Articles | ArtSlant https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/show en-us 40 Faith Holland’s Speculative Fetishism and Digital Self-Care <p>&ldquo;Best viewed without underwear,&rdquo; reads the vinyl on the wall as you walk into the gallery. Below the text is a fishbowl full of what looks like other people&rsquo;s underthings, left or &ldquo;donated&rdquo; to the exhibition. This is by no means a command, rather a &ldquo;completely consensual suggestion,&rdquo; says artist Faith Holland. Which is an apt descriptor of much of her show <em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/events/show/456393-speculative-fetish" target="_blank">Speculative Fetish</a></em> at TRANSFER Gallery in Bushwick.</p> <p>On the opposing wall is her recent collection, <em>Queer Connections </em>(2017). The installation is a punny take on the gendering of cables and wires that has occurred over time. With brightly colored nail polish, Holland fuses what would be considered two &ldquo;male&rdquo; pieces together. As Holland explained to me, the project began as a daisy chain of wires rendered impotent by their forced connections. She then photographed sections of the chain, creating strange sculptural images that are cropped, enlarged, cut out and mounted under plexi. Together, they dance across the wall in a playful mural, or a &ldquo;wire orgy,&rdquo; as Holland says. But up close there is something disarming about the tenuous connections and the slapdash adhesive rendered larger than life, yet still human in scale.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171128135121-speculative-fetish-3.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Faith Holland,&nbsp;<em>Queer Connections</em>, 2017. Courtesy of TRANSFER. Photo:&nbsp;Walter Wlodarczyk</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>In the center of the room stands a display case. Its surface has a genius-bar-meets-world-of-kink aesthetic; the case below, filled with makeup and wires, resembles a defunct dollar store&mdash;the kind that might sell an assortment of cables just as colorful as the palettes of eye shadows also on view. For the works displayed atop the case Holland takes Apple products&mdash;already known for their softened use of hardware casing&mdash;and covers the touch screens with fluids or materials that either come from, or interact with the human body. The screens are alight with fleshy but pixilated gif loops, and smothered in used contact lenses, pubic hair, lipstick, or moisturizer.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171128135410-Fetish__Lipstick_.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Faith Holland,&nbsp;<em>Fetish (Lipstick)</em>, 2017. Courtesy of TRANSFER</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>At first encounter these objects are abject, yet there is an element of self-care in their handling and upkeep that makes us think about our own relationship to our precious, but somewhat disposable screens. As Holland states, these devices have become so inextricably a part of our lives, yet they are &ldquo;designed to die,&rdquo; to become obsolete in order to be replaced by new and updated versions. In a way, they are utterly human in their needs and upkeep. Holland highlights this analogous relationship by treating the digital screen like a human visage.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20171128161334-wire-bath.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Faith Holland, <em>Wire Bath</em>,&nbsp;2017. Courtesy of TRANSFER.&nbsp;</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>This theme is carried through the final piece in the show, which is located in the restroom down the hall. The video work mounted on the wall depicts the artist in a soapy tub full of colorful Ethernet cables, taking equal care to scrub her own body as well as the wires submerged with her. Again, this feeling of abjection, of fetishism, takes root, mixing the physical armatures of the digital with the human experience in unexpected ways. These performative works, including the video installation and the display of Apple screens covered in fluids, are more unsettling to look at, yet they end up resonating in a way that <em>Queer Connections</em> ends up falling a bit flat. Where the cheeky comparison of &ldquo;male&rdquo; and &ldquo;female&rdquo; wires begins to wear thin, the screen-visage or wire-appendages sink in, making us uncomfortably aware of our own dependencies and new techno-fetishism that is increasingly normalized. We may not be physically bathing with our internet or moisturizing our iPhone screens, but most of us are guilty of this fetish-like behavior.</p> <p>Faith Holland presents a picture of technological eroticism that fuses our consumer-driven tech culture with fluids and products more commonly associated with sex, beauty, and self-care. The works are colorful, yet dulled down by use; electric, yet rendered useless. From the image-sculptures on the walls to the iPhone-cum-living object, there is an element of clumsy affection that begs the viewer to come in, take off your panties, and stay a while.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171128134818-wire-bath-toe.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Courtesy TRANSFER</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><em>Faith Holland&rsquo;s <a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/events/show/456393-speculative-fetish" target="_blank">Speculative Fetish</a> continues at TRANSFER Gallery through January 6, 2018.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/452624-olivia-b-murphy?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Olivia B. Murphy</a></p> <p><em>Olivia B. Murphy is a writer and editor based in New York, covering arts and culture. Her work has appeared in various publications both in print and online, including&nbsp;L&#39;Officiel Magazine,&nbsp;Hyperallergic, Freunde Von Freunden,&nbsp;Whitehot,&nbsp;Riot of Perfume,&nbsp;doingbird, and&nbsp;Whitewall Magazine.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;Faith Holland,&nbsp;<em>The Fetishes</em>, 2017. Courtesy of TRANSFER. Photo:&nbsp;Walter Wlodarczyk.&nbsp;All images: Courtesy of TRANSFER)</span></p> Tue, 28 Nov 2017 08:14:24 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Rachel Frank Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/45539-b-stylecolor-333333-under-the-radar-rachel-frank-xia-zhang-gudrun-lockb" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/257498-rachel-frank" target="_blank">Rachel Frank</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>My work uses sculpture, video, and performance to explore the tensions between the natural world and the manmade. Mixing environmental theory, political activism, and research into natural history, my work makes connections between personal histories and contemporary issues concerning the natural world, extinction, and loss that we collectively face today.</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>I personally think an artist has a responsibility to continually question themselves and the world around them. I think they should strive to be honest and truthful about what they are making and why. I think this sounds easy in theory, but many artists have a hard time not latching onto trends and making what they perceive the market wants. It&rsquo;s not easy to make yourself continually vulnerable by thematizing what you are really interested in, regardless of its currency, since it makes the prospect of rejection more difficult.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)? </strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171126173615-Vapors_Vessels__1_.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Vessels</em>, 2017, Single-channel HD Video Still</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p>I&rsquo;m probably like many artists in that I&rsquo;m most excited about the project or projects I am working on at the present moment. One of my on-going sculptural video projects,&nbsp;<em><a href="http://www.rachelfrank.com/Vapors" target="_blank">Vapors</a></em>, features human performers wearing masks of an extinct woolly rhinoceros and woolly mammoth&mdash;two animals from the last wave of extinctions of Megafauna at the end of the Ice Age&mdash;who, transported in time, carry out a fragmented dialogue on&nbsp;Anthropogenic shifts, transitions, and upheavals in the landscape. The most recent iteration of the project,&nbsp;<em>Vessels</em>&nbsp;expands upon this project,&nbsp;examining the historical ways man divined the future and sought influence over natural processes.&nbsp;<em>Vessels</em>&nbsp;is being presented at Hunter College in the&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/events/show/459336-rachel-frank-vessels" target="_blank">Thomas Hunter Projects</a>&nbsp;space with an opening reception on Friday, December 8.</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>I don&rsquo;t want to say never, but I would love to work on a large-scale production of&nbsp;<em>A Midsummer Night&rsquo;s Dream</em>, from the sets to the costumes and staging, drawing a closer connection to the myth of Theseus and the Minotaur. It would be amazing to have the space to think both about small features like how Oberon&rsquo;s headdress might respond to a particular scene to larger questions like how staging might change the lighting and narrative of an individual character.</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t? </strong>&nbsp;</p> <p>I feel like there are many artists out there that should be known but are still emerging, so this is a difficult question. If I had to pick three, I&rsquo;m really interested in artists at the moment who are mixing various genres in exciting new ways:&nbsp;<a href="http://www.brianzegeer.com/" target="_blank">Brian Zegeer</a>&nbsp;uses an eclectic mixture of video, sculpture, and drawing in his work exploring both Appalachian narratives from his birthplace and his Lebanese heritage.&nbsp;<a href="http://susanmetrican.com/home.html" target="_blank">Susan Metrican</a>&nbsp;is a Boston-based artist who mixes theatricality into her sculptural paintings exploring a bodily relationship between objects and perception.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.wienalin.com/sculpture01/" target="_blank">Wiena Lin&rsquo;s</a>&nbsp;works imagine a post-Anthropocene world of human-made objects, mixing invented archeology, technology, and sculpture. There are many more, but these three fall into the above criteria in interesting ways.