Articles | ArtSlant https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/show en-us 40 Stretching across a city and climbing into the sky <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&ldquo;Our sky was destroyed during World War II,&rdquo; creaks a white-bearded eighty-six-year-old Otto Piene from in front of the lens of a video created on the occasion of his Berlin multi-sited exhibition </span><span style="font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.ottopieneinberlin.de/index.php?id=1774&amp;no_cache=1" target="_blank"><em>More Sky</em></a></span><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><em>. </em>He explains his lasting impression with the light phenomena that would permeate his art practice for upwards of six decades, his desire to establish a new launching point for his practice, for the role of art to act as rebuilder.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In conjunction, the </span><span style="font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ber/events/show/343082-more-sky">Neue Nationalgalerie</a></span><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"> and the </span><span style="font-size: medium;"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ber/events/show/342051-more-sky">Deutsche Bank Kunsthalle</a></span><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"> have organized <em>More Sky&shy;</em>, a festival of sorts, spanning three projects and two exhibition spaces, dedicated to the German artist&rsquo;s lengthy career as a boundary breaking contemporary artist. Born in Westphalia in 1928, Piene quickly developed a willingness to interject his curiosities into his art practice. He experimented obsessively with the media of light through projection and kinetic light installations, challenging the canvas itself, disrupting tradition by smoking, charring, and setting its surfaces ablaze in order to explore the causality of light and the dynamism of the work&rsquo;s very movement and evolution.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The collection exhibited at the Deutsche Bank Kunsthalle sets the stage for understanding the infatuations that drove the logical and linear development of Piene&rsquo;s oeuvre&mdash;namely, his deep-rooted interest in flight. The two-part exhibition commences in the Kunsthalle anteroom with a series of drawings dating back to the artist&rsquo;s early career in 1952. The black-and-white works depict a blend of anthropomorphic heavenly bodies and nudes careening through the sky, falling and rising, floating on, in, and out of the planes of sight. The interwoven bodies recall the flying metropolises of Argentinean artist Tom&aacute;s Saraceno, which invite the viewer to imagine an alternative way of living and interacting.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/32120/1dkh/20140807155159-OP_Pressebilder_DBKH_Olympiaregenbogen_1972.jpg" alt="" /></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Otto Piene,</strong> <em>Olympia Regenbogen (Olympia Rainbow), </em>1972, Lithographie; &copy; VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn 2014 / Courtesy Sammlung Deutsche Bank; Photo: Mathias Schormann</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">These expressions of energy and movement find their way out of the artwork and into the world that surrounds them. Light installations in the adjoining rooms seduce visitors to interact and dance alongside their light projections, eliminating boundaries and creating an event to which viewers pay witness. In the next room, works like <em>Olympic Rainbow</em> (1972), a collection of documentary data from the sky art piece in which Piene flew five helium-filled tubes over the stadium of the closing ceremony for the 20<sup>th</sup> Olympic Games in Munich in 1972, showcase the artist as not only exhibiting an interest in the aesthetics of those seen forces of light and picture, but as having taken to study of the science and ecology of unseen forces as well. In stunning color, <em>Olympic Rainbow</em> ascends into the sky exposing the ephemerality of wind and the conduits by which it operates above us.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">At the Neue Nationalgalerie, Piene&rsquo;s work <em>The Proliferation of the Sun</em> takes up the entirety of the ground floor. Scheduled to run from 10pm to 3am, the reverse opening hours of the museum, the work is an impressive synchronized light projection display in which a series of choreographed projectors generates a performance featuring hand-painted slides. Orbs and circles appear in the projections as approximately 1,120 slides are cast into the shadows. Involving sound, architecture, light, and performance, <em>The Proliferation of the Sun </em>sees Piene&rsquo;s paintings leap off the 1,120 slides onto the walls, intermingling realities and demanding the revelation of new possibilities.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20140807060939-OP_SkyArtEvent_DvB_2.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Otto Piene</strong>, <em>Sky Art Event,</em> July 19, 2014, Installation view outside Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin; Photo: David von Becker</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">On July 17, 2014 Otto Piene died while in a taxi on his way to the Neue Nationalgalerie to continue preparations for the scheduled sky art event meant to mark the launch of the entire program. A posthumous homage, on July 19<sup>th</sup> three illuminated air sculptures <em>Berlin Superstar</em> (1984), <em>Paris Star </em>(2008), and <em>Cereus Star</em> (2008), up to 90 meters high, climbed into the sky and floated above the roof of the Neue Nationalgalerie against Berlin&rsquo;s night sky.</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/147418-nicole-rodriguez?tab=REVIEWS">Nicole Rodriguez</a></span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="line-height: 26px; text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">[Image on top: <strong>Otto Piene</strong>, <em>The Proliferation of the Sun</em>, 2014, Installation view at Neue Nationalgalerie, Berlin; Photo: David von Becker]</span></p> Thu, 07 Aug 2014 11:36:40 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Funhouse Fascination <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #525552;">Highlighting his win of this year&rsquo;s Ars Fennica prize, Jeppe Hein&rsquo;s <em>There Are No Ordinary Moments</em> also forms the celebrated artist&rsquo;s first solo exhibition in Finland. The choice was made by Akiko Miki, Senior Curator at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris. Her decision was informed by the way his work affects behavior and engages perception. Thus, it makes perfect sense that the exhibition presents an elucidating overview of his output ranging from his use of reflective materials, geometric shapes, repetitive actions, text, furniture and machinery to the much more ephemeral phenomena of vapor and sound. The selection is bracketed by the entertaining <em>Smoking Bench</em> (2002) &ndash; a mirror accompanied by a bench that envelops visitors in a cloud of vapor when they sit down to examine their reflections &ndash; and his <em>Frequency Watercolors (D) </em>(2013) &ndash; splatter paintings created by running pigment-loaded stencil brushes around the edges of sound bowls.</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><span style="color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20131206055244-Jeppe_7.