Bigindicator

Holiday: Summer Group Show

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En Pensant a Paul Eluard (Still Life with flowers), 1952 Pen And Ink On Paper 22.9 X 16.5 Cm © Courtesy of Ibid.
Holiday: Summer Group Show

27 Margaret Street
London W1W 8RY
United Kingdom
June 18th, 2016 - August 27th, 2016
Opening: June 17th, 2016 12:00 PM - 6:00 PM

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http://www.ibidgallery.com
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+44(0)2076378773
OPEN HOURS:  
Closed
TAGS:  
painting, drawing, sculpture, photography

DESCRIPTION

Ibid Gallery is pleased to present Holiday, an exhibition comprising of works by artists from multiple generations.

The works shown revolve around the theme of holiday and its related ideals of escapism, pastime, leisure, eroticism, landscape and nature. For some, holidays can be replenishing, unfolding possibilities to realise untapped potential, but for others a forced experience of false promises of relaxation and peace of mind.

Further to this, the works in the show touch on both the uplifting side but often more indulgent nature of vacation.

Takashi Murakami’s painting depicts a group of bizarre, alien-like characters suggestive of a family on holiday where they are dressed up in cloths they wouldn’t normally wear and engaging in a form of holiday theatrics. Rallou Panagiotou’s ongoing Liquid Degrade series of oversized marble drinking straws reference the discarded straws of the holidaymakers who descend upon the Greek islands during the summer months.

Henri Matisse’s work on paper, Odalisque Étendue (1928), depicts a post-coital recline, suggestive of an uninhibited holiday fling, while Jack McConville’s, El Expolio (2014), shows a young man who could also be post-fling, unselfconsciously pulling up his trousers in an alley lit by street lights. Visually similar is the work of Frances Picabia made in 1925, the year the artist returned to figurative painting from cubism, and shows two naked figures lounging in a Mediterranean garden.

Other works in the show include David Adamo’s plaster and clay cookie crumbles which mimic Italian-American candy-coloured butter cookies that are often eaten at celebrations and holidays and Alexander Calder’s Hammock (1974), a hand-woven Jute tapestry depicting a series of floating balloons above a beach.

Bringing together works from different periods in recent art history with contemporary works, Holiday presents the multi-layered ideas and activities of leisure time which sometimes aren’t quite what they are idealized to be.