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Rachel Frank,<em>Vapors</em>, 2017, Single Channel Hd Video Still)</span></p> Sun, 26 Nov 2017 09:42:43 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Beloved Sculptor Thaddeus Mosley on 91 Years of Carving His Own Path <p>Walking into Thaddeus Mosley&rsquo;s studio is like entering a bestiary that has exploded from its pages. From three feet tall to scraping the ceiling of the workshop, the wooden bodies of Mosley&rsquo;s sculptures radiate warmth and power as they cut through the air. Inspired by birds and the art of Brancusi, Mosley&rsquo;s daring compositions arc into splendid, gravity-defying geometries. With works weighing as much as four hundred pounds, one wonders how this 91-year-old artist is still intimately engaging the wood with his body, chiseling it by hand, some seven decades into his career.</p> <p>On November 8, in an event filled with cutting-edge poetry and performance, Mosley received the Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professional Achievement Award from his alma mater, the University of Pittsburgh. I was lucky enough to interview him in his studio about how he eschewed the trappings of the commercial art world, how to define &ldquo;Black Art,&rdquo; and what advice he has for aspirant young artists.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table align="center" width="550"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;The main thing that sustained me was that I wanted to find out what I could do and I haven&rsquo;t found that out yet.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171122091836-3466469054_42e0269e0a_b.jpg" style="text-align: center;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><em>Thaddeus Mosley: Sculpture (Studio | Home)</em>, Installation at The Mattress Factory, 2009.<br /> Courtesy of The Mattress Factory, Pittsburgh, PA. Photo: Tom Little</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Jessica Lanay: How long have you been making art now that you are 91? What made you start?</strong></p> <p><strong>Thaddeus Mosley:</strong>&nbsp;I have been making art since I was in my late 20s. In the early 50s Scandinavian design furniture came to the United States and at Kaufmann&rsquo;s Department Stores they did all sorts of things that stores don&rsquo;t do now: they had a whole display floor of Scandinavian furniture and they always had sculpture and paintings up. They had small teak birds and fish on wire stands. I looked at those and said, &ldquo;well, I can make those.&rdquo; I didn&rsquo;t use teak wood, I just used two-by-fours. So I went to the hardware store and got some brass rods and I made my own fish and birds and stuff.</p> <p><strong>JL: Did you have experience with wood carving before?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM:</strong> Oh, no, no, I had a lot of experience with looking at the stuff.</p> <p><strong>JL: Did you find that you had an affinity for drawing and painting?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM:</strong> When I was a kid I did, but in schools that I went to art was not a big part of the curriculum. In grade school they had art, but in my young days young folks did athletics. I thought when I was a kid I would like to be a painter.</p> <p>At the University of Pittsburgh I had a friend who painted but he went into sociology. We used to go to the Carnegie, particularly to the Internationals because in those days the directors would travel around the world for three or four years and choose [artists] individually, so we couldn&rsquo;t wait to see what would be in the Carnegie International&mdash;those were the type of things that spurred me. When I was young, I always thought there wasn&rsquo;t anything I couldn&rsquo;t do if I wanted to do it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171122091744-3309713074_c646f2b6da_b.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">The artist&rsquo;s studio. Courtesy of The Mattress Factory, Pittsburgh, PA. Photo: Tom Little</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JL:</strong> <strong>When I came into your studio, I saw influences from Dogon art, Makunde art, sculptors like Edmonia Lewis, I saw Alberto Giacometti; I see lines similar to lines in the drawings of Modigliani&mdash;which visual artists influence you?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM:</strong> My main influences are Brancusi, Noguchi, and African Art. I like David Smith&rsquo;s sculpture a great deal. And out of West Africa, where I think most of my influence comes from, it would mostly be the Central Congo. A lot of African Art and Noguchi&rsquo;s things include repetition of form or variations on form or a theme, where a shape is turned different ways or elongated or diminished. There you get to see some of my vision.</p> <p>Another thing people should be aware of is the connection I have with the material. I want to show the beauty, the warmth of the wood by creating more texture, and most of the woods just have a natural finish. That is the main advantage of this material, as opposed to steel or clay. It has an organic warmth that inorganic materials don&rsquo;t have.</p> <table align="right" width="350"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: right;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;Everything should rise from the bottom to the top to get the feeling of levitation.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><strong>JL:</strong> <strong>Your work represents an incredible defiance of gravity. Some pieces seem to me as if they should be falling over, but there is this balance of air and shape. I imagine that you aren&rsquo;t only looking at the wood, but the space around it. Compositionally, take us through making a piece.</strong></p> <p><strong>TM:</strong> I have a philosophy of weight and space and that means that everything should rise from the bottom to the top to get the feeling of levitation; I would say my talent is making things that come apart&mdash;most of these pieces can be taken apart. Sometimes you get the feeling of intimacy between shapes. I always look to see how well they hold up in space. You can almost take the same thing in music, how it punctuates the space around it&mdash;what it does in the silence you might say.</p> <p>I always say there is a dance: does the piece look like it has movement even though it is standing still? I like for them to look like they are supposed to move. I try to visualize in my mind how things are going to look when they are done. Sometimes I get a piece of wood that is interesting and I see interesting shapes. Most of this is mental and not physical pre-planning. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn&rsquo;t.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171122091907-3309711858_10494a110f_b.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">The artist&rsquo;s studio. Courtesy of The Mattress Factory, Pittsburgh, PA. Photo: Tom Little</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JL:</strong> <strong>A lot of emerging and mid-career artists decide to move to larger cities&mdash;New York or Los Angeles&mdash;to be closer to the commercial art industry. What inspired you to stay in Pittsburgh?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM:</strong> Well, two or three things. First of all, I never liked the commercial aspect of this business. Like any business, for the people that are seeking to get in&mdash;whether you are a writer or dancer or actor&mdash;you are almost always at the will of the controllers. You do what they want you to do, when they want you to do it, and for the price they want you to do it. In the &rsquo;60s, Leon Arkus asked me to have a solo show, my first solo show, at the Carnegie Museum of Art. Leon brought in Art Seidenberg and Lefevre Gallery, people from New York, to look at my work. Both of them wanted to know if I could do two shows at one time and I said that I couldn&rsquo;t produce that much work. And they asked if I could move to New York and I explained that I would have to get transferred from Pittsburgh. They said, &ldquo;what do you mean transferred?&rdquo; and I said, &ldquo;I can get transferred from the Post Office here to the Post Office in New York.&rdquo; Then they said that I couldn&rsquo;t have a job&mdash;that I would have to spend all of my time working on my art. In the meantime I was married with children. If I had been a single guy I might have considered it. But I said that I couldn&rsquo;t do it. That aspect of churning out work helped me discover that it wasn&rsquo;t about the art but about something they could sell.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table align="center" width="650"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;When you are involved in the commercial aspect of the arts you always have the pressure to produce and sell, and I never really wanted that.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I was married twice, I had three kids living with me, and I had to get a house. I always believe that your first consideration if you are a parent is your children. Then I guess I got past the age that people were really interested in me. I was in a show in Philadelphia and one of the critics said that he couldn&rsquo;t be interested in someone&rsquo;s work who is past the age of forty. I was surprised that you recognized all the African influence in my artwork; very few African American institutions have been interested in my work. But I have never depended on art for a living&mdash;I was in the civil service for many years. I have a pension and can do whatever I want. When you are involved in the commercial aspect of the arts you always have the pressure to produce and sell, and I never really wanted that.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171122092026-3466469928_c3d981918a_b.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Thaddeus Mosley: Sculpture (Studio | Home)</em>,&nbsp;Installation at The Mattress Factory,&nbsp;2009.&nbsp;<br /> Courtesy of The Mattress Factory, Pittsburgh, PA. Photo: Tom Little</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JL: How have you been able to sustain a whole life of art? I know there are a lot of artists who give up because they feel they can&rsquo;t work full-time and do their art. Or a lot of people who find it hard to get exposure for their work and give up because they figure they are never going to be able to do anything with it. What has been your life philosophy for continuing to make art no matter what?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM: </strong>At an art residency I came across a young man who asked me how he could make a living doing sculpture. I told him that there are numerous ways you can make a living at this but I think the main thing you have to decide is why you are doing this. Like someone that is writing poetry or someone who is writing novels&mdash;because everyone hopes that they are going to become another Picasso or someone like that&mdash;I never felt that way. I made sculpture for myself. I was very selfish. I wanted it in my house. I think the main thing that sustained me was that I wanted to find out what I could do and I haven&rsquo;t found that out yet. I tell anyone, I don&rsquo;t think anything is as exciting as finding that you can do something yourself. I am always eager to come to the studio and if I get an idea I start working on it.