Arts. While at their show, I happened upon Jake Ziemann and Julie Henson, who were both included in <em>EXPAT</em>, and who now share a huge studio in Boyle Heights. I dropped by the space to talk about their work and relocation.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170622151208-7._JakeZiemann_Medium_standing_here_until_you_make_me_move_Front.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Jake Ziemann, <em>standing here until you make me move</em>, 2016, Spray paint, acrylic, and gouache on ceramic, wood, cardboard, plaster, and graphite powder, 28 x 8 x 7 inches. Courtesy of the artist and Shulamit Nazarian</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table align="left" width="400"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: #1f1f1f;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;My move to Los Angeles has made me realize how connected my personal state is to my work.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>When I showed up, Ziemann was working outside in a roomy tool shop with saws and worktables. Since moving into his new studio, he has been making work that hangs in mobile-like configurations from the ceiling, emphasizing notions of precariousness and instability. &ldquo;I believe my move to Los Angeles from San Francisco has made me realize how connected my personal state is to my work,&rdquo; he said. Elaborately knotted ropes bind small ceramic clumps to long wooden poles; they&nbsp;entwine a ceramic arch-shape. The knots restrict and support the pieces in these suspended states. One particularly alluring piece consists of an old painting sewn into tube shapes, filled with concrete, then tightly bound and left to dry. The ropes were later removed, leaving behind the remnants of the squeezing process frozen in time.</p> <p>The studio&rsquo;s huge main room provides a perfect spot for photographing work, staging studio visits, or hosting gatherings. Henson had just deinstalled her solo exhibition at Anat Ebgi, and the work was set up in the main room. Of the artists in <em>EXPAT</em>, Henson&rsquo;s work is the most overtly socio-political. She juxtaposes silhouettes of women athletes with images of women from fashion magazines. Using mirror, acrylic, and plywood, her materials reiterate &ldquo;the cold language of advertising,&rdquo; she said.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170622151129-6._JulieHenson_Triumphant_Return_2.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Julie Henson, <em>The Triumphant Return</em>, 2016, Inkjet print and flocking on plywood, 34 x 22.5 x 37.5 inches</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table align="right" width="400"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: #1f1f1f;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t feel &lsquo;comfortable&rsquo; here.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&ldquo;I don&rsquo;t feel &lsquo;comfortable&rsquo; here,&rdquo; Henson says. Meaning, she doesn&rsquo;t feel that sense of comfort, or perhaps boredom and stagnation, that one feels when they are settled in a spot. Here she is always working on her art. Since moving to LA, her work became more sculptural. Still using images from magazines &ldquo;and turning them back into solids,&rdquo; she is now taking things a step further. The bodies are now three-dimensional, slotted like segmented building toys, and then repositioned as teetering and awkward giant amulets, jewels, or trophies. They seem to signify the way that female bodies are glorified and commodified in the media, yet oftentimes seen only as parts. &nbsp;</p> <p>Henson is married to Seth Curcio, who was using an unoccupied space at their studio as an office. He is the previous co-founder and publisher of <em>Daily Serving</em>, and is now the Senior Director of Shulamit Nazarian Gallery where he has just curated his first show, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/events/show/449151-broken-language"><em>Broken Language</em></a>, which includes Josh Faught, an SF textile artist, and Greg Ito, whose work is also in <em>EXPAT</em>. Since moving to LA, Ito has been working on several bodies of new paintings using multiple narrative vignettes on single canvases. These are based on the story of his grandparents who were interned together in a camp during WWII, where they managed to find love despite the harrowing times. In the paintings, two hands posing in a variety of gestures are featured adjacent to imagery common in children&rsquo;s fantasy stories. The narratives reiterate uncertain outcomes in the face of danger or the midst of deceit. Lone boats float on a calm sea with smoke in the distance; a lick of flames curls out of a second story bedroom window.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170622151101-7GregIto_Soothsayer.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Greg Ito, <em>Soothsayer</em>, 2017, Acrylic on canvas, 31.5 x 23.75 inches. Courtesy of the artist</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Throughout the work in <em>EXPAT</em> there seems to be a subtle darkness looming, despite the hopeful promise of Los Angeles, whether Ito&rsquo;s bittersweet love stories, Ziemann&rsquo;s sculptural existentialism, or Hansen highlighting the enduring social exploitation of female bodies. In contrast, Petra Cortright mines digital data in her practice, and her video work in <em>EXPAT</em> includes herself as subject. Her post-digital-selfie cinematic pieces seem very LA. Bailey Hikawa&rsquo;s <em>Refrigerator Feelings</em> is another exception. She painted her first stand-alone painting after moving to LA, replete with washy soft colors and abstract shapes playfully floating on an almost nude canvas.</p> <p>Perhaps <em>EXPAT</em>&rsquo;s darkness is a case of &ldquo;no matter where you go, there you are.&rdquo; In some ways the question &ldquo;Does location matter?&rdquo; seems simply answered by the fact that every artist bio or press release states the city where an artist works and lives; people may even confer &ldquo;zip code cred&rdquo; to a given location. But is it to be expected that an artist would make a sudden and radical shift, drastically changing their work after moving to a new location?&nbsp;If the goal&mdash;as seems to be the case with <em>EXPAT</em>&mdash;is to create or identify a West Coast artistic relationship between LA and SF, one that acknowledges the ever shifting back and forth of ideas and bodies, what will the new place-identifying moniker be? &ldquo;LA/SF&rdquo;? Is it even important? With <em>EXPAT</em>, the subjects and conceptual concerns ultimately remain true to the artists&rsquo; ongoing practices, no matter where they lay down roots.</p> <p>I drive back to SF through the heartland on the 5. It&rsquo;s 95 degrees, and the air conditioner (that I don&rsquo;t need in the Bay Area) is not working. I finally arrive home in Oakland, to the cool ocean breeze, and a bright pink sunset. It is after all, still California.</p> <p><em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/events/show/449149-expat" target="_blank">EXPAT</a> ran May 14&ndash;June 4 at R/SF projects, San Francisco.</em></p> <p><em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/events/show/449151-broken-language" target="_blank">Broken Language</a> continues through July 1 at Shulamit Nazarian, Los Angeles.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/1872-leora-lutz?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Leora Lutz</a></p> <div>&nbsp; <hr align="left" size="1" width="33%" /> <div id="edn1"> <p><span style="font-size:14px;"><a href="#_ednref1" name="_edn1" title="">[1]</a> R/SF has some safety in numbers with <a href="http://jessicasilvermangallery.com/" target="_blank">Jessica Silverman Gallery</a> and the <a href="http://www.tenderloinmuseum.org/" target="_blank">Tenderloin Museum</a>&nbsp;as nearby neighbors.</span></p> </div> <div id="edn2"> <p><span style="font-size:14px;"><a href="#_ednref2" name="_edn2" title="">[2]</a> Los Angeles is the second largest city in the United States, with more than 18 million inhabitants sprawled across over 4,800 square miles of the total Greater LA region. About ten years ago I did a casual count of active galleries and museums in the Greater Los Angeles region that were listed in a locally distributed comprehensive gallery guide. The total exceeded 400&mdash;from the Inland Empire to the edge of the water in Santa Monica, from the southern edge of Orange County to the top of the Palisades&mdash;and those are just the ones listed in the guide. Today, the number exceeds 800. In comparison, a recent quick tally of an SF-based gallery guide listed only about 70 venues for a city with 850+ thousand inhabitants spanning 48 square miles, or 7+ million people spanning 6,900 square miles for the entire Bay Area region.