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Jeppe Hein</strong>, Installation view showing <em>Are You Really Here</em>, 2013; Courtesy Amos Anderson Museum / Photo: Stella Ojala.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Hein has a reputation for producing works that mimic the appearance and strategies of minimalist and conceptual art. A walk through this presentation reminds us of the work of artists such as Robert Morris, Joseph Kosuth, Hans Haacke, Agnes Martin and Dan Graham, but with an interesting twist. He invests his work with unexpected psychological content that makes us aware of our presence and mindset. Concise statements written in neon tubing comment &ndash; &lsquo;You don&rsquo;t have to be perfect to be here,&rsquo; says one &ndash; and question &ndash; &lsquo;Are you really here,&rsquo; asks another. Not only that, but we encounter our reflections over and over again. They appear in the glazing of framed works, a bicycle mirror and when inspecting a hole in the wall. Our proximity to a large mirror gets it shaking. The trembling images change our understanding of both ourselves and the room&rsquo;s attributes. Strolling through this presentation conveys the lighthearted aura of a funhouse; and, with that there is also the risk of triteness. In this regard <em>Screw On Wall</em> (2007) stands out as the most obvious example. Though it engenders surprise and second glances when people notice the screw turning itself into or out of the wall, fascination soon withers. The piece comes across more as a lame gag than an evocative gesture. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20131206055425-Jeppe_1.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>Jeppe Hein</strong>, Installation view showing <em>Light Pavilion</em>, 2009 / <em>You Don't Have To Be Perfect To Be Here</em>,&nbsp; 2012; Courtesy Amos Anderson Museum /Photo: Stella Ojala.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">In an attempt to create an overall experience &ndash; something involving more than the sequential examination if individual works &ndash; Hein also requested that the exhibition spaces be painted various colors. These have been drawn from Goethe&rsquo;s Theory of Colors and condition our responses to the works and the spaces in which they have been set. For some, the dark blue and green used in the small galleries accentuated their intimacy; for others they became claustrophobic. I found that the dark blue conferred an aura to <em>Light Pavilion</em> (2009) that made it much more dream-like and difficult to forget. The light sky blue, pale salmon and eggshell tones enhanced the airiness of the larger spaces and set up contrasts that intensified subtleties inherent to the work. The decision to employ color in this way also recalls Sol LeWitt&rsquo;s switch from graphite to the use of vivid hues. Here, color helps further diminish the systematic or clinical nature of the work. It collects the art works into select communities, which, in turn, encourages new interpretations.</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/362537-john-gayer?tab=REVIEWS">John Gayer</a><br style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(Image on top:<strong> Jeppe Hein</strong>, <em>Detail of 1-Dimensional Mirror Labyrinth, </em>2006; Courtesy Amos Anderson Museum / Photo: Stella Ojala.)</span></p> Mon, 09 Dec 2013 10:49:30 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list The perfect shudder of spectral light upon a terrible beauty. <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Words like <em>psychedelic</em> get trotted out by acid amateurs at every flickering bulb and swirl of color. Real psychedelic experiences are punishing in their power: a nauseating kaleidoscope; a universe decentered and dismantled; still things gyrate and dancers stay still in a blurry wash of purest energy; atoms are split inside your skull and come bursting through glassy eyes; other humans dissolve into electric atmospheres and social mores collapse into mere theater.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Henri-Georges Clouzot's <em>L'Enfer</em> is truly&nbsp;psychedelic. It is an acid experience&nbsp;in every beautiful and terrifying way. Here the film director's&nbsp;experiments with light and time in&nbsp;this unfinished masterpiece play on the troubled face of Romy Schneider,&nbsp;forced to work slave's hours without rest till her fragile psyche frayed away, later on a suicide. This compelling excerpt of the&nbsp;film centers an exhibition of precise and elegant geometry.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20131031192135-ll.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="color: #525552;"><strong>Florian &amp; Michael Quistrebert</strong>, <em>still from The Eighth Sphere</em>, 2010, double channel video installation, 1'41 looped; Courtesy of the Artist and Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions (LACE).</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Julio Le Parc's kinetic sculptures spin and shift simple abstractions. Florian &amp; Michael Quistrebert's double projection mirrors and unmirrors an undulating and radiant array upon a chromed corner. Isabelle Cornaro's video of currency shifts and defamiliarizes the common coin. Pierre-Laurent Cassi&egrave;re's light bulb beamed into life by lasers elicits a soft and disorienting rumble. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Curator Martha Kirszenbaum and scenographer Marianne Zamecznik's precise arrangement exudes a control in all these kinetic sculptures and phenomenological light shows. Sensual and sensorial, the exhibition makes the intimacy of the&nbsp;darkened gallery a necessary nightscape, a room roomy enough to hold all the phantasms of an expanding consciousness, one that threatens to dissolve but is held just so by the curved ceiling and unbroken walls of the gallery and the shimmering clarity of its&nbsp;curatorial vision.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/12307-andrew-berardini?tab=REVIEWS">Andrew Berardini</a>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">[Image on top: <strong>Isabelle Cornaro</strong>, <em>still from De l&rsquo;argent film&eacute; de profil et de trois quarts [Money filmed from a side view and a three-quarter view] , </em>2010, 16 mm transferred to DVD, 02 :13 min.; Courtesy of the Artist and Los Angeles Contemporary Exhibitions (LACE).]</span></p> Thu, 31 Oct 2013 13:49:53 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Playing with Gray Matter <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Conceived as half of a two-exhibition series titled <em>A Matter of Sight and Light and Matter</em>, Lotte Geeven's solo show at PAKT plays with the viewer&rsquo;s perception, right off the bat. The most striking installation in the Zeeburg gallery is a series of stripes, ranging from black to white, which turn the banal chromatic shift of the venue's floor that occurs over the course of the day into something visible and discrete. Another work, this one sound-based, plays noises recorded by the artist during her visit to a 9.101 meter-deep hole on the Czech border. Geeven's display of the speakers on a golden rectangle gives the installation a quasi-magical allure, but the origins of the sound &ndash; the hole was dug for scientific purposes &ndash; connect to the wider span of PAKT's double bill. <em>A Matter of Sight and Light and Matter</em> is in fact moderated by a scientist conducting research on the impact of light on molecular movement, and the interest in invisible, molecular waves is explicit throughout the exhibition. Light and sound are referenced both literally&nbsp;&ndash; through flashing lamps or speakers&nbsp;&ndash; and more subtly &ndash; the same sound insulation material deployed by Haroon Mirza in his Silver Lion-winning installation at the 2011 Venice Biennale can be found under glass itself, insulated and reduced to a minimal sculpture.