</p> <p>You have to have the spirit of an amateur, loving to do something just for the doing. I knew people who started out as painters and they didn&rsquo;t sell anything so they quit. They would be better off selling cars than painting if that was it. A lot of times there is a lack of mutual support that makes people stop or question themselves. When you are first starting out you don&rsquo;t have the greatest confidence, you&rsquo;re finding your way. But for me, it has always been a very internal and selfish quest.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171122092005-3390652388_569e7961f6_b.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">The artist&rsquo;s home.&nbsp;Courtesy of The Mattress Factory, Pittsburgh, PA. Photo: Tom Little</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table align="center" width="650"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;How do you know if someone is doing Black Art? Look at the artist&mdash;I don&rsquo;t care what the art looks like.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JL: What are you thoughts on Blackness or a Black Art Aesthetic&nbsp;in terms of your art and process?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM:</strong> I was in the time when the Black Revolution was on in the &rsquo;60s. I knew Dana Chandler and some of those people who were Black Revolutionary Artists. I knew people like Baraka. Some of these people were like, if you weren&rsquo;t writing about the protest or if your painting did not address the conditions of the African American in the United States then it was European Decadence. And I knew a group of people that had spaces here that said that any artist that shows in White institutions can&rsquo;t show with us. And I said, &ldquo;well, you just did me a favor.&rdquo;</p> <p>I had friends that adhered to this philosophy, but I think that your first responsibility is to your own mind and your own integrity and what you see as an individual. If you think that you need to belong to a herd to be comfortable then that is okay. But I also knew people who were chanting freedom but wanted the woman to walk four or five steps behind them and be subservient to them and I said, &ldquo;you aren&rsquo;t talking about freedom, you&rsquo;re talking about being in charge, you want power over other people, you want the same thing that you&rsquo;re deriding.&rdquo;</p> <p>I have a friend&mdash;I think he is one of the few great painters in the country&mdash;Sam Gilliam, and people were putting him down because they did not think he was doing what they called &ldquo;Black Art.&rdquo; People ask, well how do you know if someone is doing Black Art? And I say that the easiest definition is to look at the artist&mdash;I don&rsquo;t care what the art looks like. I just feel that an artist first has to not worry about conforming. I just do what I do, and if you don&rsquo;t like it, that&rsquo;s fine. I like it and I am not going to make something I don&rsquo;t like.</p> <p><strong>JL:</strong> <strong>What advice would you give to an artist trying to find their way?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM:</strong> The first thing I would say is to look a lot and read a lot. How I learned was looking and reading and buying art books and going to museums and galleries and looking to see how I think the thing was made. I would tell them to find out why this is making your life interesting. There are a lot of things that aren&rsquo;t very valuable in life so you want to do something that is going to increase the value of your life or enhance it to some degree and, as odd as it may seem, this is what makes my life, even in my old age. I am always happy. The good, bad and the ugly, I enjoy looking at it all. If it is not fun making it then I have no interest in it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/490259-jessica-lanay?tab=REVIEWS">Jessica Lanay</a></p> <p><em>Jessica Lanay is a poet and short story writer from the Florida Keys living in Pittsburgh. Her work can be found in Salt Hill Journal, Tahoma Literary Review, and is forthcoming in Fugue and The Common.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>(Image at top: Thaddeus Mosley at home. All images: Courtesy of The Mattress Factory, Pittsburgh, PA. Photos: Tom Little)</p> Wed, 22 Nov 2017 07:58:20 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Art Golacki Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/46540-b-under-the-radar-thomas-flynn-ii-art-golacki-patricia-glauserb" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/418627-art-golacki" target="_blank">Art Golacki</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>Since every one of us evolved from the very subjective perception of ever-changing phenomena called collectively a reality, I am in constant process of sharing my personal experience of that journey.&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>In my opinion, to translate what is indescribable.&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171120095225-20170512210639-golacki_talkingtrees25.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Talking Trees 25</em>, 2017, Photography</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>Self discovery, but I am afraid I do not have any tangible evidence to support it.</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>A feature scientific film investigating every single cell of my body in search of an Ego.</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?&nbsp;</strong></p> <p>Tomasz Bednarczyk,&nbsp;<a href="https://www.discogs.com/artist/878081-Tomasz-Bednarczyk" target="_blank">Tomasz Bednarczyk Discography at Discogs</a><br /> Fascinating young Polish composer, master of minimal and ambient, my favorite chill out.</p> <p>Jerzy Rosolowicz,&nbsp;<a href="https://makinguse.artmuseum.pl/en/jerzy-rosolowicz/">Jerzy Rosołowicz &middot; MAKING USE</a><br /> Protagonist of the conceptual&nbsp;art&nbsp;movement in Poland and at the same time extremely modest and kind man, my favorite&nbsp;art&nbsp;college teacher.</p> <p>Stanislaw Ignacy Witkiewicz,<strong>&nbsp;</strong><a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanis%C5%82aw_Ignacy_Witkiewicz" target="_blank">Stanisław Ignacy Witkiewicz - Wikipedia</a><br /> Colorful and fascinating personality, multi-disciplinary Polish artist from interwar period openly admitting his experience with psychedelics, my favorite teenage idol.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: <em>Still Life in Black with Melons</em>, 2017, Digital photography)</span></p> Mon, 20 Nov 2017 01:54:48 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list The Trouble with “Neighbors”: Ai Weiwei, the Istanbul Biennial, and Forced Migration <p>Last month Public Art Fund in New York opened Ai Weiwei&rsquo;s citywide exhibition, <em><a href="https://www.publicartfund.org/ai_weiwei_good_fences_make_good_neighbors" target="_blank">Good Fences Make Good Neighbors</a></em>. The project entails steel, fence-like architectural interventions and large-scale banners depicting photographs of Syrian refugees from the artist&rsquo;s time in Lesbos, Greece. The exhibition is not alone in its use of domestic language to address global issues of mass forced migration. The 15th Istanbul Biennial, which concluded last week and was curated by Danish-Norwegian artist duo Elmgreen &amp; Dragset, took the title <em><a href="http://15b.iksv.org/home" target="_blank">a good neighbour</a></em>.</p> <p>The conceit of &ldquo;neighbor&rdquo; brings us to the scale of the home without quite entering <em>our</em> home: a neighbor, after all, is our closest foreign element. Today, both Turkey and the US find themselves embroiled in internal debates over policies concerning both external borders and internal relations between communities. The invocation of neighbors addresses&mdash;though to what end varies between these exhibitions&mdash;geopolitical issues over borders and boundaries and the legal designations that determine the futures of populations displaced by war and famine. In Ai&rsquo;s installation borders are evoked by fences and images of refugees installed in public spaces around the city. The Istanbul Biennial, on the other hand, nods to Turkey&rsquo;s status as hosting one of the highest populations of displaced Syrians more intimately, focusing on the private rather than public spaces.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117153513-12.-GoodFencesPhoto_JasonWyche_4027_ed.jpg.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ai Weiwei, <em>Arch</em> from <em>Good Fences Make Good Neighbors</em>, 2017, Galvanized mild steel and mirror polished stainless steel. Courtesy of Ai Weiwei studio and Frahm &amp; Frahm. Photo: Jason Wyche</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Last March Angela Merkel negotiated what has since been termed the &ldquo;EU-Turkey Deal,&rdquo; offering Turkey 6 billion Euro in refugee aid in exchange for the country preventing further crossings to Europe, particularly via Greece. Anyone arriving &ldquo;irregularly&rdquo; to Greece&mdash;even those seeking asylum&mdash;would, according to the deal, be returned to Turkey and made to apply from there. In Turkey, however, only asylum seekers originating from Europe qualify as &ldquo;refugees&rdquo; in any legal sense, as the country signed the 1951 Geneva Convention with a &ldquo;geographical limitation.&rdquo; The three million asylum seekers currently in Turkey, and any held in transit to Europe, are instead deemed &ldquo;<a href="https://www.loc.gov/law/help/refugee-law/turkey.php" target="_blank">persons of subsidiary protection</a>&rdquo;&mdash;a designation that nefariously keeps would-be asylum seekers outside of the international refugee system that would protect them.</p> <p>While many asylum seekers are living in camps in the south of Turkey, others have made it to cities, and Istanbul reflects its new population. In the months preceding the exhibition, promotional posters for the Biennial introduced the &ldquo;good neighbor&rdquo; theme in a series of questions: <em>Is&nbsp;a good neighbor&nbsp;your friend on Facebook?</em> <em>Is&nbsp;a good neighbor&nbsp;someone who lives the same way as you? Is&nbsp;a good neighbor&nbsp;a stranger you don&rsquo;t fear?</em> The inquisitive framework&mdash;<i>what is a good neighbor anyway?&mdash;</i>contrasts the aphoristic &ldquo;good neighbor&rdquo; in Ai&rsquo;s title, which references an ironic and <a href="https://www.theatlantic.com/entertainment/archive/2010/05/sarah-palin-misinterprets-robert-frost/57248/" target="_blank">often misunderstood</a> line from Robert Frost&rsquo;s 1915 poem &ldquo;Mending Wall.