</span>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;<em>EXPAT</em>, installation view at R/SF projects, 2017. Courtesy of the gallery)</span></p> </div> </div> Fri, 23 Jun 2017 01:03:10 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: Milos Rajkovic aka Sholim <p>Milos Rajkovic aka <a href="http://sholim.com/" target="_blank">Sholim</a> is a Belgrade-based gif artist and &ldquo;digital surrealist&rdquo; who creates wonderfully mind-bending visual puzzles. Behind Rajkovic&rsquo;s visual wit is a subversive sense of humor that he puts to work tackling diverse socio-political topics like corporate culture, religion, and our dependence on technology. His meticulously constructed tableaux are often created from manipulated vintage found footage giving them an uncanny quality that defies time and space.</p> <p>Welcome to the strange and wonderful world of Milos Rajkovic.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" class="giphy-embed" frameborder="0" height="480" src="https://giphy.com/embed/3o6ZsWcC4xlQ3TrZCw" width="480"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Christian Petersen: What were you like as a kid?</strong></p> <p><strong>Milos Rajkovic:</strong> As a kid in the 90s I really enjoyed that era&rsquo;s MTV music videos.</p> <p><strong>CP: What was your first experiences with a computer like?</strong></p> <p><strong>MR:</strong> I think it was 1990 or 1991 when my father bought his first PC 286 with a black and white screen. My first memory about some sort of &ldquo;animation&rdquo; is from that period. I drew simple objects in AutoCad then I moved it with the mouse to different positions on screen. Then by clicking the undo and redo buttons they magically moved. I was 5 years old.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" class="giphy-embed" frameborder="0" height="480" src="https://giphy.com/embed/l2QZY6AxfQIIwWIj6" width="480"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How would you describe your personality?</strong></p> <p><strong>MR:</strong> Passionately patient.</p> <p><strong>CP: When did you first start experimenting with gifs? </strong></p> <p><strong>MR:</strong> During the MySpace era I started to experiment with gifs as form of art and promotion. I really loved MySpace because it allowed you to create your page full of gifs but the internet back then was too slow for it and that&rsquo;s why everything with that site fell apart. A couple of years later, when the internet became faster and gifs became larger (over 1 or 2 megabytes), Tumblr was a place where whole gif art story began.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" class="giphy-embed" frameborder="0" height="480" src="https://giphy.com/embed/3oz8xG6LrP4ziY8sr6" width="480"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: How did growing up in Serbia influence the art you now make?</strong></p> <p><strong>MR:</strong> It influenced me a lot. Serbia is a small and sometimes off the radar country in Europe and I realized that if I want to be noticed I&rsquo;d need to work twice as much as somebody from France on something that is five times more authentic than something someone from England can create.</p> <p><strong>CP: How would you describe your relationship with social media?</strong></p> <p><strong>MR:</strong> I love it a lot because it&rsquo;s almost free and it&rsquo;s the best tool for promotion art and inspiring other people.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" class="giphy-embed" frameborder="0" height="480" src="https://giphy.com/embed/l41Yz18qKoSmESS6A" width="480"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: In your view, how has the internet changed creativity in general?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>MR:</strong> It changed it in a way that I don&rsquo;t like very much. Now creativity entertains people instead of being inspirational.</p> <p><strong>CP: Your work is very political. What issues do you feel most strongly about?</strong></p> <p><strong>MR:</strong> I am from a part of Europe where a lot of political shit happened in last 25 years. Because of that it feels very relevant to create something about it.</p> <p><strong>CP: Most net/gif artists try and avoid being so directly political. Why do you think that is?</strong></p> <p><strong>MR:</strong> Because they don&#39;t have a clear attitude about it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" class="giphy-embed" frameborder="0" height="480" src="https://giphy.com/embed/l3q2sGeZz7DDcMf4I" width="480"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: You say that people have an &ldquo;unhealthy dependence on technology.&rdquo; How will that change humanity?</strong></p> <p><strong>MR:</strong> This is a great question but I don&#39;t want to go deep into it. I just want say that I hope that it won&#39;t change humanity in negative way.</p> <p><strong>CP: Do you think there&nbsp;will ever be a significant reaction against it?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p><strong>MR:</strong> Since the industrial revolution art is constant reaction against it and it should always be.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" class="giphy-embed" frameborder="0" height="480" src="https://giphy.com/embed/xT1XGw4KikKyVKfYSQ" width="480"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Your work is very modern but also often has a vintage aesthetic.</strong></p> <p><strong>MR:</strong> I don&#39;t like 3D or VR because it&rsquo;s synthetic/unnatural. That&rsquo;s why I use recorded footage or interesting segments from old movies. Also I want to pay respect and create homages to the times that pass away. For me that&rsquo;s a natural flow of creativity in art.</p> <p><strong>CP: Why is humor important in your work?</strong></p> <p><strong>MR:</strong> Humor is essentially needed in art&mdash;especially if you have a serious message to share. It creates balance and it&rsquo;s like a brake for not being extreme. That&#39;s most important. Just imagine Public Enemy without&nbsp;Flavor Flav: it would be a really, really, really serious band.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" class="giphy-embed" frameborder="0" height="480" src="https://giphy.com/embed/l41YoxIiomxXvYQ5a" width="480"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Do you begin with a fixed idea for your gifs?</strong></p> <p><strong>MR:</strong> Sometimes it&#39;s a fixed idea and sometimes the footage that I found or shot dictates the flow of finding the idea.</p> <p><strong>CP: How much experimentation is involved?</strong></p> <p><strong>MR:</strong> Maybe 90 percent!!!! I go into experimentation because it always pushes me away from the safe zone and that&rsquo;s the place where real magic happens.</p> <p><strong>CP: How long, on average, does it take to make one gif?</strong></p> <p><strong>MR:</strong> I never measure time. The only thing that is important to me is that I am happy with the work I create.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" class="giphy-embed" frameborder="0" height="480" src="https://giphy.com/embed/xTiTnkMSBP4efjmtTq" width="320"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: Do you feel like you are part of a global gif art scene or net art scene?</strong></p> <p><strong>MR:</strong> I feel like I am part of a community of creative people who use the internet to unselfishly share art with the rest of the world.</p> <p><strong>CP: Would you describe yourself as a surrealist? </strong></p> <p><strong>MR:</strong> I would like to describe myself as a digital surrealist. I&rsquo;m a big fan of lowbrow or pop surrealism painters and that&rsquo;s something that influences me the most.</p> <p><strong>CP: What has the reaction been like in Belgrade/Serbia to your art?</strong></p> <p><strong>MR:</strong> When I explain to someone that you can live and have a career by doing this kind of stuff the reactions are positive. But if I don&#39;t have the will to explain then people think that I am bored AF and that&rsquo;s why I have a lot time for doing this. Haha, it&rsquo;s funny.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" class="giphy-embed" frameborder="0" height="480" src="https://giphy.com/embed/xUPGcEliPvaZxoJuKI" width="480"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CP: What are your thoughts on the monetization of net/digital art?</strong></p> <p><strong>MR:</strong> My work is an ad that circulates online and I have a lot of requests (sometimes annoyingly a lot) for working on some projects but as long as your ad is quality there&rsquo;s no worries.</p> <p><strong>CP: What do you do besides making art?</strong></p> <p><strong>MR:</strong> Live my life.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&#39;re interested in what&#39;s happening with art on the web. We invited online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, to write a bi-monthly column for us. Every other Wednesday he selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(All images: Courtesy of the artist)</span></p> Thu, 22 Jun 2017 05:35:10 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list ArtSlant Prize IX, Round 5 Jurors Announced <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="line-height: 30px; width: 100%; float: center;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="text-align: center;"><b style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large;"><i>Round 5 is underway! Apply today for your chance at $5k in prizes!