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20131009170841-lotte_geeven-installation_view.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Science is there, then, but the PAKT show is also marked by the artist's own distinctive poetic. The cohesiveness of Geeven's language is maintained across a range of media encompassing sculpture and video, the latter represented by <em>Shifting Sediments.</em> This suspended projection depicts a rock being scanned by a copy-machine-like light from below, a simple yet scenic visual solution that well represents the Eindhoven-based artist's knack for synthetic visions&nbsp;&ndash; something I had the chance to witness for the first time at FatForm's <em><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/31938">Present Forever</a></em> show, for which Geeven came up with an upside-down car, rotating endlessly on the garage floor. Her use of minimal shapes, like the sphere, is often tampered with by a playful take, replacing soul-less, symbolic objects with pop-infused, less alien ones. Sometimes it&rsquo;s a basketball, but in this case the apple is a recurring element.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20131009171055-20131006_161011.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Not unlike the grayscale that catches our eye upon entering the gallery, though, the overall mood of the show is one of mystique, if not seriousness. Geeven is after what lies just outside our perception, be it geographically &ndash; the center of the Earth &ndash; or temporally &ndash; the darkest hours of the night, when the gallery appears black. Her video seems to suggest the tangible surface of rocks is something worthy of systematic scrutiny, or at least the fascinated gaze of a child holding a lamp to read a book under the sheets at night. Whatever message the artist wishes to fill the hole in our eyes with, it is an intriguing invitation. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/186239-nicola-bozzi?tab=REVIEWS">Nicola Bozzi</a>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(All images: <strong>Lotte Geeven</strong>, installation view of <em>There Is A Hole Inside Your Eye</em>, PAKT, Amsterdam; Courtesy of the artist and PAKT, Amsterdam; Photo: Nicola Bozzi.)</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Tue, 15 Oct 2013 05:54:09 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Excite the right electron and it'll glow. <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">A single splash in an ocean of invisible waves, the spectrum of visible light hints just enough radiance to tease the rest. Outside our paltry paintbox of chroma hide rays gamma and long, thermal and micro, radar and TV, radio both AM and FM depending on the shimmy of the music or the monotone of the talk. All this invisible radiance penetrates buildings and molecules, tables and oil tankers, you and me, vibrating the air with ghostly resonance. &nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Infrared just above and ultraviolet just below, we can almost see. With a little help from this or that technology, darkness can be penetrated with a strappy pair of special goggles and the hidden light of certain materials can be excited just so by the coated glass of a bulb better known in haunted houses and discotheques. Blocking out almost all but ultraviolet, a black light can reveal the secret properties of stones and paper, toothpaste and cum, spot counterfeits and catch murderers. The shortish ultraviolet unseen sneaks in, gets an electron to jump and with that lost energy sends back a longer wave that our limited eyes can finally bear witness.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Though chlorophyll glows bloodred under blacklight, the electron dance party is nowhere more beautiful than in stones. Greens and blues, reds and oranges glow as true fluorescents merely mimicked by dyes. The luminance waved back by certain minerals deserve the moving poetry of its radiance. They fluoresce.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20130926073334-RocksInvite-Black.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Radioactive orange of a mutant carrot and the labial purple of an erotic alien, creamy blues and coral pinks, luminous lavenders and glittering golds as the metal could shine only in our dreams, and of course the strange soft folds of violet beyond violet, a death shroud soaked in spirit, truly otherworldly, every ounce of ultra.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Here they are arranged just so by human hands, basking simply and plainly in sunlight, they shimmer at night under the spectral glow of black light. The first of three shows, this arrangement of elemental things reflects for the artist Emilie Halpern, noted in the press release, a concept derived in part from the shōka style of ikebana, the traditional Japanese art of floral composition. The style, cultivated in the Ikenobō school in the 15th century, is a minimal description of the universe in three parts: the earth (地), the heavens (天), and humanity (人). This exhibition is earth; in the next, heavens, light is captured with goldleaf; in the third, pottery crafted by the artist is put on display. We cannot predict the future beauty of unseen exhibitions, but the re-arrangement into special arrays is an ancient art, and here seen in a literal new light (best visited at night, but surely containing its own beauty during the day), reflects on the unseen qualities of all kinds of things.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">We are permeated with all those rays and electrons and countless other things we cannot see. Many of those rays carry information, words, ideas. Right now, cell phone conversations surge through us all. Through my left knee a teenage girl just broke up with her boyfriend. Through my heart a man called his sister and ask if she needed anything from the store. In my shoulder, I felt a telemarketer from Dubuque sigh into his microphone.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20130926072720-RocksInvite-White.jpg" alt="" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">I am also of course surrounded by the invisible bonds of culture and community, the love of family and friends. I am, so I'm told, protected by a missile defense net, by a border only sometimes marked by a fence. Others tell me as well that my every move can be tracked and maybe (shades of Illuminati) already is. My movements are governed by treaties I'll never read, by laws of which I only have a vague awareness. Depending on the weather, I'm filled with an equally invisible hope or dread because of all the above.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">That which cannot be seen doesn't mean that it can't in some way be communicated. Failing to do so is maybe the hallmark of all art, but that doesn't mean our tender attempts can't be beautiful, funny, or tragic, can't inspire hope or dread on top of all the rest that the universe doles out.