&rdquo; In both cases, however, the notion of neighbor works to &ldquo;domesticate&rdquo; debates about migration, to bring them down to the scale of the local, the neighborhood, the family, the home&mdash;at least ideologically. In its iterations since the the Gezi Park protests of 2013, the Istanbul Biennial has included works that take a wide-angle analysis of global socio-economic changes, featuring artists and collectives whose practices offer broad analyses of the socio-economic actors at work in the changing city. In its 2017 edition, the Biennial instead &ldquo;zoomed-in&rdquo; to show art that takes the home and interiority as its jumping-off point.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117153712-TP2_4648Ai_Weiwei_on_Porcelain__Sakip_Sabanci_Museum__Istanbul__2017__courtesy_of_Sakip_Sabanci_Museum_.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117184706-IMG_4287.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Ai Weiwei on Porcelain</em>, Sakip Sabanci Museum, Istanbul, 2017. Courtesy of Sakip Sabanci Museum</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Ai, who has been praised for addressing the migration crisis and critiqued for his tone-deaf or misguided attempts at doing so, opened the show <a href="http://www.sakipsabancimuzesi.org/en/page/exhibitions/ai-weiwei-porcelain" target="_blank"><em>Ai Weiwei on Porcelain </em></a>at the Sabanci Museum in Istanbul timed with Biennial. The exhibition includes many of his most recognizable works as well as recent work addressing the Syrian refugee crisis. Many newer works on view use domestic objects as materials and canvases&mdash;including pottery, dishes, and wallpaper emblazoned with black-and-white vignettes of refugees in makeshift camps, in transit, or running from the police. In one particularly distressing instance this wallpaper stretches around a huge atrium space, serving as a backdrop to larger-than-life documentation of Ai&rsquo;s notorious performance work, <em>Dropping a Han Dynasty Urn </em>(1995). Similarly the work <em>Study of Perspective</em> (1995&ndash;2003), in which Ai photographs his hand &ldquo;flipping off&rdquo; various architectural symbols of power around the world, reads as a kind of tone-deaf bad boy move when placed in the context of aestheticized images of refugees, people to whom the option to move around the globe so freely is all but impossible.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117153925-Screen_Shot_2017-11-15_at_10.55.11_AM.png" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ai Weiwei on eBay</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Prior to the Public Art Fund opening in New York, the organization opened a Kickstarter crowdfunding campaign and it is currently offering limited editions of the artist&rsquo;s work on eBay, including small prints of the wallpaper included in the Sabanci exhibition. No portion of the proceeds have been announced as directed toward organizations working to aid victims of forced migration, nor were donation options offered on the crowdfunding campaign menu. Rather than instrumentally benefitting refugees, the resulting &ldquo;good fences&rdquo; around New York City are aesthetically pleasing passageways and architectural interventions that offer seating and social space in parks and art venues including Washington Square, the Queens Museum, Cooper Square, and Central Park. According to the artist, the artworks are meant to &ldquo;raise awareness&rdquo; of the global refugee crisis and to the bordered and bounded lives of individuals. Instead, they materialize as convivial social projects in a city central to the international power structures that produce global inequalities&mdash;further pointing to questions about Ai&rsquo;s relationship to the state powers he aims to critique. If indeed this project is intended to &ldquo;raise awareness,&rdquo; how does that function within a leisure space? And what does it mean to do so using &ldquo;neighbor,&rdquo; in a place like New York, where, unlike Turkey, it is largely rhetorical? Ai&rsquo;s interventions do little to interrogate their namesake. Who <em>are </em>these neighbors&mdash;us or them? What makes a neighbor good or bad? Who, if anyone, is implicated or educated by this artwork?</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117154044-14.-GoodFences_CircleFence_TimothySchenck_05.jpg.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Ai Weiwei, <em>Circle Fence</em> from <em>Good Fences Make Good Neighbors</em>, 2017, Powder coated mild steel, polypropylene netting. Courtesy of the artist. Photo: Timothy Schenck</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Last Year Ai was &ldquo;<a href="http://www.artnews.com/2016/10/31/political-reactions-a-testy-ai-weiwei-speaks-with-tania-bruguera-at-the-brooklyn-museum/" target="_blank">testy</a>&rdquo; in a talk with Tania Bruguera at the Brooklyn Museum, responding to her criticisms of his now infamous photograph of himself reenacting the death of three-year-old Alan Kurdi on a beach in Bodrum, Turkey. He reprimanded Bruguera for not knowing the exact count of those who&rsquo;d lost their lives in passage. The trouble with counting the dead and depicting only their loss or desperation is that the refugee &ldquo;crisis&rdquo; isn&rsquo;t just a moment: it is an ongoing situation that continues even as Ai builds his beautiful fences in New York. To count is a process of memorialization we enact when a war is over, and those numbers can be put to wicked use. While Ai aggregates objects&mdash;life vests, clothing, shoes&mdash;to materialize the vast numbers of dead or displaced people, FRONTEX, the European Union&rsquo;s border agency, and its supporters use the same numbers to argue for further limitations on passage and harsher criminalization, which leads desperate people to attempt even more risky routes in order to avoid detection.&nbsp; Ai&rsquo;s 2016 installation of 14,000 life jackets on the columns of the Konzert Haus in Berlin was tagged with #safepassage which may have raised some awareness of refugees&rsquo; plights, but it also overwhelmed that hashtag&rsquo;s use by Medicine Sans Frontiers and aid groups who often used it for updates on travel conditions. The image of the thousands of bright orange life jackets became a favorite social media share and was retweeted and praised by some of the same officials who supported the EU-Turkey Deal (which further restrained refugees coming from Syria). Keeping refugees in Turkey has been instrumental in Europe, leaving already vulnerable people in a much less protected position&mdash;good neighbors indeed!</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"> <p dir="ltr" lang="en">Powerful art installation by Chinese artist <a href="https://twitter.com/aiww?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">@aiww</a> draping 14k refugee life vests from Greece to <a href="https://twitter.com/hashtag/Berlin?src=hash&amp;ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">#Berlin</a> concert hall <a href="https://t.co/kHbDvEAchI">pic.twitter.com/kHbDvEAchI</a></p> &mdash; Sebastian Ernst (@seb_ernst) <a href="https://twitter.com/seb_ernst/status/698823489864736768?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw">February 14, 2016</a></blockquote> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Converse to spectacles of horror and vignettes of tragedy on fine china, the Istanbul Biennial stepped away from the directly political, particularly from the limited ways in which Turkey&rsquo;s art scene has come to be read as a go-to site for geopolitical catastrophizing. Without artwork directly critical of the government, the exhibition has been <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/world/2017/sep/15/istanbul-biennial-hires-provocative-curators-but-wheres-the-political-art" target="_blank">critiqued</a> as lacking in political art. To say the work included is not political, however, misses the strength and subtlety of the exhibition. In contrast to the more broadly critical artworks presented in past biennials, Elmgreen &amp; Dragset have largely included artists and artworks that address daily life or engage in the making of domestic space and the borders that surround and divide it. Many works point to the ways in which the home is not a haven from the political but the seat of its entrenchment. None does this more clearly than Lee Miller&rsquo;s <a href="http://www.leemiller.co.uk/media/Lee-Miller-in-Hitler-s-apartment-at-16-Prinzregentenplatz-Note-the-combat-boots-on-the-bath-mat-now-stained-with-the-du/WDCDbTDMLParKJghr89Pdw..a" target="_blank">haunting photographs</a> made in the home of Adolf Hitler.</p> <p>Around the corner from Miller, in the Pera Museum, <a href="http://www.pacegallery.com/artists/507/fred-wilson" target="_blank">Fred Wilson</a> draws on materials common to stately old Istanbul homes to interrogate the erasure of Black and Afro-Turk histories from official Ottoman and Republican Turkish histories and Ottoman Turkey&rsquo;s connection to slave routes through Vienna. He commissioned two intricate chandeliers that utilize both Turkish and Venetian glass methods&mdash;in one, the two styles seem to be engulfing the other. On the surrounding walls are Ottoman Turkish-style tiles painted in Arabic script with the phrases &ldquo;Mother Africa&rdquo; and &ldquo;Black is Beautiful.&rdquo; The most powerful of his works are the smallest: etchings Wilson purchased from local souvenir art shops depicting Ottoman-era images of the city. He overlaid these in translucent velum, carefully excised to obscure all but the small and often singular black figures hidden among crowds.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117154140-IKSV_15B_Sahirugureren_307.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117164829-IMG_4225.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Fred Wilson, <em>Afro Kismet</em>, 2017, Historic photographs, engravings and oil paintings; contemporary acrylic paintings and miniatures, late 19th century Othello poster; Anthropomorphic terracotta flask from the 3rd century BC, glass pendants from the 5th century BC; contemporary Iznik tile panels, carpet, chandelier sculptures, globe sculpture, blown glass sculptures; mid 20th century wooden African mask, late 20th century African figures, wooden false wall, birdcage, antique chair and table, wall vinyl, mounted photo scans, cowrie shells, Dimensions variable. Courtesy of Pace Gallery and the artist. Sponsored by the Denver Art Museum. Photo (top): Sahir Uğur Eren. Photo (below): the author</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>While few works address the refugee crisis directly, there are strong pieces that address the precariousness of &ldquo;home,&rdquo; be it house or country. Mahmoud Obaidi&rsquo;s&nbsp;<em>Compact Home Project</em>&nbsp;consists of archives of sketches, newspaper clippings, and other ephemera he has collected since leaving Iraq.