</i></b></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><i>To apply, go to your ArtSlant profile and click&nbsp;<strong>contest entry&nbsp;</strong>or go to the<br /> <strong>Contest tab&nbsp;</strong>of your account page. <strong>Round 5 closes June 23rd, 2017.</strong></i></font></p> <p style="text-align: center;">Image at top: Round 5 submission, Titus Marques, <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1002033" target="_blank"><em>Madeira</em></a>, 2016</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170104153040-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 200px; height: 200px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large;">1st Place: $3000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">2nd Place: $1000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">3rd Place: $1000</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: large; line-height: 24px;">Honorable Mention &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size: small;"><span style="color: #00cfa6;">see below for more details</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: helvetica; font-size:18px;"><strong><em>ROUND 5 JURORS:</em></strong></span></p> <table align="center" border="0" cellpadding="10" style="width: 100%; border-style: initial; border-color: initial;"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="3" style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170620161312-tight-juror-5.jpg" /></td> </tr> <tr> <td width="200px"> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><strong>Alex Paik</strong> is an artist, director of <a href="http://www.tigerstrikesasteroid.com/" style="color: #00cfa6; tex-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Tiger Strikes Asteroid</a> and curator of <a href="http://satellite-show.com/" style="color: #00cfa6; tex-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Satellite Art Show</a> in Miami.</font></p> </td> <td width="200px"> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><strong>Will Hutnick</strong> is an artist and curator. He is the co-director of <a href="http://oygprojects.com/" style="color: #00cfa6; tex-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Ortega y Gasset Projects</a> and the Residency Director of <a href="http://wassaicartistresidency.org/" style="color: #00cfa6; tex-decoration: none;" target="_blank">The Wassaic Project</a>.</font></p> </td> <td width="200px"> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="helvetica" size="4"><strong>Polina Stroganova</strong> is the Director of <a href="http://proyectosmonclova.com/" style="color: #00cfa6; tex-decoration: none;" target="_blank">Proyectos Monclova</a> in Mexico City.</font></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170320214133-artslant-springbreak.jpg" style="width: 400px; height: 385px;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:10px;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/articles/show/47340-announcing-the-artslant-prize-2016-winners-and-exhibition-at-springbreak-art-show" target="_blank">ArtSlant Prize 2016 Exhibition</a> at <a href="http://www.springbreakartshow.com/" target="_blank">SPRING/BREAK Art Show</a>, March 2017.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">The ArtSlant Prize is an annual competition hosted by ArtSlant.com. Up for grabs are exhibition and sales opportunities including inclusion in our&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/node/index.html?ie=UTF8&amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Amazon Art Sales Platform</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, and great exposure&mdash;not to mention cash prizes for selected ArtSlant Prize winners. See below for all the details.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><span style="line-height: 21px;">Check out the latest submissions from the ArtSlant Community on our&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase" style="line-height: 21px;">Art page</a><span style="line-height: 21px;">.&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table align="center" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="3"> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:16px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 21px;">Previous ArtSlant Prize winners have gone on to secure gallery representation and have been purchased by prominent collectors, museum directors and personalities.</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2016+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2016 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/318334-brigitta-varadi" target="_blank">Brigitta Varadi</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/71495-tiffany-smith" target="_blank">Tiffany Smith</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/280850-sterling-crispin" target="_blank">Sterling Crispin</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/468710-bex-ilsley" target="_blank">Bex Ilsley</a>,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/373164-zzin-jinhee-park" target="_blank">Jinhee Park</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2014+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2015 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/16146-theresa-ganz" target="_blank">Theresa Ganz</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/315939-tina-tahir" target="_blank">Tina Tahir</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/204298-rachel-garrard" target="_blank">Rachel Garrard</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/347173-bryan-volta" target="_blank">Bryan Volta</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2014+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2014 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/45525-edra-soto" target="_blank">Edra Soto</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/246553-adam-douglas-thompson" target="_blank">Adam Douglas Thompson</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/241839-anastasia-samoylova" target="_blank">Anastasia Samoylova</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/378398-oren-pinhassi" target="_blank">Oren Pinhassi</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><strong><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2013+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2013 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/247077-robin-kang?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Robin Kang</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/238335-maureen-meyer?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Maureen Meyer</a>,&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/334738-alison-pilkington?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Alison Pilkington</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/311414-alexis-courtney?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Alexis Courtney</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-size: large;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2012+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2012 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/135691-veronica-bruce">Veronica Bruce</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/23907-steven-vasquez-lopez" target="_blank">Stephen Vasquez Lopez</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/152389-susan-meyer">Susan Meyer</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/224530-timothy-gaewsky" target="_blank">Timothy Gaewsky</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-size: large;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2011+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2011 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/233718-holly-murkerson" target="_blank">Holly Murkerson</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/36482-jason-irwin" target="_blank">Jason Irwin</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/57515-christine-de-la-garenne" target="_blank">Christine de la Garenne</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-size: large;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2010+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2010 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/18169-chantel-foretich?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Chantel Foretich</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/29757-robert-minervini?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Robert Minervini</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><strong style="font-size: large;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase?sublist=winners%5E2009+Winners" style="text-decoration-line: none; color: rgb(0, 207, 166);">ArtSlant Prize 2009 Winners</a></strong></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/103857-michael-zelehoski?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Michael Zelehoski</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/46020-yo-fukui?