Articles | ArtSlant https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/show en-us 40 Jan Christopher-Berkson Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/46094-b-stylecolor-333333under-the-radar-jan-christopher-berkson-stephanie-j-ryan-nash-bellowsb" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from </em><em><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/193078-jan-christopher-berkson?tab=PROFILE" target="_blank">Jan Christopher-Berkson</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>My practice is anchored in the image-making process and invested in generating relationships with and between images. Using basic materials like canvas, wood, and paint, my work often takes on a distinct spatiality as a point of departure to bring into focus sharp-edge geometric shapes, and occasional representational images, interplayed with color.</p> <p>My works of the past year or so contain the sense that they are creating another existence within their boundaries, the titles alluding to current political regret and fear. Whether a work has representational aspects or is purely abstracted, the viewer may attempt to order the imagery into a cogent scene that reflects perceptive reality, or the possibility of fantasy. In this way it is my goal to create synthetic structures to deal with my everyday sense of chaos and lack of control over real structures that exist in daily life&mdash;thus having a place to reorganize and compartmentalize feelings.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180108100006-20171211172924-Sundial.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Sundial</em>,&nbsp; 2017, Acrylic on canvas, 60 x 54 inches</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>An artist&rsquo;s responsibility is to create their work from within their own experience. Whether an artwork is purely about beauty, politics, or cultural disrespect, its execution should come internally from the artist&rsquo;s expressive experience.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)? </strong></p> <p>I always think the last painting I made was the greatest thing I ever made until its been hanging around in my studio for a while, haha. So that would be this:</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20180108094718-20171213201320-YearInReview.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Year In Review</em>, 2017, Acrylic on canvas, 52 x 50 inches</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:&nbsp; </strong></p> <p>I never say never&hellip; but I would like to continue with 2D work taking up a 3D space.</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p>Angela Hoener: <a href="http://angelahoener.com" target="_blank">http://angelahoener.com</a><br /> Tully Satre: <a href="http://www.tullysatre.com" target="_blank">http://www.tullysatre.com</a><br /> Paul VerBurg: <a href="http://www.verburgstudio.com" target="_blank">http://www.verburgstudio.com</a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(Image at top:&nbsp;<em>Slow Burn</em>, 2017, Acrylic on canvas, 50 x 50 inches)</span></p> Mon, 08 Jan 2018 02:05:24 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list UNDER THE RADAR: JANE SZABO | TATIANA GULENKINA | MASHA TROTZKY <p><span style="font-size:medium"><em><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(9, 127, 245); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(9, 127, 245); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(9, 127, 245); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(9, 127, 245); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar.</span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size:medium"><em><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(9, 127, 245); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/199511-jane-szabo?utm_source=JaneSzabo&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:large"><span style="color:rgb(9, 127, 245)">Jane Szabo &ndash; Los Angeles</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/1052456?utm_source=JaneSzabo&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1052456/u3azr9/20170622021604-Jane_Szabo_Sugar_and_Spice_and_Everything_Nice.jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/1052446?utm_source=JaneSzabo&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1052446/u3azr9/20170622021557-Jane_Szabo_Burden.jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/1052459?utm_source=JaneSzabo&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1052459/u3azr9/20170622021754-Jane_Szabo_Leap_of_Faith.jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a><a href="https://www.artslant.com/la/works/show/1052458?utm_source=JaneSzabo&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1052458/u3azr9/20170622021605-Jane_Szabo_You_Are_Here.jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a></p> <hr /> <p><span style="color:rgb(9, 127, 245); font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:large"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/394558-tatiana-gulenkina?utm_source=TatianaGulenkina&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;">Tatiana Gulenkina &ndash;&nbsp;</a>Washington D.C.</span></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/990131?utm_source=%20TatianaGulenkina&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/990131/u3azr9/20160524180222-5-A90A6255-Edit.jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/990146?utm_source=TatianaGulenkina&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/990146/mf2ji7/20160524180442-21-A90A2058.jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/990141?utm_source=TatianaGulenkina&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/990141/mf2ji7/20160524180345-15-A90A6106.jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/works/show/990149?utm_source=TatianaGulenkina&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/990149/mf2ji7/20160524180447-22-A90A2120.jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/458388-masha-trotzky?utm_source=MashaTrotzky&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><span style="color:rgb(9, 127, 245); font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:large">Masha Trotzky &ndash; Brussels</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/brx/works/show/1077518?utm_source=MashaTrotzky&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1077518/u3azr9/20171122093757-Christmas_set.jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/brx/works/show/1077521?utm_source=MashaTrotzky&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1077521/u3azr9/20171122093759-Power_is....jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a><a href="https://www.artslant.com/brx/works/show/1077515?utm_source=MashaTrotzky&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1077515/u3azr9/20171122093753-Art_and_Death.jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a><a href="https://www.artslant.com/brx/works/show/1077522?utm_source=MashaTrotzky&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" rel="nofollow" style="box-sizing: border-box; background-color: transparent; color: rgb(51, 122, 183); text-decoration-line: none; -webkit-tap-highlight-color: transparent;"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1077522/u3azr9/20171122093800-Russian_morning_set.jpg" style="border:0px; box-sizing:border-box; display:block; height:auto; margin-left:auto; margin-right:auto; max-width:100%; padding-right:10px; vertical-align:middle; width:100%" /></a></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p><em><span style="font-family:georgia,palatino; font-size:medium">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> Thu, 04 Jan 2018 10:12:16 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Beloved Sculptor Thaddeus Mosley on 91 Years of Carving His Own Path <p>Walking into Thaddeus Mosley&rsquo;s studio is like entering a bestiary that has exploded from its pages. From three feet tall to scraping the ceiling of the workshop, the wooden bodies of Mosley&rsquo;s sculptures radiate warmth and power as they cut through the air. Inspired by birds and the art of Brancusi, Mosley&rsquo;s daring compositions arc into splendid, gravity-defying geometries. With works weighing as much as four hundred pounds, one wonders how this 91-year-old artist is still intimately engaging the wood with his body, chiseling it by hand, some seven decades into his career.</p> <p>On November 8, in an event filled with cutting-edge poetry and performance, Mosley received the Kenneth P. Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences Distinguished Professional Achievement Award from his alma mater, the University of Pittsburgh. I was lucky enough to interview him in his studio about how he eschewed the trappings of the commercial art world, how to define &ldquo;Black Art,&rdquo; and what advice he has for aspirant young artists.</p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table align="center" width="550"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;The main thing that sustained me was that I wanted to find out what I could do and I haven&rsquo;t found that out yet.