&nbsp;<a href="http://www.pedrogomezegana.net/" target="_blank">Pedro G&oacute;mez-Ega&ntilde;a&rsquo;s</a>&nbsp;<em>Domain of Things</em>&nbsp;is a darkly beautiful performance installation in the Galata Greek School: an elevated domestic space suspended on rails is slowly shifted and disrupted by performers uncomfortably entangled among the supports.<a href="http://www.officinedellimmagine.com/lungiswagqunta_bio.html" target="_blank">&nbsp;Lungiswa Gqunta</a>&rsquo;s&nbsp;<em>Lawn</em>&nbsp;reproduces the very stage of neighborly relations, the lawn, in the green hues of broken pop bottles, filled with oil to evoke the small homemade fire bombs of riots.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117154236-IKSV_15B_Sahirugureren_235.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Pedro G&oacute;mez-Ega&ntilde;a, <em>Domain of Things</em>, 2017, Metal structure, wooden panels, furniture, sound, performance Dimensions variable Courtesy of the artist Produced with the support of Arts Council Norway, Office for Contemporary Art Norway, City of Bergen Norway, Faculty of Fine Art, Music and Design, University of Bergen and BIT Teatergarasjen. Presented with the support of QP Magazine. Photo: Sahir Uğur Eren</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117154342-IKSV_15B_Sahirugureren_058.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Lungiswa Gqunta, <em>Lawn 1</em>, 2016/17 Wood, 3,168 broken Coca Cola glass bottles, petrol, ink, 25.5 x 484 x 366 cm. Courtesy of the artist. Photo: Sahir Uğur Eren</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>In both the Biennial&rsquo;s domestic sensibilities and Ai&rsquo;s fences-cum-playgrounds and images of toiling refugees, what is most conspicuously missing is an investigation into the lives of communities. While, as Ai&rsquo;s work makes clear, thousands have died in transit at sea or remain in danger, millions of people are now living in new places. And millions of Turks now find themselves with new neighbors in the midst of an already turbulent and suspicious political climate that strains trust among even established relations.</p> <p>Across Istanbul there are many groups, both art and community projects, addressing these issues. <a href="http://www.pagesbookstorecafe.com/" target="_blank">Pages</a>, a bookstore founded by a Syrian children&rsquo;s book author and his wife, is a home not only for other refugees but also a space in which to welcome those wanting to learn more about Syrian culture, including evenings of live music. It made an appearance in the biennial, if only as the site where the artist Victor Leguy met Syrians and collected their personal artifacts. These were then displayed in the Istanbul Modern, hung and partially obscured by a line of white paint. It is a beautiful work but one that also troubles the continued question of why is it that refugees are so often represented as absences or artifacts, when they aren&rsquo;t being portrayed en mass. There are, by most counts, between two and three million refugees from Syria quietly going about their lives in Turkey, as well as many more from Libya, Iraq, and Afghanistan. Their lives are not limited to the hour of border crossing, or to the suffering and loss they have experienced; their representations should not be limited to death and loss of home.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117165846-IKSV_15B_Sahirugureren_244.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Victor Leguy, 2017, Istanbul Modern, 15th İstanbul Biennial. Photo: Sahir Ugur Eren</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>One work in the Biennial addresses another population weathering the precarity of globalization, though their displacement is more economic than violent. Chinese photojournalist Sim Chi Yin&rsquo;s <em>The Rat Tribe </em>is a portrait series depicting migrant low-wage workers in their underground living spaces within the 6,000 basements and air raid shelters around Beijing. Despite the bleak conditions and cramped quarters depicted, these images work to show the realities of people in migration. Their home lives, relationships, personal proclivities, and even joys are evident.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171117184331-image1.jpeg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Sim Chi Yin, 2017, Pera Museum, 15th Istanbul Biennial. Photo: the author</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Critiques that the 15th Istanbul Biennial lacks political edge ring false. That the domestic or interior is somehow apolitical is an old-fashioned assertion, one no longer fitting, lest we suggest that it is only bodies in the street, only public action made visible that can be deemed truly political. Rather now, <em>how</em> we consider the domestic, the interpersonal, dare I say, the feminine, remains a central question. The obvious, if hollow, political&mdash;the zoomed-out scale, the representations of borders and bodies so often present in the work of &ldquo;political&rdquo; artists&mdash;is everywhere, and as Ai&rsquo;s exhibitions show, highly popular and profitable.</p> <p>How and when does the domestic encounter and engage its already political place? How can kinship be reordered, and by whom? It is in these questions that we find the politics within the social and physical markings of the home, and where we open up an important assumption at the heart of the conceit of &ldquo;neighbor&rdquo;: the given-ness, the taken-for-granted acceptance of borders, at any level. Porosity marks lives in cosmopolitan centers; food, culture, faith, music, and language travel across borders the way sounds and smells travel through walls. Our relationships within walls are never hermetically sealed to what is outside. The domestic, the home, its neighbors and its fences, are not merely metaphors for the nation, its borders, and those outside its boundaries. Instead the domestic is itself always already engaged in the production and contestation of those systems in question. Just as the public produces our private selves, so too does the private produce a public, a national, an international; the very notion of who has a private life not only reflects but reinforces divisions of value in world politics and policy.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/200738-danyel-ferrari?tab=REVIEWS">Danyel Ferrari</a></p> <p><em>Danyel M. Ferrari is an artist and writer based in Brooklyn and Istanbul. She is a current PhD candidate at Rutgers University in Media Studies.&nbsp;</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: Promotional poster for the 15th Istanbul Biennial, Curated by Elmgreen &amp; Dragset. Photos by Lukas Wassmann, Graphic design by Rupert Smyth)</span></p> Sat, 18 Nov 2017 07:14:28 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Genevieve Goffman | Katrina Majkut | Sheelah Mahalath Bewley <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/490681-genevieve-goffman?utm_source=GenevieveGoffman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Genevieve Goffman &ndash; Portland, OR</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1063863?utm_source=GenevieveGoffman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1063863/u3azr9/20170916202813-101216_GGoffmage-4__1_.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1063870?utm_source=GenevieveGoffman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1063870/mf2ji7/20170916202843-111316_GGoffman-31.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1063867?utm_source=GenevieveGoffman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1063867/mf2ji7/20170916202824-111316_GGoffman-1.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1063868?utm_source=GenevieveGoffman&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1063868/mf2ji7/20170916202826-111316_GGoffman-9.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/181750-katrina-majkut?utm_source=KatrinaMajkut&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Katrina Majkut &ndash; Brooklyn</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1073135?utm_source= KatrinaMajkut&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1073135/u3azr9/20171031200101-Consent_Is_Asking_Every_Time_Condom.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1073592?utm_source=KatrinaMajkut&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1073592/mf2ji7/20171101131912-Step_7_Vaginal_Swabs_and_Smears.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1073583?utm_source=KatrinaMajkut&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1073583/mf2ji7/20171101131906-Kit_Cover.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1073589?utm_source=KatrinaMajkut&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1073589/mf2ji7/20171101131910-Step_4_Debris_Collection.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/490547-sheelah-mahalath-bewley?utm_source=SheelahMahalathBewley&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Sheelah Mahalath Bewley &ndash; UK</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1061425?utm_source=SheelahMahalathBewley&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1061425/u3azr9/20170830093923-2_bra.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1061447?utm_source=SheelahMahalathBewley&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1061447/mf2ji7/20170830095529-3_lighten_up.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1061449?utm_source=SheelahMahalathBewley&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1061449/mf2ji7/20170830095600-9_Wreath.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/1061448?utm_source=SheelahMahalathBewley&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1061448/mf2ji7/20170830095541-2_running_scared.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/sp?_encoding=UTF8&amp;asin=&amp;isAmazonFulfilled=&amp;isCBA=&amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;orderID=&amp;seller=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;tab=products&amp;vasStoreID=#" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Fri, 17 Nov 2017 06:08:06 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: The Wrong Edition <p><a href="http://thewrong.org/" target="_blank">The Wrong</a> is a decentralized biennial exhibition, the largest of its kind, dedicated to contemporary digital art and culture. Now in its third edition, simply titled <em>(biennale)</em>, The Wrong features a tremendous number of curated exhibitions, projects, and events&mdash;both online (in &ldquo;<a href="http://thewrong.org/filter/pavilion/" target="_blank">pavilions</a>&rdquo;) and off (in &ldquo;<a href="http://thewrong.org/filter/embassy/" target="_blank">embassies</a>&rdquo;).</p> <p>Because of the sheer magnitude of content, tackling the biennial can be an overwhelming prospect, even for the initiated. For this week&rsquo;s Wednesday Web Art column, we&rsquo;re easing you into the world of The Wrong, sharing some of our favorite work from the 2017 edition. But as you&rsquo;ll quickly learn, with such an extensive exhibition at your fingertips&mdash;1,400 artists across 70 pavilions and nearly 30 embassies&mdash;it&rsquo;s hard to stop here. Consider these works as launching points for charting your own path into the seemingly endless corners of The Wrong.