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Yo Fukui</a>, <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/artists/show/10432-julie-davidow?listtype=showcase" target="_blank">Julie Davidow</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</span></p> <hr /> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**All participants in the ArtSlant Prize Showcase Series agree to ArtSlant&#39;s&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/5575">Terms &amp; Conditions</a>.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**<em>Fees from the Artslant Juried Showcase competitions will be dedicated to the promotion of our prize winners and the administration of the competition.</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> Tue, 20 Jun 2017 12:31:36 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list What Can We Learn from Art Boycotts Today? <p>When Manifesta, the roving biennial of European contemporary art, based its 10th iteration in Saint Petersburg, Russia, it sparked a wildfire of protests. This was 2014, and opposition to the relationship between the biennial and the cultural core of Russia was robust and complicated. Protesters objected to an administrative body responsible for repressive laws, enacted by Putin, that criminalized the LGBT community, the suppression of activists and dissenters, the annexation of Crimea, and so on. Maria Kulikovska was among the artists who withdrew from the biennial, and would later stage a <a href="http://www.mariakulikovska.com/254/" target="_blank">protest action</a> where she lay, wrapped in a Ukrainian flag, on the Hermitage steps. She proclaimed in an open letter: &ldquo;As an artist and a citizen of Crimea, Ukraine, I cannot take money from the hand that brought trouble to my family, forcing them to flee from our home. I do not know what else I can do except hope that our boycott, our silence, which can sometimes be amongst the loudest cries of the world, can stop this war and only then proceed to the &lsquo;production&rsquo; of art.&rdquo;</p> <p>High-profile boycotts such as Manifesta 10&rsquo;s rekindle the long-standing dispute about the efficacy of acts of non-compliance, particularly ones uniquely situated within the art world. Boycotters who demand voice and agency are criticized by skeptics who demand a clear end-game for the commotion. The latter are often quick to deny the potential for boycotts to strike a blow to broader economic and political systems, or even effect any substantial change within the art sphere itself. Further, these debates recurringly circumambulate a set of questions: How can a boycott&rsquo;s success be measured? Is it a meaningful action of solidarity with broader struggles? Is withdrawal less conducive to transformation than engagement? Is it a pointless and self-defeating pursuit, an attention-seeking antic?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170619143518-Screen_Shot_2017-06-19_at_15.51.59.png" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Perhaps wanting the last word on the matter, Manifesta 10&rsquo;s head of public programs, Joanna Warsza, assembled and edited a reader on boycotts and contemporary art called <em><a href="http://www.sternberg-press.com/?pageId=1711" target="_blank">I Can&rsquo;t Work Like This</a></em>, published by Sternberg Press this January. While the book&rsquo;s essays are split into sections related to specific protests (boycotts of the 13th Istanbul Biennial, Manifesta 10, 19th Biennale of Sydney, and 31st Bienal de S&atilde;o Paulo), the parameters of &ldquo;art boycott&rdquo; shifts depending on the particular writer. Some stick to withdrawals by artists; others group boycotts with strikes, protests, and further acts of non-compliance that include institutional critique and exhibitions with dissenting content. In 2017, art boycotts are an ever-present part of the cultural and political landscape. The <a href="https://j20artstrike.org/" target="_blank">#J20 Art Strike</a> in January, which called for the halting of work on Inauguration Day, counted over a thousand artists and institutions as signatories. Amidst broader conversations about the possibilities and limits of individual or group acts of refusal against cultural and political regimes, it seems an especially opportune moment to reflect on the discourse surrounding art boycotts and general boycotts, and focus on the political and cultural shifts that changed public attitudes toward artists&rsquo; transformative potential on politics.</p> <p>Boris Buden, in the essay &ldquo;Fetish of the Boycott,&rdquo; declares boycotts &ldquo;a mechanism of exercising superiority.&rdquo; They have &ldquo;no real impact,&rdquo; he goes on, citing the Manifesta 10 boycotts as lacking a &ldquo;real influence on Russian politics.&rdquo; The protest actions around the biennale included Kulikovska&rsquo;s aforementioned performance and a <a href="https://www.change.org/p/hedwig-fijen-we-ask-that-manifesta-2014-reconsider-st-petersburg-as-their-next-location">petition</a> launched by artist Noel Kelly, whose demand to suspend Manifesta 10 &ldquo;until Russian troops are withdrawn from the Ukraine&rdquo; garnered over 2,000 supporters. Later came the <a href="https://chtodelat.org/b9-texts-2/vilensky/chto-delat-withdraws-from-manifesta-10/" target="_blank">public withdrawal</a> of the artist collective Chto Delat, followed by the withdrawal of artist Pawel Althamer. To Buden, although the boycotts involved dozens&mdash;thousands if you count the petition cosigners&mdash;policies and institutions remain unbudging, rendering these actions futile. Not only futile, he claims, but hypocritical, as artists are inherently complicit in matrices of subjugation by way of the art world&rsquo;s unequal relationships to other industries and the state (for example, <a href="http://brooklynrail.org/2016/03/artseen/cameron-rowland-91020000" target="_blank">art institutions&rsquo; entanglement in the prison labor system</a>, as Cameron Rowland demonstrated in the work <a href="http://artistsspace.org/exhibitions/cameron-rowland" target="_blank"><em>91020000</em></a>). Boycotts, argues Buden, are a &ldquo;fetish&rdquo; action &ldquo;to calm tensions that arise from contradictions.&rdquo;</p> <p>In his essay &ldquo;Notes on the Art Boycott,&rdquo; Dave Beech articulates a similar, albeit less patronizing, analysis of art boycotts as a symbolic gesture. Beech differentiates between the industrial strike and the art boycott, noting that the latter&rsquo;s withdrawal of labor typically doesn&rsquo;t have the direct impact on productivity and profit of mass organized workers&rsquo; strikes. He links the lineage of art boycotts instead to consumer boycotts, &ldquo;dependent on the aggregation of individual acts&rdquo; of ethical consumption, and the &rsquo;70&rsquo;s movement of institutional critique, which reasserted political activism into art. Practices such as institutional critique, and later social practice art, attempt to make visible the underlying forces of art institutions and systems, approaching art as a conspicuous platform for ethical, moral, and civil ideas.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170619143649-Untitled.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">Joanna Warsza and &Aacute;gnes B&aacute;sthy, from&nbsp;</span><em style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">I Can&#39;t Work like This: A Reader on Recent Boycotts and Contemporary Art</em><span style="font-size: 12px; text-align: center;">. Sternberg Press, 2017</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The criticism of art boycotts as a conspicuous and even aestheticized gesture of political action is similar to the enduring criticisms of institutional critique, relational aesthetics, and social practice, all subsumed under the umbrella of overtly socially and politically engaged art. In <a href="http://isreview.org/issue/90/critique-social-practice-art" target="_blank">a critique of social practice art</a>, critic Ben Davis claims that artistic practices that are posited as politics tend to emphasize individual efforts over collective organizing, overshadowing the politics at hand. Circling back to Beech&rsquo;s distinction between art boycotts and general worker boycotts, unlike workers who strike to negotiate with a long-term workplace, artists often have less investment in maintaining their relationships with the institutions they&rsquo;re boycotting.</p> <table align="right" width="400"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: #1f1f1f;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;How can we reinvoke the history of art boycotts as acts of political solidarity?