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171122091836-3466469054_42e0269e0a_b.jpg" style="text-align: center;" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: 12px;"><em>Thaddeus Mosley: Sculpture (Studio | Home)</em>, Installation at The Mattress Factory, 2009.<br /> Courtesy of The Mattress Factory, Pittsburgh, PA. Photo: Tom Little</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Jessica Lanay: How long have you been making art now that you are 91? What made you start?</strong></p> <p><strong>Thaddeus Mosley:</strong>&nbsp;I have been making art since I was in my late 20s. In the early 50s Scandinavian design furniture came to the United States and at Kaufmann&rsquo;s Department Stores they did all sorts of things that stores don&rsquo;t do now: they had a whole display floor of Scandinavian furniture and they always had sculpture and paintings up. They had small teak birds and fish on wire stands. I looked at those and said, &ldquo;well, I can make those.&rdquo; I didn&rsquo;t use teak wood, I just used two-by-fours. So I went to the hardware store and got some brass rods and I made my own fish and birds and stuff.</p> <p><strong>JL: Did you have experience with wood carving before?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM:</strong> Oh, no, no, I had a lot of experience with looking at the stuff.</p> <p><strong>JL: Did you find that you had an affinity for drawing and painting?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM:</strong> When I was a kid I did, but in schools that I went to art was not a big part of the curriculum. In grade school they had art, but in my young days young folks did athletics. I thought when I was a kid I would like to be a painter.</p> <p>At the University of Pittsburgh I had a friend who painted but he went into sociology. We used to go to the Carnegie, particularly to the Internationals because in those days the directors would travel around the world for three or four years and choose [artists] individually, so we couldn&rsquo;t wait to see what would be in the Carnegie International&mdash;those were the type of things that spurred me. When I was young, I always thought there wasn&rsquo;t anything I couldn&rsquo;t do if I wanted to do it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171122091744-3309713074_c646f2b6da_b.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">The artist&rsquo;s studio. Courtesy of The Mattress Factory, Pittsburgh, PA. Photo: Tom Little</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JL:</strong> <strong>When I came into your studio, I saw influences from Dogon art, Makunde art, sculptors like Edmonia Lewis, I saw Alberto Giacometti; I see lines similar to lines in the drawings of Modigliani&mdash;which visual artists influence you?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM:</strong> My main influences are Brancusi, Noguchi, and African Art. I like David Smith&rsquo;s sculpture a great deal. And out of West Africa, where I think most of my influence comes from, it would mostly be the Central Congo. A lot of African Art and Noguchi&rsquo;s things include repetition of form or variations on form or a theme, where a shape is turned different ways or elongated or diminished. There you get to see some of my vision.</p> <p>Another thing people should be aware of is the connection I have with the material. I want to show the beauty, the warmth of the wood by creating more texture, and most of the woods just have a natural finish. That is the main advantage of this material, as opposed to steel or clay. It has an organic warmth that inorganic materials don&rsquo;t have.</p> <table align="right" width="350"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: right;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;Everything should rise from the bottom to the top to get the feeling of levitation.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p><strong>JL:</strong> <strong>Your work represents an incredible defiance of gravity. Some pieces seem to me as if they should be falling over, but there is this balance of air and shape. I imagine that you aren&rsquo;t only looking at the wood, but the space around it. Compositionally, take us through making a piece.</strong></p> <p><strong>TM:</strong> I have a philosophy of weight and space and that means that everything should rise from the bottom to the top to get the feeling of levitation; I would say my talent is making things that come apart&mdash;most of these pieces can be taken apart. Sometimes you get the feeling of intimacy between shapes. I always look to see how well they hold up in space. You can almost take the same thing in music, how it punctuates the space around it&mdash;what it does in the silence you might say.</p> <p>I always say there is a dance: does the piece look like it has movement even though it is standing still? I like for them to look like they are supposed to move. I try to visualize in my mind how things are going to look when they are done. Sometimes I get a piece of wood that is interesting and I see interesting shapes. Most of this is mental and not physical pre-planning. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn&rsquo;t.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171122091907-3309711858_10494a110f_b.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">The artist&rsquo;s studio. Courtesy of The Mattress Factory, Pittsburgh, PA. Photo: Tom Little</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JL:</strong> <strong>A lot of emerging and mid-career artists decide to move to larger cities&mdash;New York or Los Angeles&mdash;to be closer to the commercial art industry. What inspired you to stay in Pittsburgh?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM:</strong> Well, two or three things. First of all, I never liked the commercial aspect of this business. Like any business, for the people that are seeking to get in&mdash;whether you are a writer or dancer or actor&mdash;you are almost always at the will of the controllers. You do what they want you to do, when they want you to do it, and for the price they want you to do it. In the &rsquo;60s, Leon Arkus asked me to have a solo show, my first solo show, at the Carnegie Museum of Art. Leon brought in Art Seidenberg and Lefevre Gallery, people from New York, to look at my work. Both of them wanted to know if I could do two shows at one time and I said that I couldn&rsquo;t produce that much work. And they asked if I could move to New York and I explained that I would have to get transferred from Pittsburgh. They said, &ldquo;what do you mean transferred?&rdquo; and I said, &ldquo;I can get transferred from the Post Office here to the Post Office in New York.&rdquo; Then they said that I couldn&rsquo;t have a job&mdash;that I would have to spend all of my time working on my art. In the meantime I was married with children. If I had been a single guy I might have considered it. But I said that I couldn&rsquo;t do it. That aspect of churning out work helped me discover that it wasn&rsquo;t about the art but about something they could sell.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table align="center" width="650"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;When you are involved in the commercial aspect of the arts you always have the pressure to produce and sell, and I never really wanted that.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>I was married twice, I had three kids living with me, and I had to get a house. I always believe that your first consideration if you are a parent is your children. Then I guess I got past the age that people were really interested in me. I was in a show in Philadelphia and one of the critics said that he couldn&rsquo;t be interested in someone&rsquo;s work who is past the age of forty. I was surprised that you recognized all the African influence in my artwork; very few African American institutions have been interested in my work. But I have never depended on art for a living&mdash;I was in the civil service for many years. I have a pension and can do whatever I want. When you are involved in the commercial aspect of the arts you always have the pressure to produce and sell, and I never really wanted that.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171122092026-3466469928_c3d981918a_b.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Thaddeus Mosley: Sculpture (Studio | Home)</em>,&nbsp;Installation at The Mattress Factory,&nbsp;2009.&nbsp;<br /> Courtesy of The Mattress Factory, Pittsburgh, PA. Photo: Tom Little</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JL: How have you been able to sustain a whole life of art? I know there are a lot of artists who give up because they feel they can&rsquo;t work full-time and do their art. Or a lot of people who find it hard to get exposure for their work and give up because they figure they are never going to be able to do anything with it. What has been your life philosophy for continuing to make art no matter what?