&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">As Antoine de Saint-Exup&eacute;ry wrote in <em>The Little Prince</em>: "What is essential is invisible to the eye."</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><em>This trio of shows by Halpern are apparently the last exhibitions by Pepin Moore after three and a half years of exhibitions. Thank you for all the art and artists you supported.</em></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/12307-andrew-berardini?tab=REVIEWS">Andrew Berardini</a>&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;">&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">(All images: <strong>Emilie Halpern</strong>, 2013; Courtesy of the artist and Pepin Moore.)</span><br /></span></p> Mon, 30 Sep 2013 13:55:25 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list “Casual Stripes and Warm Layers” <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif;">Among rising gallery rents and the endless expansion of larger cultural institutions in New York, micro-spaces like ArtBridge&rsquo;s Drawing Room offer a respite. <em style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Ramshackle Kaleidoscope</em>, curated by Jordana Zeldin, is a bite-sized summer exhibition that explores a wing of New Casualism. The smallness of the space&nbsp;&ndash; it was once a closet&nbsp;&ndash; is suited to the works on display: they are approachable objects, and converse comfortably with each other. Casualists tend towards the jokey and intentionally timid, but the three artists here&nbsp;&ndash; Christian Sampson, Amelia Midori Miller, and Sarah Bednarek&nbsp;&ndash; show sincerity in their practice, creating, in Zeldin&rsquo;s words, an &ldquo;understated transcendental beauty.&rdquo;</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;"><em style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;"><span style="line-height: 115%;">Ramshackle Kaleidoscope</span></em><span style="line-height: 115%;"> turns the space into a jewel box illuminated from within. A hanging sculpture by Bednarek called <em style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Crystaline Droplet </em>(2012) anchors the space. The piece is made of angular painted plywood pieces held together by tyvek, allowing the sculpture to unfold: it changes shape but follows its inherent geometry, a fitting spoke to the works around it. The room allows just enough space for one or two people to stand on any side. Another piece by her sits on a shelf in the corner of the space, geometric lines relaxed into place along a central fold. </span> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;"><span style="line-height: 115%;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20130806051350-Installation_Shot_3.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;"><span style="line-height: 115%;">Sampson&rsquo;s semi-translucent acrylics jut out from the walls, glowing with shades of purple, green, and yellow. They are descended from the Light and Space movement, but without the hermetic, grandiose statements that characterized many of those artists. The colored stripes in the acrylics look as if they were poured or painted a few minutes ago; the LED lights shining through them throw not only their patterns but the vaporous structure of the acrylics onto the walls. <em style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Projected Form Double </em>(2013) is made up of two acrylics with intersecting shadows; one has a circular gel taped to it, a lighthearted touch that adds a center to the pattern.</span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;"><span style="line-height: 115%;">The irregular stripes and layers of Miller&rsquo;s paintings seem to fold in on themselves, or perhaps bend and slide under each other. Across town, at Garis and Hahn, <em style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Dying on Stage: New Painting in New York</em> (which just closed on July 20th) surveyed the techniques and styles that fall under New Casualist painting. Like those artists, Miller is confident enough to let the irregular lines of her hand become a part of her patterns. In <em style="mso-bidi-font-style: normal;">Tie Down </em>(2013), gently curving blue and black stripes lie adjacent to each other but show hints of the white ground underneath. </span> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;"><span style="line-height: 115%;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20130806051526-Installation_Shot_2.jpg" alt="" /></span></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;"><span style="line-height: 115%;">All of the works play with the idea of flatness and pattern: Sampson&rsquo;s overhanging acrylics project versions of themselves, the creases in Bednarek&rsquo;s works become part of their pattern, and Miller&rsquo;s paintings hint at depth and folds. The many stripes and fractures here pair well with their handmade look. By using modest gestures to take on daunting histories of painting and installation, these artists create works of vibrancy and warmth</span>.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/329714-ryan-wong?tab=REVIEWS">Ryan Wong</a>&nbsp; </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;"><!--[if gte mso 9]><xml> <w:WordDocument> <w:View>Normal</w:View> <w:Zoom>0</w:Zoom> <w:TrackMoves/> <w:TrackFormatting/> <w:PunctuationKerning/> <w:ValidateAgainstSchemas/> <w:SaveIfXMLInvalid>false</w:SaveIfXMLInvalid> <w:IgnoreMixedContent>false</w:IgnoreMixedContent> <w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText>false</w:AlwaysShowPlaceholderText> <w:DoNotPromoteQF/> <w:LidThemeOther>EN-US</w:LidThemeOther> <w:LidThemeAsian>X-NONE</w:LidThemeAsian> <w:LidThemeComplexScript>X-NONE</w:LidThemeComplexScript> <w:Compatibility> <w:BreakWrappedTables/> <w:SnapToGridInCell/> <w:WrapTextWithPunct/> <w:UseAsianBreakRules/> <w:DontGrowAutofit/> <w:SplitPgBreakAndParaMark/> <w:DontVertAlignCellWithSp/> <w:DontBreakConstrainedForcedTables/> <w:DontVertAlignInTxbx/> <w:Word11KerningPairs/> <w:CachedColBalance/> <w:UseFELayout/> </w:Compatibility> <w:DoNotOptimizeForBrowser/> <m:mathPr> <m:mathFont m:val="Cambria Math"/> <m:brkBin m:val="before"/> <m:brkBinSub m:val="--"/> <m:smallFrac m:val="off"/> <m:dispDef/> <m:lMargin m:val="0"/> <m:rMargin m:val="0"/> <m:defJc m:val="centerGroup"/> <m:wrapIndent m:val="1440"/> <m:intLim m:val="subSup"/> <m:naryLim m:val="undOvr"/> </m:mathPr></w:WordDocument> </xml><![endif]--></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">&nbsp;</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; font-family: arial,helvetica,sans-serif; color: #525552;">(All Images: <em>Ramshackle Kaleidoscope</em>, Installation views; Courtesy ArtBridge Drawing Room.)</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Tue, 06 Aug 2013 06:20:15 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Tearing Shadows: An Interview with Robert Seidel <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong><em>Berlin, Apr. 2013: </em></strong>Enter the void. Decipher dark from light, temporal from physical, motion from stasis. Robert Seidel’s recent installation at 401contemporary encompassed video projection, sound, and solid-state artwork in an absorbing ode to the outer reaches of consciousness.