&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>In this formulation, boycotts are only deemed fruitful if they can deliver their demands&mdash;of halting a biennial, or forcing troops to end their occupation&mdash;and are otherwise considered self-serving. Arguments like these, preoccupied with rigid parameters of effectiveness, foreclose the possibilities of dissent. But history reveals rich and abiding relationships between art and politics, and Gregory Sholette&rsquo;s essay in<em> I Can&rsquo;t Work Like This </em>lays forth a compelling counterargument for the claims that the two are mutually exclusive. Instead of focusing on the influences of institutional critique, his essay &ldquo;Art Out of Joint: Artists&rsquo; Activism Before and After the Cultural Turn&rdquo; traces the catalyzing moments for art and politics in the &rsquo;60s, when &ldquo;loosely organized coalitions brought cultural producers together with student protesters, striking workers, and civil rights activists in acts of political solidarity.&rdquo; As examples, Sholette lists <a href="http://www.as-ap.org/content/artists-and-writers-protest-against-war-vietnam-or-artists-protest" target="_blank">Artists and Writers Protest Against the War in Vietnam</a>, citing it as the first overtly politicized postwar artists&rsquo; collective; the militant tactics of the anarchist collective <a href="http://www.halfletterpress.com/black-mask-up-against-the-wall-motherfucker/" target="_blank">Black Mask/Up Against the Wall Motherfuckers</a> of &rsquo;66; and Situationist International&rsquo;s affiliation with striking university students in France in &rsquo;68. These actions were integrated with broader struggles, in support of the anti-war movement and striking workers.</p> <p>Sholette notes that artists&rsquo; engagement in direct protest considerably narrowed by the &rsquo;80s, as &ldquo;tradition-bound cultural institutions and art world patrons pushed back against this dangerous blurring of categories.&rdquo; While art boycotts grew again in popularity, their value had diminished as the art world backed away from &ldquo;notions of wholesale social and political confrontations and change,&rdquo; and many became disillusioned by artists&rsquo; muddled interpretations of the political, which conflated collective resistance with daily individual decision-making, aesthetic experimentation with political organizing.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170619143724-black_mask.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Black Mask group on their way to Lincoln Center. Via&nbsp;<a href="https://www.joaap.org/issue9/mindelartstrike.htm" target="_blank">Journal of Aesthetics &amp; Protest</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The tensions and contradictions within the profusions of &ldquo;resistance art&rdquo; are encapsulated in the boycotts of Creative Time&rsquo;s 2011 exhibition <a href="http://creativetime.org/programs/archive/2011/livingasform/about.htm" target="_blank"><em>Living As Form</em></a>, which focused on&nbsp;socially engaged art. Creative Time&rsquo;s artistic director Nato Thompson wrote of the exhibition that &ldquo;[living] itself exists in forms that must be questioned, rearranged, mobilized, and undone.&rdquo; The boycotts protested the show&rsquo;s tour stops in Israel, drawing attention to the hypocrisy that a show of politically engaged art <a href="https://news.artnet.com/exhibitions/creative-time-defends-living-as-form-tour-stop-in-israel-40327" target="_blank">was</a> &ldquo;appearing at Israeli venues including Technion, a university with ties to the Israeli military.&rdquo; Artist groups such as Decolonizing Architecture and Allora &amp; Calzadilla eventually pulled out. For certain audiences, the controversy pinpointed the loss of faith in art to engage in political resistance in material ways. While relational art, and even social practice, was developed to form constructive opposition and restitch the disconnections between people and their communities, these intentions had been subsumed by the art world as a new category, the political entr&eacute;e in the aesthetic menu.</p> <p><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170619143802-I-cant-work-like-this_cover_364.jpg" style="margin: 20px; float: left;" />How can we reinvoke the history of art boycotts as acts of political solidarity? It&rsquo;s a question that isn&rsquo;t as lofty as it is dire. Boycotts are among the only forms of direct action that many artists can access in these situations. To revisit the words of Manifesta 10 boycotter Maria Kulikovska: &ldquo;I do not know what else I can do.&rdquo; Boycotts, it can&rsquo;t be understated, are often last-resort courses of action for artists, primarily marginalized artists, to push back against the oppression, appropriation, and tokenization that impact their lives and communities. This point is starkly absent from the criticisms of boycotts as self-serving. In recent history, we recall acts of refusal such as Adrian Piper&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.artnews.com/2013/10/25/piper-pulls-out-of-black-performance-art-show/">withdrawal</a> from the exhibition <em>Radical Presence</em>, and the YAMS&rsquo; <a href="http://www.complex.com/style/2014/05/the-yams-collective-has-withdrawn-from-the-whitney-biennial-because-of-objections-to-joe-scanlans-work">withdrawal</a> from the 2014 Whitney Biennial, both confronting racism in the curatorial decisions surrounding the exhibitions. These actions, some of the best-known instances in the arts in recent memory, asserted the power in refusal, as well as demonstrated the power of the symbolic gesture. They made clear that accountability wasn&rsquo;t a backdoor bureaucratic process, but could be demanded instantly and materially.</p> <p>Regarding the future of art boycotts, Sholette recommends that &ldquo;the task is not to wield [them] solely for cultural producers or their elite audiences, but instead to turn it outwards towards whole populations that are increasingly caught in the cruel cycle of precarity.&rdquo; At this moment, when the political potency of art is widely deemed depleted, when artists and institutions are experiencing a crisis of faith in their ability to respond to and challenge the socio-political contexts in which they find themselves, may these histories provide a compass, or at least the compass&rsquo; wind rose.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;Minh Nguyen</p> <p><em>Minh Nguyen is a writer and organizer of exhibitions and programs based in Seattle.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Maria Kulikovska, <em>254</em>, Unauthorized protest action during Manifesta 10. <a href="http://www.mariakulikovska.com/">Photo: Dana Kosmina. Courtesy of the artist.</a>)</span></p> Tue, 20 Jun 2017 04:39:14 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Denise Treizman Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/47790-under-the-radar-denise-treizman-tadasuke-jinno-am-hanson" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from</em>&nbsp;<em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/312083-denise-treizman" target="_blank">Denise Treizman</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>Using materials that we encounter in our everyday life, I am trying to make the viewer shift his perspective, even if for a short moment in time. I am hoping I can open a door that encourages the audience to see things in a different way and appreciate the beauty embedded in simple gestures and materials. I want to challenge their preconceived perceptions about what can and cannot be considered an artwork, as well as where and how art is supposed to be encountered. Using mundane objects that are known but become slightly unfamiliar when included in my pieces, I want viewers to travel in time, making associations that come from their own personal experiences or memories in relation to these materials.</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>I think it is important to constantly push the limits, to not let the work become still&hellip;always strive to get out of our comfort zone so that the work stays fresh. But the most important thing to me is to make work that comes from the heart; that is true to whom I am, to my process, and to the way I see the world.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)?</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170619125852-futbolisarte.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Futbolisarte poster. Design: ekis.cl&nbsp; Photos: <a href="http://www.schkolnick.com" target="_blank">http://www.schkolnick.com</a></span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In 2010, in Chile, I developed a huge project called <a href="https://vimeo.com/72756861" target="_blank"><em>FUTBOLisARTE</em></a>. It was the time of the Soccer World Cup in South Africa. That same year, in Chile (where I am from) sadly there was a devastating earthquake and tsunami that destroyed many cities in the country. With the whole soccer fever going on, because our national team had qualified to go to the cup after 16 years of absence, I decided to merge Soccer and Art to help those in need. I was able to get the original soccer shoes donated by the national team players and invited renowned artists from the local scene to transform one shoe into a work of art. The second one was autographed by the soccer player to whom it belonged, and together they were assembled into individual sculptures. These were exhibited and then auctioned in a huge fundraising event to rebuild a school. With the project, we raised over $50,000, but also important, with the exhibition, art was brought closer to a public that is not generally attracted to cultural activities.