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM: </strong>At an art residency I came across a young man who asked me how he could make a living doing sculpture. I told him that there are numerous ways you can make a living at this but I think the main thing you have to decide is why you are doing this. Like someone that is writing poetry or someone who is writing novels&mdash;because everyone hopes that they are going to become another Picasso or someone like that&mdash;I never felt that way. I made sculpture for myself. I was very selfish. I wanted it in my house. I think the main thing that sustained me was that I wanted to find out what I could do and I haven&rsquo;t found that out yet. I tell anyone, I don&rsquo;t think anything is as exciting as finding that you can do something yourself. I am always eager to come to the studio and if I get an idea I start working on it.</p> <p>You have to have the spirit of an amateur, loving to do something just for the doing. I knew people who started out as painters and they didn&rsquo;t sell anything so they quit. They would be better off selling cars than painting if that was it. A lot of times there is a lack of mutual support that makes people stop or question themselves. When you are first starting out you don&rsquo;t have the greatest confidence, you&rsquo;re finding your way. But for me, it has always been a very internal and selfish quest.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171122092005-3390652388_569e7961f6_b.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">The artist&rsquo;s home.&nbsp;Courtesy of The Mattress Factory, Pittsburgh, PA. Photo: Tom Little</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table align="center" width="650"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;How do you know if someone is doing Black Art? Look at the artist&mdash;I don&rsquo;t care what the art looks like.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>JL: What are you thoughts on Blackness or a Black Art Aesthetic&nbsp;in terms of your art and process?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM:</strong> I was in the time when the Black Revolution was on in the &rsquo;60s. I knew Dana Chandler and some of those people who were Black Revolutionary Artists. I knew people like Baraka. Some of these people were like, if you weren&rsquo;t writing about the protest or if your painting did not address the conditions of the African American in the United States then it was European Decadence. And I knew a group of people that had spaces here that said that any artist that shows in White institutions can&rsquo;t show with us. And I said, &ldquo;well, you just did me a favor.&rdquo;</p> <p>I had friends that adhered to this philosophy, but I think that your first responsibility is to your own mind and your own integrity and what you see as an individual. If you think that you need to belong to a herd to be comfortable then that is okay. But I also knew people who were chanting freedom but wanted the woman to walk four or five steps behind them and be subservient to them and I said, &ldquo;you aren&rsquo;t talking about freedom, you&rsquo;re talking about being in charge, you want power over other people, you want the same thing that you&rsquo;re deriding.&rdquo;</p> <p>I have a friend&mdash;I think he is one of the few great painters in the country&mdash;Sam Gilliam, and people were putting him down because they did not think he was doing what they called &ldquo;Black Art.&rdquo; People ask, well how do you know if someone is doing Black Art? And I say that the easiest definition is to look at the artist&mdash;I don&rsquo;t care what the art looks like. I just feel that an artist first has to not worry about conforming. I just do what I do, and if you don&rsquo;t like it, that&rsquo;s fine. I like it and I am not going to make something I don&rsquo;t like.</p> <p><strong>JL:</strong> <strong>What advice would you give to an artist trying to find their way?</strong></p> <p><strong>TM:</strong> The first thing I would say is to look a lot and read a lot. How I learned was looking and reading and buying art books and going to museums and galleries and looking to see how I think the thing was made. I would tell them to find out why this is making your life interesting. There are a lot of things that aren&rsquo;t very valuable in life so you want to do something that is going to increase the value of your life or enhance it to some degree and, as odd as it may seem, this is what makes my life, even in my old age. I am always happy. The good, bad and the ugly, I enjoy looking at it all. If it is not fun making it then I have no interest in it.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/490259-jessica-lanay?tab=REVIEWS">Jessica Lanay</a></p> <p><em>Jessica Lanay is a poet and short story writer from the Florida Keys living in Pittsburgh. Her work can be found in Salt Hill Journal, Tahoma Literary Review, and is forthcoming in Fugue and The Common.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>(Image at top: Thaddeus Mosley at home. All images: Courtesy of The Mattress Factory, Pittsburgh, PA. Photos: Tom Little)</p> Wed, 22 Nov 2017 07:58:20 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Wednesday Web Artist of the Week: The Wrong Edition <p><a href="http://thewrong.org/" target="_blank">The Wrong</a> is a decentralized biennial exhibition, the largest of its kind, dedicated to contemporary digital art and culture. Now in its third edition, simply titled <em>(biennale)</em>, The Wrong features a tremendous number of curated exhibitions, projects, and events&mdash;both online (in &ldquo;<a href="http://thewrong.org/filter/pavilion/" target="_blank">pavilions</a>&rdquo;) and off (in &ldquo;<a href="http://thewrong.org/filter/embassy/" target="_blank">embassies</a>&rdquo;).</p> <p>Because of the sheer magnitude of content, tackling the biennial can be an overwhelming prospect, even for the initiated. For this week&rsquo;s Wednesday Web Art column, we&rsquo;re easing you into the world of The Wrong, sharing some of our favorite work from the 2017 edition. But as you&rsquo;ll quickly learn, with such an extensive exhibition at your fingertips&mdash;1,400 artists across 70 pavilions and nearly 30 embassies&mdash;it&rsquo;s hard to stop here. Consider these works as launching points for charting your own path into the seemingly endless corners of The Wrong.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/HuMcfHjiVTg" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Aleksandra Kovačević &amp; Jelena Nikolić</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="https://wrongprostheticco.wordpress.com/portfolio/aleksandra-kovacevic-jelena-nikolic/" target="_blank">meetme@heaven</a></em><br /> This strangely calming, perpetually rotating marble slab carved with inspirational messages is the perfect way to start your Wrong adventure. It can be a challenging, emotional journey, but as the artists of this piece state: &ldquo;&lsquo;Life is full of problems, and the only way to improve our chances of overcoming most of these problems is to optimize how we think about them.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="https://wrongprostheticco.wordpress.com/" target="_blank">Prosthetic</a></em>, Curated by Darko Vukic<br /> This pavilion is inspired by the quote from political theorist Hannah Arendt: &ldquo;Our life is prosthetic. We assume that through these variety of processes we can realize our desires which themselves are becoming prosthetic. We also assume other life through this prosthetization of our current endeavors.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Q-kkh_jaDcY" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Karin Ferrari</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="http://postinternet.art/pages/karin.html" target="_blank">Hyperconnected (The Whole Picture)</a></em><br /> Ferrari&rsquo;s work is an exploration of the explosion of conspiracy culture in the internet age. The fact that this video is specifically about the &lsquo;truth&rsquo;&nbsp; behind the symbolism of the internet means the it functions brilliantly on multiple levels of paranoia and digital creation.</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="http://postinternet.art/index.html" target="_blank">Postinternet.art</a></em>, Curated by Juha van Ingen &amp; Jarkko R&auml;s&auml;nen<br /> The contributing artists were only given the name of the pavilion as inspiration for their work, leading to an eclectic mix of art dedicated to this ubiquitous term.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171115155435-Lara_Joy_Evans.png" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Lara Joy Evans</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <a href="https://lightlitecoin.info/lje" target="_blank">https://lightlitecoin.info/lje</a><br /> The primal woman&mdash;part neural network, part Neanderthal, part mud, according to DNA panel results&mdash;joyfully connects with internet life. Evans&rsquo; work, comprising &ldquo;photographs altered by AI and neural network,&rdquo; is a welcome moment of pure human vitality among the digital hive-mind.