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/HuMcfHjiVTg" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Aleksandra Kovačević &amp; Jelena Nikolić</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="https://wrongprostheticco.wordpress.com/portfolio/aleksandra-kovacevic-jelena-nikolic/" target="_blank">meetme@heaven</a></em><br /> This strangely calming, perpetually rotating marble slab carved with inspirational messages is the perfect way to start your Wrong adventure. It can be a challenging, emotional journey, but as the artists of this piece state: &ldquo;&lsquo;Life is full of problems, and the only way to improve our chances of overcoming most of these problems is to optimize how we think about them.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="https://wrongprostheticco.wordpress.com/" target="_blank">Prosthetic</a></em>, Curated by Darko Vukic<br /> This pavilion is inspired by the quote from political theorist Hannah Arendt: &ldquo;Our life is prosthetic. We assume that through these variety of processes we can realize our desires which themselves are becoming prosthetic. We also assume other life through this prosthetization of our current endeavors.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Q-kkh_jaDcY" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Karin Ferrari</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="http://postinternet.art/pages/karin.html" target="_blank">Hyperconnected (The Whole Picture)</a></em><br /> Ferrari&rsquo;s work is an exploration of the explosion of conspiracy culture in the internet age. The fact that this video is specifically about the &lsquo;truth&rsquo;&nbsp; behind the symbolism of the internet means the it functions brilliantly on multiple levels of paranoia and digital creation.</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="http://postinternet.art/index.html" target="_blank">Postinternet.art</a></em>, Curated by Juha van Ingen &amp; Jarkko R&auml;s&auml;nen<br /> The contributing artists were only given the name of the pavilion as inspiration for their work, leading to an eclectic mix of art dedicated to this ubiquitous term.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171115155435-Lara_Joy_Evans.png" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Lara Joy Evans</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <a href="https://lightlitecoin.info/lje" target="_blank">https://lightlitecoin.info/lje</a><br /> The primal woman&mdash;part neural network, part Neanderthal, part mud, according to DNA panel results&mdash;joyfully connects with internet life. Evans&rsquo; work, comprising &ldquo;photographs altered by AI and neural network,&rdquo; is a welcome moment of pure human vitality among the digital hive-mind.</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <a href="http://lightlitecoin.info" target="_blank"><em>Light Lite Coin</em></a>, curated by Coleman Mummery<br /> Described by the curator as, &ldquo;self help for collective paranoia,&rdquo; the artworks in this pavilion are all programs. &ldquo;There are bio-social implications to running these programs on yourself and sharing them with others.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/137466365" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Morgan Beringer</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="https://www.thenormalpavillion.xyz/morgan-beringer" target="_blank">Abstraction 47</a></em><br /> An endlessly morphing, mysterious and beautiful vision that evokes something between an unfathomable alien storm and a haunted impressionist watercolor.</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="https://www.thenormalpavillion.xyz/" target="_blank">Normal</a></em>, curated by Ilavenil Jayapalan<br /> This enigmatic pavilion interrogates what constitutes &ldquo;Normality.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xlanYJwnuvw" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Elizaveta Perebatova</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="http://proteytemen.com/diapavilion/perebatova/" target="_blank">ATTENTION</a></em><br /> Perebatova suggests that &ldquo;we have worked out ways of interacting with the world and have stopped notice the moment of interaction [sic]. We are automatic and enslaved by our habits.&rdquo; Her witty and enchanting video presents cryptic illustrations of banal design objects, with instructions to &ldquo;listen to reality, to look at it as if we are doing it for the first time.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="http://proteytemen.com/diapavilion" target="_blank">Diapavilion</a></em>, Curated by Protey Temen<br /> The artists in this pavilion are students of fine arts and contemporary illustration at HSE Art and Design School in Moscow, Russia. Most of works they have created are surreal and inventive pastiches of social and scientific instructional films.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171115155220-MutantClub.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artwork &amp; Pavilion:</strong> Various Artists, <em><a href="http://www.mutantclub.net/" target="_blank">Mutant Club</a></em>, Curated by Enrique Salmoiraghi<br /> One of the few pavilions where the collected contributions of the artists seamlessly form a single piece of art. They have provided the dancers and decorations for the titular intergalactic u.f.o. nightclub. This just might be the most universal, engaging, and downright entertaining pavilions in the whole biennale.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171115155134-Renee_Cox.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Renee Cox</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artworks &amp; Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="http://gisdejeunersurlherbe.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">Gis Dejeuner Sur L&rsquo;Herbe</a></em>, Curated by Jeroen Bouweriks<br /> This is one of the most successful pavilions shaped by a singular concept. The idea itself basically overwhelms the contributions of the artists, making it the curator&rsquo;s work more than anything else. Bouweriks asked a long list of artists, theorists, curators, gallerists, and designers&rdquo; in iPhone chats to Google Manet&rsquo;s painting<em> Le D&eacute;jeuner sur l&rsquo;Herbe</em> and then send him the &ldquo;original&rdquo; as an attached image. This prompt inspired reactions ranging from delight to confusion, with most contributors following his instructions exactly. Some deviate from the plan a little and send work adapted from or inspired by the famous painting, like this response (above) from the brilliant Renee Cox.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/QByGFQBiV20" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Peter Rahul</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="http://gfxfreeerror.com/peter-rahul.html" target="_blank">Phase 2</a></em><br /> A hypnotic abstract exploration of vintage computer graphics and CRT technology, this piece finds the right balance between warm nostalgia and an alternative future in a parallel universe where analogue conquered digital.</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="http://gfxfreeerror.com/index.html" target="_blank">GFX Free Error</a></em>, Curated by Haydi Roket<br /> Named after the error warning given to a malfunctioning video card, this pavilion features works that question the effects of broken technology on our perception of reality. The curator asks: &ldquo;Do we merely create new realities from these faults? If it&#39;s the sole truth, then what happens to those broken realities around us?&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/bXn1xavynj8" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artists:</strong> Signe Pierce &amp; Alli Coates</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="https://q-safe-q.tumblr.com/tagged/signepierceandallicoates/" target="_blank">American Reflexxx</a></em><br /> A modern masterpiece of documentary art: the reaction these artists got for simply being &ldquo;different&rdquo; among those who consider themselves &ldquo;normal&rdquo; is truly horrifying. The film presents a perfect representation the soul-crushing culture of trolling and bullying that is now synonymous with being online. The subject was highlighted and compounded by the fact that the abuse continued when <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXn1xavynj8" target="_blank">the video was posted online</a>. Pierce says, &ldquo;It did feel similar to the mob scene all over again, only yes, people had the opportunity to bash me anonymously.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>Pavilion: </strong><em><a href="https://q-safe-q.tumblr.com/tagged/home/chrono" target="_blank">Safe</a></em>, curated by Christopher Clary<br /> This pavilion explores the concept of being &ldquo;safe&rdquo; and &ldquo;safe spaces&rdquo; in network culture. The artists have each contributed work that &ldquo;questions the validity of safety through expressions of intersectional trauma&mdash;personal, familial, collective, and systemic.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/234747372" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Josefin Jonsson</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="http://pinkpinkmoon.altervista.org/josefin-jonsson/" target="_blank">Falling Stars</a></em><br /> According to <a href="https://www.instagram.com/pastelae/" target="_blank">her Instagram</a>, Jonsson creates &ldquo;pastel original artworks with dream layers and soft pink internet feelings.&rdquo; This descriptor barely prepares you for this unsettling slice of futuristic, new-age hypnotherapy.</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="http://pinkpinkmoon.altervista.org/" target="_blank">Pink, Pink Moon</a></em>, Curated by Fabio Paris<br /> An all-women pavilion that is also one of the biennial&rsquo;s most compelling and subversive. The artists have made work that presents &ldquo;the pink as nexus of contemporary aesthetics and not as a feminist reading.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171115154831-Mani_Nilchiani.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Mani Nilchiani</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="http://foreverfornever.xyz/" target="_blank">You-Eye</a></em><br /> A clever, minimalist, motion-activated interactive piece that questions the value and meaning of familiar symbols of modern life. It&rsquo;s also a lot of fun to play with!</p> <p><strong>Pavilion: </strong><em><a href="http://foreverfornever.xyz/" target="_blank">Forever Fornever</a></em>, Curated by Chris Romero<br /> This pavilion looks at the disappearing line between our digital personas and our physical bodies. The artworks &ldquo;portray the present, a hyper-technological world, and hypothesize the future&mdash;a dream caught between utopia and nightmare.