</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>Every time I discover a new material or learn a new technique I think of endless possibilities for new installations. Many times these ideas involve having access to big exhibition spaces, budgets for materials, teams of assistants, and more. I don&rsquo;t like to think of these ideas as things that I will never be able to make. Instead, I think of them as dream projects that are just postponed until the right time arrives. And I hope that is sooner rather than later!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170619130320-20170406045439-3_Hasta_la_Vista__Maybe.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Hasta La Vista, Maybe</em>, 2016</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.davidjjacobs.net" target="_blank">David Jacobs</a>, <a href="http://david.laveneno.org" target="_blank">David Pe&ntilde;a</a>, and <a href="https://www.paulinarutman.com" target="_blank">Paulina Rutman</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <div> <hr align="left" noshade="noshade" size="0" width="100%" /></div> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Mon, 19 Jun 2017 06:04:06 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Romily Alice Walden | Dain Mergenthaler | Katya Grokhovsky <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/486033-romily-alice-walden?utm_source=RomilyAliceWalden&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Romily Alice Walden &ndash; London / Berlin</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1051202?utm_source=RomilyAliceWalden&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1051202/u3azr9/20170614124356-UTOPIAS__IRL__URL__Romily_Alice_1.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1051209?utm_source=RomilyAliceWalden&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1051209/mf2ji7/20170614124424-FullSizeRender_20.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1051212?utm_source=RomilyAliceWalden&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1051212/mf2ji7/20170614124502-Neon_Portrait__7_Romily_Alice.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/lon/works/show/1051205?utm_source=RomilyAliceWalden&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1051205/mf2ji7/20170614124410-IMG_7392.jpg " width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/415736-dain-mergenthaler?utm_source=DainMergenthaler&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Dain Mergenthaler &ndash; Brooklyn</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1030657?utm_source= DainMergenthaler&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1030657/u3azr9/20170216210825-Mergenthaler_D_02.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1030649?utm_source=DainMergenthaler&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1030649/mf2ji7/20170216210736-_MG_9256.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1030668?utm_source=DainMergenthaler&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1030668/mf2ji7/20170216210933-yohasdollar.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1030666?utm_source=DainMergenthaler&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1030666/mf2ji7/20170216210914-wishing.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/233356-katya-grokhovsky?utm_source=KatyaGrokhovsky&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Katya Grokhovsky &ndash; Brooklyn</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1036963?utm_source=KatyaGrokhovsky&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1036963/u3azr9/20170315191624-KatyaGrokhovsky_1.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/802922?utm_source=KatyaGrokhovsky&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/802922/mf2ji7/20140408054457-KatyaGrokhovsky1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/717412?utm_source=KatyaGrokhovsky&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/717412/mf2ji7/20130717034136-Grokhovsky_Katya_10.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/776151?utm_source=KatyaGrokhovsky&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/776151/mf2ji7/20140203234114-Grokhovsky-Katya-2.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/s?marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Fri, 16 Jun 2017 03:01:37 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list 40 Years On, Skulptur Projekte Münster Keeps Troubling the Idea of “Public Space” <p>Distinct from the droves of international biennales and triennials birthed in recent decades, the <a href="https://www.skulptur-projekte.de/#/" target="_blank">Skulptur Projekte M&uuml;nster</a> (Sculpture Projects M&uuml;nster) sets itself apart as an unparalleled cultural moment once every 10 years that places strong emphasis on site-specificity and encourages long-term artistic study. The decennial&rsquo;s first edition in 1977, curated by Klaus Bussmann and Kasper K&ouml;nig, sparked controversy by radically implanting works of renowned sculptors in M&uuml;nster&rsquo;s conservative public space. Then as today, the projects stood in stark contrast to the near-timeless city, whose postcard-ready urban fabric of reconstructed historical facades smooths out the city&rsquo;s wartime traumas.</p> <p>In the four decades since &rsquo;77, the Skulptur Projekte have come to be seen by M&uuml;nster&rsquo;s citizens and financiers less as a series of heretical interventions and more as a valuable cultural asset and unique selling point. Thus the recently inaugurated fifth edition, which gestures toward new territory in nearby Marl, renews its commitment to &ldquo;public space&rdquo; by addressing the different ways it is produced conceptually, representatively, and physically across social and geographic&mdash;or at least regional&mdash;divides.</p> <p>This year&rsquo;s Skulptur Projekte, curated by Marianne Wagner, Britta Peters, and Kasper K&ouml;nig (who has remained on the curatorial team since &rsquo;77), continues to stand for a humanist&mdash;or at least human-oriented&mdash;version of democratic public space positioned against commodification, capitalist acceleration, and homogenization. They are able to do so by securing their own autonomy: from the beginning, the Skulptur Projekte have operated almost exclusively on public financing; they have been free to the public; and with K&ouml;nig&rsquo;s continuous artistic direction, they have been able to resist a desired tourism-maximizing increase in frequency. The established 10-year rhythm allows time for long durational projects to unfold next to sculptures that demand intensive planning and construction efforts. Being plural, the Skulptur Projekte are regarded more as an infrequent concatenation of singular sculptures and projects presented within a common frame, rather than a homogenizing entity. The themes addressed by the curatorial team in their process of invitation, evaluation, selection, and realization of projects fall into the background of a diverse public exhibition. What unifies the realized projects is a shared insistence on site-specificity, whether that is expressed formally, thematically, or both.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170615145020-09_Schuette.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">(left) Thomas Sch&uuml;tte, <em>Kirschens&auml;ule</em>, 1987. &copy; Skulptur Projekte 2017. Photo: Henning Rogge (right) Thomas Sch&uuml;tte, <em>Melonens&auml;ule</em>, 2017, Installation in Marl. Photo: Thorsten Arendt</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>The Hot Wire</strong></p> <p>The Skulptur Projekte&rsquo;s naming of a satellite location in the city of Marl, which hosts a joint project with the Skulpturenmuseum Glaskasten titled <em>The Hot Wire</em>, signifies a provisional shift in focus away from affluent M&uuml;nster toward another more stymied city in the German state of North Rhine-Westphalia. K&ouml;nig went so far as to refer to the city as an important &ldquo;antipode&rdquo; to M&uuml;nster while discussing Marl&rsquo;s concerning move to the far right in its most recent election. On the one hand, Marl, a municipality founded from an agglomeration of proximate towns in 1936, was marked by a utopian (first fascist, then modernist) orientation toward the future. In its relatively short history as a city, Marl grew rapidly to economic and cultural prominence, propelled by flourishing coal mining and chemical industries. It had planned for major population growth before deindustrialization and population decline set in at the turn of the 21st century. M&uuml;nster, on the other hand, has long been an anchor in the history of western civilization, itself the site of the signing of the Treaty of Westphalia in 1648, which ended the Thirty Year&rsquo;s War and set the foundation for a world system based on nation states. M&uuml;nster is predominantly Roman Catholic, is home to around 49,000 students, and is known for its extraordinary bicycle friendliness&mdash;a model city whose debt to history still prevents radical modes of spatial practice from being enacted.