</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <a href="http://lightlitecoin.info" target="_blank"><em>Light Lite Coin</em></a>, curated by Coleman Mummery<br /> Described by the curator as, &ldquo;self help for collective paranoia,&rdquo; the artworks in this pavilion are all programs. &ldquo;There are bio-social implications to running these programs on yourself and sharing them with others.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/137466365" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Morgan Beringer</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="https://www.thenormalpavillion.xyz/morgan-beringer" target="_blank">Abstraction 47</a></em><br /> An endlessly morphing, mysterious and beautiful vision that evokes something between an unfathomable alien storm and a haunted impressionist watercolor.</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="https://www.thenormalpavillion.xyz/" target="_blank">Normal</a></em>, curated by Ilavenil Jayapalan<br /> This enigmatic pavilion interrogates what constitutes &ldquo;Normality.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/xlanYJwnuvw" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Elizaveta Perebatova</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="http://proteytemen.com/diapavilion/perebatova/" target="_blank">ATTENTION</a></em><br /> Perebatova suggests that &ldquo;we have worked out ways of interacting with the world and have stopped notice the moment of interaction [sic]. We are automatic and enslaved by our habits.&rdquo; Her witty and enchanting video presents cryptic illustrations of banal design objects, with instructions to &ldquo;listen to reality, to look at it as if we are doing it for the first time.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="http://proteytemen.com/diapavilion" target="_blank">Diapavilion</a></em>, Curated by Protey Temen<br /> The artists in this pavilion are students of fine arts and contemporary illustration at HSE Art and Design School in Moscow, Russia. Most of works they have created are surreal and inventive pastiches of social and scientific instructional films.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171115155220-MutantClub.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artwork &amp; Pavilion:</strong> Various Artists, <em><a href="http://www.mutantclub.net/" target="_blank">Mutant Club</a></em>, Curated by Enrique Salmoiraghi<br /> One of the few pavilions where the collected contributions of the artists seamlessly form a single piece of art. They have provided the dancers and decorations for the titular intergalactic u.f.o. nightclub. This just might be the most universal, engaging, and downright entertaining pavilions in the whole biennale.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171115155134-Renee_Cox.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Renee Cox</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artworks &amp; Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="http://gisdejeunersurlherbe.tumblr.com/" target="_blank">Gis Dejeuner Sur L&rsquo;Herbe</a></em>, Curated by Jeroen Bouweriks<br /> This is one of the most successful pavilions shaped by a singular concept. The idea itself basically overwhelms the contributions of the artists, making it the curator&rsquo;s work more than anything else. Bouweriks asked a long list of artists, theorists, curators, gallerists, and designers&rdquo; in iPhone chats to Google Manet&rsquo;s painting<em> Le D&eacute;jeuner sur l&rsquo;Herbe</em> and then send him the &ldquo;original&rdquo; as an attached image. This prompt inspired reactions ranging from delight to confusion, with most contributors following his instructions exactly. Some deviate from the plan a little and send work adapted from or inspired by the famous painting, like this response (above) from the brilliant Renee Cox.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/QByGFQBiV20" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Peter Rahul</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="http://gfxfreeerror.com/peter-rahul.html" target="_blank">Phase 2</a></em><br /> A hypnotic abstract exploration of vintage computer graphics and CRT technology, this piece finds the right balance between warm nostalgia and an alternative future in a parallel universe where analogue conquered digital.</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="http://gfxfreeerror.com/index.html" target="_blank">GFX Free Error</a></em>, Curated by Haydi Roket<br /> Named after the error warning given to a malfunctioning video card, this pavilion features works that question the effects of broken technology on our perception of reality. The curator asks: &ldquo;Do we merely create new realities from these faults? If it&#39;s the sole truth, then what happens to those broken realities around us?&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/bXn1xavynj8" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artists:</strong> Signe Pierce &amp; Alli Coates</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="https://q-safe-q.tumblr.com/tagged/signepierceandallicoates/" target="_blank">American Reflexxx</a></em><br /> A modern masterpiece of documentary art: the reaction these artists got for simply being &ldquo;different&rdquo; among those who consider themselves &ldquo;normal&rdquo; is truly horrifying. The film presents a perfect representation the soul-crushing culture of trolling and bullying that is now synonymous with being online. The subject was highlighted and compounded by the fact that the abuse continued when <a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bXn1xavynj8" target="_blank">the video was posted online</a>. Pierce says, &ldquo;It did feel similar to the mob scene all over again, only yes, people had the opportunity to bash me anonymously.&rdquo;</p> <p><strong>Pavilion: </strong><em><a href="https://q-safe-q.tumblr.com/tagged/home/chrono" target="_blank">Safe</a></em>, curated by Christopher Clary<br /> This pavilion explores the concept of being &ldquo;safe&rdquo; and &ldquo;safe spaces&rdquo; in network culture. The artists have each contributed work that &ldquo;questions the validity of safety through expressions of intersectional trauma&mdash;personal, familial, collective, and systemic.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><iframe allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0" height="394" mozallowfullscreen="" src="https://player.vimeo.com/video/234747372" webkitallowfullscreen="" width="700"></iframe></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Josefin Jonsson</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="http://pinkpinkmoon.altervista.org/josefin-jonsson/" target="_blank">Falling Stars</a></em><br /> According to <a href="https://www.instagram.com/pastelae/" target="_blank">her Instagram</a>, Jonsson creates &ldquo;pastel original artworks with dream layers and soft pink internet feelings.&rdquo; This descriptor barely prepares you for this unsettling slice of futuristic, new-age hypnotherapy.</p> <p><strong>Pavilion:</strong> <em><a href="http://pinkpinkmoon.altervista.org/" target="_blank">Pink, Pink Moon</a></em>, Curated by Fabio Paris<br /> An all-women pavilion that is also one of the biennial&rsquo;s most compelling and subversive. The artists have made work that presents &ldquo;the pink as nexus of contemporary aesthetics and not as a feminist reading.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171115154831-Mani_Nilchiani.gif" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Artist:</strong> Mani Nilchiani</p> <p><strong>Artwork:</strong> <em><a href="http://foreverfornever.xyz/" target="_blank">You-Eye</a></em><br /> A clever, minimalist, motion-activated interactive piece that questions the value and meaning of familiar symbols of modern life. It&rsquo;s also a lot of fun to play with!</p> <p><strong>Pavilion: </strong><em><a href="http://foreverfornever.xyz/" target="_blank">Forever Fornever</a></em>, Curated by Chris Romero<br /> This pavilion looks at the disappearing line between our digital personas and our physical bodies. The artworks &ldquo;portray the present, a hyper-technological world, and hypothesize the future&mdash;a dream caught between utopia and nightmare.&rdquo;</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/441718-christian-petersen?tab=REVIEWS" target="_blank">Christian Petersen</a></p> <p><em>We run an online magazine, so of course, we&#39;re interested in what&#39;s happening with art on the web. We invited online gallerist, founder, and curator of&nbsp;<a href="http://www.digitalsweatgallery.com/" target="_blank">Digital Sweat Gallery</a>, Christian Petersen, to write a bi-monthly column for us. Every other Wednesday he selects a Web Artist of the Week.