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Most certainly, the cinematic elements of Seidel’s enchanting projection sculpture necessitate pervasive blackness, but this is to ignore the material component of the work, the variegated contours and curves that remain invisible when untouched by light, lurking. Therein lies the paradox; that it must simultaneously be both light and dark to make visible every facet of <i>Tearing Shadows, </i>and Seidel as an artist.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><i>Tearing Shadows</i> examines these contradictions and attempts to draw connections between the seemingly disparate elements of projection, sculpture and sound. Air-born textures are created from the play of the prismatic spectrum, as Seidel’s filmic projection conflates with the undulating dimensions of the physical sculpture. The lull of mesmerizing patterns is intermittently interrupted by glimpses of pure rainbow convergences; an illusion that embeds itself deep in your retina and forces you to question the clarity of your perception.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Seidel’s next exhibit will take the form of a water fountain projection, to be displayed at the <a target="_blank" href="http://www.lichtsicht-biennale.de/">Lichtsicht Biennale</a> in September.</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/61227321" webkitallowfullscreen="" mozallowfullscreen="" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="337" width="600"></iframe></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><a href="http://vimeo.com/61227321">tearing shadows | teaser | robert seidel | 401contemporary berlin, germany</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/robertseidel">Robert Seidel</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><b>Melissa King: How do you devise a relationship between sculpture, projection and sound in a work like </b></span></em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><b>Tearing Shadows</b></span><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><b>? Does one element come first and then inform the others?</b></span></em></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Robert Seidel: </span></strong>As with all of my work actually, sketches are the entry point for the development of the structural discourse for my sculptures. While I cut these from the material by hand there are however always further adjustments and extrapolations of the form. Additional overlaps form sketch fragments on the shapes. As a finalizing element I apply heat, which rips the shape from its two-dimensionality, realizing the relief-like interwoven objects that the viewer experiences.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The projections are constituted in parallel. I actually hail from experimental film, wherein I mainly collate complex, abstract forms from a myriad of sources (3D models, 3D scans, x-rays, sketches, videos, scientific analysis data, etc.) into a fluid whole. Sometimes however I solely work with filmed, naturally occurring processes, such as wash outs, burnings, or disentanglements, which undergo temporal and spatial restructuring. Until recently I had not utilized these for sculptural projections, and wanted to delve into formalizing the transformative processes inherent in light and shadows with the work <em>Tearing Shadows</em>.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">For most of the works I work in collaboration with different composers and musicians; this time the sound experiments are my own though, constituted from field recordings of mine. These were then arranged into a dense whole with timing that allowed for singularity in the renditions, which constantly changed in direction and mood, allowing the viewer to walk about the sculptural space always encountering new light-sound constellations.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">The actual installation is only wrought from all of these elements when the work is set up, thus is only really realized on location. A lot of material remains unused, but could however be all-important for the contextualization of the piece at an alternate locale.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><b>MK: The sculpture mimics the form of torn up sheets of paper. Is there a connection between this destructive act and the nature of film as a temporal, perishable medium?</b></span></em></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>RS:</strong> Actually I started with temporary paper sculptures, however, within the gallery context a temporally more stable and robust material was more fitting. Within the scope of my materials researches I learned to appreciate the properties of plastics, which transform, similarly to celluloid, dramatically under the influence of heat. Films themselves are not only a perishable medium, in my works I also render abstracted processes of creation, constitution and dispersion, be it of memories, structure or constellations.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">These effects may also be transferred to sculptural surfaces I project upon, which in and of themselves represent a finalized state, but through projections are then however disassociated from their own temporal states by light, reallocating them to a new state of limbo. All the materials of my sculptures operate within the scope of their perishable nature and dissolution, amongst them also “folds”, where I projected upon plaster casts of Ancient Greek sculptures.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20130630202332-1.jpg" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><b>MK: </b></span></em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><b>Tearing Shadows</b></span><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><b> plays with optics and distortion of the senses. Can you tell us more about the rainbow color flashes used in the work and what effect you hoped to achieve by embedding these?</b></span></em></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>RS:</strong> As a momentary aspect within the projections I wanted to engagingly dissolve the sculptural space. In experimental film there are flicker-films, that, in their fast, repetitive renditions of extreme contrasts dissolve the silver screen and generate different effects of altered perception. As the viewer may however interactively venture through the installation, not passively observing from a theatre seat, I reduced the intensity. I rather wanted to remind the subject of microscopic depictions, and their chromatic aberrations. For some viewers the experience turned out to be rather more extreme however, making the space feel almost boundless – the extrapolation upon human perception is truly difficult...</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><b>MK: Using two-point projection has limitations in that only certain aspects of the facade of the work are highlighted. How do you achieve multi-dimensionality without the subject being able to access a dead angle in the sculptural space?</b></span></em></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>RS:</strong> The arrangement of the sculptural elements in their differentiated spatial depths distracts the viewers’ attention consciously from the limitations that this aspect entails. Also, there are projected shadows that intermingle with the shadows caused by the projector angles, constituting an ever-changing rhizomatic space. The lighting technicians of film, theatre and opera have founded a technically limited but innovated effective discourse, which I also deploy in my works.