</p> <p>While the question of public space would be more starkly differentiated between M&uuml;nster and a city in former East Germany or, say, a city closer to M&uuml;nster&rsquo;s true geographical antipode in Polynesia, the differences that arise between M&uuml;nster and Marl become interesting in that both share a lasting affinity for public sculpture. In Marl, two open-air exhibitions took place under the header Stadt und Skulptur (City and Sculpture) in 1970 and 1972, featuring works of German sculptors alongside those of Swiss and Dutch sculptors, respectively. Just one year later, in 1973, the people of M&uuml;nster were outraged by the installation of George Rickey&rsquo;s sculpture <em>Three Squares Gyratory</em> in a public park, which gave rise to Skulptur Projekte &rsquo;77 as a response (and further provocation). As the story goes, Marl was once modern and optimistic about future growth, while M&uuml;nster was dwelling in the past, ambivalent about the aesthetic trappings of modernity. The dream of Marl&rsquo;s planners turned into the nightmare of deindustrialization, while M&uuml;nster&rsquo;s conservativism ironically led it eventually to become a Mecca for sculpture.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170615145119-07_Gerdes_Marl.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170615145148-06_Gerdes_Muenster.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ludger Gerdes, <em>Angst</em>, 1989, (above) Location in Marl (below) Re-located installation in M&uuml;nster. &copy; Skulptur Projekte 2017. Photo: Henning Rogge</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>The Hot Wire</em> addresses the linked but divergent histories of the two cities by means of material exchanges between them. Spurred by a straightforward idea to trade sculptures between the two cities, it evolved into a collaboration involving new productions. Artists Lara Favaretto, Thomas Sch&uuml;tte, Sany, and Jo&euml;lle Tuerlinckx&rsquo;s new works made for Marl are complimented by temporarily transplanted sculptures by Richard Artschwager and Reiner Ruthenbeck as well as an exhibition of models from past Skulptur Projekte, including unrealized works. In reciprocity, Ludger Gerdes&rsquo; <em>Angst [Fear] </em>(1989) and Olle B&aelig;rtling&rsquo;s filigree iron sculpture <em>YZI </em>(1969) have been relocated from Marl&rsquo;s aging modernist city center to the environs of M&uuml;nster&rsquo;s central LWL-Museum, which hosts new projects together with an exhibition from the Skulptur Projekte archive.</p> <p>The choice to bring visibility to Marl comes at a point when political discourse across Europe is lurching right, and other deindustrializing cities in Germany and abroad are forced to adapt their economies or fall into economic and social obscurity. As demonstrated by growing restrictions to freedom of speech worldwide, democratic public space as an imperfect humanist concept is (and always has been) under threat by latent xenophobia. As the far right manifests and metastasizes in public space, the old tools of political correctness and theoretical pedantry fail over and over again. Rather than addressing threats to public space by proselytizing a perceived audience with politico-aesthetic sermons, the Skulptur Projekte exhibit instead a highly localized practice, rooted in global concerns, that appeals to visitors embedded in a particular context. In Marl and M&uuml;nster alike, everyday spaces become the starting coordinates for new lines of flight.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170615145238-01_Bunte.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Andreas Bunte, <em>Laboratory Life</em>. &copy; Skulptur Projekte 2017. Photo: Henning Rogge</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Skulptur Projekte 2017</strong></p> <p>A total of 35 new works respond to specific local conditions for this year&rsquo;s Skulptur Projekte. Spread mostly throughout M&uuml;nster, with some in the aforementioned Marl, the projects include sculptural works and interventions ranging from the hand-held to the architectural in scale, as well as performative and video-based works. Several projects involve or even require the use of a smartphone or internet capable device in order to be accessed, opening up the internet as an extension of public space that at the previous edition in 2007 had only begun to go mobile (the first iPhone was announced that year). The few projects that not only exceed established notions of &ldquo;public space&rdquo; but, furthermore, invoke novel, even speculative vectors for its maintenance and development, make the greatest contribution to Skulptur Projekte&rsquo;s renewed commitment to public space as a place for difference. The following projects&mdash;emblematic in their ability to broaden established notions of public space&mdash;represent only a cross-section of the extremely wide gamut of artistic practices involved in this year&rsquo;s Skulptur Projekte.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170615145323-13_Pierre.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Pierre Huyghe, <em>After ALife Ahead</em>, Skulptur Projekte 2017, Ice rink concrete floor; Sand, clay, phreatic water; Bacteria, algae, bee, chimera peacock; Aquarium, black switchable glass, conus textile; Incubator, human cancer cells; Genetic algorithm; Augmented reality; Automated ceiling structure; Rain; Ammoniac; Logic game. Photo: Ola Rindal</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>The most admired work of &rsquo;17 is likely to be Pierre Huyghe&rsquo;s large-scale installation <em>After ALife Ahead</em>, which transforms a disused indoor ice rink into a technologically cultivated alien biotope. Before entering the building through a side door, visitors are greeted with yellow signs warning against bees and the risk of stumbling. Once inside, they are confronted by a heavily excavated ground plane with shards of the original reinforced concrete floor slipping and sliding into the raw earth below. Mud structures resembling giant anthills grow skyward from the pit, puddles with algae incubate yet invisible life forms, white peacocks tip-tap in the rafters, and small sea creatures swim about in a tinted-glass aquarium at the center of the rink&rsquo;s scarcely perforated exoskeleton. All the while an air compressor emits spurts of unknown gas and a dim light sleepily pulsates in the aquarium. UFO-like black sunshades mysteriously open and close in the distant ceiling above&mdash;and with an augmented reality app, they fly around the artificial sky. If public space exists in the world Huyghe has constructed for us, it can only be the result of collaboration between living organisms and technological devices, or between terrestrial life and inhuman reason.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170615145408-05_Deller.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Jeremy Deller, <em>Speak to the Earth and It Will Tell You,</em> 2007&ndash;2017. &copy; Skulptur Projekte 2017. Photo: Henning Rogge</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Jeremy Deller&rsquo;s <em>Speak to the Earth and It Will Tell You</em> straddles artistic practice, anthropological study, ecology, and publishing. For Skulptur Projekte &rsquo;07, he asked some 50 garden allotment associations in M&uuml;nster to keep diaries on the everyday life of their urban agricultural plots, which are not only used for growing one&rsquo;s own fruit and vegetables but are also vital sites of social encounter. Deller handed each association a large, empty, hardbound green book to accumulate fragments like photographs, announcements, anecdotes, poems, pressed flowers, and so on. Ten years later, the resulting library is now exhibited at one such allotment association in M&uuml;nster. Visitors are invited to leaf through the books and instructed to exercise caution: their next stop is in the museum collection. The work publicly exposes aspects of a culture that often stays obscure to those not directly involved, making a semi-private space fully public. Importantly, this act of &ldquo;Ver&ouml;ffentlichen&rdquo; (usu. &ldquo;publishing,&rdquo; lit. &ldquo;making available to the public&rdquo;) takes place directly at the site of its production, troubling the distinction between private and public even further.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170615145437-11_Wagner_DeBurca.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">B&aacute;rbara Wagner and Benjamin de Burca, <em>Bye Bye Deutschland! Eine Lebensmelodie</em>. &copy; Skulptur Projekte 2017. Photo: Henning Rogge</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>A third and final example&mdash;though there are many more to consider, including the works by Peles Empire, Mika Rottenberg, and Hito Steyerl&mdash;is possibly the most proletarian, the most intentionally humorous, and surely the most camp of them all. B&aacute;rbara Wagner and Benjamin de Burca&rsquo;s <em>Bye Bye Deutschland! Eine Lebensmelodie (Bye Bye Germany! A Melody of Life)</em> is a <a href="https://vimeo.com/221232855" target="_blank">video</a> work exploring the culture surrounding Schlager, a popular genre that amounts to more than just &ldquo;hit songs.