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> Thu, 16 Nov 2017 04:45:40 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list “Good Art Always Gives”: Alvaro Barrington’s Generous First Solo at PS1 <p>Brooklyn-based artist <a href="https://www.instagram.com/alvarobarrington/?hl=en" target="_blank">Alvaro Barrington</a> views Marcus Garvey as &ldquo;an abstract avatar...like a saint or a north star of some sort.&rdquo; It&rsquo;s one of the things that drew him to London, where he attended the Slade School of Fine Art for graduate school in 2015&mdash;and where I befriended him. He describes his time there as a &ldquo;pilgrimage,&rdquo; often citing Garvey&rsquo;s life in London in relation to the body of work he made there:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">[Garvey] died poor in London. It wasn&rsquo;t until decades later that Jamaica&mdash;where he was born&mdash;realized his influence and began to celebrate him. I imagine London being where the first real shift in his radical thinking early on in his life took place, and later [where] he had to take in his failures and the forces that destroyed his movement.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107142916-0E9A2187.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">All images: Installation view of&nbsp;<em>Alvaro Barrington</em>. On view at MoMA PS1 in New York from October 22 to December 31, 2017. Courtesy MoMA PS1. Photos: Pablo Enriquez</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>Alvaro&rsquo;s painting, <em>Garvey loves flowers too </em>is the header image for <a href="https://www.moma.org/calendar/exhibitions/3901" target="_blank">his first (ever) solo show, at MoMA PS1</a> in New York, which opened October 22 and runs through December 31. The painting is large and arresting, made on burlap and partially woven with brown yarn using techniques orally passed on to him by his Grenadian aunts. The series represents the progression of Garvey&rsquo;s life. Alvaro described the process to me:</p> <p style="margin-left: 80px;">I used really high quality paint, Old Holland, in [<em>Garvey loves flowers too</em>] so the colors are vibrant; the last painting will be made of cheap quality house paint that will lose color and vibrancy quickly. It will be [Garvey] at the end of his life, confronting himself and where he might have went wrong.</p> <p>After a studio visit, Klaus Biesenbach invited Alvaro to show his work at PS1 shortly after he graduated. The intention of the exhibition is to reproduce the same energy of that visit and capture Alvaro&rsquo;s approach to painting, one that is more process-oriented and less product-based. Alvaro decided to include two works he did not make that are important to him: <em>Transaction in the sky</em>, a painting by Brooklyn-based artist <a href="http://www.ttfarrell.com" target="_blank">Teresa Farrell</a> and <em>A clock with no hands</em>, a porcelain sculpture I made. I was curious about his decision to include Teresa&#39;s and my work but mostly wanted to discuss his own. As the resulting conversation shifted back and forth between our practices it became clear how much we influence each other&rsquo;s work, and also how much the very act of dialogue and exchange are paramount to Alvaro&rsquo;s practice.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107142943-0E9A2255.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Alvaro Barrington: </strong>As a way of making, everything comes from a personal place. All my material choices are things that were part of past experiences. The imagery&rsquo;s usually taken from something, then I push it. For example, I am making this dick painting based on Chris Ofili&rsquo;s <em>Pimping ain&rsquo;t easy. </em>I thought maybe I could do something with it, &lsquo;cause I got where Chris was coming from but didn&rsquo;t feel the same way. So I took the graphic structure, which is just a black dick that goes from the top to the bottom of the canvas, and as I was sewing it, I remembered my grandmother used to hang clothes outside to dry and I thought maybe I needed to bring some clothespins into the painting. But also before I got the idea to make a dick painting, I had bleached burlap thinking about Helen Frankenthaler and her staining, and my grandmother bleaching clothes to remove stains so I thought it would be cool to make a painting that starts with my grandmother, goes into a dick, then ends with my grandmother.</p> <p>I started sewing &lsquo;cause I remember my aunt had made me a tablecloth when I was like 15, which at the time I didn&rsquo;t really appreciate but kept using it for months &lsquo;cause I knew she would appreciate that I used it. The memory of her color choices always stuck with me and now I realize she was actually a quite brilliant artist.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107143148-0E9A2214.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <table align="center" width="600"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;Art is always about visibility and being seen.&rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Cristine Brache: </strong>It&rsquo;s interesting how you weave canonical works in with your personal history. It feels like you start with a purpose when making work but the purpose functions more as a point of departure, allowing the subconscious to consciously creep in.</p> <p><strong>AB: </strong>The studio is really the place that I process my own subconscious thinking, like, what images I pay attention to. Then I spend a year or two working through that particular image till it becomes something and in turn, my ideas change in the process too.</p> <p><strong>CB: </strong>I can relate to that.</p> <p><strong>AB: </strong>I remember you being very slow in your making. There is something important about your speed. I always think about your work in relationship to time, which is why I asked if I could put <em>A clock without hands</em> in the show.</p> <p><strong>CB: </strong>I&rsquo;ve never considered the actual time I&rsquo;ve spent making work in relation to its conceptual framework. Time, or more specifically, lost time, really resonates with me because it comes with feelings of erasure or non-being, yearning, and memory loss.</p> <p>The way you use material maternal figures in your life did also speaks to time and the preservation of being, almost as a way to canonize your family and give them space to be seen. Your decision to accentuate the presence of time in your paintings is what I chose to make absent with <em>A clock without hands</em>. Its inclusion in your show is poignant and poetic.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107143452-0E9A2221.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AB: </strong>Art is always about visibility and being seen. It&rsquo;s what makes hip hop so powerful, it&rsquo;s the voice of people that society may not see. I was raised by mostly women and incorporating the materials they use is my way of trying to see them. It&rsquo;s like taking that journey with them and listening or being ready to listen cause I have a hint of what they went through.</p> <p><strong>CB: </strong>How do you think about time in relation to your own work?</p> <p><strong>AB:</strong> Time more recently is something that sits in an abstract place for me because I have the privilege of choosing how I exist in it. When I was working shitty jobs&ndash;&ndash;getting paid $5.15 an hour&ndash;&ndash;it was deeply tied to the idea of time as having a monetary value because it dictated so many aspects of my life. In the studio though, it&rsquo;s not so much about time but about what the work needs and sometimes it needs a quick gesture. Other times it needs a slow working that can take months.</p> <p>The cultural history in my work is very romanticized because I left Grenada when I was 8 and it&rsquo;s no longer the Grenada that I knew. But I make paintings that reflect that my early childhood was formed there. I&rsquo;m a lot of cultures blended together &lsquo;cause I think that reflects the immigrant experience. Cultures become a tool for me to use, to pick up and drop off, to think about my experiences. I guess because paintings get preserved, it&rsquo;s automatically a preservation of that.</p> <p>Maybe somewhat like you being Puerto Rican but not quite being Puerto Rican. I remember years ago us talking about what some would call code switching, but I think when you talked about it&mdash;about existing in these different cultural spaces in Florida, then China&mdash;it felt like you were talking about you and not the label of an action. It was like you were talking about things that can be labelled but really it was about you, not the label.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107143610-0E9A2173.