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">I would love to develop an installation with multiplex numbers of projections. To date I only had a comparable chance to do so at Young Projects in Los Angeles. There almost all of my film and installation work met, and the internal development and interrelationship of my work became perceivable. In Germany's institutions it is unfortunately often even problematic to attain a single feasible projector…</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20130630202557-tear_poster.jpg" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><b>MK: To your mind is film documentation, illusion or something more abstract?</b></span></em></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>RS:</strong> Film as a medium can be anything; it is actually a container for any form of ideas, which are then compounded into a whole. In my abstract works this has many forms: the raw material for experimental film; conserved shape-giving processes enlivened in projections of dead material; the expansion of the perceptions of space that serves the documentation of a work; or in extreme cases all of this resulting in the subjective image structuring and editing, constituting a work within itself.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Film, and its derivatives, remain the medium with the most artistic potential in our day and age, which is unfortunately not equivalently reflected in the current exhibition sphere. It is really sad to see that the art world retains a phobia of the technical complexity of the medium, but exactly for this reason one should stand in opposition to all the arbitrariness of contemporary advertising and Hollywood film practice as an artist.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><b>MK: Where do you plan on taking your practice in the future?</b></span></em></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>RS:</strong> After this I hope to be able to work more on a "pure" movie, I would like to again develop a work which does away with the limitations of the real world – film is thus also a place of salvation, to round off the above list.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">—<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/258564-melissa-king?tab=REVIEWS">Melissa King</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"> </span></em></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><em>ArtSlant would like to thank Robert Seidel for his assistance in making this interview possible.</em><br /></span></p> <p></p> <p><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;">(All images: <strong>Robert Seidel</strong>,<em> Tearing Shadows</em>; Courtesy of the artist)</span></p> Tue, 02 Jul 2013 05:56:39 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Catlin 2013: Philippa Snow & Charlotte Jansen <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><b><i>Charlotte Jansen: Good to see you the other night at the Catlin Prize. And those pointy jazzy shoes of yours... have a good time?</i></b></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>Philippa Snow:</strong> Those jazzy shoes were an absolute nightmare; half a size too small, and the tip came off the heel when I - very sensibly - went straight home after the prize (by which I mean: "went for whiskey sours in a dark bar").</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><b><i>CJ: Talking of dark rooms; I meant to ask you what you were doing crouching down on the floor there when I got in?</i></b><i></i></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>PS:</strong> I was trying to get some signal, in fact, to send my partner a picture of the big blue monster with the caption "I can't believe this is what I do for a job." He responded with "nice suit." A wag. Did you end up feeling terrible the next day, or no? I think if I had stayed, I definitely might have done. In a very professional manner, obviously.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><b><i>CJ: Well, the aperol cocktails did not help. But they definitely made me very verbose about the art that evening. So, the winner for 2013 was Terry Ryu Kim, who created the installation piece, Screening Solution I, II &amp; III: now 5k richer. Deserved? (deserve-</i></b><b><i>ed?</i></b><b><i>)</i></b></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>PS:</strong> I think that it was the slickest work in the show, and I think that it was the most eminently saleable. If I'm absolutely honest, I didn't initially realise that it was an artwork - I thought that it was a piece of elaborate set-dressing, designed to hustle us into the room with, you know, the dancing monster. But that's sort of the point, right? A rat in a maze, pushing a button for a long-remembered treat (read: Campari cocktail). The CCTV, in fact, was sort of eerie and pale and ephemeral and just <i>unheimlich</i>, in a blink-and-you'll-miss-your-own-reflection kind of way. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20130606140023-DavidOgleInstall.jpg" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>David Ogle<em>,</em></strong><em> </em><em>08020</em>; Photo by Peter Hope.</span><br /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><b><i>CJ: It had a definite finesse to it, and I like that idea, turning visitors into surveilled subjects on a stage in the appropriated public space. But I do think my favourite was the light work in the second room... what did you make of it?</i></b><i></i></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>PS:</strong> Ah, the David Ogle! Would this have been your winner? I'm always cautious about light works, because they're so easy to make into something good-looking and ultimately, you know, <i>contempo</i>. As with the winning work, one could have this perfectly tastefully in one's home, assuming that "one" were a collector of art, and had a home which was generally palatial. What was it you liked in particular about it - the style, or the content? </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><b><i>CJ: And I know you were a bit disturbed by those Japanese face-tighteners...</i></b><i></i></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>PS:</strong> Yes, there's an absolutely horrifying informercial for them. Hang on - I'll find it, as we're doing this for the web:</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium;"><a target="_blank" href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SXcYVh-W14E">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SXcYVh-W14E</a></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Shades of Mike Myers in his plastic Shatner mask. I'm quite interested to hear what you thought of these (these being Juno Calypso's images), as they were the winner of the visitors' prize: one thing which did really strike me was the attention to detail, in the colour schemes and the settings. That sort of thing in constructed images of this type always makes me think about, say, Guy Bourdin - there's something very seventies about it. I'm a big Guy Bourdin fan, so that's no small compliment. Some very heavy Lynchian vibes going on there, as well, wouldn't you say?</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/3215/4yn/20130606140216-pork_web.jpg" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><strong>Juno Calypso<em>, </em></strong><em>Reconstituted Meat Slices</em>; Courtesy Juno Calypso.