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&#39;re interested in what&#39;s happening with art on the web. We invited online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, to write a bi-monthly column for us. Every other Wednesday he selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Thu, 16 Nov 2017 04:45:40 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Rebecca Kaufman Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/48461-under-the-radar-haya-ogura-rebecca-kaufman-lesley-blakelock" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/489829-rebecca-kaufman" target="_blank">Rebecca Kaufman</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>I am trying to communicate a re-evaluation of perception using the ancient&nbsp;technology&nbsp;of painting to reflect on the addictive visual technologies we rely so heavily upon today.</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>An artist&rsquo;s&nbsp;responsibility is to visually and conceptually communicate life experience&nbsp;within their community, connecting consciousness across space and time. As a mentor of mine once put it, &ldquo;the micro is always a&nbsp;reflection&nbsp;of the macro.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)?</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171113085046-IMG_1060.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I don&rsquo;t know if this is the&nbsp;greatest thing I have ever made, but it&rsquo;s one of the greatest things I have had part in making. This mural was a collaboration between myself and a peer in graduate school, Greta Anderson, for a group exhibition we had&nbsp;titled <em>Psychedelia</em> at the Swell Gallery in San Francisco in 2016. The image was taken from a Bridget Riley painting, then mirrored vertically and horizontally and projected into the corner of two 16-foot-high walls. We easily logged 30 hours painting and installing the show, just to have to paint white over it 10 days later&mdash;but it was absolutely worth it.</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>If I want to make something, I will make it. No&nbsp;matter&nbsp;how monumental, or how many years it takes to complete, it will happen. Never say never!</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p><a href="http://laurarokas.com" target="_blank">Laura Rokas</a>, <a href="http://tcolcord.wixsite.com/tomcolcord" target="_blank">Tom Colcord</a>, and <a href="http://www.maryamyousif.com" target="_blank">Maryam Yousif</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: <em>End of Line</em>, 2017,&nbsp;Acrylic on Canvas, 67 x 84 x 1.3 inches)</span></p> Mon, 13 Nov 2017 00:53:33 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list “Good Art Always Gives”: Alvaro Barrington’s Generous First Solo at PS1 <p>Brooklyn-based artist <a href="https://www.instagram.com/alvarobarrington/?hl=en" target="_blank">Alvaro Barrington</a> views Marcus Garvey as &ldquo;an abstract avatar...like a saint or a north star of some sort.&rdquo; It&rsquo;s one of the things that drew him to London, where he attended the Slade School of Fine Art for graduate school in 2015&mdash;and where I befriended him. He describes his time there as a &ldquo;pilgrimage,&rdquo; often citing Garvey&rsquo;s life in London in relation to the body of work he made there:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">[Garvey] died poor in London. It wasn&rsquo;t until decades later that Jamaica&mdash;where he was born&mdash;realized his influence and began to celebrate him. I imagine London being where the first real shift in his radical thinking early on in his life took place, and later [where] he had to take in his failures and the forces that destroyed his movement.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107142916-0E9A2187.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">All images: Installation view of&nbsp;<em>Alvaro Barrington</em>. On view at MoMA PS1 in New York from October 22 to December 31, 2017. Courtesy MoMA PS1. Photos: Pablo Enriquez</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Alvaro&rsquo;s painting, <em>Garvey loves flowers too </em>is the header image for <a href="https://www.moma.org/calendar/exhibitions/3901" target="_blank">his first (ever) solo show, at MoMA PS1</a> in New York, which opened October 22 and runs through December 31. The painting is large and arresting, made on burlap and partially woven with brown yarn using techniques orally passed on to him by his Grenadian aunts. The series represents the progression of Garvey&rsquo;s life. Alvaro described the process to me:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">I used really high quality paint, Old Holland, in [<em>Garvey loves flowers too</em>] so the colors are vibrant; the last painting will be made of cheap quality house paint that will lose color and vibrancy quickly. It will be [Garvey] at the end of his life, confronting himself and where he might have went wrong.</p> <p>After a studio visit, Klaus Biesenbach invited Alvaro to show his work at PS1 shortly after he graduated. The intention of the exhibition is to reproduce the same energy of that visit and capture Alvaro&rsquo;s approach to painting, one that is more process-oriented and less product-based. Alvaro decided to include two works he did not make that are important to him: <em>Transaction in the sky</em>, a painting by Brooklyn-based artist <a href="http://www.ttfarrell.com" target="_blank">Teresa Farrell</a> and <em>A clock with no hands</em>, a porcelain sculpture I made. I was curious about his decision to include Teresa&#39;s and my work but mostly wanted to discuss his own. As the resulting conversation shifted back and forth between our practices it became clear how much we influence each other&rsquo;s work, and also how much the very act of dialogue and exchange are paramount to Alvaro&rsquo;s practice.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107142943-0E9A2255.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Alvaro Barrington: </strong>As a way of making, everything comes from a personal place. All my material choices are things that were part of past experiences. The imagery&rsquo;s usually taken from something, then I push it. For example, I am making this dick painting based on Chris Ofili&rsquo;s <em>Pimping ain&rsquo;t easy. </em>I thought maybe I could do something with it, &lsquo;cause I got where Chris was coming from but didn&rsquo;t feel the same way. So I took the graphic structure, which is just a black dick that goes from the top to the bottom of the canvas, and as I was sewing it, I remembered my grandmother used to hang clothes outside to dry and I thought maybe I needed to bring some clothespins into the painting. But also before I got the idea to make a dick painting, I had bleached burlap thinking about Helen Frankenthaler and her staining, and my grandmother bleaching clothes to remove stains so I thought it would be cool to make a painting that starts with my grandmother, goes into a dick, then ends with my grandmother.</p> <p>I started sewing &lsquo;cause I remember my aunt had made me a tablecloth when I was like 15, which at the time I didn&rsquo;t really appreciate but kept using it for months &lsquo;cause I knew she would appreciate that I used it. The memory of her color choices always stuck with me and now I realize she was actually a quite brilliant artist.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107143148-0E9A2214.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table align="center" width="600"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;Art is always about visibility and being seen.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Cristine Brache: </strong>It&rsquo;s interesting how you weave canonical works in with your personal history. It feels like you start with a purpose when making work but the purpose functions more as a point of departure, allowing the subconscious to consciously creep in.</p> <p><strong>AB: </strong>The studio is really the place that I process my own subconscious thinking, like, what images I pay attention to. Then I spend a year or two working through that particular image till it becomes something and in turn, my ideas change in the process too.</p> <p><strong>CB: </strong>I can relate to that.</p> <p><strong>AB: </strong>I remember you being very slow in your making. There is something important about your speed. I always think about your work in relationship to time, which is why I asked if I could put <em>A clock without hands</em> in the show.</p> <p><strong>CB: </strong>I&rsquo;ve never considered the actual time I&rsquo;ve spent making work in relation to its conceptual framework. Time, or more specifically, lost time, really resonates with me because it comes with feelings of erasure or non-being, yearning, and memory loss.</p> <p>The way you use material maternal figures in your life did also speaks to time and the preservation of being, almost as a way to canonize your family and give them space to be seen. Your decision to accentuate the presence of time in your paintings is what I chose to make absent with <em>A clock without hands</em>. Its inclusion in your show is poignant and poetic.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107143452-0E9A2221.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AB: </strong>Art is always about visibility and being seen. It&rsquo;s what makes hip hop so powerful, it&rsquo;s the voice of people that society may not see. I was raised by mostly women and incorporating the materials they use is my way of trying to see them. It&rsquo;s like taking that journey with them and listening or being ready to listen cause I have a hint of what they went through.</p> <p><strong>CB: </strong>How do you think about time in relation to your own work?</p> <p><strong>AB:</strong> Time more recently is something that sits in an abstract place for me because I have the privilege of choosing how I exist in it. When I was working shitty jobs&ndash;&ndash;getting paid $5.15 an hour&ndash;&ndash;it was deeply tied to the idea of time as having a monetary value because it dictated so many aspects of my life. In the studio though, it&rsquo;s not so much about time but about what the work needs and sometimes it needs a quick gesture. Other times it needs a slow working that can take months.</p> <p>The cultural history in my work is very romanticized because I left Grenada when I was 8 and it&rsquo;s no longer the Grenada that I knew. But I make paintings that reflect that my early childhood was formed there. I&rsquo;m a lot of cultures blended together &lsquo;cause I think that reflects the immigrant experience. Cultures become a tool for me to use, to pick up and drop off, to think about my experiences. I guess because paintings get preserved, it&rsquo;s automatically a preservation of that.