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CB: </strong>I think it&rsquo;s hard to feel rooted anywhere when my parents moved to the U.S. to raise me. Miami is particular in that it&rsquo;s a microcosm of Latin America. So almost everyone I grew up with was a first generation American, taking on both Latino and American cultural characteristics. My identity is very specific to Miami but it changes when I go to Puerto Rico or when I&rsquo;m in places outside of Miami in the U.S., or like China and Europe. In China people often didn&#39;t believe I was American because I don&#39;t have blonde hair or blue eyes, in Europe people were surprised when I told them I was Puerto Rican because they thought Puerto Ricans were all black. In other parts of the U.S. I was often put in the position to defend my identity often hearing &ldquo;Where are you <em>really</em> from?&rdquo; when I&#39;d first say I was from Miami. It&#39;s a burden and a gift.</p> <p><strong>AB: </strong>It always leaves me at a place of comfort and discomfort &lsquo;cause I like the mobility aspect of my identity and as an artist I get to play with it. But I imagine it&rsquo;s very different when your identity is grounded. Like, I see my two youngest brothers who were born in Brooklyn, and it&rsquo;s amazing to see how very secure in their narrative they are. I look back at when I was 20 and I felt so lost.</p> <p>But I&rsquo;m curious about how you end up with your material choices and also your reduction of specific objects, like <a href="http://cristinebrache.info/beware.html" target="_blank"><em>Beware of Dog</em></a>. It feels like they hint at things that you don&rsquo;t give away... I&rsquo;m glad we are having this conversation &lsquo;cause I never really want to ask you about your work. I think your work is the thing that people need to look at, not your personal history.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107143546-0E9A2161.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CB: </strong>I think about material so much. It&rsquo;s very important to me that the material contradicts the objects it occupies, pointing to a space between (English) words. I think about what weight certain objects carry, associations that people typically project onto them and then think about how I can heighten that mood by making the object using an equally thought out material.</p> <p>Most successful work tends to open up and poke at emotional coordinates within psyches without being too explicit or arriving at any categorical statements. It also gives the viewer an opportunity to take a step into the grey area people often have so much trouble sitting still in. It&#39;s great to talk about methodologies and process but it&#39;s important that the conversation doesn&#39;t make the work. Ultimately, the work needs to complete itself.</p> <p>I felt that sense of completion the first time I saw your work. You have such a firm grasp on the formal qualities of painting, its history, and use of color and composition. When you add how carefully considered your subject matter and choice of material are, like the burlap and yarn, I am left with a strong feeling of closure with regards to the inner motions that occur in viewing it. It feels like an ardent trip that is very big and present yet doesn&#39;t dominate me. I think the way you handle abstraction and figuration helps navigate this process for the viewer.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107143639-0E9A2216.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AB: </strong>Giving is really important in art in that it&rsquo;s the artist&rsquo;s personal experience of making it, but someone who is experiencing it feels like they have space in there. I think that&rsquo;s what holds me to your work &lsquo;cause it actually situates itself far less personally than my work does. I&rsquo;m always screaming for attention.</p> <p><strong>CB: </strong>[laughs] But you manage the demands for attention well. The big presence, both visually and emotionally don&rsquo;t dominate or try to control me.</p> <p><strong>AB: </strong>I think that&rsquo;s the presence part &lsquo;cause as I was an orphan, I never felt quite seen after my mom died. But I also want to be someone who can move without responsibility to stay. Control is tied to responsibility for me.</p> <p><strong>CB:</strong> Your install at PS1 is a very immersive feat.</p> <table align="center" width="600"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding: 10px;"> <p style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large; color: rgb(31, 31, 31); text-align: center;"><span style="font-size: x-large;"><em>&ldquo;One of my cousins who never goes to museums or galleries said he felt comfortable in the room and that meant everything to me. &rdquo;</em></span></p> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107143850-0E9A2168.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>AB: </strong>It was meant for folks to question their own experiences so that it has to go back to the viewer. A lot of young artists make the mistake of thinking art means doing what they want to do and you look at the work and it takes from you emotionally &lsquo;cause it&rsquo;s not very giving. The artist is very selfish, but good art always gives. So when you say you&rsquo;re thinking about the materials in terms of how folks understand it, you&rsquo;re having a conversation with people about possibilities in their life.</p> <p>I always make so that I don&rsquo;t have to explain to my brother too much. So that he gets it from his own experiences or can just look and get enough of it. The intention with the work and the installation was for him and the community I grew up in could be in PS1 and feel like there is a space there for them. One of my cousins who never goes to museums or galleries said he felt comfortable in the room and that meant everything to me.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171107144021-0E9A2221.jpg" /></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>CB: </strong>Yeah I think I remember a conversation we had about that, I remember saying something along the lines of &ldquo;if my grandma can take something away in the viewing of the work then I&rsquo;ve succeeded.&rdquo; Art became a language through its history and context, hence its study. It is so niche it winds up alienating a lot of people who haven&#39;t learned its language and history when the work is solely operating on a conceptual level. I really don&rsquo;t like to make people feel stupid, which is why I think layers are important. They allow the work to be accessible to different kinds of viewers. It&rsquo;s confusing because art is often considered universal, though, contemporary art rarely is. It&rsquo;s a parallax that needs to be accounted for depending on the level of connectivity you&rsquo;re after.</p> <p><strong>AB: </strong>Art always happens in a community and that history has told the wrong story. It often isolates artists, especially black artists. You and Teresa [Farrell, also in the PS1 show] along with a lot of other folks are in my community. Your ideas and how you make helps push me. Like you and Teresa work opposite of each other in that she is a maximalist like Hieronymus Bosch and anything can end up in her work, including gum or a guy she had a relationship with, a TV show she saw, music she listens to. It can all end up in a single painting. And you&rsquo;re a minimalist in that you reduce things through a very considered deliberation. I like working between the two of you.</p> <p>I don&rsquo;t arrive at my ideas out of nowhere. It comes from our conversations about life and art, the same with my community and ways of seeing. The show is really about looking.</p> <p><br /> &mdash;Cristine Brache<br /> &nbsp;</p> <p><span style="font-size:12px;">(All images: Installation view of <em>Alvaro Barrington</em>. On view at MoMA PS1 in New York from October 22 to December 31, 2017. Image courtesy MoMA PS1. Photo by Pablo Enriquez.)</span></p> Wed, 08 Nov 2017 01:10:50 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Jill Pauline Smith | Will Peck | Janna Dyk <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/493030-jill-pauline-smith?tab=PROFILE?utm_source=JillPaulineSmith&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Jill Pauline Smith &ndash; Toronto</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1068725?utm_source=JillPaulineSmith&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1068725/u3azr9/20171016230350-_MG_9295.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1068724?utm_source=JillPaulineSmith&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1068724/y8wnrh/20171016230349-_MG_9276.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1068727?utm_source=JillPaulineSmith&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1068727/y8wnrh/20171016230355-_MG_9310.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1068728?utm_source=JillPaulineSmith&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1068728/y8wnrh/20171016230359-_MG_9316.