</span> <br /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><b><i>CJ: Shudder. You know how I've hated Lynch since you forced me to watch Blue Velvet. WHY would anyone make such a film.</i></b></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><b><i>It’s always interesting at Catlin to see the disparity between the simultaneous visitor's vote (this year won by Juno Calypso) and what the judges select… </i></b><i></i></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>PS:</strong> I don't say this to deliberately underestimate the public (or the winner of the public vote), but I suppose I always expect their winner to be something that's either appealing to the eye, or that has a certain novelty to it. Honestly, I assumed that the monster piece would be their winner, but Calypso makes a kind of sense, as well; it's the sort of imagery which might look at home in a womenswear campaign, or as the artwork for a Lana Del Ray L.P. (at least, at absolute face value, which is its intention, I think).</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">(I'm aware that this is making me seem pretentious as all hell, but I sort of <i>am</i>. I apologise.)</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><b><i>CJ: I can’t believe I missed that big fluffy blue monster! </i></b></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><b><i>[Part of the performance by Nick Deeley]. </i></b><i></i></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>PS:</strong> I know that this is perhaps not the most important quality in an art work, but it was Goddamned adorable. Intellectually, I was certain that it was a person in a monster suit, and not a real monster. Emotionally, I just wanted to bury my face in that big blue behemoth's chest, and go to sleep. I also felt convinced, on some level, that it would be the big blue monster receiving the prize if Nicky Deeley were to have won, and felt cheated not getting to see the resultant acceptance speech. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">(If anybody who knows Nicky Deeley is reading this: I will buy that monster suit.)</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><b><i>CJ: (Oh me too. You can have it for the weekend and holidays).</i></b><i></i></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><b><i>But really what we should ask ourselves, and each other, is: do canapes distract from art? What is your view on food at openings? And canapes: if consumed in sufficient quantity, can they ever really replace dinner?</i></b><i></i></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><strong>PS:</strong> "Free food is good food," as I have tattooed over the small of my back - I don't think canapes can ever hurt anything. I didn't actually <i>eat</i> any of these, though - were they any good? </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">I think maybe next time, they should theme the canapes around the work: I've always felt that more artworks could do with being edible. Sarah Lucas had the right idea with her indecent kebabs.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">What did you think of the quality of the venue, by the way? Really quite a stylishly put-together - and well-stocked, in terms of booze and those aforementioned untried-canapes - event, I thought. A <i>real</i> thing for the calendar (you can imagine my air quotes here).</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">I like the Londonnewcastle space. It’s the second year the Prize has run here and it really fills it, so many shows I’ve seen there don’t know what to do with such endless space, but it has a great flow that really benefits the artists, and I think that more than anything constitutes good curating. The Prize night has become a very popular party event for sure - let’s not forget that it has corporate support, hence all those suits and cocktails, and don’t try to smoke a joint the in garden by the way - but I don’t think that’s a bad thing. Justin Hammond [the Catlin Prize curator] knows how to work both things together, and it’s ultimately doing a good thing for emerging artists.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">—<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/265136-philippa-snow?tab=REVIEWS">Philippa Snow</a> &amp; <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/162742-charlotte-jansen?tab=REVIEWS">Charlotte Jansen</a><br /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">(Image on top: <strong>Nicky Deeley</strong> performing <em>Island Year; </em>photograph by Emily Hasell.)</span></span></p> <p></p> Fri, 15 Sep 2017 10:20:15 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Space-Time <p style="text-align: justify;"></p> <blockquote> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><i>I've always wanted to make a light that looks like the light you see in your dream. </i></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">—James Turrell, excerpted from <i>James Turrell: A Retrospective</i></span></p> </blockquote> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><i> </i></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Art is always stumbling into someone else's dream.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">At LACMA, be warned of lines and guards; turns out someone else's dream forces you to book a place months in advance, pay $45, sign a waiver to lab-coated girls in exchange for ten or so minutes with flickering lights. Just one of a dozen logistical hiccups. The precision of other people's dreams has a dollop of the authoritarian, thankfully only a dollop.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Most of the show is dreamy.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Few artists have devoted themselves so wholly to light as James Turrell. And though there are more than one acolyte of light wandering the great wildernesses of the world only so many of them consider themselves artists.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Light is spiritual. Light is electric. Light is cosmic.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Divinity has almost always been a play of light. Turrell's grandmother told him once that the reason they were going into the Quaker Meeting House was to breathe in light. He still is trying to figure out what this means. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Turrell has made a Meeting House, more than a few psychedelic light chambers with spacey materials with one form of electric light steady or flickering, holographic or otherwise bent, and has spent his life, many millions of treasure, and at least two marriages building a naked-eye observatory out of a hollowed cinder cone volcano in the Arizona desert called Roden Crater.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">There's something ballsy and Promethean about the venture. And the man himself thickly bearded, soft eyed, deep-voiced, speaking in elemental terms about one of the most elemental aspects of existence, evokes a somber, spiritual stillness that's damn charismatic.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/1538/2dh/20130605170534-4.jpg" /></span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: x-small; color: #525552;"><strong>James Turrell,</strong> <em>Breathing Light</em>, 2013, LED light into space, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, purchased with funds provided by Kayne Griffin Corcoran and the Kayne Foundation, M.2013.1, © James Turrell, Photo © Florian Holzherr.