</p> <p>Maybe somewhat like you being Puerto Rican but not quite being Puerto Rican. I remember years ago us talking about what some would call code switching, but I think when you talked about it&mdash;about existing in these different cultural spaces in Florida, then China&mdash;it felt like you were talking about you and not the label of an action. It was like you were talking about things that can be labelled but really it was about you, not the label.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107143610-0E9A2173.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CB: </strong>I think it&rsquo;s hard to feel rooted anywhere when my parents moved to the U.S. to raise me. Miami is particular in that it&rsquo;s a microcosm of Latin America. So almost everyone I grew up with was a first generation American, taking on both Latino and American cultural characteristics. My identity is very specific to Miami but it changes when I go to Puerto Rico or when I&rsquo;m in places outside of Miami in the U.S., or like China and Europe. In China people often didn&#39;t believe I was American because I don&#39;t have blonde hair or blue eyes, in Europe people were surprised when I told them I was Puerto Rican because they thought Puerto Ricans were all black. In other parts of the U.S. I was often put in the position to defend my identity often hearing &ldquo;Where are you <em>really</em> from?&rdquo; when I&#39;d first say I was from Miami. It&#39;s a burden and a gift.</p> <p><strong>AB: </strong>It always leaves me at a place of comfort and discomfort &lsquo;cause I like the mobility aspect of my identity and as an artist I get to play with it. But I imagine it&rsquo;s very different when your identity is grounded. Like, I see my two youngest brothers who were born in Brooklyn, and it&rsquo;s amazing to see how very secure in their narrative they are. I look back at when I was 20 and I felt so lost.</p> <p>But I&rsquo;m curious about how you end up with your material choices and also your reduction of specific objects, like <a href="http://cristinebrache.info/beware.html" target="_blank"><em>Beware of Dog</em></a>. It feels like they hint at things that you don&rsquo;t give away... I&rsquo;m glad we are having this conversation &lsquo;cause I never really want to ask you about your work. I think your work is the thing that people need to look at, not your personal history.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107143546-0E9A2161.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CB: </strong>I think about material so much. It&rsquo;s very important to me that the material contradicts the objects it occupies, pointing to a space between (English) words. I think about what weight certain objects carry, associations that people typically project onto them and then think about how I can heighten that mood by making the object using an equally thought out material.</p> <p>Most successful work tends to open up and poke at emotional coordinates within psyches without being too explicit or arriving at any categorical statements. It also gives the viewer an opportunity to take a step into the grey area people often have so much trouble sitting still in. It&#39;s great to talk about methodologies and process but it&#39;s important that the conversation doesn&#39;t make the work. Ultimately, the work needs to complete itself.</p> <p>I felt that sense of completion the first time I saw your work. You have such a firm grasp on the formal qualities of painting, its history, and use of color and composition. When you add how carefully considered your subject matter and choice of material are, like the burlap and yarn, I am left with a strong feeling of closure with regards to the inner motions that occur in viewing it. It feels like an ardent trip that is very big and present yet doesn&#39;t dominate me. I think the way you handle abstraction and figuration helps navigate this process for the viewer.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107143639-0E9A2216.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AB: </strong>Giving is really important in art in that it&rsquo;s the artist&rsquo;s personal experience of making it, but someone who is experiencing it feels like they have space in there. I think that&rsquo;s what holds me to your work &lsquo;cause it actually situates itself far less personally than my work does. I&rsquo;m always screaming for attention.</p> <p><strong>CB: </strong>[laughs] But you manage the demands for attention well. The big presence, both visually and emotionally don&rsquo;t dominate or try to control me.</p> <p><strong>AB: </strong>I think that&rsquo;s the presence part &lsquo;cause as I was an orphan, I never felt quite seen after my mom died. But I also want to be someone who can move without responsibility to stay. Control is tied to responsibility for me.</p> <p><strong>CB:</strong> Your install at PS1 is a very immersive feat.</p> <table align="center" width="600"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;One of my cousins who never goes to museums or galleries said he felt comfortable in the room and that meant everything to me. &rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107143850-0E9A2168.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AB: </strong>It was meant for folks to question their own experiences so that it has to go back to the viewer. A lot of young artists make the mistake of thinking art means doing what they want to do and you look at the work and it takes from you emotionally &lsquo;cause it&rsquo;s not very giving. The artist is very selfish, but good art always gives. So when you say you&rsquo;re thinking about the materials in terms of how folks understand it, you&rsquo;re having a conversation with people about possibilities in their life.</p> <p>I always make so that I don&rsquo;t have to explain to my brother too much. So that he gets it from his own experiences or can just look and get enough of it. The intention with the work and the installation was for him and the community I grew up in could be in PS1 and feel like there is a space there for them. One of my cousins who never goes to museums or galleries said he felt comfortable in the room and that meant everything to me.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107144021-0E9A2221.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CB: </strong>Yeah I think I remember a conversation we had about that, I remember saying something along the lines of &ldquo;if my grandma can take something away in the viewing of the work then I&rsquo;ve succeeded.&rdquo; Art became a language through its history and context, hence its study. It is so niche it winds up alienating a lot of people who haven&#39;t learned its language and history when the work is solely operating on a conceptual level. I really don&rsquo;t like to make people feel stupid, which is why I think layers are important. They allow the work to be accessible to different kinds of viewers. It&rsquo;s confusing because art is often considered universal, though, contemporary art rarely is. It&rsquo;s a parallax that needs to be accounted for depending on the level of connectivity you&rsquo;re after.</p> <p><strong>AB: </strong>Art always happens in a community and that history has told the wrong story. It often isolates artists, especially black artists. You and Teresa [Farrell, also in the PS1 show] along with a lot of other folks are in my community. Your ideas and how you make helps push me. Like you and Teresa work opposite of each other in that she is a maximalist like Hieronymus Bosch and anything can end up in her work, including gum or a guy she had a relationship with, a TV show she saw, music she listens to. It can all end up in a single painting. And you&rsquo;re a minimalist in that you reduce things through a very considered deliberation. I like working between the two of you.</p> <p>I don&rsquo;t arrive at my ideas out of nowhere. It comes from our conversations about life and art, the same with my community and ways of seeing. The show is really about looking.</p> <p><br /> &mdash;Cristine Brache<br /> &nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(All images: Installation view of <em>Alvaro Barrington</em>. On view at MoMA PS1 in New York from October 22 to December 31, 2017. Image courtesy MoMA PS1. Photo by Pablo Enriquez.)</span></p> Wed, 08 Nov 2017 01:10:50 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Gregory Eddi Jones Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/48370-under-the-radar-alphonso-dunn-traci-mims-gregory-eddi-jones" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers fro</em><em>m <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/487178-gregory-eddi-jones" target="_blank"><em>Gregory Eddi Jones</em></a></em><em>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>I generally manipulate appropriated images to critique the politics of original image sources. With my newest work, I&rsquo;m making Dadaist digital collages that signify their own futility as reflections of political spectacle.</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>I tend to shun that sort of mysticism, and I think if you think about the inverse of that question, what defines an irresponsible artistic act, there&rsquo;s little that could be mentioned aside from maybe the guy who shot a dog in the 70s. So I guess my conclusion is that the artist&rsquo;s responsibility is to not shoot dogs.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)?</strong></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171106133754-Untitled_Screen_Cap__12__the_fourth_wall_--_Gregory_Eddi_Jones_2017.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Gregory Eddi Jones, <em>Untitled Screen Cap #12 (the fourth wall)</em>, 2017</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>This probably doesn&rsquo;t count, but one time I wrote out a list of instructions, kind of like a Sol Lewitt thing, that people have to follow by using a camera in various utilitarian kinds of ways. One is that the reader must wait until nighttime, go outside, and throw their car keys as far as they can into the dark. Then they have to take photographs with a camera flash to find them and print the resulting photos. It&rsquo;s a pretty stupid thing, and I will never do it. (But if you want to do it, you have the instructions, and I would be happy to review your results.)</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p>Well, I publish artists so I don&rsquo;t know if I want to point to individuals. All the artists published on <a href="http://www.inthein-between.com/featured-artists/" target="_blank">In the In-Between: Journal of Digital Imaging Artists</a> are worth knowing in my mind.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top: <em>Flowers for donald </em>&nbsp;#<em>16 (press room [with sponsored content])</em>, 2017, Digital Collage)</span></p> Mon, 06 Nov 2017 05:43:00 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list