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/493115-will-peck?utm_source=WillPeck&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Will Peck &ndash; Norwich</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1069839?utm_source=WillPeck&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1069839/u3azr9/20171023152503-Will_PeckPhotopaper_sceen_shots_9.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1069832?utm_source=WillPeck&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1069832/y8wnrh/20171023152414-Will_PeckPhotopaper_sceen_shots_4.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1069838?utm_source=WillPeck&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1069838/y8wnrh/20171023152501-Will_PeckPhotopaper_sceen_shots_10.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1069848?utm_source=WillPeck&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1069848/y8wnrh/20171023152626-Will_PeckPhotopaper_sceen_shots_19.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/493505-jannadyk?tab=PROFILE?utm_source=JannaDyk&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Janna Dyk &ndash; New York</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1070277?utm_source=JannaDyk&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1070277/u3azr9/20171024195412-janna_dyk_this-lr.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1070261?utm_source=JannaDyk&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1070261/y8wnrh/20171024192604-DykJanna_Certain_People-HD_IMG_5981-lr.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1070259?utm_source=JannaDyk&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1070259/y8wnrh/20171024192352-janna_dyk_is-lr.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1070272?utm_source=JannaDyk&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1070272/y8wnrh/20171024194250-DykJanna_YouAreMySunshine_lr.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/sp?_encoding=UTF8&amp;asin=&amp;isAmazonFulfilled=&amp;isCBA=&amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;orderID=&amp;seller=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;tab=products&amp;vasStoreID=#" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Sun, 05 Nov 2017 06:58:07 -0800 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Aimee Gilmore Answers 5 Questions <p><em>This is&nbsp;5 Questions. Each week, we send five questions to an artist featured in&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ams/articles/show/48441-under-the-radar-aimee-gilmore-eva-perez-ann-moody" target="_blank">Under the Radar</a>, our weekly email highlighting the best art on the ArtSlant network. This week we seek answers from <a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/489198-aimee-gilmore?tab=PROFILE" target="_blank">Aimee Gilmore</a>.</em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What are you trying to communicate with your work?</strong></p> <p>Even now while reflecting back, it is almost impossible to comprehend growing a human life inside me. Carrying her. Nurturing her. Protecting her. My body acclimated; my skin stretched, my womb expanded, my bones strengthened, my mind prepared. What you can only know after is that you will never actually be prepared. Other mothers don&rsquo;t tell you the truth about labor. How can they? It is practically indescribable. It is a visceral experience. It&rsquo;s messy. It&rsquo;s painful. It&rsquo;s unpredictable. It&rsquo;s long. It&rsquo;s very long. I journeyed to an unfamiliar mental space. That was the scariest part, the unknown. Will it hurt? Will I be safe? Will I be able to do this? Will she be safe? Will it take hours? Will it take days? Will I be strong enough to get through it? This array of questioning I imposed on myself revealed the role I was thrust into: Mother. Questioning now performs on a foundational level for my work. I sketch in questions, seeking clarity through examination, yet the answers are immaterial. I allow space for the objects, surfaces, colors, and sounds from my everyday life to enter the work. These are the relics from those first few days, months, and now years of the most significant transformation in my life.&nbsp;Seemingly mundane, commonplace and deep-rooted in their conventional and often clich&eacute;d representation of motherhood, I take inspiration from objects like the breast pump and baby clothes as they operate as the visual cues of the lineage I am now and forever connected to.</p> <p>As she grew within, our first ways of communicating were purely gestural. We moved as one. My body allotted for more space within as needed. As my body grew through connection, her body grew in preparation to separate. For nearly a year, one person exists as two people. Two bodies compressed into one. Two hearts synchronizing rhythms.&nbsp;Two lives sharing breaths. Two strangers cohabiting a sacred space. Intimate strangers. Two lives living solely in a state of waiting. Waiting to separate while growing apart, separating while waiting. The separation is subsequently violent. I was not prepared. For two days, my body strained to release her. I pushed, I ripped, I agonized, I cried, I slept, I moaned, I screamed, I gave up, I recovered, I prevailed. I reached between my legs until I felt her small, slippery body and cradled her in my hand while pulling her to my breast. Separations are never easy but this one was particularly demanding. What I know now after two years is that motherhood exists in a constant state of transitions, a perpetual letting go.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171016091844-20171006183321-IMG_2004.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Milkscape</em>, 2017, Breast milk and ink on mylar</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>After pumping in my studio one of the small containers of breast milk spilled onto my desk covering a page in my sketchbook, a library book, and a sheet of Mylar. The residue intrigued me. The milk dried tracing its own movement across the surface. The milk curdled and cracked all while building a collection of organic forms that retained the appearance of a purposeful mark. The slowness of each subsequent spill allowed me the time to question what exactly the breast milk was acting as in these works. My breast milk performed as the material trace of my transition into my new role as mother&mdash;beautiful but messy, quiet and calm yet chaotic and unpredictable, and profoundly abstract while similarly rooted in reality. Produced for her. Only for her. Only from me. Breast milk is the material created from an intimate exchange of body to body. Once again two bodies physically connected but this time my body inside of her body. Two bodies engaged in a continuous exchange. Breast milk acts as the invisible ink of a secret dialogue between mother and child, only revealing its materialness when separated from the body. I struggle to decode this exchange as its power fades through language. To try and connect my experience through language does not suffice. This is where the making becomes pivotal. I am not asking my breast milk to perform as anything other than what it is and what it can do: a liquid, a bodily fluid, a watery material. It dries, it curdles, it fractures, it thickens. It transforms from liquid to solid. It is an element of the earth, of nature, of my body.&nbsp;<em>Milkscapes</em>&nbsp;made from the essence of my body now performing as a mother. These&nbsp;<em>Milkscapes</em>, this collection of imagery reflects this process of archiving a routine through its most essential material and highlights the communication between mother and daughter through abstraction. Perhaps it is through this collection of&nbsp;<em>Milkscapes</em>&nbsp;that I can begin to viscerally suggest the abstract nature of motherhood as the unpredictable nature of breast milk as a material exposes and emphasizes the necessity of letting go.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171016091800-20170802203942-IMG_0246.JPG" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;"><em>Milkscape (Thawed)</em>, 2017, Breast milk and ink on mylar</span></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>What is an artist&rsquo;s responsibility?</strong></p> <p>I think the most important responsibility of an artist is to speak their truth. From there, from this sharing, offers an invitation to know more. Know more about a way of thinking, a way of being, a way of understanding, that we may or may not be accustomed to. From this &ldquo;artist&rsquo;s truth&rdquo; comes great responsibility and great opportunity. I think maybe now more than ever, being able to share objects, images, experiences, that hold and contain the multitude of intentions and perspectives from a specific way of thinking is a real privilege. In this way my work speaks not only for me but for anyone who identifies with it in any way. That power is not lost on me.