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">He didn't set out alone; Robert Irwin and Doug Wheeler were there, and others too, all playing with light. They stumbled down different roads, sometimes intersecting in the last forty years. People tend to call that initial gang Light and Space given their penchant for both.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Here Light and Space means a geometric beaming light illuminates a corner; the wall sliced out bends its luminous interior towards us with force; the curved room is a fantasy fallen out of 60s futurism—a clean, bright, trippy heaven where nothing really happens but a shift of color and perhaps an increase in telepathy (see: <a href="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ganzfeld_effect" target="_blank">ganzfeld</a>).</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">When we look towards art, a few of us are looking for what only light can bring. Illumination.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Do you need electric lights, carved ceilings and walls, and elaborate multimillion dollar observatories to bring us closer to enlightenment?</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">James Turrell, again from this show's book: <br /></span></p> <blockquote> <p style="text-align: justify;"><em><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Remember technology does not make good work. You can still write a poem on a brown paper bag, and haiku is just as profound as the Pyramids.</span></em></p> </blockquote> <div style="text-align: justify;" class="yj6qo ajU"> <div data-tooltip="Hide expanded content" id=":z" class="ajR" role="button" tabindex="0"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><img class="ajT" src="https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/images/cleardot.gif" /></span></div> <div data-tooltip="Hide expanded content" class="ajR" role="button" tabindex="0"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">—<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/12307-andrew-berardini?tab=REVIEWS">Andrew Berardini</a></span></div> <div data-tooltip="Hide expanded content" class="ajR" role="button" tabindex="0"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"> </span></div> </div> <p style="text-align: justify;"></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="color: #525552; font-size: x-small;">(Image on top: <strong>James Turrell</strong>, <i> Raemar Pink White, </i>1969, Shallow Space, Collection of Art &amp; Research, Las Vegas, Installation view at Griffin Contemporary, Santa Monica, CA; © James Turrell, Photo by Robert Wedemeyer, courtesy Kayne Griffin Corcoran, Los Angeles)</span></p> <p></p> Wed, 05 Jun 2013 10:08:20 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list A Landscape After the Storm <p style="text-align: justify;" text-align:="" justify=""><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">John Coplans’ essay, “<a target="_blank" href="http://www.eastofborneo.org/articles/pasadenas-collapse-and-the-simon-takeover-diary-of-a-disaster-1975">Pasadena’s Collapse and the Simon Takeover: Diary of Disaster</a>” written for <em>Artforum</em> in 1975, unravels the mirages and problems that the Pasadena Art Museum faced before being essentially purchased by ketchup mogul Norton Simon. Architects Lad + Kelsey's plan rode over the balance of architecture and beneficial exhibition space for their own design vision. The new building and location opened in late 1969 with a chaotic flurry of anticipation from the staff and artists, a renovation that eventually cost the museum its soul.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;" text-align:="" justify=""><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">During this period Coplans worked as the senior curator (1967-1969), seeking to expand the museum’s contemporary collection. One of the works purchased in those years was Dan Flavin’s <em>“monument” on the survival of Mrs. Reppin</em>, 1966. This particular piece required a corner installation; however, due to the Lad + Kelsey design of round curved wall edges, the work was unable to be installed in accord with the artist's vision until Frank Gehry renovated the galleries in 1999. However, <em>“monument” on the survival of Mrs. Reppin</em>, has rarely been shown properly.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;" text-align:="" justify=""><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">I decided to focus on one work alone, in an attempt to strip history from the equation of looking at art. Simply just in for the pleasure of admiring without consequence in any form (no tweets, instagram, facebook, or any other social media ripoff in mind). It seems like I failed at my attempt, but also succeeded. For this reason, it’s best to look at Flavin as the landscape after a storm, or the first phases of early morning—constantly altering light and the horizon. Sometimes, just in it for pure pleasure.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;" text-align:="" justify=""><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">Known for his fluorescent light arrays, Flavin most often dedicated his luminous landscapes to people he knew or artists who inspired him. Even though some of Flavin’s titles tongue at satire, they are more striking as vanishing moments and stories, electric icons and monuments.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;" text-align:="" justify=""><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">For<em> “monument” on the survival Mrs. Reppin</em>, Flavin was compelled by the WWII history of dealer Rudolf Zwirner's mother-in-law who had been interned by the Allies for not divorcing her German husband. A mysterious work, subtly lit in contrasts to the artist’s usual bright, atmospheric color. We know almost nothing of Mrs. Reppin but her legend, and only with this cornered monument of fluorescent white and red. </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;" text-align:="" justify=""><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">If you’re into the whole nostalgia ridden singularity, the second gallery of the <i>Beyond Brancusi</i> exhibition of which this piece is part, plays out a beautiful color theory of blues and grays, almost alluding to a cinematic theater stage or a Guy de Cointet play backdrop. The works in the second gallery were gifts to the museum by the artists under the curatorial workings of John Coplans—works were acquired in the same year as the Flavin.</span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;" text-align:="" justify=""><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"> </span></p> <p text-align:="" justify=""><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;">—<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/164344-arely-villegas?tab=REVIEWS">Arely Villegas</a></span></p> <p text-align:="" justify=""><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"> </span></p> <p style="text-align: justify;"><span style="font-size: medium; color: #525552;"><span style="font-size: x-small;">[Image on top: <strong>Dan Flavin</strong>, American, 1933-1996, <i>"monument" on the survival of Mrs. Reppin,</i> 1966, Warm red and white fluorescent light, Norton Simon Museum, Museum Purchase, Fellows Acquisition Fund; © 2012 Stephen Flavin/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York; courtesy of David Zwirner, New York.]</span><br /></span></p> Sat, 18 May 2013 21:31:03 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list