&rdquo; In Germany, Schlager is an integral sing-along backdrop to normative German life, typically invested in the reproduction of the institutions of gender, the family, marriage, and &ldquo;the people.&rdquo; In essence, it&rsquo;s &ldquo;the people&rsquo;s music,&rdquo; and for that reason it is often overlooked or simply ignored by the cultural elite. Presented inside the dimly lit and comfortably kitsch Elephant Lounge club in M&uuml;nster&rsquo;s old town, the video resonates so deeply with its context that it becomes impossible to imagine screening it anywhere else. Following the lives of M&uuml;nster locals Markus Sparfeldt and Steffi Teumner, both voice-doubles for famous Schlager performers, the video slips and slides from scenes of mundane daily routine dominated by family life into vibrant and immersive moments of fantasy in song.</p> <p>With humor, humility, and a pinch of voyeurism, the protagonists tell their story in distinct yet interdependent ways. On one side, they bring viewers into their lives through direct public observation (e.g. shots of Teumner walking around M&uuml;nster with a baby carriage; footage from a drone camera landing in Sparfeldt&rsquo;s hand while seated at a park bench). On the other, they recreate their dreams and express their desires in a powerfully cinematic, musical form. Wagner and de Burca&rsquo;s work at once breaks down the barriers between public and private, low and high culture, and ironically reinforces them through the codification of &ldquo;real&rdquo; and &ldquo;fantasy&rdquo; spaces. In this way, it resembles life more than any other work this year.</p> <p><em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/events/show/448676-skulptur-projekte-2017" target="_blank">Skulptur Projekte M&uuml;nster &rsquo;17</a> runs through October 1, 2017.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/477171-benjamin-busch?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Benjamin Busch</a></p> <p><em><a href="http://www.benbusch.info/" target="_blank">Benjamin Busch</a></em>&nbsp;<em>is currently researching critical modes of architectural production within the field of spatial practice. Treating architecture as a symptom of abstract processes, his artwork and writing investigate complex fields of relations within the built environment.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: B&aacute;rbara Wagner and Benjamin de Burca, <em>Bye Bye Deutschland! Eine Lebensmelodie</em>. &copy; Skulptur Projekte 2017. Photo: Henning Rogge)</span></p> Thu, 15 Jun 2017 07:59:31 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Apply to The ArtSlant Prize for Your Chance at an Exhibition and $5K in Prizes! <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%; float: center;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="line-height: 30px; width: 100%; float: center;"> <tbody> <tr> <td>&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="text-align: center;"><b style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Round 5 of <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/8456" target="_blank">The ArtSlant Prize IX</a> is underway! Apply today for your chance at $5k in prizes!</b></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="georgia" size="4">To apply, click the menu icon in the upper right, sign in and click <strong>ArtSlant Prize</strong>. You can also apply by going to your ArtSlant profile and click <strong>contest entry&nbsp;</strong>or go to the&nbsp;<strong>Contest tab </strong>of your account page. </font></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><font face="georgia" size="4">Round 5 closes June 23, 2017.</font></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">The ArtSlant Prize is an annual competition hosted by ArtSlant.com. Up for grabs are exhibition and sales opportunities including inclusion in our&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/node/index.html?ie=UTF8&amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;me=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;merchant=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;redirect=true" style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">Amazon Art Sales Platform</a><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;">, and great exposure&mdash;not to mention cash prizes for selected ArtSlant Prize winners. See the <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/8456" target="_blank">FAQ</a> for all the details.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; line-height: 30px;"><span style="line-height: 21px;">Check out the latest submissions from the ArtSlant Community on our&nbsp;</span><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/showcases/showcase" style="line-height: 21px;">Art page</a><span style="line-height: 21px;">. &nbsp;</span></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 30px;"><span style="line-height: 21px;">*Image above: Round 5 Submission by <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/works/show/1050890-transmitting-under-the-guise-of-hallucination" target="_blank">David Rios Ferreira: </a></span></span><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/works/show/1050890-transmitting-under-the-guise-of-hallucination" target="_blank"><em>Transmitting under the guise of hallucination</em>, 2017</a>.</span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2" style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</td> </tr> <tr> <td colspan="2"> <table align="center" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td colspan="3"> <hr /> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**All participants in the ArtSlant Prize Showcase Series agree to ArtSlant&#39;s&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/5575">Terms &amp; Conditions</a>.</span></p> <p><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: small;">**<em>Fees from the Artslant Juried Showcase competitions will be dedicated to the promotion of our prize winners and the administration of the competition.</em></span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;&nbsp;</p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Wed, 14 Jun 2017 07:02:07 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list David Hannon Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/46569-b-stylecolor-333333under-the-radar-david-hannon-jessica-simorte-philippe-safireb" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from</em>&nbsp;<em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/463029-david-hannon" target="_blank">David Hannon</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>I am exploring the role of fantasy in queerness and perversions of the body. The interiors I create are a disorienting place that reveals the horror of the everyday. In my most recent&nbsp;performance, <em>Mantle</em>, I made an immersive installation and embedded myself in a flat and then interacted with the audience to help me bring an oversize necklace back into a constructed domestic interior where the necklace unsettlingly rests in the space.</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>It certainly is an interesting and scary time to be making work but I&nbsp;want to bring the personal public, especially queer identity&nbsp;issues. The way Felix Gonzalez-Torres does is especially poignant.&nbsp;An artist&#39;s responsibility therefore is to bring what is invisible, visible.&nbsp;Like a magician.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art or not)? </strong></p> <p>Aforementioned in the first question, I made this giant necklace!&nbsp;It is 22 feet long and part of my MFA thesis show:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20170609150335-unnamed-1.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>Although I do not have a piece directly in mind,&nbsp;I want to include other performers in my installations, similar to Mike Kelley&#39;s <em>Day is Done</em> installation and accompanying video works, and perhaps with more collaboration&mdash;because collaboration is very important! &nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p>You probably know these artists but I love how they incorporate the digital and sculptural together:</p> <p><a href="https://www.gregorybennett.net/" target="_blank">Gregory Bennett</a><br /> <a href="http://jacolby.com/home.html" target="_blank">Jacolby Satterwhite</a><br /> <a href="http://www.joiriminaya.com/" target="_blank">Joiri Minaya</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <div> <hr align="left" noshade="noshade" size="0" width="100%" /></div> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Mon, 12 Jun 2017 04:03:43 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list