</p> <p><strong>Tell us about a work you want to make but never will:</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;I find that my best works originate from a place of pure imagination and wonder. I try not to put the constraints of the word on any ideas. One of the most magical feelings as an artist is having an idea and delivering it into existence, even though the transition from thought to object is inevitably always a little different and unexpected.</p> <p>I try to allow my ideas to start grand and then scale back as necessary so it&rsquo;s difficult for me to imagine a circumstance where a work I want to make will&nbsp;<em>never</em>&nbsp;happen...but I could imagine one of my huge <em>Milkscape</em> banners waving from the flag pole high above the White House or Congress.</p> <p><strong>Show us the greatest thing you ever made (art&nbsp;or not)?</strong></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/32120/1dkh/20171016091729-Maya__2017.jpg" /></p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span style="font-size:12px;">Maya, 2017</span></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <p><strong>Who are three artists we should know but probably don&rsquo;t?</strong></p> <p><a href="http://www.jaykatelansky.com" target="_blank">Jay Katelansky</a>, <a href="http://www.veronicaaperez.com" target="_blank">Veronica A. Perez</a>, and <a href="http://www.aninamajor.com" target="_blank">Anina Major</a>.</p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>&mdash;The ArtSlant Team</p> <p><em>ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans" target="_blank">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission&mdash;from our&nbsp;<a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/articles/editorial" target="_blank">magazine</a>&nbsp;to our&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" target="_blank">residency</a>&nbsp;and&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank">prize</a>.&nbsp;Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your&nbsp;<a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" target="_blank">watchlist.</a></em></p> <p>&nbsp;</p> <p>(Image at top: <em>Pushed (Chrome Series)</em>, 2017, Chrome plated baby bottle)</p> Mon, 16 Oct 2017 02:24:46 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list Under the Radar: Gwen Gerard | Keith O. Anderson | Sara Hupas <table style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <table align="center" border="0" style="width: 100%;"> <tbody> <tr> <td> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant is an open Arts community with over 200,000 free, user-generated <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">artist profiles</a>. The support of our community is an essential part of our mission &mdash; from our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/editorial?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Mag" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">magazine</a> to our <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/33747" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">residency</a> and <a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">prize</a>. Every week our editors select the best artist profiles from under the radar. </span></em></span></p> <p><span style="font-size: medium;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; line-height: 24px;">Follow your favorite artists to see new work and exhibitions by adding them to your <a href="http://www.artslant.com/global/articles/show/11143" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">watchlist.</a></span></em></span></p> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/198659-gwen-gerard?utm_source=GwenGerard&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" georgia="" large="" palatino="" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; text-decoration: none;">Gwen Gerard &ndash; France</span></span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/works/show/1046285?utm_source=GwenGerard&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1046285/u3azr9/20170512165520-support__espace_aux_Feuilles_de_Platane_pjeg.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/works/show/1046274?utm_source=GwenGerard&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1046274/mf2ji7/20170512155820-polyedre___nativite___isoce_le_pjeg.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/works/show/1026124?utm_source=GwenGerard&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1026124/mf2ji7/20170121121932-turn_turn_turn_.png" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/works/show/1023935?utm_source=GwenGerard&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1023935/mf2ji7/20170108100909-effeuille_es2.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/130651-keith-o-anderson?utm_source=KeithOAnderson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Keith O. Anderson &ndash; New York</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1053667?utm_source= KeithOAnderson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1053667/u3azr9/20170701171720-Sitting_on_this_bench_waiting_and_hoping_I_will_meet_a_poet_today_2017.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/993638?utm_source=KeithOAnderson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/993638/u3azr9/20160613163831-FullSizeRender_copy.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1050826?utm_source=KeithOAnderson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1050826/u3azr9/20170612171958-From_the_book_of_Tao-_Archival_masking_tape__fire_ressidue_and_Black_wrap_foil-_Sculpture_11_x_14_x_15_in__sheet_of_Black_wrap_foil-_38_x_39.5_2016.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ny/works/show/1044568?utm_source=KeithOAnderson&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1044568/u3azr9/20170501201116-I_brought_a_Pyramid_from_Egypt_to_our_first_meeting-_Acrylic_paint__cloth_napkins_and_wood-_22_7.8_x_22_in-_20178.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <hr /> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/global/artists/show/475707-sara-hupas?utm_source=SaraHupas&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar" style="text-decoration: none;"><span color="#097ff5" face="georgia, palatino" size="4" style="color: #097ff5; font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: large;">Sara Hupas &ndash; Krakow</span></a></p> <p><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1044775?utm_source=SaraHupas&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1044775/u3azr9/20170503163842-IMG_6574.jpg" style="display: block; margin-left: auto; margin-right: auto;" width="100%" /></a></p> <table width="100%"> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1043703?utm_source=SaraHupas&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1043703/mf2ji7/20170425162204-ASPECT_Sara.Hupas.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1027127?utm_source=SaraHupas&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1027127/mf2ji7/20170125210844-IMG_0528.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="33%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/ew/works/show/1044780?utm_source=SaraHupas&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Radar"><img src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/work/image/1044780/mf2ji7/20170503164510-_MG_0919.JPG" width="100%" /></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <hr /> <p style="text-align: center;"><em><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino; font-size: medium; line-height: 24px;">ArtSlant supports thousands of contemporary artists through our outreach and exposure programs&mdash;come join the best online arts community today!</span></em></p> <p style="text-align: center;">&nbsp;</p> <table> <tbody> <tr> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/articles/show/8456?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Prize" target="_blank"><img alt="" src="https://s3.amazonaws.com/media.artslant.com/userimages/84518/3mfh/20170213165906-ArtSlant_Prize_IX_2017-01.jpg" style="width: 100%;" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.artslant.com/par/foundation?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Residency"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182447-residency-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="https://www.amazon.com/sp?_encoding=UTF8&amp;asin=B07428P5PG&amp;isAmazonFulfilled=0&amp;isCBA=&amp;marketplaceID=ATVPDKIKX0DER&amp;orderID=&amp;seller=A2JPU387EQQ9HR&amp;tab=&amp;vasStoreID=" style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182634-sales-room-200-logo.jpg" width="100%" /></a></td> <td style="padding 0px;" width="25%"><a href="http://www.artslant.com/ny/intros/plans?utm_source=Radar&amp;utm_medium=image&amp;utm_campaign=Subs"><span style="font-family: georgia, palatino;"><img src="http://dbprng00ikc2j.cloudfront.net/userimages/84518/3mfh/20150605182549-profile-subscriptions-logo-300.jpg" width="100%" /></span></a></td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table> Fri, 01 Sep 2017 00:54:10 -0700 https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list https://www.artslant.com/ny/Articles/list