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Misappropriation: A Pop-Up Exhibition

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20110111004335-pope
"Benedict 04.28.10" , 2010 Archival Pigment Print on Paper, Mounted on Aluminum 48" X 48" © Ray Beldner
20110111004758-0006_a_seaton_shred
"Surf Gang, Venice Beach", 2010 Acrylic Ink and C-print on Wood Panel 24" X 20" © Annie Seaton
20110111004938-lott_i-just-want-to-see
"I Just Want to See", 2009 Oil on Canvas 27” X 36” © Brendan Lott
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"Your Face Here", 2010 Oil on Canvas 24" X 24" © Sonja Schenk
20110111005757-oprahhires
"Oprah, 05.21.10", 2010 Archival Pigment Print on Paper, Mounted on Aluminum 48" X 48" © Ray Beldner
20110111010133-swell
"Swell", 2010 Acrylic Ink and C-print on Wood Panel 24" X 20" © Annie Seaton
Misappropriation: A Pop-Up Exhibition

8526 Washington Blvd.
Culver City, CA 90232
January 23rd, 2011 - January 30th, 2011
Opening: January 29th, 2011 6:00 PM - 9:00 PM

QUICK FACTS
WEBSITE:  
http://misappropriationart.blogspot.com/
NEIGHBORHOOD:  
other
EMAIL:  
annie@annieseatonart.com
PHONE:  
310.621.5847
OPEN HOURS:  
By Appointment Only
TAGS:  
photography, mixed-media, digital, installation, conceptual, figurative
COST:  
Free

DESCRIPTION

Ray Beldner, Brendan Lott, Sonja Schenk, and Annie Seaton are pleased to announce the opening of their exhibition, Misappropriation.

The pop-up show, which takes place during the Art Los Angeles Contemporary Art Fair, includes paintings, mixed media, digital prints, and small-scale installation all using and misusing found photo-based imagery.

Appropriation as an artistic practice and visual strategy is not new to contemporary artists, but the case that this show makes is that the Internet enables a new kind of appropriation or borrowing, a "mis-appropriation" which is the intentional--sometimes humorous, sometimes dark--misuse of someone else's material. In this case, their images or their likenesses.
Each artist in the show collages images they have taken or found on the Internet or elsewhere, and they re-purpose and re-contextualize them in a way that reflects on their origins. They are in a sense "meta-images" that problematize the picture's original purpose and meaning.